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Encyclopedia > Watford
Watford
—  Town and Borough  —
Borough of Watford
Motto: Audentior[1]
Watford within Hertfordshire
Coordinates: 51°39′20″N 0°23′48″W / 51.65556, -0.39667
Country United Kingdom
Constituent area England
Region East of England
County Hertfordshire
Borough Watford
Government
 - Type Borough with Mayor & Cabinet
 - Mayor Dorothy Thornhill (Liberal Democrat)
 - MP Claire Ward (Labour)
Area
 - Borough 55.5 km² (21.43 sq mi)
Elevation 71 m (233 ft)
Population
 - Borough 80,000
 - Density 1,441.4/km² (3,733.1/sq mi)
 - Urban 121,000
 - Ethnicity[2] 83.7% White
8.9% South Asian
3.4% Black
2.4% Mixed Race
1.6% Chinese or other
Time zone GMT (UTC)
 - Summer (DST) Summer Time (British) (UTC+1)
Postcode area WD
Area code(s) 01923
ONS code 26UK
Website: www.watford.gov.uk

Watford (pronunciation ) is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England, situated 19 miles (30 km) northwest of London and within the bounds of the M25 motorway. The borough lies just to the north of Greater London. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links HertfordshireWatford. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... If she can help, she will ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Claire Margaret Ward (born 9 May 1972) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... BST is a three letter acronym that may refer to: // Bangladesh Standard Time, the time zone for Bangladesh British Summer Time, known as British Standard Time between 1968 and 1971 Bibliographic style file (.bst), used with BibTeX Binary search tree, a data structure Biochemical Society Transactions, the transactions journal of... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... The UK postal system runs on a system of alphanumeric codes, or postcodes. ... The WD postcode area, also known as the Watford postcode area, is a group of 11 postal districts around the town of Watford in Hertfordshire, England. ... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ...


The parish of Watford Rural covers an area to the south of the borough of Watford (which is largely urbanised), in the Three Rivers District. The nearby areas of Bushey, Rickmansworth, Chorleywood, Kings Langley, Abbots Langley and South Oxhey, located in Three Rivers and Hertsmere districts, also form part of the Watford postcode area. Watford Rural is a civil parish in the Three Rivers district of, Hertfordshire, England. ... Three Rivers is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... Bushey (population 24,000) is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... , Rickmansworth is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England, 4¼ miles (7km) west of Watford. ... Chorleywood is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom. ... Kings Langley is a village in the borough of Dacorum in the county of Hertfordshire, England on the southern edge of the Chiltern Hills. ... Abbots Langley is a large village in the English county of Hertfordshire. ... South Oxhey is a place in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England. ... Three Rivers is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... Hertsmere is a local government district and borough in Hertfordshire, England. ... The WD postcode area, also known as the Watford postcode area, is a group of 11 postal districts around the town of Watford in Hertfordshire, England. ...


The most recent official estimates put the population of Watford at 79,600 at mid-2006.[3] The borough had 79,726 inhabitants at the time of the 2001 Census.[4] The Watford urban area, which includes much of neighbouring Three Rivers, had a total population of 120,960 in the 2001 census,[5] making it the 47th largest urban area in England. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ...


Watford was created as an urban district under the Local Government Act 1894, and became a municipal borough by grant of a charter in 1922. In the British Isles an urban district was a type of local government district which covered an urbanised area. ... The Local Government Act 1894 (57 & 58 Vict. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ...

Contents

History

Origins

Watford stands on a low hill near the point at which the River Colne was forded by travellers between London and the Midlands. This route, originally a pre-Roman trackway, departed from the ancient Roman Watling Street at Stanmore, heading for the Gade valley and thence up the Bulbourne valley to a low and easily traversed section of the Chiltern Hills near Tring. The modern High Street follows the route of this road.[6][7] The Colne is a river in England. ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Concise Oxford Dictionary gives the definition of trackway as a path formed by the repeated treading of people or animals, and it is with this idea in mind that this article has been written. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... For other uses, see Stanmore (disambiguation). ... The River Gade is a river in England. ... The River Bulbourne runs from Dudswell in Northchurch, through Berkhamsted and Bourne End to where it joins the River Gade at Two Waters in Apsley near Hemel Hempstead. ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment in south east England. ... Map sources for Tring at grid reference SP924117 Tring is a small market town in the Chiltern Hills in Hertfordshire, England with a population of 13,000. ...


The ford was close to the later site of the old gas works, now the car park of the Tesco Extra store.[citation needed] The town probably originated in Saxon times as a string of houses on the northern side of this ford. It was located on the first dry ground above the marshy edges of the River Colne.[citation needed] This article refers to Tesco PLC - the international retailer headquartered in the UK, see also Tesco (Disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ...


It is generally agreed that the town is named after the ford, but the origin of the first part of the name is uncertain. Theories include the Old English words wæt (wet), wadan (wade), watul (wattle, a fence) or wath (hunter), Watling Street, and a hypothetical Saxon landowner called "Wata".[7] Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ...


Early history

Watford is first mentioned in an Anglo-Saxon charter of 1007. It does not get a mention by name in the Domesday Book, but was included in the entry for the then more important settlement of Cashio which stood half a mile away at the crossroads of the St Albans road and Hempstead road near the modern Town Hall.[8] A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... A crossroads (the word rarely appears in singular) is a road junction, where two or more roads meet (there are three or more arms). ...


The settlement's location helped it to grow, since as well as trade along this north-south through route it possessed good communications into the vale of St Albans to the east and into the Chiltern Hills along the valley of the River Chess to the west. In 1100 Henry I granted a charter to Watford to hold a weekly market.[6] , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment in south east England. ... The River Chess is chalk-stream which springs from Chesham, Bucks and lies in the Chess Valley in Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, in south-eastern England. ... Henry I (c. ...

St Mary's Church
St Mary's Church

The parish church of St Mary the Virgin was built in 1230 on the same site as an earlier Saxon church. It was extensively restored in 1871.[9] A parish church is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish, the basic administrative unit of episcopal churches. ...


The great houses of Cassiobury and The Grove were built in the seventeenth centuries and expanded and developed throughout the following centuries. Cassiobury became the family seat of the Earls of Essex, and The Grove the seat of the Earls of Clarendon.[8] A chromolithograph of Cassiobury House, published around 1880. ... Earl of Essex is a title that has been held by several families and individuals, of which the best-known and most closely associated with the title was Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1566 - 1601). ... The title Earl of Clarendon was created in 1776 for the politician and diplomat Thomas Villiers, second son of William Villiers, 2nd Earl of Jersey. ...


The Sparrows Herne turnpike was established in 1762 to improve the route across the Chilterns, with the road maintained from charges levied at toll houses along the way. The location of a toll house can be seen at the bottom of Chalk Hill on the Watford side of Bushey Arches close to the Wickes hardware store; set in an old flint stone wall is a Sparrows Herne Trust plaque.[10] This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Industrial Revolution

Watford remained an agricultural community with some cottage industry for many centuries. The Industrial Revolution brought the Grand Junction Canal (now Grand Union Canal) in 1798 and the London and Birmingham Railway in 1837, both located here for the same reasons the road had followed centuries before, seeking an easy gradient over the Chiltern Hills. The land-owning interests permitted the canal to follow closely by the river Gade, but the prospect of smoke-emitting steam trains drove them to ensure the railway gave a wide berth to the Cassiobury and Grove estates. Consequently, although the road and canal follow the easier valley route, the railway company was forced to build an expensive tunnel under Leavesden to the north of the town. The main Watford railway station was and remains outside of the town centre to the east at Watford Junction.[11] A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... The Grand Junction Canal was a canal in England from Braunston in Northamptonshire to the River Thames at Brentford, with a number of branches. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ... The London and Birmingham Railway (L&BR) was an early railway company in the United Kingdom from 1833 until 1846, at which date it became a constituent part of the London and North Western Railway. ... The Chiltern Hills are a chalk escarpment in south east England. ... Great Western Railway No. ...


These developments gave the town excellent communications and stimulated its industrial growth during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


Economy

Entrance to the Harlequin Centre
Entrance to the Harlequin Centre

Watford is a major regional centre for the northern home counties. It is the most westerly of these commercial centres and the only one in Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire County Council designates Watford and Stevenage to be its major sub-regional centres, heading its list of preferred sites for retail development.[12] The primary shopping area is the Harlequin Shopping Centre, a large purpose-built indoor mall with over 140 shops, restaurants and cafes built during the 1990s, opened officially in June 1992. The phrase Home Counties is used to designate the group of English counties which border or surround London. ... For other uses see Stevenage (disambiguation) Stevenage is a town and district in Hertfordshire, England. ... The Harlequin Centre in Watford is the biggest shopping centre in Hertfordshire, England. ...


The High Street, running through the town centre, is the main focus of activity at night having a high concentration of the town's bars, clubs and restaurants.


The head offices of a number of national companies such as Camelot Group, operator of the National Lottery; Iveco, manufacturers of commercial vehicles; and Haden Young, the building services division of Balfour Beatty are located in the town. The borough is also the UK base of many multi-nationals including Total Oil, Sanyo, TK Maxx, Costco, and Beko. Camelot Group plc is a private company which runs the UKs National Lottery, or Lotto. ... Iveco is a European truck, bus, and diesel engine manufacturer, based in Turin, Italy. ... Haden Young Limited is one of the UKs largest mechanical and electrical (M&E) services contractors with an annual turnover of around £200 million and is operated as a division of Balfour Beatty. ... Balfour Beatty plc (LSE: BBY) is a British based construction and civil engineering company based in central London. ... Total S.A. (Euronext: FP, NYSE: TOT) is a French oil company headquartered in Paris, France. ... Sanyo Electric Co. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ... In 1950s when Turkey had just started to industrialize, Vehbi Koç, the founder of Koç Holding, was in the search of a product to help Turkey gain foreign currency. ...


The town was home to the Scammell Lorries Factory from 1922 until its closure in 1988. The site is now a residential area. TBO 312 Scammell Scarab - Steam Museum, Swindon. ...


Transport

Road

Watford is close to strategic roads - the M25 motorway that rings London and the M1 motorway that connects London to the Midlands and northern England. The M25 motorway looking south between junctions 14 and 15, near Heathrow Airport. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Rail

The town is served by one of the principal north-south rail routes – the West Coast Main Line – which connects London (terminus at Euston) to the Midlands, north-west England and Scotland. Some long-distance trains on this route serve Watford Junction, where there are also frequent suburban and regional trains. There is a shuttle train service to St Albans, via some local stations in North Watford, and there is a suburban loop to Watford High Street station between Watford Junction and Bushey station. There is a direct rail connection to Gatwick Airport and the south coast via Clapham Junction. The WCML running alongside the M1 motorway at Watford Gap in Northamptonshire A Virgin Pendolino and freight train on the WCML The West Coast Main Line (WCML) is one of the most important intercity railway lines in the United Kingdom, part of the British railway system. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Euston station, also known as London Euston, is a major railway station to the north of central London in the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about the country. ... Watford Junction station is a railway station in Watford, Hertfordshire,United Kingdom. ... The St Albans Abbey Branch Line is a railway line from Watford Junction to St Albans Abbey railway station. ... , St Albans is the main urban area of the City and District of St Albans in southern Hertfordshire, England, around 22 miles (35 km) north of central London. ... , North Watford is an area in Watford, Hertfordshire. ... The Watford High Street station was a London Underground station in operation from April 16, 1917 to September 24, 1982. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... London Waterloo Vauxhall London Victoria Grosvenor Bridge Chatham Main Line Queenstown Road (Battersea) Chatham Main Line Battersea Park West London Line Clapham Junction To Wandsworth Town South Western Main Line and Brighton Main Line Clapham Junction railway station is in Battersea in the London Borough of Wandsworth. ...


London Underground serves Watford Metropolitan Line station at the outer north-western boundary of the system. The Metropolitan Line branch is due to be diverted to Watford Junction via the disused Croxley Green branch.[13] The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... Watford is a station at the end of the Watford branch of London Undergrounds Metropolitan Line in the north-western part of the network in Zone A. // The station is in Cassiobury Park Avenue, at the junction with Metropolitan Station Approach, in the Cassiobury area of Watford. ... London Transport Portal The Metropolitan Line is part of the London Underground, coloured maroon on the Tube map. ... , Croxley Green is a village of approximately 5,000 dwellings and 12,000 residents located between Watford (to the north-east) and Rickmansworth (to the south-west) in Hertfordshire, England. ...


Water

Watford is on the main Grand Union Canal route northwards from London. There is little commercial use, since the advent of the railway, but the canal is used for recreational purposes. The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ...


The River Gade and the River Colne also run through Watford. The River Gade is a river in England. ... The Colne is a river in England. ...


Air

Regular and frequent bus and coach services connect Watford Junction station to Heathrow Airport and Luton Airport, direct train services run from Watford Junction Station to Gatwick and Birmingham International Airport. Heathrow redirects here. ... London Luton Airport (IATA Airport Code LTN, ICAO Airport Code EGGW, previously called Luton International Airport) is an airport about 30 miles to the north-west of London in the town of Luton, Beds. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... There are two cities named Birmingham with international airports: See either Birmingham International Airport (UK) Birmingham International Airport (US) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Watford's closest airfield is Elstree Aerodrome, three miles (5 km) east of the town. Many private charters, as well as occasional holiday charters take off from here, with the on-request customs service contributing to the popularity of this airfield. Elstree Airfield (IATA: ETR, ICAO: EGTR) is located 2. ...


The Rolls Royce or De Havilland factory as it was known in World War II at Leavesden was responsible for the manufacture of the Mosquito fighter bomber and the Halifax bomber during the second world war and later became Leavesden Aerodrome, to the north of Watford, which is no longer operational. It was converted into Leavesden Film Studios, now famously the home of the Harry Potter films. For other uses, see De Havilland (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The de Havilland Mosquito[1] was a British combat aircraft that excelled in a number of roles during the Second World War. ... Halifax W1057 ZA-X of No. ... Leavesden Film Studios is a film and media complex constructed on the site of the former Rolls Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodrome, which was an important centre of aircraft production during World War II. It is situated approximately 20 miles northwest of central London near the town of Watford. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


Education

History

Watford Free School building
Watford Free School building
See also: Watford Grammar School for Boys#History of the Watford Grammar Schools

William Saunders noted in 1595 a "George Redhead, schoolmaster" of Watford, and in 1640 Francis Coombe gave £10 a year to a Free School in Watford for teaching the poor to cast accounts, to read English and to write.[6] It was recorded then that, "The master hath the use of a room over two houses belonging to the Church Estate, nearest the churchyard." In 1704, Mrs Elizabeth Fuller of Watford Place built a new Free School for forty boys and twenty girls on her land next to the churchyard, with rooms for a Master and a Mistress.[11] Watford Grammar School for Boys is based in Watford in Hertfordshire, UK. A Free School was founded as a charity school by Francis Coombe in 1640 and re-founded as a school for boys and girls by Elizabeth Fuller in 1704. ... Elizabeth Fuller (born 1644, died 1709), re-founded a Free School for boys and girls at Watford. ...


In the mid-19th century, the only schools in Watford were Mrs Fuller's Free School, by now in a poor state, and St Mary's National Schools (separate schools for boys and girls) in Church Street. All offered elementary education. State-funded elementary schools began to appear in the 1860s and 1870s. The Free School closed in 1882, and its endowment contributed to founding the Watford Endowed Schools, which provided secondary education and charged fees.[14] After these schools, now called the Watford Grammar School for Boys and the Watford Grammar School for Girls, moved to new sites in 1907 and 1912, the building housed the Watford Central School, which taught pupils up to the age of 14. St Mary's National Schools closed in 1922, and the site is now a car park.[15][16] A national school is a particular type of primary school in Ireland that is not directly financed or administered by the State. ... Watford Grammar School for Boys is based in Watford in Hertfordshire, UK. A Free School was founded as a charity school by Francis Coombe in 1640 and re-founded as a school for boys and girls by Elizabeth Fuller in 1704. ... In the English education system, Central Schools were selective secondary education schools between the more prestigious grammar schools and the secondary schools. ...


Primary schools

Main article: Primary schools in Watford

All the state-funded primary schools in Watford are co-educational. Under an earlier system, schools were divided into infant schools, covering Reception and Years 1 and 2, and junior schools, covering Years 3 to 6. Most such schools have amalgamated to form Junior Mixed Infant schools or (equivalently) primary schools, and all new schools are of this type. Within the municipal borough, there are now 6 linked pairs of infant schools and junior schools, and 14 JMI or primary schools, of which 2 are Roman Catholic. The Watford urban area is also served by schools in the neighbouring districts of Three Rivers and Hertsmere. Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... A Junior School is most commonly a school for pupils aged 7-11 in the United Kingdom. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Three Rivers is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... Hertsmere is a local government district and borough in Hertfordshire, England. ...


Secondary schools

Although all state-funded secondary schools in Hertfordshire are comprehensive, there is a great deal of differentiation in the southwestern corner of the county, centred on Watford but also including most of the Three Rivers district and Bushey in Hertsmere district. Within this area, there are:[17] For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... A comprehensive school is a secondary school that does not select children on the basis of academic attainment or aptitude. ... Three Rivers is a local government district in Hertfordshire, England. ... Bushey (population 24,000) is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... Hertsmere is a local government district and borough in Hertfordshire, England. ...

  • partially selective schools, which offer a proportion of places according to ability or aptitude, and the rest to siblings or those living near the school: Parmiter's School, Queens' School, Rickmansworth School, St Clement Danes School, Watford Grammar School for Boys and Watford Grammar School for Girls.
  • Bushey Meads School, which selects 10% for technological aptitude and uses banded admissions to ensure a comprehensive intake for the remainder.
  • non-selective Roman Catholic schools, whose intake is evenly spread: St Joan of Arc Catholic School and St Michael's Catholic High School.[18]
  • other non-selective schools, whose intake is markedly affected by the above partially selective schools: Bushey Hall School, Francis Combe School and Westfield Community Technology College.[19]

The partially selective schools and Bushey Meads School operate common admissions tests in mathematics and non-verbal reasoning each autumn. In addition to those seeking selective places, all applicants to Bushey Meads and Queens' Schools are required to take the tests, so they are taken by the majority of Year 6 children in the area. The partially selective schools also operate a common test and audition procedure to select children for specialist music places.[17] Parmiters School is a co-educational mixed ability school in Garston near Watford, Hertfordshire, England with a long and interesting history. ... Queens School, in Watford, is state funded secondary school currently designated a Specialist Sports College taking students aged 11 (Year 7) through to 18 (Year 13). ... Rickmansworth School (colloquially Ricky School), formerly Rickmansworth Grammar School, is a coeducational secondary school of around 1,200 pupils, situated in Croxley Green (Hertfordshire), near Rickmansworth. ... Watford Grammar School for Boys is based in Watford in Hertfordshire, UK. A Free School was founded as a charity school by Francis Coombe in 1640 and re-founded as a school for boys and girls by Elizabeth Fuller in 1704. ... Bushey Meads School (also commonly known as BMS by staff and students) is a secondary school in Bushey, Hertfordshire, UK. The current Head Teacher is Mr Kieth Douglas (BA(hons) MA), who started as a new member of staff in the school in December 2005. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Saint Joan of Arc Roman Catholic School is a larger than average, mixed, voluntary-aided, comprehensive school taking students aged 11 Year 7 through to 18 Year 13. ...


Results achieved by the schools at GCSE are also widely spread, including the three highest and the two lowest scoring state schools within Hertfordshire.[20] The area also has by far the highest incidence in the county of children allocated to schools to which they had not applied.[21] GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ...


Sport

Watford v Coventry at Vicarage Road in May 2000
Watford v Coventry at Vicarage Road in May 2000

Watford is home to professional football team Watford F.C., who reached the FA Cup Final in 1984 (as well as three other semi-finals), also finishing as league runners-up in 1983. They were relegated from the old Division One in 1988. In 1996, Watford were relegated from the new Division One (now Football League Championship). It has been suggested that Harry the Hornet be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... For information on FA Cup Final Referees, see FA Cup Final Referees. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ...


Watford won the then Nationwide Division Two championship in 1998, then the following season (1998–99) reached the Premiership by winning the First Division Play-Off Final, beating Bolton Wanderers F.C. at Wembley Stadium by two goals to nil. Unfortunately, the club were relegated the season after. From 1892 until 1992, the Football League Second Division was the second highest division overall in English football. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see list of professional sports leagues. ... The Football League Championship Playoffs are a series of playoff matches contested by the teams finishing from 3rd to 6th in the Coca Cola Football League Championship table. ... Bolton Wanderers Football Club is an English professional football club based in Horwich, in the Borough of Bolton, England. ... For the new stadium, see Wembley Stadium. ...


After five years of uncertainty, Watford won the Football League Championship Play-Off Final against all the odds to achieve promotion to the Premiership once again in 2006, this time beating Leeds United A.F.C. by three goals to nil. Again, as before they were relegated to the Football League Championship after a single season (2006–2007) in the Premiership. The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see list of professional sports leagues. ... Leeds United Association Football Club are an English professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The 2006-07 FA Premier League season, the fifteenth since its establishment, started on August 19, 2006. ...


Singer-songwriter Sir Elton John is a keen, long-term supporter of Watford F.C. and a former club chairman. He still maintains his links with Watford as Honorary Life President.[22] The current Chairman is Graham Simpson and the Chief Executive is Mark Ashton. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ...


Since 1997 the club has shared its ground, Vicarage Road, with Saracens Rugby Football Club. Vicarage Road, a stadium in Watford, Hertfordshire, England, is the home of the football club Watford F.C. and their tenants, the Saracens rugby union club. ... Official website www. ...


Places of interest

Cassiobury Park

Daffodils in Cassiobury Park
Daffodils in Cassiobury Park

Cassiobury Park is on the grounds of Cassiobury House and consists of 190 acres (0.77 km²) of open space. The house itself was demolished in 1927 and the original imposing gatehouse entrance to the park in the 1970s due to road widening. In July 2007, the park won a Green Flag Award, which recognises the best green spaces in the country.[23] It has a children's play area which includes a paddling pool, play equipment, mini train track for children's rides, bouncy castle, ice cream van and a kiosk where you can buy food and drinks. The Grand Union Canal passes through the park. A chromolithograph of Cassiobury House, published around 1880. ... The canal at Braunston The Grand Union Canal is a canal in England and part of the British canal system. ...


Watford Colosseum

The Watford Colosseum was used to record the Lord of the Rings soundtracks and is world renowned for its acoustic qualities, which are often said to be the best available in the UK. It is now in administration after funding difficulties, but is still open to bookings whilst the local council decides its fate.[24] Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ...


Watford Palace Theatre

Palace Theatre
Palace Theatre

The Watford Palace Theatre is the only producing theatre in Hertfordshire. It presents a selection of comedy, drama, world premieres, family-friendly shows and an annual traditional pantomime. Situated just off the High Street, the Edwardian theatre building is approaching its centenary and has recently been refurbished. For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ...


The Pumphouse Theatre and Arts Centre

The Pump House Theatre and Arts Centre is based in an old pumping station situated in Watford's lower high street. The building was converted for use as a theatre, with rehearsal rooms, and meeting place for local arts based groups. Current facilities include a 124 seat theatre, rehearsal rooms, and live music venue. Community groups currently meeting at the Pump House include Dance House (children's ballet), Pump House Clog Morris (women's Morris dancing), Pump House Jazz (jazz club), Open House (live open mic music), Woodside Morris Men (men's Morris dancing) and youth and adult theatre groups.[25] Woodside Morris Men are a UK Morris Dance side based in Watford, Hertfordshire. ...


"North of Watford"

The phrase "North of Watford" is used light-heartedly to describe areas of the United Kingdom that are north of London. This is possibly because Watford was one of the first places that horses were changed on the route to the north-west from London[citation needed]. Alternatively, the phrase may refer to the Northamptonshire village of Watford, about 50 miles (80 km) further north, which was traditionally an important waypoint on the old east-west and north-south coaching routes. This was the point where the main north-south road, rail and canal routes came together at a gap in the hills known as Watford Gap. Watford in Hertfordshire is much better known and so frequently mistaken, in the context of this phrase, for the same place. Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Watford is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. ... Watford Gap and the small village of Watford in Northamptonshire, is the traditional crossing point on the old east-west coaching route across England. ...


Suburbs

Including areas outside Watford Borough:

Aldenham is a village in Hertfordshire, England. ... Bushey (population 24,000) is a town in the Hertsmere borough of Hertfordshire in the South East of England. ... , Garston is a village in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, more or less contiguous with Watford and now, despite retaining a fiercely strong local identity, is effectively, a suburb. ... , Rickmansworth is a town in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England, 4¼ miles (7km) west of Watford. ... Statistics Population: 2000 (apx) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TQ034929 Administration District: Three Rivers Shire county: Hertfordshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Hertfordshire Historic county: Hertfordshire Services Police force: Hertfordshire Constabulary Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone... Kings Langley is a village in the borough of Dacorum in the county of Hertfordshire, England on the southern edge of the Chiltern Hills. ... Abbots Langley is a large village in the English county of Hertfordshire. ... , Radlett is a small town located north of London in the county of Hertfordshire between St Albans and Elstree on Watling Street with a population of approximately 8,000. ... Oxhey is a suburb of the borough of Watford in the county of Hertfordshire, England. ... South Oxhey is a place in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire, England. ... , Croxley Green is a village of approximately 5,000 dwellings and 12,000 residents located between Watford (to the north-east) and Rickmansworth (to the south-west) in Hertfordshire, England. ...

Twin towns

Watford has five twin towns:[26] Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Société Générale twin towers, located in Nanterre in the district of La Défense. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Pesaro is a town and comune in the Italian region of the Marche, capital of the Pesaro e Urbino province, on the Adriatic. ...

Notable people

Watford was the birthplace of:


Watford is the burial place of: Barbara Joan Estelle Amiel, Lady Black of Crossharbour (born in Watford, Hertfordshire, England on December 4, 1940), is a British-Canadian journalist and writer. ... Stephen Andrew is a Canadian journalist, best known for his work as a television news reporter and anchor. ... Michael Bentine (January 26, 1922 - November 26, 1996) was a comedian, comic actor, and member of the Goons. ... The Goons are a small internet community. ... Michaela Breeze (born 17 May 1979) is a Welsh weightlifter. ... Ray Cooper Ray Cooper (born August 19, 1942 in Watford, Hertfordshire) is an English musician. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Anthony Berkeley Cox (July 5, 1893 - 1971) was a British crime fiction author, born in Watford, England. ... Christopher J. Date is an independent author, lecturer, researcher, and consultant, specializing in relational database technology. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... Cyril Fletcher (June 25, 1913 – January 2, 2005) was an English comedian. ... Terry Flynn (born 10th April,1943 in Watford) was a leading British Neo-Nazi and former leader of the November 9th Society. ... Nicola Rachele-Beth Grahame[1] (born April 28, 1982)[1] from Watford, Hertfordshire[2] rose to fame in the UK when she was chosen to be a housemate on Big Brother 7 in 2006. ... Robert Glenister (born March 11, 1960 in London, England) is a British actor, the son of director John Glenister and the brother of actor Philip Glenister. ... Geraldine Estelle Geri Halliwell (born 6 August 1972) is a British pop singer-songwriter, childrens author, actress and Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Population Fund. ... The Spice Girls are a BRIT Award-winning English pop group formed in 1994. ... Kenny Jackett (born 5 January 1962 in Watford) is a former Welsh football player who is now a manager. ... Swansea City AFC (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Dinas Abertawe) is a Welsh football team currently playing in the Football League League One. ... Vincent Peter Jones (born 5 January 1965) is an English-born ex-footballer (and former captain of the Wales national football team). ... Super Hans of Peep Show played here by Matt King. ... A peep show or peepshow is an exhibition of pictures or objects viewed through a small hole or magnifying glass. ... Nicholas Verity Knight (born Watford, Hertfordshire, England on 28 November 1969) is an English cricketer, a left-handed opening batsman. ... Nicholas Leeson (English, born February 25, 1967) is a former derivatives trader whose unsupervised speculative trading caused the collapse of Barings Bank, the United Kingdoms oldest investment bank. ... Barings Bank (1762 to 1995) was the oldest merchant banking company in London, England [1] until its collapse in 1995 after one of the banks employees, Nick Leeson, lost $1. ... The Simpsons character, see Reverend Timothy Lovejoy Timothy Paul Lovejoy (born 28 March 1968), is a British television presenter, famous for his Saturday morning football programme on Sky Sports - Soccer AM - alongside co-host Helen Chamberlain. ... Sky Sports is the brand name for a group of 9 channels. ... Soccer AM is a British Saturday-morning football show presented by Helen Chamberlain and Andy Goldstein. ... Gerald Moore (July 30, 1899 – March 13, 1987) was an English pianist best known for accompanying many famous singers in the performance and recording of lieder. ... Marjorie Mo Mowlam (18 September 1949 – 19 August 2005) was a British politician, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Labour Member of Parliament. ... Mark Oaten Mark Oaten (born 8 March 1964, Watford) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom, and Member of Parliament for the Winchester constituency. ... Stuart Parkin FRS is a British experimental physicist at IBMs Almaden Research Center. ... The Rev. ... Paul Robinson (born December 14, 1978 in Watford) is an English football player. ... West Bromwich Albion Football Club (also known as West Brom, The Baggies, Albion, The Albion, The Throstles or W.B.A.) are an English professional football club based in West Bromwich, West Midlands. ... Terry Scott Terry Scott (May 4, 1927 - July 26, 1994) was an actor and comedian who appeared in seven Carry On films. ... The Carry On films were a long-running series of British low-budget comedy films, directed by Gerald Thomas and produced by Peter Rogers. ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... Grant Shapps (born September 14, 1968, Hertfordshire) is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Welwyn Hatfield in the United Kingdom, winning the seat in the 2005 election on 5 May 2005. ... Welwyn Hatfield is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Kelly Smith (born 29 October 1978 in Watford) is an English football player who currently plays in England for Arsenal Ladies. ... First International Scotland 2-3 England (Greenock, Scotland; November 19, 1972) Largest win Hungary 0-13 England (Tapolca, Hungary; October 27, 2005) Worst defeat Norway 8-0 England (Moss, Norway; June 4, 2000) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1995) Best result Quarter-finals, 1995 Olympic Games Appearances None; not... Arsenal Ladies Football Club are an English womens football club affiliated with Arsenal FC. Founded in 1987, they are the most successful club in English womens football; the team have won the FA Womens Premier League nine times, the FA Womens Cup eight times, and the... Bradley Walsh (born 4 June 1960) is an English comedian and latterly television actor. ... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Melanie Walsh Watford born Melanie started her career in Modelling after winning a local modelling competition in Watford; Her first ever shoot was for, the Sun as a page 3 model in 2000. ...

Thomas Webster Rammell was born in Dent de Lyon on the Isle of Thanet, Kent, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Crystal Palace. ...

References

  1. ^ Virgil. Aeneid, VI, 95. “Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito. trans.: Yield thou not to adversity, but press on the more bravely.” 
  2. ^ Area: Watford, Resident Population Estimates by Ethnic Group, Office for National Statistics.
  3. ^ Mid Year Population Estimates Hertfordshire 2006, Office for National Statistics, August 2007, revised October 2007.
  4. ^ 2001 Census, Key Statistics for Local Authorities, Office for National Statistics, 2003.
  5. ^ Census 2001, Key Statistics for urban areas, Office for National Statistics.
  6. ^ a b c Samuel Lewis (ed.) (1848). "Watford (St. Mary)", A Topographical Dictionary of England, 7th edition, p486. Retrieved on 2008-03-22. 
  7. ^ a b W.R. Saunders (1931). History of Watford. Watford: Peacock. 
  8. ^ a b William Page (ed.) (1908). "Watford: Manors", A History of the County of Hertford: volume 2, Victoria County History, pp451-464. Retrieved on 2008-05-19. 
  9. ^ William Page (ed.) (1908). "Watford: Churches and Charities", A History of the County of Hertford: volume 2, Victoria County History, pp464-469. Retrieved on 2008-05-19. 
  10. ^ Sparrow Herne Trust Turnpike Marker, Lower High Street, Watford, Images of England, English Heritage National Monuments Record.
  11. ^ a b William Page (ed.) (1908). "Watford: Introduction", A History of the County of Hertford: volume 2, Victoria County History, pp446-451. Retrieved on 2008-03-22. 
  12. ^ Hertfordshire: an Economic Overview. Hertfordshire County Council (November 2004). Retrieved on 2008-05-19.
  13. ^ Croxley Rail Link. Transport for London. Retrieved on 2008-05-19.
  14. ^ W.R. Carter (1894). "Mrs. Fuller's Free School". Watford Endowed Schools Journal 3. 
  15. ^ R.E. Slinn (1957). A History of Elementary Education in Watford 1704-1903. University of London Institute of Education. 
  16. ^ J.B. and L.V. Nunn (2003). The Book of Watford: A portrait of our town, 2nd edition. 
  17. ^ a b Moving On – Applying for a Secondary or Upper School place, Hertfordshire County Council, 2007.
  18. ^ Ofsted reports for these schools describe their intake.
  19. ^ Ofsted reports for these schools discuss the affect on their intake.
  20. ^ Hertfordshire: GCSE (and equivalent) results, Secondary School achievement and attainment tables 2007, Department for Children, Schools and Families.
  21. ^ Admissions Update 2007, Agenda Item No. 4, Hertfordshire County Council Admissions Forum, 14 June 2007.
  22. ^ They Shaped the Club", Watford F.C. History, 3 February 2008.
  23. ^ Cassiobury Park, Green Flag Awards.
  24. ^ Watford Colosseum, Watford Borough Council.
  25. ^ The Pump House Theatre & Arts Centre
  26. ^ Twinning, Watford Borough Council, accessed October 12, 2007.
  27. ^ Oral history interview with C.J. Date by Thomas Haigh on the Computer History Museum website
  28. ^ Roll of Honour, The Heritage Foundation.
  29. ^ "Great Scott!", Chortle, 2003-05-09. 

For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Victoria History of the Counties of England, commonly known as the Victoria County History or the VCH, is an English history project begun in 1899 in honour of Queen Victoria with the aim of creating an encyclopaedic history of each of the traditional counties of England. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Victoria History of the Counties of England, commonly known as the Victoria County History or the VCH, is an English history project begun in 1899 in honour of Queen Victoria with the aim of creating an encyclopaedic history of each of the traditional counties of England. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... The Victoria History of the Counties of England, commonly known as the Victoria County History or the VCH, is an English history project begun in 1899 in honour of Queen Victoria with the aim of creating an encyclopaedic history of each of the traditional counties of England. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED) is a non-ministerial United Kingdom government department, established on 1st September 1992. ... The Office for Standards in Education (OFSTED) is a non-ministerial United Kingdom government department, established on 1st September 1992. ... The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) is a British government department created on 28 June 2007 on the disbanding of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 51°39′20″N 0°23′48″W / 51.65556, -0.39667 The University of Portsmouth is the only university in the city of Portsmouth, Hampshire. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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