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Encyclopedia > Weblog

A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally, but not always, in reverse chronological order). Although most early weblogs were manually updated, tools to automate the maintenance of such sites made them accessible to a much larger population, and the use of some sort of browser-based software is now a typical aspect of "blogging". A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with HTML documents hosted by web servers or held in a file system. ...


Blogs range in scope from individual diaries to arms of political campaigns, media programs, and corporations. They range in scale from the writings of one occasional author, to the collaboration of a large community of writers. Many weblogs enable visitors to leave public comments, which can lead to a community of readers centered around the blog; others are non-interactive. The totality of weblogs or blog-related websites is often called the blogosphere. When a large amount of activity, information and opinion erupts around a particular subject or controversy in the blogosphere, it is sometimes called a blogstorm or blog swarm. The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Representative democracy History of democracy Referenda Liberal democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Ideology Elections Elections by country Elections by calendar Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by... A corporation is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name AS (anonymous society) or something similar, depending on language (see below). ... A community is an amalgamation of living things that share an environment. ... Blogosphere (alternate: blogsphere) is the collective term encompassing all weblogs or blogs as a community or social network. ...


The format of weblogs varies, from simple bullet lists of hyperlinks, to article summaries or complete articles with user-provided comments and ratings. Individual weblog entries are almost always date and time-stamped (but this is not a pre-requisite for being a blog), with the newest post at the top (or bottom) of the page, and reader comments often appearing below it. Because incoming links to specific entries are important to many weblogs, most have a way of archiving older entries and generating a static address for them; this static link is referred to as a permalink. The latest headlines, with hyperlinks and summaries, are frequently offered in weblogs in the RSS or Atom XML format, to be read with a feed reader. A hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference in a hypertext document to another document or other resource. ... A permalink (a portmanteau made by contracting the phrase permanent link) is a type of URL designed to refer to a specific information item (often a news story or weblog item) and to remain unchanged permanently, or at least for a lengthy period of time to prevent link rot. ... RSS is a family of XML file formats for web syndication used by (amongst other things) news websites and weblogs. ... Atom is an XML-based document format for the syndication of web content such as weblogs and news headlines, and an HTTP-based protocol for editing weblogs based on the format. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a W3C-recommended general-purpose markup language for creating special-purpose markup languages. ...


The tools for editing, organizing, and publishing weblogs are variously referred to as "content management systems", "publishing platforms", "weblog software", and simply "blogware". In computing, a content management system (CMS) is a system used to organize and facilitate collaborative creation of documents and other content. ... Weblog software (also called blog software) is a category of software which consists of a specialized form of Content Management Systems specifically designed for creating and maintaining weblogs. ... Blogware is a general term encompassing software to create, edit, manage and publish weblogs (blogs). ...

Contents


History

Precursors

  • Electronic communities existed before internetworking, but generally had some quality to them. For example the AP wire was, in effect, similar to a large chat room where there were "wire fights" and electronic conversations. Another pre-digital electronic community Amateur (or "ham") radio allowed individuals who set up their own broadcast equipment to communicate with others directly. Ham radio also had logs called "glogs" that were personal diaries made using wearable computers in the early 1980s.
  • Before blogging became popular, digital communities took many forms, including Usenet, email lists and bulletin boards. In the 1990s Internet forum software, such as WebX, created running conversations with threads. The term "Thread", in reference to consecutive messages on one specific topic of discussion, comes from email lists and Usenet as well, and "to post" from electronic bulletin boards, borrowing usage directly from their corkboard predecessors. Many of the terms from weblogging were created in these earlier media. See "Common Terms", below.
  • Diarists kept journals on the Internet: some called themselves escribitionists. A notable example was game programmer John Carmack's widely read journal, published via the finger protocol.

Internetworking involves connecting two or more computer networks with some sort of routing device to exchange traffic back and forth, and to guide traffic on the correct path (among several different ones usually available) across the complete network to their destination. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... A chat room is an online forum where people can chat online (talk by broadcasting messages to people on the same forum in real time). ... Mrs. ... A CyborgLog (often abbreviated to glog) is a first-person recording of an activity, in which the person doing the recording is a participant in the activity. ... // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 60s and 70s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... Usenet is a distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... Electronic mailing lists are a special usage of email that allows for widespread distribution of information to many Internet users. ... A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer system running software that allows users to dial into the system over a phone line and, using a terminal program, perform functions such as downloading software and data, uploading data, playing games, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users. ... // Events and trends The 1990s are generally classified as having moved slightly away from the more conservative 1980s, but otherwise retaining the same mindset. ... Gaia Online, the largest English language forum-based community as of April 2005 — powered by a modified version of phpBB. An Internet forum is a web application which provides for discussion, often in conjunction with online communities. ... An escribitionist is a person who keeps a diary or journal via electronic means, and in particular, publishes their entries on the web. ... John Carmack is a widely recognized and influential game programmer. ... The finger protocol is a simple network protocol based on RFC 1288 (The Finger User Information Protocol). ...

Blogging begins

Blogging combined the personal web page with tools to make linking to other pages easier, specifically blogrolls and TrackBacks, as well as comments and afterthoughts. This way, instead of a few people being in control of threads on a forum, or anyone able to start threads on a list, there was a moderating effect that was the personality of the weblog's owner. Justin Hall, who began eleven years of personal blogging in 1994 while a student at Swarthmore College, is generally recognized as one of the earliest bloggers. A blogroll is a collection of links to other weblogs. ... TrackBack is a system implemented by Movable Type and later adopted by many blogging tools, including BoastMachine, Dotclear, TypePad, Nucleus or WordPress, that allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it. ... Gaia Online, the largest English language forum-based community as of April 2005 — powered by a modified version of phpBB. An Internet forum is a web application which provides for discussion, often in conjunction with online communities. ... Justin Hall Justin Hall (born in Chicago, Illinois, December 16, 1974) is a writer and graduate student living in Los Angeles, California. ... Swarthmore College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college in the United States. ...


The term "weblog" may have been coined by Jorn Barger in December 1997. The shorter version, "blog", was coined by Peter Merholz, who, in April or May of 1999, broke the word weblog into the phrase "we blog" in the sidebar of his weblog. [1] This was interpreted as a short form of the noun [2] and also as a verb to blog, meaning "to edit one's weblog or a post to one's weblog". The site Open Diary, while not using the term blog until recently, launched in 1998, had over 2000 diaries by 1999, and near 400 000 as of september 2005. Blog usage spread during 1999, with the word being further popularized by the near-simultaneous arrival of the first hosted weblog tools: Evan Williams and Meg Hourihan's company Pyra Labs launched Blogger (which was purchased by Google in February 2003) and Paul Kedrosky's GrokSoup. As of March 2003, the Oxford English Dictionary included the terms weblog, weblogging and weblogger in their dictionary. [3] Jorn Barger in 2005 Jorn Barger (born 1953 in Yellow Springs, Ohio) is a United States blogger, best known today as editor of Robot Wisdom, an influential early weblog. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Merholz (born 1972) is a weblogger. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Sidebar is a term for information placed at one or both sides of an article in a printed or Web publication, graphically separate from the rest of the display but with some contextual connection. ... The Open Diary is an online website where you can begin an online diary, which you can choose to be a private diary for yourself, or one which others can read. ... Evan Williams is a co-founder of Pyra Labs, creator of Blogger, which was acquired by Google. ... Meg Hourihan co-founded Pyra Labs, the company behind Blogger before its acquisition by Google. ... Pyra Labs is the company who coined the word Blogger, and made the service a big success. ... Blogger is a service created by Pyra Labs that provides Web-based tools used by individuals to publish to the Web. ... Google, Inc (NASDAQ: GOOG), is a U.S. public corporation, initially established as a privately-held corporation in 1998, that designed and managed the Internet Google search engine. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a comprehensive dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP). ...


One of the pioneers of the tools that make blogging more than merely websites that scroll is Dave Winer. One of his most important contributions was the creation of servers which weblogs would ping to show that they had been updated. Blog reading utilities, such as Blogrolling [4], use the aggregated update data to show a user when their favorite blogs have new posts. Dave Winer Dave Winer (b. ... In computing, a server is: A computer software application that carries out some task (i. ... ping in a Windows 2000 command window Ping is the name of a computer network tool used on TCP/IP networks (such as the Internet). ...


Blogging's rise to influence

Among the first established political blogs with U.S.-wide audiences were Andrew Sullivan's AndrewSullivan.com, Ron Gunzburger's Politics1.com, Jerome Armstrong's MyDD.com, and Markos Moulitsas Zúniga's DailyKos.com(which is the most-viewed blog online) -- all of which launched widely read blogs in 2001-02. The first blog-driven political controversy was probably the fall of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, who had remarked, at a party honoring U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, that Thurmond's leadership abilities may have made him a good President. Since Thurmond had spent much of his early political career sympathetic to white supremacists, Lott's statements were conveyed in the media to be racist. In the aftermath, bloggers such as Josh Marshall strove to demonstrate that his remarks were not an isolated misstatement, by finding evidence including quotes from other previous speeches of Lott's which were taken to be racist. Their efforts kept the story "alive" in the press until a critical mass of disapproval forced Lott to resign his position as Senate Majority Leader. Andrew Sullivan Andrew Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a British-American blogger and journalist, known both for his heterodox personal-political identity (HIV-positive, gay, libertarian/conservative and Catholic) and for his pioneering efforts in the field of weblog journalism. ... Ronald M. Ron Gunzburger (b. ... Markos Moulitsas Zúniga (born September 11, 1971), often known by his username and former military moniker Kos, is the founder and main author of Daily Kos, a far left weblog for Democratic Party politics. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... Chester Trent Lott Jr. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Strom Thurmond James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... A screenshot of TPM and Marshall Joshua Micah Marshall (born February 15, 1969 in St. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ...


By this point blogging was enough of a phenomenon that how-to manuals had begun to appear, primarily focusing on using the tools, or creating content. But the importance of a blog as a way of building an electronic community had also been written on, as had the potential for blogs as a means of publicizing other projects. Established schools of journalism began researching the blogging phenomenon, and noting the differences between current practice of journalism and blogging. Journalism is a discipline of collecting, verifying, analyzing and presenting information gathered regarding current events, including trends, issues and people. ...


Since 2003, weblogs have gained increasing notice and coverage for their role in breaking, shaping, or spinning news stories. One of the most significant events was the sudden emergence of an interest in the Iraq war, which saw both left-wing and right-wing bloggers taking measured and passionate points of view that did not reflect the traditional left-right divide. The blogs which gathered news on Iraq, both left and right, exploded in popularity, and Forbes magazine covered the phenomenon. The use of blogs by established politicians and political candidates—particularly Howard Dean and Wesley Clark—to express opinions on the war and other issues of the day, cemented their role as a news source. Meanwhile, the increasing number of experts who blogged, such as Daniel Drezner and J. Bradford DeLong, gave blogs a built-in source of in-depth analysis. 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... News is essentially new information or current events. ... This article covers invasion specifics. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the Right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Howard Brush Dean III, M.D. (born November 17, 1948) is a prominent American Democratic politician, currently serving as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. ... Wesley Clark This article is about the general. ... J. Bradford DeLong (born June 24, 1960), a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, writes a popular blog, Brad DeLongs Semi-Daily Journal which covers political, technical, and economic issues as well as criticism of their coverage in the media. ...


The Iraq war was the first "blog war" in another way: bloggers in Baghdad gained wider readership, and one (Salam Pax) published a book of his blog. Blogs also arose amongst soldiers serving in the Iraq war. Such "milblogs" have given readers a new perspective on the realities of war. Reading the thoughts of people who were "on the spot" provided a supplement and perhaps a differing viewpoint to official news sources. Blogs were often used to draw attention to obscure news sources, for example posting links to the traffic cameras in Madrid as a huge anti-terrorism demonstration filled the streets in the wake of the M11 attacks. Bloggers would often provide nearly instant commentary on televised events, which became a secondary meaning of the word "blogging", such as "I am blogging Rice's testimony," i.e., "I am posting my reactions to Rice's testimony to my blog as I watch it." This article covers invasion specifics. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Several hundred killed after stampede in Baghdad A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Salam Pax (Arabic and Latin for peace) is a pseudonymous blogger from Iraq whose site Where is Raed? (see external links) received notable media attention during (and after) the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Demonstrators march through the intersection of 18th and M Streets NW in Washington DC at the A16 demonstration against the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... The 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks (also known as 11/3, 3/11, M-11 and 11-M) were a series of coordinated terrorist bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. ... Condoleezza Rice, (born November 14, 1954), is the second United States Secretary of State in the administration of President George W. Bush. ...


By the end of 2003 top rated blogs Instapundit, Daily Kos, and Atrios were receiving over 75,000 unique visitors per day. Much on the same lines, personal blogging became a rage in US, Europe and lately in Asia also. Soon after, Blogs came to be classified for their premium content. Instapundit is a U.S. political weblog produced by Glenn Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee. ... Daily Kos (pronounced to rhyme with prose) is an American political weblog aimed at Democrats and liberals/progressives. ... Dr. Duncan Black, known under his internet publishing pseudonym as Atrios, is the author of the popular liberal weblog Eschaton, which receives an average of over 100,000 hits per day. ...


Blogging goes mainstream

In 2004, the role of blogs became increasingly mainstream, as political consultants, news services and candidates began using them as tools for outreach and opinion formation. Even politicians not actively involved in a campaign such as Tom Watson, a UK Labour Party MP, began to use blogging as a means for creating a bond with constituents and creating a channel for their ideas and opinions. Minnesota Public Radio broadcast a program by Christopher Lydon and Matt Stoller called "The Blogging of the President", which covered the transformation in politics that blogging seemed to presage. The Columbia Journalism Review began regular coverage of blogs and blogging. Anthologies of blog pieces began to reach print, and blogging personalities began appearing on radio and television. In the summer of that year both the Democratic and Republican National Conventions credentialed bloggers, and blogs became a standard part of the publicity arsenal, with mainstream programs, such as Chris Matthews' Hardball, forming their own blogs. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary declared "blog" as the word of the year in 2004. (Wikinews) Political consulting is the business which has grown up around advising and assisting political campaigns, primarily in the United States. ... Thomas Anthony Watson (born 8 January 1967) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is the principal centrist/centre-left political party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... Christopher Lydon born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1940 is an American media personality and author whose work in radio includes creating The Connection for WBUR. He is a former journalist with the New York Times, former WGBH Boston evening news anchor and was a candidate for mayor of Boston in... Matthew N. Stoller, born February 1978, is a blogger and media producer best known for for his activities during the campaign for the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. ... Chris Matthews Christopher John Matthews (born December 17, 1945) hosts a nightly, hour-long talk show called Hardball with Chris Matthews on the American cable television channel MSNBC, formerly on CNBC. Matthews, a Roman Catholic, graduated from The College of the Holy Cross, and did graduate work in economics at... Hardball with Chris Matthews is a talk show on MSNBC hosted by Chris Matthews. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ...


Blogs were some of the driving forces behind the alleged "Rathergate" scandal involving Dan Rather of CBS and some memos used on the show 60 Minutes II. Within 72 hours a coordinated group of bloggers had built a case that they were likely forgeries. The evidence presented eventually created such concern over the issue that CBS was forced to address the situation and make an apology for their inadequate reporting techniques. This is viewed by many bloggers as the advent of blogs' acceptance by the mass media as a source of news. It also showed how blogs could keep the pressure on an established news source, forcing defenses and then a retraction of the original story. The Killian documents (often referred to as the CBS documents during the 2004 US presidential campaign) were memos purportedly written by the late Lieutenant Colonel Jerry B. Killian. ... Dan Rather, from a telecast in October 2004. ... CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) is a major television network and radio broadcaster in the United States. ... 60 Minutes is the name of an American magazine-format television news program produced by CBS News. ... Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive. ...


Blogging is also used now to break consumer complaints and vulnerabilities of products, in the way that Usenet and email lists once were. One such example is accusations about vulnerability of Kryptonite 2000 locks. The Kryptonite lock is a brand of bicycle lock for securing a bicycle to a pole or other fixture, when the owner wants to leave the bicycle in a public place. ...


Bloggers have also moved over to other media. Duncan Black (a.k.a. Atrios), Glenn Reynolds, Markos Moulitsas Zúniga (a.k.a. Kos), Ana Marie Cox (a.k.a. Wonkette), and others have appeared on radio and/or television. Hugh Hewitt is an example of a media personality who has moved in the other direction, adding to his reach in "old media" by being an influential blogger. Amateur blogs like www.sameerbhat.blogspot.com is an excellent example of well-written, quality blogs. Duncan Black (May 23, 1908 - January 14, 1991) was responsible for unearthing the work of many early political scientists, including Charles Dodgson, and was responsible for the Black electoral system, a variant upon the Condorcet method whereby, in the absence of a Condorcet winner (e. ... Dr. Duncan Black, known under his internet publishing pseudonym as Atrios, is the author of the popular liberal weblog Eschaton, which receives an average of over 100,000 hits per day. ... Glenn Reynolds (born August 27, 1960) is Beauchamp Brogan Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee, and is best known as the Internets Instapundit. ... Markos Moulitsas Zúniga (born September 11, 1971), often known by his username and former military moniker Kos, is the founder and main author of Daily Kos, a far left weblog for Democratic Party politics. ... Kos or Cos (36°51′ N 27°14′ E, Greek Κώς) is a Greek island in the Dodecanese group of islands, in the Aegean Sea. ... Ana Marie Cox (left) with Jessica Cutler Ana Marie Cox is a well known political blogger who writes under the pen name Wonkette. ... Wonkette is both the pen name of Washington, DC-area journalist Ana Marie Cox, the former executive editor of Suck. ... Hugh Hewitt is a conservative radio talk show host, author, and blogger. ...


In January 2005, Fortune magazine listed Peter Rojas, Xeni Jardin, Ben Trott and Mena Trott, Jonathan Schwartz, Jason Goldman, Robert Scoble, and Jason Calacanis as eight bloggers that business people "could not ignore." 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... The 2004 Fortune 500 issue The magazine Fortune was founded by Time Magazine co-founder Henry Luce in 1930 at the outset of the Great Depression. ... Engadget is a technology weblog. ... Xeni Jardin Xeni Jardin, pronounced SHEH-nee zhar-DAN (born 1973 in Richmond, Virginia, USA), is a webblogger and journalist. ... Ben Trott and Mena G. Trott (born September 1977) are the married co-founders of Six Apart, creators of Movable Type and TypePad. ... Ben Trott and Mena G. Trott (born September 1977) are the married co-founders of Six Apart, creators of Movable Type and TypePad. ... Jonathan I. Schwartz (born 1967 ? [1]) is the current President and COO of Sun Microsystems. ... Robert Scoble is a technical evangelist who works for Microsoft and maintains the popular blog, Scobleizer. ...


The year 2005 also saw the introduction of the first qualification in blogging.


Blogging and culture

Blogging however, was as much about technology as politics, and the proliferation of tools to run blogs and the communities around them connected blogging with the Open Source movement. Writers such as Larry Lessig and David Weinberger used their blogs to promote not just blogging, but more generally different social models. One of the running discussions within journalism and blogging is what "blogging" means for the way news "happens" and is covered. This leads to questions over intellectual property and the role of the mass media in society. Many bloggers differentiate themselves from the mainstream media, while others are members of that media working through a different channel. The open source movement is an offshoot of the free software movement that advocates open-source software as an alternative label for free software, primarily on pragmatic rather than philosophical grounds. ... Lawrence Lessig Lawrence Lessig (born June 3, 1961) is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of its Center for Internet and Society. ... David Weinberger is a technologist and commentator, probably best known as co-author of the Cluetrain Manifesto (originally a website, and eventually a book). ... In law, particularly in common law jurisdictions, intellectual property or IP refers to a legal entitlement which sometimes attaches to the expressed form of an idea, or to some other intangible subject matter. ... Mass media is the term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ... Mass media is the term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ...


Many bloggers have large agendas, and see blogging as part of Open Source Politics, or the ability of people to participate more directly in politics, helping to frame the debate (See George Lakoff). Some institutions see blogging as a means of "getting around the filter" and pushing messages directly to the public. Open source politics is a term used to describe a political process that uses Internet technologies such as blogs and email to provide for a rapid feedback mechanism between political organizations and their supporters. ... George P. Lakoff (born 1941 /ˈleɪˌkof/) is a professor of linguistics (in particular, cognitive linguistics) at the University of California, Berkeley where he has taught since 1972. ... Message in its most general meaning is the object of communication. ...


Social Impact

The free speech imperative of the blog world has also had a deep social impact. For example, a number of companies have clashed with bloggers, firing a few of them (for example Heather Armstrong, Mark Jen or Jessica Cutler). Heather Armstrong (born July 19, 1975) is a humorist and photographer who resides in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Mark Jen is known for being terminated with cause by Google, Inc. ... Jessica Cutler Jessica Cutler (born May 18, 1978) is a former congressional intern and journalist who ran a blog called the Washingtonienne concerning her sex life, and the ensuing scandal on Capitol Hill. ...


Blogs have also been seen as repositories for information about the state of mind of certain people: in some cases, they could provide insight in the minds of people who committed suicide, people who committed crimes, or people who were victims of a crime (in 2005, a blogger named his murderer in the last entry on his blog [5]). 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Creating and publishing weblogs

Since their introduction, a number of software packages have appeared to allow people to create their own weblog. Blog hosting sites and Web services to provide editing via the Web have proliferated. Common examples include GreatestJournal, Pitas, Blogger, LiveJournal, DeadJournal and Xanga. A software package is a special method for the distribution and installation of software on computer systems. ... GreatestJournal is a weblog site allowing Internet users to keep an online journal or diary. ... Blogger is a service created by Pyra Labs that provides Web-based tools used by individuals to publish to the Web. ... LiveJournal (often abbreviated LJ) is the name of a weblog site allowing Internet users to keep an online journal or diary. ... The new DeadJournal logo, introduced July 2, 2005. ... Screenshot of Xanga. ...


There are some other blog systems in some countries. For example in Czechia (Europe) you can create your own weblog on Bloguje.cz, Blogy Lide, Brouzdej.cz, Xblog.cz, Blog.cz and Pooh.cz. Bloguje. ...


Many more advanced bloggers prefer to generate their blogs by using server-side web applications such as Nucleus CMS, Movable Type, bBlog, WordPress, Drupal, b2evolution, boastMachine, Antville, Serendipity and Textpattern to publish on their own website or a third party site, or to host a group of blogs for a company or school. Such programs provide greater flexibility and power, but require more knowledge. If they provide a Web interface for editing, server-based systems make it easy for travelers to create and edit text; many travelers like to produce their travelblogs from Internet cafes while they travel around the globe. Nucleus CMS is an open-source content management system written in PHP, with a MySQL backend, primarily written and maintained by Wouter Demuynck. ... Movable Type is a proprietary weblog publishing system developed by California-based Six Apart. ... bBlog is a Web publishing system (a. ... WordPress is a web publishing system (a. ... - Mitch Kapor, founder of Lotus and of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, [1]. Drupal is a content management framework, content management system and blogging engine which was originally written by Dries Buytaert as a bulletin board system. ... b2evolution is a multi-lingual, multi-user, multi-blog publishing system written in PHP and backed by a MySQL database. ... boastMachine is a web publishing application (a. ... Serendipity is a PHP based weblog system. ... Textpattern is a content management system originally developed by Dean Allen. ... A school is most commonly a place designated for learning. ... A Travelblog is a weblog used for the purpose of chronicling a trip. ... E-Corner First internet cafe, was located at Waverley station An Internet café or cybercafé is a place where one can use a computer with Internet access for a fee, usually per hour or minute; sometimes one can have unmetered access with a pass for a day or month, etc. ...


In addition, some people program their own blogs from scratch by using PHP, CGI, ASP, Perl, ColdFusion or other server side software. While these are much more difficult to create, they add a maximum potential for creativity. PHP is a popular open-source, reflective programming language used mainly for developing server-side applications and dynamic web content, and more recently, other software. ... Common Gateway Interface (CGI) is an important World Wide Web technology that enables a client web browser to request data from a program executed on the Web server. ... Asp is an archaic term for a number of species of poisonous snake that live in the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe. ... Perl, also Practical Extraction and Report Language (a backronym, see below), is an interpreted procedural programming language designed by Larry Wall. ... In computing, ColdFusion is a tag-based, middleware programming language used chiefly for writing web-based applications. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


The phenomena of multi-blogging refers to individuals, businesses or institutions that maintain multiple blogs simultaneously. If one runs a single blog, technically they are a blogger; however if one creates, maintains, and runs 2, 10, 50, 100 or more blogs, they are a multi-blogger. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into weblog. ... Blogger is a service created by Pyra Labs that provides Web-based tools used by individuals to publish to the Web. ... Multi-blogger Multi-blogger (or multiblogger) refers to any person who maintains multiple blogs. ...


Two features which are common to blogging are "blogrolls" and "commenting" or "feedback."


A blogroll is a list of other blogs that are linked separately from any article. This is one means by which a blogger creates a context for his blog, by listing other blogs that are similar to his/her own, or blogs the blogger thinks may be of relevance to users. It is also used as measure of the number of citations a blog has, and is used to rank "blog authority" in a manner similar to the way that Google uses hard coded HTML linking to create "page rank." Still another use of the "blogroll" is reciprocal linking: bloggers agree to link to each other, or link to another blog in hopes of getting a link in return. A blogroll is a collection of links to other weblogs. ... Google, Inc (NASDAQ: GOOG), is a U.S. public corporation, initially established as a privately-held corporation in 1998, that designed and managed the Internet Google search engine. ... In computing, HyperText Markup Language (HTML) is a markup language designed for the creation of web pages and other information viewable in a browser. ...


Another central, and sometimes controversial, aspect of blogging is the use of a feedback comment systems. A comment system allows users to post their own comments on an article or "thread." Some blogs do not have comments, or have a closed commenting system which requires approval from those running the blog. For other bloggers, including several very prominent ones, comments are the crucial feature which distinguishes a "true" blog from other kinds of blogs. Commenting can either be built into the software, or added by using a service such as HaloScan. If a blog has regular commenters, this is referred to as the blog's community. A comment system allows users to post their own comments on an article or thread. ... HaloScan provides a free, easy to use commenting and trackback system for weblogs and websites, allowing visitors to leave instant feedback. ...


Tools such as QumanaLE Ecto and w.bloggar allow users to maintain their Web hosted blog without the need to be online while composing or editing posts. Enhancements to weblog technology continue to be developed, such as the TrackBack feature introduced by Movable Type in 2002 and subsequently adopted by other software companies (e.g., Userland) to enable automatic notification between websites of related content—such as a post on a particular topic or one which responds to a post on another blog [6]. bBlog has gone as far as implementing threaded trackbacks on comments, and comments on trackbacks. A request has been made on Wikipedia for this article to be deleted in accordance with the deletion policy. ... TrackBack is a system implemented by Movable Type and later adopted by many blogging tools, including BoastMachine, Dotclear, TypePad, Nucleus or WordPress, that allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it. ... Movable Type is a proprietary weblog publishing system developed by California-based Six Apart. ... bBlog is a Web publishing system (a. ...


Blogs with features such as TrackBack are credited with complicating search engine page ranking techniques [7] [8]. Integrating these into search engines has proven to be a challenge, and has been used to deliberately "push" page rankings. However, as one Google executive remarked, it is the search engine's job to find the ways that a website represents a "vote" for another website. This page is about Google Inc. ...


Web hosting companies and online publications also provide blog creation tools, such as Salon, Tripod, Bravenet, America Onlineand through web hosting,which calls its subscriber blogs "journals."


Types of weblogs

Personal

Often, the word blog is used to describe an online diary or journal, such as LiveJournal. The weblog format of an online diary makes it possible for users without much experience to create, format, and post entries with ease. People write their day-to-day experiences, complaints, poems, prose, illicit thoughts and more, often allowing others to contribute, fulfilling to a certain extent Tim Berners-Lee's original view of the World Wide Web as a collaborative medium. In 2001, mainstream awareness of online diaries began to increase dramatically. A diary is a book for writing discrete entries arranged by date. ... A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) is a daily record of events or business. ... LiveJournal (often abbreviated LJ) is the name of a weblog site allowing Internet users to keep an online journal or diary. ... A diary is a book for writing discrete entries arranged by date. ... Bust of Homer, one of the earliest European poets, in the British Museum Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday speech. ... Sir Tim Berners-Lee Sir Tim (Timothy John) Berners-Lee, KBE (TimBL or TBL) (b. ... Graphic representation of the World Wide Web around Wikipedia The World Wide Web (WWW, W3, or simply Web) is an information space in which the items of interest, referred to as resources, are identified by global identifiers called Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ...


Online diaries are integrated into the daily lives of many teenagers and college students, with communications between friends playing out over their blogs. Even fights may be posted in the diaries, with not-so-veiled insults of each other easily readable by all their friends, enemies, and complete strangers. Adolescence is the transitional stage of development between childhood and full adulthood, representing the period of time during which a person is biologically adult but emotionally not at full maturity. ...


Personal opinions on experiences and hobbies are very common in the blog world. Blogs have given the opportunity for people to express their views to a mass audience. What may have been created to be used among a few friends may be viewed by the internet-using public.


FriendBlog

A FriendBlog is a distributed networked journal on the web, composed of short, frequently updated posts written by friends connected through their similar interests. The author allows his FriendBlog to connect to other FriendBlogs, belonging to friends and acquaintances. This creates a "chain" of blogs.


Topical

Topical blogs focus on a specific niche, often a technical one. An example is Google Blog, covering nothing but news about Google. Another example is a soldier blog. Many blogs now allow categories, which means a general blog can be reshuffled to become a topical blog at the user's need. Topical blogs can cover local information like this Wisconsin boating blog. Soldier blogs are blogs written by Soldiers. ...


Health

Blogs written as personal accounts of living with a specific health issue, sharing information about the experience with others who have an interest in that health issue and providing mutual support. An example of this is My 'Hepatitis C' Weblog.


Literary

Given the obvious focus on words, it's not surprising that the Grub Street tradition has continued on the internet with daily commentary emanating from literary blogs (or litblog) such as Bookslut and Maud Newton. Grub Street is the former name of the present day Milton Street, London, EC2. ... A Litblog (alternate: lit-blog or literary blog) is a Weblog that focuses primarily on the topic of literature. ...


Travel

Famous explorers wrote their journeys down on paper. These days, modern travelers have used blogs such as RealTravel, as a way to share their stories and photos, even while they are traveling around the world.


Research

An increasing number of scholars and students blog their research notes, combining the traditional scholar's private notebook with public discussion. GrandTextAuto is an example of a group research blog. A related genre is the anonymous professor's blog, where the various issues related to academia may be freely discussed. Examples include BitchPhD and Confessions of a Community College Dean.


Issues

Issues blogs focus on activism, debate and current events. Examples are Daily KOS and The Club for Growth.


News

Many weblogs provide a news digest on a certain topic, with short abstracts/summaries and links to interesting articles in the press. Examples are ThisDaily, Slashdot, and Fark.


Political

Another common kind of blog is a political blog. Often an individual will link to articles from news web sites and post their own comments as well. Many of these blogs comment on whatever interests the author. Some of them are more specialized. One subspecies is the watch blog, a blog which sets out to criticize what the author considers systematic errors or bias in an online newspaper or news site—or perhaps even by a more popular blogger.


Political blogs attracted attention because of their use by two political candidates in 2003: Howard Dean and Wesley Clark. Both gained political buzz on the Internet, and particularly among bloggers, before they were taken seriously by the establishment media as candidates. Joe Trippi, Dean's campaign manager, made the Internet a particular focus of the campaign. Both candidates stumbled in the end, but were, at one time or another, thought of as front runners for the Democratic Nomination. Howard Brush Dean III, M.D. (born November 17, 1948) is a prominent American Democratic politician, currently serving as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. ... Wesley Clark This article is about the general. ... Joe Trippi is the worlds foremost authority on Diet Pepsi, a fact that dismays the Cocal Cola company to no end. ...


Legal

Blogs by lawyers or law students, or which discuss law and legal affairs are often referred to as blawgs. By extension, the creator of such a blog is a blawger, sometimes spelled blawgger (variant, rare).


The coining of the term blawg is generally attributed by blawgers to Denise Howell of Bag and Baggage. See Jeff Rosen Gets All Mixed Up on Blawgs, Blogging and Other Things by law blogger Dennis Kennedy (criticizing Jeff Rosen for limiting the definition of blawg to law-student blogs, and for failing to credit Denise). Blogs by lawyers, law professors, or law students, or which discuss law and legal affairs are often referred to as blawgs. ...


Highly popular and influential blawgs include How Appealing, by appellate litigator (that is, a lawyer who brings or defends cases on appeal) Howard Bashman; ACSBlog [9] run by the American Constitution Society; the group blog the Volokh Conspiracy, which is headed by UCLA School of Law Professor Eugene Volokh; and Goldstein & Howe, LLP's sister blogs SCOTUSblog (for Supreme Court of the United States, see SCOTUS) and the Supreme Court Nomination Blog. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Some blawgs are narrow and deal with a focused and/or technical area of law. Others, like the Volokh Conspiracy, deal with whatever topic the blawgers wish to discuss.


A few blawgers are actually and regularly funny, flouting the common perception of lawyers as humorless (as others defy, deny or mock the more vicious stereotypes of lawyers being greedy and nasty). One funny law blogger is a judge on California's Fourth District Court of Appeal, Division 3: Associate Justice William Bedsworth, who writes A Criminal Waste of Space. The most salacious is probably Underneath Their Robes by Article III Groupie (meaning she's a big fan of the Federal Judiciary, which was created by Article Three of the United States Constitution). A blawg that wrestled with the marketing implications for a lawyer's practice of running a humorous weblog is Evan Schaeffer's Legal Underground, formerly known as "Notes from the (Legal) Underground" (former tagline: A weblog that asks the question-- Why are Lawyers So Stuffy?). In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified mental picture of an individual or group of people who share a certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ... Article Three of the United States Constitution establishes the judicial branch of the federal (national) government. ...


Media

Some blogs serve as media watchdogs, reporting on falsehoods or inconsistencies that are presented as facts in the mass media. Many media blogs are focused exclusively on one newspaper or television network. Some may also feature independent reviews like Hotwatercooler.blogspot.com [10]


Religious

Some blogs discuss religious topics. Religious blogs show the public's points of view on various controversies both in religion and in politics, economics, and life in general.


Collaborative (also collective or group)

Many weblogs are written by more than one person about a specific topic. Collaborative weblogs can be open to everyone or limited to a group of people. MetaFilter is an example of this type of weblog. Metafilters main page MetaFilter, known as MeFi to its members, is a community weblog whose purpose is to share links and discuss interesting websites. ...


Slashdot, whose status as a blog has been debated, nevertheless has a team of editors who approve and post links to technology news stories throughout the day. Although Slashdot does not refer to itself as a weblog, it shares some characteristics with weblogs. Slashdot (often abbreviated to /.) is a popular technology-related website, updated many times daily with articles that are short summaries of stories on other websites with links to the stories, and provisions for readers to comment on the story. ...


Another example is SharewareBlogs which acts as a forum for shareware developers. While mainly maintained by a very select group of people, all shareware developers can post blogs to draw attention to their own products or services.


A new form of blog represents a fusion of bloggers and traditional media sources, allowing for topics covered in the traditional media, both print and broadcast, to be fleshed out on the web. One prominent early example of this sort of blog is the Dallas Morning News editor's blog. Another is Hugh Hewitt's blog, affiliated with his syndicated talk radio program. A later example is Lone Star Times, a commercial weblog affiliated with conservative Houston talk-radio station KSEV.


Eclectic

From the Slashdot style blog comes eclectic blogs, which tend to focus on specific niches such as ImpactLab's science and technology blog. Such sites contain articles and stories from other blogs and news sources on the web. There are often few articles actually written by the authors of these blogs and instead the blogs themselves tend to function as passageways for readers to find the actual source of the article or original posting. Slashdot (often abbreviated to /.) is a popular technology-related website, updated many times daily with articles that are short summaries of stories on other websites with links to the stories, and provisions for readers to comment on the story. ...


Medical

Some blogs are geared towards health and medicine. Medical blogs generally fall into 2 categories. One type is a blog written by a health care professional (such as a physician) about his or her life experiences or other personal thoughts. A more recent but (so far) unique trend is the blog that deals with actual patient cases. This latter blog allows other physicians to submit cases to the blog. Physicians can then offer comments or help with the case. Although not yet tested, this format could theoretically increase patient care by allowing the primary doctor to get feedback by other experts in the field. As of yet, the only "roundtable" blog of this nature is a pulmonary-related blog that deals with cases related to the lung. It is unclear whether other medical fields will arise in this new blog format.


Partner (collaboration on multi-section documents)

A partner blog site has a parallel web page or wiki page. Consider the possible similarities between a blog site and a multi-section web document. Blogs are generally thought of as a collection of periodic postings organized by reverse date, each posting its own topic that does not necessarily directly relate to the last. An essay or any large document is also a collection of headings or sub-topics but organized by sequence so that each sub-topic follows from the last to form a coherent whole.


At the blog site, readers can use the comments link to discuss each section. The author or authors of both sites having the passwords to both would keep these two parallel, building on the feedback and re-weaving it into the section of the web page essay and re-editing the original blog posting. Revisions to the web page would come after consensus formed in the posting at the blog site. The web page provides a streamlined printout or reading without the distractions of the comment and date data. The comments section of the blog provides a way to track, remember and negotiate each heading section of the document. The web page also provides more secure control of the developing document than with a wiki, but slows down the evolution of the more comprehensive document. A troika partnership of web, wiki and web page is also viable. This has a wide range of uses for group editing of policy statements, manuals, and grant and curriculum development..


Educational

There are many educational applications of blogs. Students can use weblogs as records of their learning and teachers can use weblogs as records of what they taught. For example, a teacher can blog a course, recording day-by-day what was taught, including links to Internet resources, and specifying what homework students are required to carry out. This application has many advantages: (1) a student can quickly catch-up if they miss a class; (2) the teacher can use the blog as a course plan; and (3) the blog serves as an accurate summary of the course that prospective students or new teachers can refer to.


There are other educational applications of blogs. Students can blog an educational excursion, recording day-by-day (or hour by hour) where they went, what they saw and what they learned - including photographs, audio or video. The collaborative features of blogs can be used to permit several students to contribute to the blog.


Blogs can be used by a wide range of educational organisations. For example, SQA uses a blog to keep teachers up-to-date with new qualifications. Will Richardson's blog is a compendium of useful educational blogging resources. The Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) is the authority which issues examination papers and awards examination results to students in Scotland. ...


Directory

Directory weblogs are useful for web-surfers because they often collect numerous web sites with interesting content in an easy to use and constantly updated format. News-related weblogs can fall into this category or the previous one (political blogs).


Don’t confuse these with weblog directories, such as BlogWise, and specialist directories like BritBlog or directory/search engines like LSBlogs.



These provide a more structured collection of weblog links, and will often offer novel services and interesting views of the data within the directory. These can be a good source of like-minded bloggers, or bloggers situated near you.


Forums/Other CMS systems

Technically, a forum can sometimes be regarded as a weblog, but in reality, a distinction is drawn between the two. Many types of existing software, that pre-date blogging are in effect a type of "blog" software, but the rise of blogging came about due to easy to use blogging software for the masses. If for example, forum software is used for the purposes of creating and publishing a online journal, or list, then it would be regarded as a weblog. The distinction between a blog and a forum is best decided by the creator of the said item, as they are aware of its purpose.


Business

Entrepreneurial

A number of entrepreneurs are establishing blogs to promote their businesses. Often business blogs act as a showcase for entrepreneurs to provide a window into the behind-the-scenes goings on at their business, presenting a more personal "face" to the public rather than a cold corporate persona. In some cases the blog itself is the core of the business bringing in revenue from advertising, selling products or information. Examples include The Barter Blog, Business Opportunities Weblog and Entrepreneur's Journey.


Corporate

Increasingly, employees of corporations are posting official or semi-official blogs about their work. The employers however, do not always appreciate the endeavor. In January 2005 Joe Gordon was fired from Waterstone's bookshop in Edinburgh, Scotland, because he referred to his boss as an "asshole in sandals." In 2004 Ellen Simonetti, a Delta Air Lines flight attendant, was fired for posing in uniform on her blog. David Corby was fired from Wells Fargo in 2002 after he complained about a department policy forcing employees to wear american flag pins to show support for the victims of the September 11, 2001 attacks. He described the event as fascist. Perhaps the most famous case of all occurred when "Troutgirl" Joyce Park was fired from Friendster because she discussed the rationale behind the website's technology conversion from J2EE to PHP on her blog. 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... Gower Street branch Waterstones is a United Kingdom based chain of bookshops. ... Edinburghs location in Scotland Edinburgh viewed from Arthurs Seat. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the UK Languages with Official Status1 English Scottish Gaelic Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Delta Air Lines NYSE: DAL (IATA: DL, ICAO: DAL, and Callsign: Delta) is a major U.S. airline headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, operating a large domestic and international network that spans North America, South America, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ... 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks were a series of suicide attacks against civilians of the United States conducted on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Friendster Logo Friendster is an Internet social network service. ... Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition or J2EE is a Standard (albeit with no ISO or ECMA standard) for developing distributed Multi-tier architecture applications, based on modular components running on an application server. ... PHP is a popular open-source, reflective programming language used mainly for developing server-side applications and dynamic web content, and more recently, other software. ...


Other employers have reacted differently. For instance, when Power Line bloggers were attacked by a Star Tribune columnist, one of the bloggers' employers came to his defense. Power Line is a conservative blog run by three lawyers, John H. Hinderaker (Hindrocket), Scott W. Johnson (The Big Trunk) and Paul Mirengoff (Deacon). Power Line covers political and social issues relevant to conservative Americans. ... The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-St. ...


With the rise in popularity of blogs in 2004 senior management caught on to the trend and by January 2005 several types of organizations, including universities, had started using blogs to communicate with their stakeholders. Some believe this corporate takeover of a tool that was used primarily by Internet enthusiasts will lead to a decrease in the popularity of the medium. Others believe that the use of blogs by organizations will add new voices and vitality to the medium. At any rate, there is little evidence that the growth rate of the blogosphere has slowed. A prime example of senior management blogging is GM's Fastlane blog [11], edited, among others, by GM vice chairman Bob Lutz. General Motors Corporation NYSE: GM, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Daewoo, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab, and Vauxhall. ...


In 2005 the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) published the guide How to Blog Safely (About Work or Anything Else). The EFF uses the blue ribbon as symbolism for their Free Speech defense. ...


Small Business

Many small business people are far ahead of the corporate curve in using blogs to promote their businesses. Examples include Kerry M. Kerstetter, CPA, the Tax Guru, and small business trainer Timothy Lee's Land of Opportunity.


Advice

Many weblogs provide expert advice, such as Microsoft technical knowledge (GaryDev) or fiction publishing for women (Four Chicks and a Book). The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Many small businesses are also using blogs to offer advice and better connect with their clients. These blogs are particularly prevalent in the real estate industry where agents typically have a great deal of flexibility in marketing themselves. Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...


Another type of small online business using blogs are independent software development firms. And example of a blog providing user tips, information about software updates and content related to the software product's purpose is (Wheatworks Software's Blog).


Formats

Some weblogs specialize in particular forms of presentation, such as images (see web comics), or videos (see videoblog), or on a particular theme, and portmanteaus have been coined for some of these, such as moblogs (for "mobile" blog). Web comics are comics that are available on the web. ... Videoblogs is a variant of weblogs using video as their main content, often with additional text as in a standard weblog. ... Portmanteau has two meanings. ... Moblog is a blend of the words mobile and weblog. ...


Audio

One of the types of blog that has undergone rapid expansion since the year 2000 is the MP3 blog, which make audio files available to the user. MP3 blogs are normally targeted at highly specialized musical genres, such as late 60s soul music or early 90s hip-hop or even the latest stuff in electronic dance music genres like grime. However, personal audioblogs are also on the rise (See also Podcasting). This article is about the year 2000. ... An MP3 blog is a type of weblog in which the creator makes music files, normally in the MP3 format, available for download. ... Musical genres are categories which contain music which share a certain style or which have certain elements in common. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began among urban African Americans and Latinos in New York City in the early 1970s, and has since spread around the world. ... Grime is musical offshoot of the early 21st century UK Garage scene that developed in Londons East End between 2002-2004. ... Podcasting is a method of publishing audio programs via the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed of new files (usually but not limited to MP3s). ...


Photography

The increasing ubiquity of digital cameras and broadband connections has made it ever easier to post and share photos on the web. Bloggers have adapted their software to facilitate the publishing of photos, creating what is called a photoblog. Photo sharing sites like Buzznet and Flickr have integrated the typical photo gallery service with photo sharing, blogging and syndication to create a new kind of social software. A SiPix digital camera next to a matchbox to show scale. ... A WildBlue Satellite Internet dish. ... A photography blog, picture log or simply a photoblog, is a web application which contains periodic posts containing user-taken photographs on a common webpage. ... Photo sharing is a term given to a crop of mid-2000s websites which provide means to publish a collection of digital photos online in a centralized and organized fashion. ... A screenshot of hot tags on Flickr. ... Social Software lets people rendezvous, connect or collaborate by use of a computer network. ...


Video

In January 2005 the first VloggerCon was held, catering to a new breed of bloggers, the video blogger. A vlog, or videoblog, is a weblog which uses video as its primary presentation format. Vlog posts are usually accompanied by text, image and additional metadata to provide a context or overview for the video. A vlog or video blog is a blog (short for weblog) which uses video as the primary content; the video is linked to within a videoblog post and usually accompanied by supporting text, image, and additional meta data to provide context. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Metadata (Greek: meta-+ Latin: data information), literally data about data, is information that describes another set of data. ...


Common terms

Blogging, like any hobby, has developed something of a specialised vocabulary. The following is an attempt to explain a few of the more common phrases and words, including etymologies when not obvious. A vocabulary is a set of words known to a person or other entity, or that are part of a specific language. ... In historical linguistics, etymology is the study of the origins of words. ...

Audioblog
A blog where the posts consist mainly of voice recordings sent by mobile phone, sometimes with some short text message added for metadata purposes. (cf. podcasting)
Bleg
A blog entry consisting of a request to the readers, such as for information or contributions. A portmanteau of "blog" and "beg".
Blog feed
The XML-based file in which the blog hosting software places a machine-readable version of the blog so that it may be "syndicated" for further distribution on the web. Formats such as RSS and Atom are used to structure the XML file.
Blogfoo
Statements written with an air of generality while obviously pointed at a specific person or group of people.
Blog hopping
to follow links from one blog entry to another, with related side-trips to various articles, sites, discussion forums, and more.
Blogorrhea
A portmanteau of "blog" and "logorrhea", meaning excessive and/or incoherent talkativeness in a weblog.
Blogroll
A list of blogs. Usually a blogger features a list of his favorite blogs in the sidebar of his blog. These lists can be made dynamic using services like BlogRolling.
Blog site
The web location (URL) of a blog, which may be either a dedicated domain, a sub-domain, or embedded within a web site.
Blogsite
Sometimes confused with a simple blog or blog site, but a blogsite is a web site which combines blog feeds from a variety of sources, as well as non-blog sources, and adds significant value over the raw blog feeds.
Blogsnob
A person who refuses to respond to comments on their blog from people outside their circle of friends.
Dark Blog
A non-public blog (e.g. behind a firewall)
Flog
A portmanteau of "fake" and "blog". A blog that's ghostwritten by someone, such as in the marketing department.
Moblog
A portmanteau of "mobile" and "blog". A blog featuring posts sent mainly by mobile phone, using SMS or MMS messages. They are often photoblogs.
Multi-blog
Creating, maintaining, and running multiple blogs (2 or more) simultaneously.
Multi-blogger
An individual, business, or institution that runs multiple blogs.
Permalink
Permanent link. The unique URL of a single post. Use this when you want to link to a post somewhere.
Ping
The alert in the TrackBack system that notifies the original poster of a blog post when someone else writes an entry concerning the original post.
Shocklog
Weblogs to produce shocking discussions by posting various shocking content.
Splog
A blog which is composed of spam. A Spam blog or "any blog whose creator doesn’t add any written value." The term was coined by Marc Cuban in a posting on his blog.
TrackBack
A system that allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it. The system works by sending a 'ping' between the blogs, and therefore providing the alert.
Troll
A commenter whose sole purpose is to attack the views expressed on a blog, for example, a liberal going to a conservative blog, or vice versa. Many trolls will leave their remarks on multiple posts and continue to visit the blog, sparking spirited debate amongst the blog's regular readers. Trolls' verbosity can range from eloquent to crass, although most trolls probably fall into the latter category.
Vorage
A marriage between the words forage and video defined as "The act of foraging for video on the internet and sharing it with others." Bloggers or vloggers who share streaming or downloaded video content on the web often engage in voraging, scouring search engines and obscure websites to present a curated collection of videos that usually fall within a set theme or editorial perspective.

An MP3 blog is a type of weblog in which the creator makes music files, normally in the MP3 format, available for download. ... Metadata (Greek: meta-+ Latin: data information), literally data about data, is information that describes another set of data. ... cf. ... Podcasting is a method of publishing audio programs via the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed of new files (usually but not limited to MP3s). ... This article is in need of attention. ... A portmanteau (plural: portmanteaux or portmanteaus) is a word that is formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words. ... A blog feed is an XML-based file in which the blog hosting software for a blog site places a machine-readable version of the blog so that it may be syndicated for further distribution on the web. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Blog hopping is to follow links from one blog entry to another, with related side-trips to various articles, sites, discussion forums and more. ... This article is about a type of web application. ... A portmanteau (plural: portmanteaux or portmanteaus) is a word that is formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words. ... Logorrhoea (US logorrhea) (Greek λογορροια, logorrhoia, word-flux) is defined as an excessive flow of words and, when used medically, refers to incoherent talkativeness that occurs in certain kinds of mental illness, such as mania. ... A blogroll is a collection of links to other weblogs. ... A blogsite (one word) is a website with a web application that integrates content from multiple sources, such as weblogs, syndicated blog feeds, discussion forums, FAQs, etc. ... A Uniform Resource Locator, URL (spelled out as an acronym, not pronounced as earl), or Web address, is a standardized address name layout for resources (such as documents or images) on the Internet (or elsewhere). ... A blogsite (one word) is a website with a web application that integrates content from multiple sources, such as weblogs, syndicated blog feeds, discussion forums, FAQs, etc. ... The first use of the term weblog. ... A blogsite (one word) is a website with a web application that integrates content from multiple sources, such as weblogs, syndicated blog feeds, discussion forums, FAQs, etc. ... A blogsite (one word) is a website with a web application that integrates content from multiple sources, such as weblogs, syndicated blog feeds, discussion forums, FAQs, etc. ... A non-public blog, such as one behind a firewall or specifically hidden to all but a defined group of friends. ... Flog may refer to: A blog on Freenet A photolog Flagellation (flogging) Australian slang meaning sell A fake blog typically used as a sales tool This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A portmanteau (plural: portmanteaux or portmanteaus) is a word that is formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words. ... Moblog is a blend of the words mobile and weblog. ... A portmanteau (plural: portmanteaux or portmanteaus) is a word that is formed by combining both sounds and meanings from two or more words. ... A received SMS being announced on a Nokia phone. ... Multimedia Messaging System (MMS) is the logical evolution of the Short Message Service SMS, a text-only messaging system for mobile networks. ... A permalink (a portmanteau made by contracting the phrase permanent link) is a type of URL designed to refer to a specific information item (often a news story or weblog item) and to remain unchanged permanently, or at least for a lengthy period of time to prevent link rot. ... Pingback is a method for Web authors to request notification when somebody links to one of their documents. ... Weblogs - also known as blogs created to produce shocking discussions by posting various shocking content. ... Spam blogs, sometimes referred to by the Neologism splogs, are Web Log (or blog) sites which the author uses only for promoting affiliated websites. ... Cuban worked at Dairy Queen for a one day photo op. ... TrackBack is a system implemented by Movable Type and later adopted by many blogging tools, including BoastMachine, Dotclear, TypePad, Nucleus or WordPress, that allows a blogger to see who has seen the original post and has written another entry concerning it. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc. ... ... Forage is the herbaceous plant material (mainly grasses and legumes) eaten by grazing animals. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Blogger is a service created by Pyra Labs that provides Web-based tools used by individuals to publish to the Web. ... A vlog or video blog is a blog (short for weblog) which uses video as the primary content; the video is linked to within a videoblog post and usually accompanied by supporting text, image, and additional meta data to provide context. ... This article is about the computer terms. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The success of the Google search engine was mainly due to its powerful PageRank algorithm and its simple, easy-to-use interface. ... The front page of the English Wikipedia website. ...

See also

In computing, a content management system (CMS) is a system used to organize and facilitate collaborative creation of documents and other content. ... Autocasting is an automated form of podcasting that allows bloggers and blog readers to generate audio versions of text blogs from RSS feeds. ... Blog client (weblog client) is software to manage (post, edit) blogs from operating system with no need to launch a web browser. ... Blogebrity was an internet project which was born in May of 2005 as a contest entry, and nevertheless managed to have a real-world impact upon the blogosphere. ... BlogRoots was a weblog support site that grew from the book We Blog: Publishing Online with Weblogs (Paul Bausch, Matthew Haughey, Meg Hourihan, authors. ... Blogstream is a play on the term mainstream that references the alternative news and information network growing up around weblogs and user driven content mechanisms. ... During the Renaissance (especially in England), commonplaces (or commonplace books) were for some people a popular way to compile knowledge, usually done by writing information into books. ... A diary is a book for writing discrete entries arranged by date. ... A screen shot of the results of searching for Miserable failure on Google. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into weblog. ... A news aggregator, or simply aggregator, is a software application, webpage or service that collects syndicated content, such as RSS and other XML feeds from weblogs and mainstream media sites. ... Blogging has opened a new horizon for self-expression in the traditionally mute Iranian society where individualism was less respected. ... Podcasting is a method of publishing audio programs via the Internet, allowing users to subscribe to a feed of new files (usually but not limited to MP3s). ...

External links and sources

Additional information and statistics
  • MyBlogPimp.com — (Create free Web-blogs, Life Journals)
  • Blogpulse.com — Track and search for any trend in blogging.
  • BlogTree.com — Site that attempts to map blog genealogy.
  • BlogUP - Blog Things & Goodies — Enhances blog with new content: users can create their own advanced or simple quizes, polls and other goodies & tools.
  • Blog Software Comparison Chart from the Online Journalism Review, by Susannah Gardner
  • Blogwizard (Create, edit and maintain your blogs [xml-rpc))
  • LS Blogs (Lists many Blog hosts/providers and tools. Also lists blogs.)
  • A FAQ on Blogs by Andreas Ramos
  • Legal Guide for Bloggers by the Electronic Frontier Foundation
  • Found Blogging A dedicated free resource about all aspects of Blogs
  • A glossary of blogging terms
  • Technorati Major blog hub, search engine, and aggregator
  • PubSub Major blog prospective search engine and aggregator
  • MeatballWiki's very comprehensive article on Weblogs (particularly about their history).
  • Weblogs: A History and Perspective by Rebecca Blood. Describes the rise of the original weblog community, and introduces the idea of blogging as a form of "participatory media".
Advocacy
  • Committee to Protect Bloggers
  • EFF's "Fighting for Bloggers' Rights" page
  • The Online Coalition letter to the FEC
Articles and books
  • Blog Primer — Understanding and Reading a Blog for Beginners by John C. Dvorak
  • The Blogger Manifesto (or, Do Weblogs Make the Internet Better or Worse?)
  • "Blogs? zzzz ..." — by Wynn Quon, National Post (2005). A reality check on blog-o-mania.
  • A Few Thoughts on Journalism and What Can Weblogs Do About It by Rebecca Blood. Reflection on the relationship between blogs and journalism.
  • Hammer, Nail: How Blogging Software Reshaped the Online Community by Rebecca Blood. Describes the ways in which blogging software has created and reinforced aspects of blogging culture.
  • "How to blog" Tips for perfection in the art of blogging
  • Dan Gillmor's We The Media. Grassroots Journalism by the People, for the People (2004, full text online) sees blogs as paradigmatic of a new form of journalism in the digital age.
  • "Web of Influence" — by Daniel W. Drezner, Henry Farrell from Foreign Policy Magazine
  • Weblogs and Journalism in the Age of Participatory Media by Rebecca Blood argues that blogging is best understood as a form of personal publishing that is more often "participatory media" than journalism.
  • Why I ***ing Hate Weblogs! — Sarcastic opinion article exploring the phenomenon (warning: harsh language).
  • "Why your Movable Type blog must die" (humorous article)
  • 10 reasons to blog by meïdia
Miscellaneous

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5836 words)
Enhancements to weblog technology continue to be developed, such as the TrackBack feature introduced by Movable Type in 2002 and subsequently adopted by other software companies to enable automatic notification between websites of related content—such as a post on a particular topic or one which responds to a post on another blog [6].
Some weblogs specialize in particular forms of presentation, such as images (see web comics), or videos (see videoblog), or on a particular theme, and portmanteaus have been coined for some of these, such as moblogs (for "mobile" blog).
Weblogs and Journalism in the Age of Participatory Media by Rebecca Blood argues that blogging is best understood as a form of personal publishing that is more often "participatory media" than journalism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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