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Encyclopedia > Waukegan, Illinois
City of Waukegan
City
Nickname : Wauk-Town
Motto : At The Top Of Illinois
Country United States
State Illinois
County Lake
Area 23.1 sq mi (59.8 km²)
 - land 23.0 sq mi (59.6 km²)
 - water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km²)
Center
 - coordinates 42°22′21″N 87°51′41″W / 42.3725, -87.86139Coordinates: 42°22′21″N 87°51′41″W / 42.3725, -87.86139
 - elevation 669 ft (203.9 m)
Population 87,901 (2000)
Density 3,819.8 /sq mi (1,474.8 /km²)
Founded 1829
 - Incorporated, Town 1849
 - Incorporated, City February 23, 1859
Mayor Richard H. Hyde
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 60085, 60087
Location of Waukegan within Illinois
Location of Illinois in the United States
Website : http://www.waukeganweb.net

Waukegan (IPA: /wɔˈkigən/) is a city in Lake County, Illinois. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 87,901. A 2003 census estimated the city population to be 91,452. It is the ninth-largest city in Illinois by population. List of cities in Illinois, arranged in alphabetical order. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Map_of_USA_IL.svg‎ File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Illinois ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This chart shows concisely the most common way in which the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is applied to represent the English language. ... Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ...

Contents

Geography

Waukegan is located at 42°22′21″N, 87°51′41″W (42.372471, -87.861521).[1] Waukegan is on the shore of Lake Michigan, about 8 miles south of the border with Wisconsin and 40 miles north of downtown Chicago, at an elevation of about 669 feet above sea level. Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 59.8 km² (23.1 mi²). 59.6 km² (23.0 mi²) of it is land and 0.2 km² (0.1 mi²) of it (0.35%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Waukegan is commonly referred to as the midpoint between Chicago and Milwaukee. For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... This article is about Milwaukee in Wisconsin. ...


Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1860 3,433
1870 4,507 31.3%
1880 4,012 -11.0%
1890 4,915 22.5%
1900 9,426 91.8%
1910 16,069 70.5%
1920 19,226 19.6%
1930 33,499 74.2%
1940 34,241 2.2%
1950 46,698 36.4%
1960 61,784 32.3%
1970 65,134 5.4%
1980 67,653 3.9%
1990 69,392 2.6%
2000 87,901 26.7%

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 87,901 people, 27,787 households, and 19,450 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,475.0/km² (3,819.8/mi²). There were 29,243 housing units at an average density of 490.7/km² (1,270.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 50.14% White, 19.21% African American, 0.54% Native American, 3.58% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 22.96% from other races, and 3.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 44.82% of the population. The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 27,787 households out of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.5% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 24.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.09 and the average family size was 3.68. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 12.1% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 16.4% from 45 to 64, and 7.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 103.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 103.2 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $42,335, and the median income for a family was $47,341. Males had a median income of $30,556 versus $25,632 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,368. About 10.7% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.1% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


History

Waukegan, visited by Pere Marquette in 1673, is one of the oldest communities in Illinois. The city started as a French trading post and Potawatomi Indian settlement known as "Little Fort". Records dating back to 1829 tell of a treaty signed by the Potawatomis in which they ceded all of their land in this area to the Federal Government. Pere Marquette or Pére Marquette (French for Father Marquette) refers to the following: Father Jacques Marquette, a French Jesuit missionary and namesake of Marquette University Pere Marquette Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin Pere Marquette River Pere Marquette Railway, originally the Pere Marquette Railroad, now part of CSX Amtraks Pere... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ...


Little Fort became the County Seat of Government in 1841 by virture of its population, replacing Libertyville. Between 1844 and 1846, the town's population grew from 150 to 750 people. In 1849 when the town was incorporated, the population had risen to 2,500. Libertyville is a suburb of Chicago in Lake County, Illinois, United States. ...


Proud of the growth of their community and no longer wanting to be characterized as "little", on March 31, 1849 the residents of Little Fort changed the name of their town to Waukegan, the Potawatomi word for "fort" or "trading post".


Early settlers were initially attracted to Waukegan as a port city and shipped produce and grain from Lake and McHenry County farms to Chicago. The creation of the Illinois Parallel Railroad (now the Union Pacific Railroad) in 1855 stimulated interest in Waukegan as a manufacturing center. The town continued to grow and diversify, and Waukegan was incorporated as a city on February 23, 1859, with an area of 5.62 square miles. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Union Pacific redirects here. ...


Superfund sites

Waukegan Harbor, with OMC (purple), WCP (red), and Johns-Manville (yellow) Superfund sites
Waukegan Harbor, with OMC (purple), WCP (red), and Johns-Manville (yellow) Superfund sites

Waukegan contains three Superfund sites that are on the National Priorities List. Checking the status of a cleanup site Superfund is the common name for the United States environmental law that is officially known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. §§ 9601 to 9675, which was enacted by the United States Congress on December 11... The National Priorities List (NPL) is the list of hazardous waste sites in the United States eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the federal Superfund program. ...


In 1975, PCBs were discovered in Waukegan Harbor sediments. Investigation revealed that during manufacturing activities at Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC), hydraulic fluids containing PCBs had been discharged through floor drains at the OMC plant, directly to Waukegan Harbor and into ditches discharging into Lake Michigan.[3] The OMC plants were subsequently added to the National Priorities List, and was designated as one of 43 Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Cleanup of the site began in 1990, with OMC providing $20-25 million in funding. During the OMC cleanup, additional soil contaminants were found at the location of the former Waukegan Manufactured Gas and Coke company. Soil removal was completed at the Coke site in 2005, and cleanup of that soil will continue for several years. Labelling transformers containing PCBs. ... The Outboard Marine Corporation was a maker of boat motors and maintenance supplies, they also owned several lines of boats such as cris craft. ... The National Priorities List (NPL) is the list of hazardous waste sites in the United States eligible for long-term remedial action financed under the federal Superfund program. ... Great Lakes Areas of Concern are designated geographic areas within the Great Lakes watershed that show severe environmental degradation. ...


The Johns-Manville site is located one mile north of the OMC site. In 1988, asbestos contamination found in groundwater and air prompted listing on the National Priorities List and subsequent cleanup. In 1991, the soil cover of the asbestos was completed. However, additional asbestos contamination was found outside the Johns-Manville property which will require further cleanup. [4] Pieces of asbestos also continue to wash up at Illinois Beach State Park. [5] link titleJohns Manville, a Berkshire Hathaway company (NYSE: BRK.A, BRK.B), is a leading manufacturer and marketer of premium-quality building and specialty products. ... Shoreline along the Northern Unit of Illinois Beach State Park Main beach in the Southern Unit of Illinois Beach State Park Illinois Beach State Park is part of the Illinois state park system and is located along Lake Michigan in northeast Illinois in the city of Zion and the Village...


The Yeoman Creek Landfill is a Superfund site located 1.5 miles west of the Johns-Manville site. The site operated as a landfill from 1959 to 1969. In 1970, it was discovered that the lack of a bottom liner in the landfill had allowed leachate to enter groundwater, contaminating the water with volatile organic compounds and PCBs, and releasing gases that presented an explosion hazard. All major cleanup construction activities were completed in 2005, and monitoring of local water and air continues. [6] Leachate is the liquid produced when water percolates through any permeable material. ... This article describes a highly specialized aspect of its subject in the Terminology and legal definitions section. ...


Revitalization

The city has plans for redevelopment of the lakefront. The lakefront and harbor plan calls for most industrial activity to be removed, except for the Midwest Generation power plant and North Shore wastewater treatment facilities. The existing industry would be replaced by residential and recreational space. The Johns-Manville site is to be converted into a recreational facility containing 16 soccer fields and five baseball diamonds.[7] The city also set up several tax increment financing zones which have been successful in attracting new developers. The first step in the revitalization effort, the opening of the Genesee Theatre, has been completed. Tax Increment Financing, or TIF, is a tool for redevelopment and community improvement projects throughout the United States for more than half a century. ...


Notable people

Waukegan is considered the hometown of comedian Jack Benny (1894-1974), though he was born in Chicago; a Waukegan middle school is named for him, and a statue of him stands in the downtown. Waukegan is the birthplace of writer Ray Bradbury (born 1920), whose great-grandfather was mayor of the city in 1882. The Waukegan of the 1920s appears as "Green Town" in several of Bradbury's fictional works, particularly Dandelion Wine. Ray Bradbury Park, named in the author's honor, includes the bridge over the ravine featured in that novel. [4] A noted science fiction writer of a later generation, Kim Stanley Robinson, was born in Waukegan in 1952. For the documentary about Jerry Seinfeld, see Comedian (film). ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Waukegan Community Unit School District 60 (also known as Waukegan Public Schools or District 60) is located in Waukegan, Illinois and serves Waukegan, Park City, and Beach Park. ... Ray Douglas Bradbury (born August 22, 1920) is an American literary, fantasy, horror, science fiction, and mystery writer best known for The Martian Chronicles, a 1950 book which has been described both as a short story collection and a novel, and his 1953 dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451. ... For other uses, see Dandelion Wine (disambiguation). ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For the late American actress, see Kim Stanley. ...


Other notable people

Gary Bennett (born April 17, 1972 in Waukegan, Illinois) is a back-up catcher for the St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Judging Amy is an American television drama that aired from September 19, 1999 until May 3, 2005 on CBS. The show stars Amy Brenneman of NYPD Blue and Tyne Daly of Cagney & Lacey. ... David Clennon (born May 10, 1943, Waukegan, Illinois) is an American actor perhaps best known for his portrayal of Miles Drentell in the ABC series thirtysomething. ... Thirtysomething (1987 – 1991) was a ground-breaking and award-winning American television drama created by Marshall Herskovitz and Edward Zwick for United Artists Television. ... Neil Richard Flynn (born November 13, 1960) is an American actor who is perhaps best known for his role as Janitor in the sitcom Scrubs. ... For other uses see Scrubs Scrubs is an Emmy and Peabody Award-winning American situation comedy/comedy-drama that premiered on October 2, 2001, on NBC. It was created by Bill Lawrence and is produced by ABC Studios (previously known as Touchstone Television). ... Otto Everett Graham Jr. ... Ward Just (born 1935 in Waukegan, Illinois) is an American writer. ... Jason Kao Hwang (b. ... Shawn Dwayne Marion (born May 7, 1978 in Waukegan, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player currently for the Miami Heat of the NBA. He is widely regarded as one of the most versatile players in the league due to his ability to play many positions. ... The Miami Heat (known as the HEAT [in all capital letters] on official team publications) is a professional basketball team based in Miami, Florida, United States. ... Jerome Bernard Orbach (October 20, 1935 – December 28, 2004) was an American actor best known for his starring role as wisecracking Detective Lennie Briscoe in the Law & Order television series and for his musical theater roles. ... This article is about the original television series. ... Charles Edgar Redman (born December 24, 1943 in Waukegan, Illinois) is a former United States diplomat. ... U.S. State Department website Categories: | ... Greg and Colin Strause Brothers Greg and Colin Strause (known as Brothers Strause) are a directing duo and special effects artists who grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. ... Michael The Burner Turner (born February 13, 1982 in Waukegan, Illinois) is an American football tailback who plays for the San Diego Chargers. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1966–present) Eastern Conference (1966) Western Conference (1967-69) Coastal Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present) NFC West (1970-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Black, Red, Silver and White Mascot Freddie Falcon Personnel Owner Arthur Blank General Manager... Scrap Iron Adam Pearce (born June 24, 1978), is an American professional wrestler. ... For other uses, see Ring of Honor (disambiguation). ... The National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) is the largest governing body for a group of independent professional wrestling promotions and sanctions various NWA championships. ... Brian Van Holt (born July 6, 1969) is an American actor. ... Steve DiGiorgio Steve DiGiorgio (born November 7, 1967, Waukegan, Illinois) is an American musician. ... Marvin Smitty Smith (born June 24, 1961) is an American jazz drummer and composer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Transportation

Waukegan has a port district which operates the city harbor and regional airport.

  • Waukegan Harbor:
    • Marina provides services and facilities for recreational boaters.
    • Industrial port provides access for 90-100 large shipping vessels yearly. Companies with cargo facilities at the port currently include Gold Bond Building Products (capacity for 100,000 tons of gypsum), LaFarge Corp (12 cement silos), and St Mary's Cement Co (2 cement silos).[8] The industrial functions at the port are scheduled to be shut down in the future due to problems dredging the harbor. [9] [10]
  • Waukegan Regional Airport:

The Lake County (IL) McClory recreational trail passes through Waukegan. For other uses, see Gypsum (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cement (disambiguation). ... A general aviation scene at Kemble Airfield, England. ... The United States Customs Service (now known as U.S. Customs and Border Protection or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. ... Alternative meaning: Dalai Lama (song) The Dalai Lama belongs to the Gelug sect of Tibetan Buddhism. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...

  • Provides a non-motor route spanning from Kenosha, WI to the North Shore.

Metra provides service between Waukegan and downtown Chicago via the Union Pacific North Line. Service runs daily from early morning to late evening. A Metra Train in Ogilvie Transportation Center Metra (officially known as the Northeast Illinois Regional Commuter Railroad Corporation) is a regional rail system that serves the city of Chicago, Illinois, United States and surrounding cities, many of them Chicago suburbs. ... The Union Pacific/North (UP-N) is a commuter rail line provided by Metra and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad in Chicago, Illinois and its surrounding suburbs. ...


Pace provides public bus service throughout Waukegan and surrounding areas. Most buses run Monday thru Saturday with limited Sunday/Holiday service on two routes. Pace is the suburban bus division of the Regional Transportation Authority in the Chicago area. ...


Artistic references

  • Waukegan's Amstutz Expressway, locally known as the "highway to nowhere," has been used as a shooting location for such films as Groundhog Day, The Ice Harvest, and Batman Begins.
  • Waukegan is mentioned in the Tom Waits song "Gun Street Girl."
  • The book The Man From Waukegan by J.P. Zabolski is an autobiographical account comparing Waukegan in the '60s with the city in 2003.
  • The poet Frank O'Hara mentioned Waukegan in his poem "Mary Desti’s Ass."
  • The poem, "Wonders of the Visible World," by J.Tarwood seems to be about Waukegan.
  • The character Johnny Blaze from the Marvel comic book Ghost Rider is described as having been born in Waukegan.[5]
  • In an episode of Married... with Children, Al flips off a random point on an Illinois map during his Army reserve training. Jefferson replies, "I think you owe the nice people of Waukegan an apology."
  • In an episode of That '70s Show, Kelso mentions that the new police academy he is going to attend (after he burned down the old building with a misfired flare) is located in Waukegan.
  • In 2005 Ringo Starr and the Roundheads recorded a concert for an episode of Soundstage at Genesee Theatre in Waukegan.

The Amstutz Expressway is a short, limited-access road located in Waukegan. ... Groundhog Day is a 1993 comedy film directed by Harold Ramis, starring Bill Murray and Andie MacDowell. ... Starring John Cusack as Charlie Arglist, Billy Bob Thornton as Vic, Connie Nielsen as Renata, Randy Quaid as Bill Guerrard, Oliver Platt as Pete Van Heuten And Ned Bellamy as Sidney The Ice Harvest Directed By Harold Ramis November 23, 2005 From: Focus Features Category: Film stubs ... For the video game based on the film, see Batman Begins (video game). ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Francis Russell OHara (June 27, 1926 – July 25, 1966) was an American poet who, along with John Ashbery, James Schuyler and Kenneth Koch, was a key member of what was known as the New York School of poetry. ... Johnny Blaze, or John Blaze, is a fictional, supernatural superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several fictional supernatural anti-heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Married… with Children was a long-running American sitcom about a dysfunctional family living in Chicago. ... That 70s Show is an American television sitcom that centered on the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional town of Point Place, Wisconsin, from May 17, 1976 to December 31, 1979. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Soundstage is a live concert series on PBS, originally aired 1974–1985, with a new version beginning in 2004. ...

Notes

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... EPA redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - h2g2 - Waukegan, Illinois, USA (972 words)
Waukegan harbour was also one of the busiest on the Great Lakes, with nearly a thousand ships sailing per year.
Waukegan is also the birthplace of Johnny Blaze, motorcycle stuntman, who went on to become Ghost Rider in the Marvel comic book series of the same name.
Waukegan Regional Airport serves the city; however, both Chicago's O'Hare Airport and Milwaukee's Gen'l Mitchell Field are roughly 30 minutes drive away by car (these are nearly inaccessable by train with several confusing transfers necessary).
Waukegan, Illinois - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (697 words)
Waukegan is commonly referred to as the midpoint between Chicago and Milwaukee, although it is still a part of Chicagoland.
Waukegan is considered the home town of comedian Jack Benny; a middle school is named for him and a statue of him stands in the downtown.
Waukegan is the birthplace of writers Ray Bradbury and Kim Stanley Robinson.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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