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Encyclopedia > Weaving
Tweed loom, Harris, 2004
Tweed loom, Harris, 2004
Woven sheet
Woven sheet

Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. This cloth can be plain (in one color or a simple pattern), or it can be woven in decorative or artistic designs, including tapestries. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 212 KB) Harris tweed loom Author: Wojsyl, 2004 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Weaving Harris Tweed ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 212 KB) Harris tweed loom Author: Wojsyl, 2004 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Weaving Harris Tweed ... For other uses, see Harris Tweed (disambiguation). ... An Cliseam from the Abhainn Mharaig, just off the main road to Lewis. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x1255, 327 KB) Summary now thats a good weave Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Weaving User:Henningklevjer Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2000x1255, 327 KB) Summary now thats a good weave Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Weaving User:Henningklevjer Metadata This file contains additional information, probably... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... WaRp. ... WEFT Champaign 90. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ...


The majority of commercial fabrics, in the West, are woven on computer-controlled Jacquard looms. In the past, simpler fabrics were woven on other dobby looms and the Jacquard harness adaptation was reserved for more complex patterns. Some believe the efficiency of the Jacquard loom, and the Jacquard weaving process makes it more economical for mills to use them to weave all of their fabrics, regardless of the complexity of the design. However, an industrialist weaving large runs of simple plain weave fabric may need to be convinced of the logic of investing in Jacquard machines, when a much lower cost loom would suffice. It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the machine. ... Jacquard loom on display at Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England The Jacquard Loom is a mechanical loom, invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, that has holes punched in pasteboard, each row of which corresponds to one row of the design. ... A Dobby Loom is a type of floor loom that controls the warp threads using a device called a dobby. ... Jacquard weaving makes possible in almost any loom the programmed raising of each warp thread independently of the others. ...


Handweaving, along with hand spinning, is a popular craft. Weavers use wooden looms to create rugs, fabrics, and tapestries. A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... Look up Rug in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... There is an album by Carol King called Tapestry A tapestry cushion, depicting pansies Tapestry is a form of textile art. ...


Fabric in which the warp and/or weft is tie-dyed before weaving is called ikat. Fabric decorated using a wax resist method is called batik. Categories: Stub ... Ikat weaving from the Island of Sumba, Indonesia Ikat is a style of weaving that uses a tie-dye process on either the warp or weft before the threads are woven to create a pattern or design. ... This article is about the textile dyeing technique. ...


Satin weaves, twill weaves, and plain weaves are the 3 basic types of weaving by which the majority of woven products are formed. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ... Plain weave is one of the three basic types of textile weaves. ...

Contents

Process

An Indian weaver preparing his warp.
An Indian weaver preparing his warp.

In general, weaving involves the interlacing of two sets of threads at right angles to each other: the warp and the weft. The warp are held taut and in parallel order, typically by means of a loom, though some forms of weaving may use other methods. The loom is warped (or dressed) with the warp threads passing through heddles on two or more harnesses. The warp threads are moved up or down by the harnesses creating a space called the shed. The weft thread is wound onto spools called bobbins. The bobbins are placed in a shuttle which carries the weft thread through the shed. The raising/lowering sequence of warp threads gives rise to many possible weave structures from the simplest plain weave (also called tabby), through twills and satins to complex computer-generated interlacings. Image File history File linksMetadata Weaver_in_India. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Weaver_in_India. ... Fig. ... WaRp. ... WEFT Champaign 90. ... Parallel is a term in geometry and in everyday life that refers to a property in Euclidean space of two or more lines or planes, or a combination of these. ... The shed shown in tablet weaving In weaving, the shed is the area between upper and lower warp yarns through which the weft is woven. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Both warp and weft can be visible in the final product. By spacing the warp more closely, it can completely cover the weft that binds it, giving a warpfaced textile such as rep weave. Conversely, if the warp is spread out, the weft can slide down and completely cover the warp, giving a weftfaced textile, such as a tapestry or a Kilim rug. There are a variety of loom styles for hand weaving and tapestry. In tapestry, the image is created by placing weft only in certain warp areas, rather than across the entire warp width. This article is about tapestry the textile. ... A Shahsavan kilim with typical geometrical symbols some of them of mythological inspiration such as the crab or scarabeus Kilims are flat tapestry-woven carpets or rugs produced from the Balkans to Iran. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... WEFT Champaign 90. ...


Weaving in ancient and traditional cultures

Prehistoric woven objects and weaving tools
Prehistoric woven objects and weaving tools

There are some indications that weaving was already known in the Palaeolithic era. An indistinct textile impression has been found at Pavlov, Moravia. Neolithic textiles are well known from finds in pile dwellings in Switzerland. One extant fragment from the Neolithic was found in Fayum at a site which dates to about 5000 BCE. This fragment is woven at about 12 threads by 9 threads per cm in a plain weave. Flax was the predominant fibre in Egypt at this time and continued popularity in the Nile Valley, even after wool became the primary fibre used in other cultures around 2000 BCE. Another Ancient Egyptian item, known as the Badari dish, depicts a textile workshop. This item, catalogue number UC9547, is now housed at the Petrie Museum and dates to about 3600 BCE. Enslaved women worked as weavers during the Sumerian Era. They would wash wool fibers in hot water and wood-ash soap and then dry them. Next, they would beat out the dirt and card the wool. The wool was then graded, bleached, and spun into a thread. The spinners would pull out fibers and twist them together. This was done by either rolling fibers between palms or using a hooked stick. The thread was then placed on a wooden or bone spindle and rotated on a clay whorl which operated like a flywheel. Image File history File linksMetadata Prehistoric_weaving. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Prehistoric_weaving. ... The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic – lit. ... Pavlov is either Ivan Pavlov, a Russian scientist, or F.P. Pavlov, the nom-de-plume of A.N. Bykov, a Russian engineer and writer the Soviet platoon commander Yakov Pavlov; see Pavlovs House. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Pile dwelling on Sumatra, Indonesia Pile dwellings are houses raised over the surface of the soil or a body of water. ... An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Al Fayyum is one of the governorates of Egypt located in the centre of the country. ... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London, England, is run by the Institute of Archaeology, which is part of University College, London. ... Sumer (or Å umer; Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR [1]) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Lye is a caustic solution used for glass and soap making. ... -1... In chemistry, to bleach something generally means to whiten it or oxidize it. ... For other uses, see Hand (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wood (disambiguation). ... This article is about the skeletal organs. ... The word spindle might (or might not) have several meanings: A spindle (shrub), a poisonous shrub or small tree of the genus Euonymus. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... Look up whorl in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Spoked flywheel Flywheel from stationary engine. ...


The slaves would then work in three-woman teams on looms, where they stretched the threads, after which they passed threads over and under each other at perpendicular angles. The finished cloth was then taken to a fuller. For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... Fulling is a step in clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to get rid of oils, dirt, and other impurities. ...


Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897) points to numerous Biblical references to weaving in ancient times: Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ...

Weaving was an art practised in very early times (Ex. 35:35). The Egyptians were specially skilled in it (Isa. 19:9; Ezek. 27:7), and some have regarded them as its inventors.

In the wilderness, the Hebrews practised it (Ex. 26:1, 8; 28:4, 39; Lev. 13:47). It is referred to in subsequent times as specially the women's work (2 Kings 23:7; Prov. 31:13, 24). No mention of the loom is found in Scripture, but we read of the "shuttle" (Job 7:6), "the pin" of the beam (Judg. 16:14), "the web" (13, 14), and "the beam" (1 Sam. 17:7; 2 Sam. 21:19). The rendering, "with pining sickness," in Isa. 38:12 (A.V.) should be, as in the Revised Version, "from the loom," or, as in the margin, "from the thrum." We read also of the "warp" and "woof" (Lev. 13:48, 49, 51-53, 58, 59), but the Revised Version margin has, instead of "warp," "woven or knitted stuff." The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... The Revised Version (or English Revised Version) of the Bible is a late 19th-century British revision of the King James Version of 1611. ...

Weaving in the American Southwest

Textile weaving, using cotton dyed with pigments, was a dominant craft among pre-contact tribes of the American southwest, including various Pueblo peoples, the Zuni, and the Ute tribes. The first Spaniards to visit the region wrote about seeing Navajo blankets. With the introduction of sheep and wool by Europeans, the Navajo adopted the new source of thread and the resulting woolen products have become very well known. By the 1700s the Navajo had begun to import yarn with their favorite color, Bayeta red. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Pueblo Indians . ... The Zuni (also spelled Zuñi) or Ashiwi are a Native American tribe, one of the Pueblo peoples, most of whom live in the Pueblo of Zuñi on the Zuni River, a tributary of the Little Colorado River, in western New Mexico. ... Look up ute in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Navajo people (or Diné) of the Southwestern United States are currently the largest Native American tribe in North America, with an estimated tribal population of 300,000. ...


Using an upright loom, the Navajos made almost exclusively utilitarian blankets. Little patterning and few colors were characteristic of almost all early blankets, except for the much sought after Chief's Blanket, which evolved from the 1st Phase, few wide bands, to the 2nd phase, wide bands with squares on the corners to the 3rd Phase which made more and more use of patterns and colors. The Navajo also traded for commercial wool, including the uniforms of soldiers, to reweave into intricate multicolored blankets called Germantown.


Under the influence of European settlers at trading posts, the local Navajos began to weave blankets and rugs into distinct styles. They included "Two Gray Hills" (predominantly black and white, with traditional patterns), "Teec Nos Pos" (colorful, with very extensive patterns), "Ganado" (founded by Don Lorenzo Hubbell), red dominated patterns with black and white, "Crystal" (founded by J. B. Moore), oriental and Persian styles (almost always with natural dyes), "Wide Ruins," "Chinlee," banded geometric patterns, "Klagetoh," diamond type patterns, "Red Mesa" and bold diamond patterns. Many of these patterns exhibit a fourfold symmetry, which is thought to embody traditional ideas about harmony. Navajo Rugs and Blankets, are textiles produced by Navajo people(or Dine) of the Four Corners area of the United States. ... Don Lorenzo Hubbell (November 27, 1853 - November 12, 1930) was a 19th century trader instrumental in promoting the sale of Navajo art. ... A traditional craftsman mending a rug in Isfahan. ... For other uses, see Mesa (disambiguation). ...


Weaving in Amazonia

In Native Amazonia, densely woven palm-bast mosquito netting, or tents, were utilized by the Panoans, Tupí, Western Tucano, Yameo, Záparoans, and perhaps by the indigenous peoples of the central Huallaga River basin (Steward 1963:520). Aguaje palm-bast (Mauritia flexuosa, Mauritia minor, or swamp palm) and the frond spears of the Chambira palm (Astrocaryum chambira, A.munbaca, A.tucuma, also known as Cumare or Tucum) have been used for centuries by the Urarina of the Peruvian Amazon to make cordage, net-bags hammocks, and to weave fabric. Among the Urarina, the production of woven palm-fiber goods is imbued with varying degrees of an aesthetic attitude, which draws its authentication from referencing the Urarina’s primordial past. Urarina mythology attests to the centrality of weaving and its role in engendering Urarina society. The myth of post-diluvial creation accords women’s weaving knowledge a pivotal role in Urarina social reproduction. Even though palm-fiber cloth is regularly removed from circulation through mortuary rites, Urarina palm-fiber wealth is neither completely inalienable, nor fungible since it is a fundamental medium for the expression of labor and exchange. The circulation of palm-fiber wealth stabilizes a host of social relationships, ranging from marriage and fictive kinship (compadrazco, spiritual compeership) to perpetuating relationships with the deceased.[1] A river in the Amazon rainforest The Amazon is a rainforest in South America. ... Genera Many; see list of Arecaceae genera Arecaceae or Palmae (also known by the name Palmaceae, which is taxonomically invalid. ... Bast are the strong fibers in the phloem of some plants. ... For other uses, see Mosquito (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Panoan (also Pánoan, Panoano, Panoana, Páno) is a family of languages spoken in Peru, western Brazil, and Bolivia. ... Tupi can mean: The Tupi people of Brazil. ... The Short Tucano is a basic two seat turboprop trainer used by the RAF. It is an adaptation of the EMBRAER Tucano, the principle alteration being the use of a Garrett turboprop powerplant over the standard Pratt & Whitney engine. ... Indigenous peoples are: Peoples living in an area prior to colonization by a state Peoples living in an area within a nation-state, prior to the formation of a nation-state, but who do not identify with the dominant nation. ... The Huallaga River (also known as the Guallaga and Rio de los Motilones), which joins the Amazon River to the west of the Río Ucayali, rises high among the mountains, in about 10 degrees 40 minutes southern latitude, on the northern slopes of the celebrated Cerro de Pasco. ... Binomial name Astrocaryum chambira Burret Astrocaryum chambira (Chambira palm) is a palm native to Amazon Rainforest vegetation in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. ... An Indigenous Peoples of the Peruvian Amazon (Loreto), they refer to themselves as Kachá (lit. ... Amazon River basin The Amazon Basin is the part of South America drained by the Amazon River and its tributaries. ... This article deals with the most common use of the word hammock, a sling for sleeping or resting in. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... An Indigenous Peoples of the Peruvian Amazon (Loreto), they refer to themselves as Kachá (lit. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Diluvium is a term in geology for superficial deposits formed by flood-like operations of water, and so contrasted with alluvium or alluvial deposits formed by slow and steady aqueous agencies. ... An origin belief, or creation myth, is a supernatural story or explanation that describes the beginnings of humanity, earth, life, and the universe (cosmogony). ... A mortuary is a cold chamber used to keep the deceased from seriously decomposing; this practice exists for the sake of recognition of the deceased and to allow time to prepare for burial. ... For the business meaning, see Wealth (economics). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Look up exchange in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word circulation can mean the following: The transport of blood through the circulatory system. ... In the contexts of sociology and of popular culture, the concept of interpersonal relationships involves social associations, connections, or affiliations between two or more people. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... Kinship is the most basic principle of organizing individuals into social groups, roles, and categories. ... This page deals with the cessation of life. ...


Weaving in Persia

Hand weaving of carpets and kilims has been an important element of the tribal crafts of many of the subregions of modern day Iran. Examples of carpet types are the Lavar Kerman carpet from Kerman and the Seraband rug from Arak. A Shahsavan kilim with typical geometrical symbols some of them of mythological inspiration such as the crab or scarabeus Kilims are flat tapestry-woven carpets or rugs produced from the Balkans to Iran. ... For the U.S. city, see Kerman, California. ... Seraband rug or Saraband, is an Iranian or Persian handwoven floor covering from the Ser-e Band district located southwest of Arak, Iran. ... Arak may refer to: Arak, a city in centeral Iran Arak, an alcoholic beverage made from grapes and anise This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Weaving as an industry

Before the Industrial Revolution, weaving remained a manual craft, usually undertaken by craftsmen in their homes. Looms might be broad or narrow; broad looms were those too wide for the weaver to pass the shuttle through the shed, so that the weaver needed an assistant (often an apprentice). This ceased to be necessary after John Kay invented the flying shuttle in 1733, which also sped up the process of weaving. A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ... A number of people have been called John Kay: John Kay (1704–1780), English inventor of textile machinery, notably the flying shuttle John Kay (17??–17??), English developer of textile machinery, notably the spinning frame John Kay (1742–1826), Scottish caricaturist Sir John Kay (1943–2004), British High Court judge... The flying shuttle was developed by John Kay in 1733, and was one of the key developments in weaving that helped fuel the Industrial Revolution. ...


Great Britain

The first attempt to mechanise weaving was the work of Edmund Cartwright from 1785. He built a factory at Doncaster and obtained a series of patents between 1785 and 1792. In 1788, his brother Major John Cartwight built Revolution Mill at Retford (named for the centenary of the Glorious Revolution. In 1791, he licensed his loom to the Grimshaw brothers of Manchester, but their Knott Mill burnt down the following year (possibly a case of arson). Edmund Cartwight was granted a reward of £10,000 by Parliament for his efforts in 1809.[2] However, success in power-weaving also required improvements by others, including H. Horrocks of Stockport. Only during the two decades after about 1805, did power-weaving take hold. This led ultimately to hardship among handloom weavers, whose wages were driven down by competition from machine. This led to machine breaking by the Luddites. Textile manufacture was one of the leading sectors in the British Industrial Revolution, but weaving was a comparatively late sector to be mechanised. However, ultimately, the various innovations took weaving from a home-based artisan activity (labour intensive and man-powered) to mass-production under the power of steam undertaken in factories. See also Textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution. Edmund Cartwright Edward (Edmund) Cartwright (April 24, 1743 in Marnham, Nottinghamshire – October 30, 1823 in Hastings, Sussex) was an English clergyman and inventor of the power loom. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... John Cartwright (17 September 1740 – 23 September 1824) served in the Royal Navy then joined the Nottinghamshire militia as a major. ... , Retford is a market town in Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands of England, located 31 miles from the county town of Nottingham, in the district of Bassetlaw. ... The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (VII of Scotland) in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange), who as a result ascended the English throne as William... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ... The Luddites were a social movement of English textile artisans in the early nineteenth century who protested — often by destroying textile machines — against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt threatened their livelihood. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... An artisan, also called a craftsman,[1] is a skilled manual worker who uses tools and machinery in a particular craft. ... // The term steam engine may also refer to an entire railroad steam locomotive. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ...


Another important step forward was the invention in France of the Jacquard loom, enabling complicated patterned cloths to be woven, by using punched cards to determine which threads of coloured yarn should appear on the upper side of the cloth. Jacquard weaving makes possible in almost any loom the programmed raising of each warp thread independently of the others. ...


Colonial America

Colonial America was heavily reliant on Great Britain for manufactured goods of all kinds. British policy was to encourage the production of raw materials in colonies. Weaving was not prohibited, but the export of British wool was. As a result many people wove cloth from locally produced fibers in Colonial America. This article is about the colonial history of the United States. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ...


In Colonial times the colonists mostly used cotton and flax for weaving. They could get one cotton crop each fall. Flax was harvested in the summer. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ...


In preparing wool for weaving, colonists would first shear the sheep with spring back clippers. This was done while keeping the sheep's feet from touching anything so it would not try to break free. They would try to cut the wool off the sheep in one big chunk because that way they would get long fibers. Sheep-shearing was done in the spring so that the fleece would regrow in time for the winter. Medium fine Merino shearing Lismore, Victoria Sheep shearing, typically just called shearing, is the process by which the woolen fleece of a sheep is removed. ...


After shearing, wool would be washed in hot water to get out the dirt and grease (lanolin), then carded, at which point it would be ready for spinning into yarn. Washing the wool was a delicate procedure, because they didn't want to agitate the fibres too much in the process, and end up with felt. If the wool was clean enough (little to no vegetable matter), they could wait until after it is spun to clean out the lanolin, at which point it is easier to clean because it is yarn. Lanolin, also called Adeps Lanae, wool wax, wool fat, or wool grease, a greasy yellow substance from wool-bearing animals, acts as a skin ointment, water-proofing wax, and raw material (such as in shoe polish). ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... A selection of 4 different felt cloths. ...


A card is a set of two brushes stroked one on the other with the fibre in the middle. This process of carding loosen and fluffs the fiber, as opposed to combing, which lines up all the fibres in the same direction, making the wool or cotton ready for spinning.-1... Combing is a method for preparing fiber for spinning by use of combs. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ...


Cotton was harvested from little stalks. The cotton boll is white, roughly spherical and fluffy. Its seeds had to be removed before carding, a difficult and time-consuming process. (Later, a "cotton gin" was invented which took a lot of the work out of seed removal.) After carding it would be ready for spinning. A cotton gin on display at the Eli Whitney Museum. ...


Linen is made from flax fibre. After growing the flax, workers had to ret it. To prepare flax for weaving, the stalks would be "braked", meaning beaten, with a tool that looks like a paper cutter but instead of having a big knife it has a blunt arm, then a scutching tool (a blunt wooden knife) is used to scrape away pieces of the stalk, and then the fibre is pulled through a heckling comb to get it ready for spinning. A heckling comb is like a brush with metal bristles that you pull flax stalks through. Retting Retting, n. ... Look up stem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Heckling combs are used to remove the fibrous core and impurities from flax. ...


After they spun the yarn, it would be dyed with berries, bark, flowers, herbs or weeds, often gathered by children.


With the yarn made, they would prepare the loom. The strings on a loom run in two directions. The yarn that is attached to the loom is called the warp, and the woof or weft is woven through it. The woof is wrapped around the shuttle, and woven alternately over and under the warp strings. WaRp. ... WEFT Champaign 90. ... The simplest shuttle is a flat, narrow piece of wood with notches on the ends to hold the weft yarn. ...


A plain weave was what most people liked in Colonial times. Almost everything was plain woven then. Sometimes designs were woven into the fabric but mostly designs were added after weaving. The colonists would usually add designs by using either wood block prints or embroidering.


Weaving in America, 1800-1900

The Jacquard loom attachment was perfected in 1801, and was becoming common in Europe by 1806. It came to the US in the early 1820's, some immigrant weavers bringing jacquard equipment with them, and spread west from New England. At first it was used with traditional human-powered looms. As a practical matter, previous looms were mostly limited to the production of simple geometric patterns. The jacquard allowed individual control of each warp thread, row by row without repeating, so very complex patterns were suddenly feasible. Jacquard woven coverlets (bedspreads) became popular by mid-century, in some cases being custom-woven with the name of the customer embedded in the programmed pattern. Undyed cotton warp was usually combined with dyed wool weft. Jacquard loom on display at Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England The Jacquard Loom is a mechanical loom, invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, that has holes punched in pasteboard, each row of which corresponds to one row of the design. ... Detail of hand-woven overshot coverlet made in the traditional style, dark blue wool and natural cotton, 1970s A woven coverlet or coverlid is a type of bed covering with a woven design in colored wool yarn on a background of natural linen or cotton. ...


Natural dyes were used until just before the Civil War, when artificial dyes started to come into use.


See also

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Inkle weaving is a type of weaving where the shed is created by manually raising or lowering the warp yarns, some of which are held in place by fixed heddles on a loom known as an inkle. ... Jacquard weaving makes possible in almost any loom the programmed raising of each warp thread independently of the others. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... The theme of weaving in mythology is ancient, and its lost mythic lore probably accompanied the early spread of this mysterious art. ... Persian weave is a methode of weave used in jewelry and other art forms. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... A woman weaves a basket in Cameroon. ... Kasuri is a Japanese word for fabric that has been woven with fibers dyed specifically to create patterns and images in the fabric. ... Friendship bracelets are special, usually self-made, bracelets given from one friend to another as a symbol of their friendship. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A Shahsavan kilim with typical geometrical symbols some of them of mythological inspiration such as the crab or scarabeus Kilims are flat tapestry-woven carpets or rugs produced from the Balkans to Iran. ... Irish linen is the brand name given to linen produced in Ireland. ... The word plaid has varying but related meanings in the Goidelic languages and is used to refer to: Plaid (pattern), a cross-hatched dyeing pattern often used for wool clothing and distinctly Gaelic Plaid, Plaid Cymru, the largest political party advocating independence for Wales Plaid (band), an English electronic music...

References

  1. ^ Bartholomew Dean. "Multiple Regimes of Value: Unequal Exchange and the Circulation of Urarina Palm-Fiber Wealth" Museum Anthropology February 1994, Vol. 18, No. 1, pp. 3-20 available online)(paid subscription).
  2. ^ W. English, The Textile Industry (1969), 89-97; W. H. Chaloner, People and Industries (1093), 45-54

External links

The textile arts include feltmaking, quilting, patchwork, sewing, knitting, crochet, needlework and embroidery. ... Quilt block in applique and reverse applique Applique or appliqué (from French, applied) is an ancient needlework technique in which pieces of fabric, embroidery, or other materials are sewn onto a foundation fabric to create designs. ... Detail of a crocheted doily, Sweden Crochet (IPA: krəʊʃeɪ) is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... Fiber or fibre[1] is a class o f materials that are continuous filaments or are in discrete elongated pieces, similar to lengths of thread. ... For the record label, see Knitting Factory. ... For other uses, see Lace (disambiguation). ... Nålebinding (Danish: literally binding with a needle or needle-binding, also naalbinding or naalebinding) is a fabric creation technique predating both knitting and crochet. ... Needlework is another term for the handicraft of decorative sewing and textile arts. ... Example of patchwork Patchwork or pieced work is a form of needlework that involves sewing together pieces of fabric into a larger design. ... Passementerie of applied gold cord and embroidery worn by Henry VIII of England (detail of a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, c. ... Plying, in textile manufacture, is the activity of twisting, intermingling, or otherwise intimately combining two or more fibers or yarns into a combined yarn or fiber. ... Quilter and Quilters redirect here. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Sewn redirects here. ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Z-twist and S-twist yarns Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Textile printing is a general name for all woven fabrics and the art of ornamenting such fabrics by printing on designs or patterns in color is very ancient, probably originating in the East. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Ladies making silk, early 12th century painting by Emperor Huizong of Song (a remake of an 8th century original by artist Zhang Xuan), illustrates silk fabric manufacture in China. ... The history of silk begins, according to Chinese tradition, in the 27th century BC. The Chinese were able to continue making it exclusively for three millennia without ever divulging the secret process whereby it was made. ... Quilting fabric is as old as ancient Egypt if not older and wholecloth quilts were very common trade goods in wealthy circles in Europe and Asia going back as far as the 15th century. ... With the establishment of overseas colonies, the British Empire at the end of the 17th century/beginning of the 18th century had a vast source of raw materials and a vast market for goods. ... Timeline of clothing and textiles technology. ... In knitting, crochet and other textile arts, blocking is a family of techniques for setting the stable dimensions of a finished textile piece by pinning it to the desired size and annealing it with heat and moisture, e. ... Fiber art is a subclassification of fine art defined by the usually exclusive use of fabrics, yarn, other natural fibers, and now synthetic fibers to focus on the properties of the material as well as the hands-on work intensive process as part of the significance of the piece. ... Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... Ainu ceremonial dress on display under glass in the British Museum. ... The manufacture of textiles is one of the oldest of mans technologies. ... The Textile industry (also known in the United Kingdom and Australia as the Rag Trade) is a term used for industries primarily concerned with the design or manufacture of clothing as well as the distribution and use of textiles . ... Wearable Art, also known as Artwear, describes the making of individually designed pieces of usually hand-made clothing as artistic expressions. ... Structure of basketweave fabric Basketweave is a simple type of textile weave. ... Double Weave a type of advanced weave. ... Cross-stitch on even-weave fabric, Hungary, mid-20th century Even-weave fabric or canvas is any woven textile where the warp and weft threads are of the same size. ... Pile fabrics used to be made on traditional hand weaving machines. ... pique Pique refers to a weaving style, as in pique cotton, which is characterized by raised parallel cords or fine ribbing (for example, in the collar of a polo shirt or tennis shirt). ... Plain weave is one of the three basic types of textile weaves. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Textile (disambiguation). ... WaRp. ... WEFT Champaign 90. ... Yarn Spools of thread Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibers, suitable for use in the production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking. ... Detail of hand-woven overshot coverlet made in the traditional style, dark blue wool and natural cotton, 1970s A woven coverlet or coverlid is a type of bed covering with a woven design in colored wool yarn on a background of natural linen or cotton. ... A rigid heddle A heddle is a device used in hand operated looms that separates groups of warp threads for the passage of the weft. ... Ikat weaving from the Island of Sumba, Indonesia Ikat is a style of weaving that uses a tie-dye process on either the warp or weft before the threads are woven to create a pattern or design. ... Inkle weaving is a type of weaving where the shed is created by manually raising or lowering the warp yarns, some of which are held in place by fixed heddles on a loom known as an inkle. ... Jacquard weaving makes possible in almost any loom the programmed raising of each warp thread independently of the others. ... Kasuri is a Japanese word for fabric that has been woven with fibers dyed specifically to create patterns and images in the fabric. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... Navajo Rugs and Blankets, are textiles produced by Navajo people(or Dine) of the Four Corners area of the United States. ... The simplest shuttle is a flat, narrow piece of wood with notches on the ends to hold the weft yarn. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tāniko is a weaving technique used by the Māori. ... This article is about tapestry the textile. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... A Dobby Loom is a type of floor loom that controls the warp threads using a device called a dobby. ... Jacquard loom on display at Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, England The Jacquard Loom is a mechanical loom, invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, that has holes punched in pasteboard, each row of which corresponds to one row of the design. ... Some of the 1200 power looms at the Plevna factory building, completed in 1877 , at the Finlayson & Co cotton mills in Tampere, Finland The power loom was designed in 1784 by Edmund Cartwright and first built in 1785 . ...

 
 

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