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Encyclopedia > Watership Down
Watership Down

First edition cover
Author Richard Adams
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Fantasy novel
Publisher Rex Collings
Publication date November 1972
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages 413 pp (first edition, hardback)
ISBN ISBN 0-901720-31-3 (first edition, hardback)
Followed by Tales from Watership Down

Watership Down is the title of Richard Adams's first and most successful novel. The novel is about a group of rabbits and is named after Watership Down, a hill in the north of Hampshire, England. The story is a heroic fantasy with rabbits of human intelligence but in their natural environment. They are depicted as having a culture, including a language (Lapine), proverbs, poetry and mythology. Several chapters present pieces of rabbit lore and many editions also include an appendix of Lapine vocabulary. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Richard_Adams_WatershipDown. ... For other persons named Richard Adams, see Richard Adams (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... ISBN redirects here. ... Tales from Watership Down was a follow-up to Richard Adams highly successful novel about rabbits, Watership Down, and was first published in the United Kingdom in 1996. ... Watership Down can refer to: Watership Down, Richard Adamss first and most successful novel Watership Down, Hampshire, the hill Watership Down (film), the 1978 animated film based on the novel Watership Down (TV series), the television series based on the novel Category: ... For other persons named Richard Adams, see Richard Adams (disambiguation). ... This article is about the literary concept. ... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... Categories: UK geography stubs ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Heroic fantasy is a sub-genre of fantasy literature which chronicles the tales of heros and their conquests in imaginary lands. ... Lapine is an artificial language constructed by Richard Adams and spoken by the fictional rabbits of his novel Watership Down. ... Look up proverb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the art form. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ...


It was published in the United Kingdom by Rex Collings Ltd in 1972 and it has never since been out of print.[1] In his struggle to get it into print, Adams had seen it rejected by 13 other publishers. Watership Down is near the area where Adams grew up. The story is based on a collection of tales that Adams told to his young children on trips to the countryside. Adams's description of wild rabbit behaviour was much influenced by The Private Life of the Rabbit by British naturalist Ronald Lockley, although Adams had already written the essentials of the story when he discovered Lockley's work.[citation needed] Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ronald Mathias Lockley (November 8, 1903) - April 12, 2000 (aged 96)) was a Welsh naturalist and author who spent much of his later life in New Zealand. ...


Watership Down has been made into an acclaimed classic film and a television series, and is Penguin Books' best selling novel of all time.[2] Watership Down is an animated film directed by Martin Rosen and based on the book Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... Watership Down is an animated adaptation for television of the novel of the same name by Richard Adams, co-produced by Alltime Entertainment of the United Kingdom and Decode Entertainment of Canada. ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

Plot introduction

Watership Down tells the story of a group of rabbits who — against the wishes of their Chief Rabbit — escape from their threatened warren. The story follows their subsequent adventures. They find sanctuary in a warren on the down (for which the book is named), but the story continues after this. For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... A domestic warren is an artificial, enclosed establishment of animal husbandry dedicated to the raising of rabbits for meat and fur. ... A downland is an area of open chalk upland. ...


Plot summary

The real Watership Down, near the Hampshire village of Kingsclere, in 1975.

In the Sandleford warren, Fiver, a young runt rabbit who is a seer, receives a frightening vision of his warren's imminent destruction. When he and his brother, Hazel, fail to convince their chief of the need to evacuate, they set out on their own with a small band of others who heeded the warning, and barely manage to elude the Owsla, the warren's military caste. What follows is a perilous journey in which the band faces dangers of all varieties from all directions. While they eventually find a peaceful new home at Watership Down, they have new problems that will lead to a deadly conflict with the neighbouring warren called Efrafa, a police state led by the despotic General Woundwort.
Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Clairvoyance, from 17th century French Clair meaning clear and voyant meaning seeing, is a term used to describe the transference of information about an object, location or physical event through means other than the 5 traditional senses (See Psi). ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... A police state is a political condition where the government maintains strict control over society, particularly through suspension of civil rights and often with the use of a force of secret police. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Characters in Watership Down

Most of the rabbits in the book have a distinct personality. The names presented here are the forms that most commonly appear in the book. These are mostly nicknames: where they have an original "Lapine" name, it is given in parentheses along with its meaning in that language. Woundwort, Vervain, and Ragwort are named after English plants found in Watership Down where the story is set, as are many other names. Species About 300 species, including: Stachys affinis Stachys alopecuros Stachys alpina Stachys annua Stachys bullata Stachys byzantina Stachys candida Stachys chrysantha Stachys ciliata Stachys citrina Stachys coccinea Stachys corsica Stachys cretica Stachys discolor Stachys ehrenbergii Stachys germanica Stachys hyssopifolia Stachys iva Stachys lavandulifolia Stachys libanotica Stachys macrantha Stachys macrostachya Stachys... Species About 250 species, including: Verbena alata Verbena bonariensis Verbena bracteata Verbena brasiliensis Verbena canadensis Verbena carolina Verbena corymbosa Verbena elegans Verbena gracilis Verbena hastata Verbena hispida Verbena incisa Verbena laciniata Verbena lasiostachys Verbena macdougallii Verbena menthifolia Verbena officinalis Verbena peruviana Verbena phlogiflora Verbena rigida Verbena robusta Verbena runyonii Verbena... Binomial name Senecio jacobaea L. Ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) is a very common wild flower in the family Asteraceae that is found throughout Europe, usually in dry, open places, and has also been widely distributed as a weed elsewhere. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Hazel's rabbits

The original group that leaves the Sandleford warren, all bucks, consists of the following. Buck may refer to any of the following: Look up Buck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

  • Hazel, the leader, eventually Hazel-rah, the Chief Rabbit. Quiet, but has a talent for bringing out the best in his followers. Unlike most chief rabbits, Hazel is not particularly large or strong but rather wins the other rabbits' devotion by making quick, intelligent decisions. Sometimes the leadership can get to his head, but, conversely, the idea of leading intimidates him.
  • Fiver (Hrairoo, "Little Thousand"; hrair is any uncountable large number, and since rabbits can only count to four, the fifth kitten in a litter is the thousandth), Hazel's little brother. He is small and weak but also the seer of the group. He has an almost prophetic ability to sense all sorts of danger.
  • Dandelion, the storyteller (an important job in lapine society) and fastest runner of the group.
  • Blackberry, the thinker and problem-solver. Blackberry is able to understand complicated concepts, such as boats and latches, that the other rabbits cannot begin to fathom.
  • Bigwig (known in Lapine as Thlayli, meaning "Fur-head"), the best fighter and the strongest rabbit of the group. A member of the Owsla (military elite) of Sandleford warren. Receives his name from the unusual thickening of the fur around his ears.
  • Silver, with silver fur. The main fighter besides Bigwig, and also a member of the Sandleford Owsla. He is also the nephew of the Threarah, Sandleford's Chief Rabbit. In the movie when they were crossing a river to escape a dog he helped Bigwig push a board across the river with Fiver and Pipkin on board because they were too tired to swim.
  • Buckthorn, also a fighter, and known for being stolid and dependable.
  • Pipkin (Hlao, "Depression in grass" affectionately Hlao-roo), small, timid and weak but also very loyal to Hazel. He often worries about things that no one else worries about.
  • Speedwell, Acorn, Hawkbit, who are foot soldiers and followers rather than officers. Hawkbit is a heavy, misfortune-prone rabbit, described by Hazel as being "a rather slow, stupid rabbit". Speedwell the more optimistic of the three, and Acorn the dim-wit of the three."

They are later joined by: Hazel is a fictional character, a rabbit in Richard Adams novel Watership Down. ... Leader redirects here. ... Fiver (Lapine: Hrair-roo, sometimes Hrairoo) is a fictional character: a buck rabbit who is one of the central characters in Richard Adams novel Watership Down. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... Dandelion is a fictional character: a buck rabbit in Richard Adams novel, Watership Down. ... For the 2001 film, see Storytelling (film) Storytelling is the ancient art of conveying events in words, images, and sounds. ... Blackberry is a fictional character: a buck rabbit in Richard Adams novel, Watership Down. ... Bigwig is a fictional character, a rabbit, from the novel Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... An owsla is a group of physically strong and well-trained rabbits who guard and defend a warren, in Richard Adams book Watership Down. ...

  • Strawberry, from Cowslip's warren. He joins Hazel's expedition after losing his mate, Nildro-hain, to the snares his warren had become accustomed to. He overcomes his spoiled ways and manages to pull his weight with the rest, becoming a valuable adviser in the construction of the warren at Watership Down.
  • Holly, former Captain of the Sandleford Owsla and a master fighter and tracker. Like Bigwig, a born second-in-command. At first fiercely loyal to his old Chief Rabbit, and originally out to arrest Hazel and Bigwig for mutiny, the catastrophe at Sandleford Warren has left him traumatized for at least some time, and after re-joining the others he defers to Hazel and Bigwig as his leaders.
  • Bluebell, the jokester, a rabbit of the Sandleford warren who ends up following after and protecting Holly on his journey to Watership Down. Makes jokes when things get bad, so they don't seem as significant.
  • Three hutch rabbits: one buck, Boxwood, and two does, Haystack and Clover. (Another buck, Laurel, is left behind).
  • Blackavar, Efrafan rebel and prisoner. He was rejected from the Efrafan Owsla despite his expert tracking skills. Tried to escape but caught. As punishment the Efrafan Council tore up his ears and he is paraded through feeding times as a warning during his imprisonment.
  • Ten Efrafan does that leave their birthplace, only eight of which survive. Most notable among the does are:
    • Hyzenthlay ("Shine-dew-fur," Fur shining like dew), who is the leader of the rebellious does in Efrafa and has some of the abilities of a seer.
    • Thethuthinnang (Movement of Leaves).
    • Vilthuril, who later becomes Fiver's mate and the mother of his kittens, including one who, by the end of the book, has started to show prophetic abilities of his own.
    • Thrayonlosa, dies during the escape.
  • Groundsel, Thistle, and three other Efrafan bucks who surrender and join the warren following Efrafa's failed attack. Groundsel later becomes the first Chief Rabbit of the new warren between Efrafa and Watership Down.

Tracking in hunting is the science and art of observing a place through animal footprints and other signs, including: tracks, beds, chews, scat, hair, etc. ... Blackavar is a fictional character: a buck rabbit in Richard Adamss novel Watership Down. ... Hyzenthlay (Shine-dew-fur or fur shining like dew) is one of the Efrafan does that escaped with Bigwig. ...

Non-rabbit allies

  • Kehaar, a migratory black-headed gull whose injured wing forces him to take refuge on Watership Down. He later befriends the rabbits and helps in many unexpected circumstances. He is an especial friend to Bigwig. Kehaar possesses a strange accent of his own (perhaps similar to Norwegian), wherein "B" is altered to "P", "W" to "V", "J" to "Y", "TT" to "DD", and sometimes "I" to "EE" (so that "Bigwig" is pronounced "Peegveeg"). He cannot pronounce the name "Dandelion" and so refers to the rabbit of that name as "Meester Dando". In addition, Kehaar is somewhat gregarious and coarse-mouthed, talking often but with somewhat ungrammatical sentences and the use of the expression "Damn".
  • The unnamed mouse whom Hazel saves from a kestrel. He returns the favour by warning the warren of the Efrafans coming to attack them.
  • Lucy, the young girl who finds Hazel after he has been attacked by her cat.
  • Dr. Adams, the doctor to whom Lucy shows Hazel. He and Lucy later set him free. Richard Adams' father was a country doctor, and this character is an homage to him. In the foreword of the book the author writes that the humans in the book (Lucy, her parents, their farmhands) do not really exist, but he does not mention Dr. Adams.
  • Unidentified engine driver, whose train goes by at just the right time to save some of the Watership rabbits from Woundwort.

For other uses, see Watership Down (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Larus ridibundus Linnaeus, 1766 The Black-headed Gull, (Larus ridibundus), is a small gull which breeds in much of Europe and Asia, and also in coastal eastern Canada. ... This article is about the animal. ... Binomial name Falco tinnunculus Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is a bird of prey belonging to the falcon family Falconidae. ... A railroad engineer or train driver is a person who operates a railroad locomotive. ...

Enemies

  • General Woundwort, a tyrannical Chief Rabbit and founder of Efrafa. Woundwort is obsessed with control, which he believes to be the only successful means of safety. He is also impatient and bloodthirsty, desiring no outcome to occur but the one he has set himself to accomplish. Eventually, he is killed or driven away by a dog; later generations associate him with the Black Rabbit-- the symbol of death-- and use him to warn disobedient youngsters against mischief.
  • Vervain, Woundwort's lieutenant and commander of his Owslafa.
  • Campion, a Captain of Owsla; a superb tracker and leader of Woundwort's Wide Patrols.
  • Chervil, a "mark" Captain of Owsla in Efrafa under whom Bigwig serves.
  • Bartsia, an Efrafan Owslafa member in charge of the prisoner Blackavar. Bigwig permanently injures his leg while freeing Blackavar during the breakout.
  • Charlock, an Efrafan Captain of Owsla who led the pursuit of Holly, Silver, Buckthorn, and Strawberry during their escape; he is killed by a train.
  • Mallow, a "mark" Captain of Owsla in Efrafa, one of Woundwort's best officers who, with Campion, was with Woundwort when he defeated the warren at Nutley Copse. Bigwig accidentally leads a fox onto his Wide Patrol, killing him.
  • Cowslip, a member of a warren of rabbits (known later by Hazel's group as the Tharn Warren, or Warren of the Snares) who are 'harvested' for food by a human.
  • Betony and Kingcup, two rabbits mentioned in Cowslip's warren. Betony is a family rabbit that Blackberry shares with while Kingcup is mentioned by Strawberry who calls him for a meeting in the warren's great burrow.
  • Silverweed, a rabbit of the Warren of the Snares. He was a poet, and told the Sandleford rabbits a song when they arrived at the warren. He terrified Fiver: "I can smell him from here. He terrifies me."
  • Snowdrop, a Council member at Efrafa. An elderly rabbit, Snowdrop is referred to as "old Snowdrop". He appears to have been a close advisor of Woundwort and much of the warren's success was down to Snowdrop's ideas.
  • Nelthilta, a rabbit who was going to escape Efrafa with Bigwig and the other does, but then betrays them and tells the council members everything.
  • Various elil (predators) who are the enemies of all rabbits. Elil are termed '"the Thousand" or "U embleer hrair", the stinking (as in a fox) thousand.
  • Humans are also sometimes thought to be an enemy of Watership Down, though they serve mainly to forward the plot.

General Woundwort is a fictional rabbit villain in the Richard Adams novel Watership Down. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Vervain is one of the Efrafan rabbits from the tale Watership Down. ... An owsla is a group of physically strong and well-trained rabbits who guard and defend a warren, in Richard Adams book Watership Down. ... Campion is a fictional character, a rabbit from the novel Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... Tracking in hunting is the science and art of observing a place through animal footprints and other signs, including: tracks, beds, chews, scat, hair, etc. ... Cowslip is a character in Watership Down. ... Silverweed is Cowslips seer in the Warren of the Shining Wires. ... Elil is a term used by rabbits in Richard Adamss Watership Down to refer to their natural enemies (foxes, cats, stoats, etc. ... Elil is a term used by rabbits in Richard Adamss Watership Down to refer to their natural enemies (foxes, cats, stoats, etc. ...

Characters in rabbit lore

  • El-ahrairah (literally Elil-hrair-rah, the "prince with a thousand enemies" and is pronounced with the same stresses as in the prase "Never say die") is the folk hero at the centre of most of the rabbits' stories. As time passes the adventures of real living rabbits are transformed into fantastical tales of El-ahrairah. (El-ahrairah and his stories resemble Odysseus and his travels to some extent.)
  • Rabscuttle, El-ahrairah's best friend and companion in adventure.
  • Black Rabbit of Inlé, the rabbit grim reaper. A servant of Frith who ensures that all rabbits die at their appointed time.
  • Frith, literally "the sun", is a god-figure who created the world and promised that rabbits would always be allowed to thrive.
  • Prince Rainbow, a demigod-figure who communicates between El-ahrairah and Frith. He is always trying to beat El-ahrairah at his own devious games.
  • Hufsa, a strange rabbit from another country that is a spy for Prince Rainbow.
  • Yona, a hedgehog who gossips a lot, gets El-ahrairah into trouble and unintentionally helps him trick Prince Rainbow. The word also means "hedgehog" in general in the Lapine language.
  • Hawock, a pheasant who also unintentionally helps El-ahrairah trick Prince Rainbow.
  • Rowsby Woof, a dog who El-ahrairah tricks.
  • King Darzin, a king, species unknown, who El-ahrairah also tricks.

El-ahrairah is a fictional character, the rabbit folk hero in Richard Adamss Watership Down and the protagonist of nearly all of the rabbits stories. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Death, personified is an anthropomorphic figure or a fictional character who has existed in mythology and popular culture since the earliest days of storytelling. ... Genera Atelerix Erinaceus Hemiechinus Mesechinus Paraechinus A hedgehog is any of the small spiny mammals of the subfamily Erinaceinae and the order Erinaceomorpha. ... Lapine is an artificial language constructed by Richard Adams and spoken by the fictional rabbits of his novel Watership Down. ...

Major themes

The religious subtleties in the book may either parody or parallel Western religious concepts. Similarities between the Lapine folk hero El-ahrairah and the Trickster of folk mythology are apparent. The exaggeration of the heroic feats of El-ahrairah and the progressive attribution of new feats to his symbolic character, the recognition of the Sun as the god Frith in the absence of a scientific explanation of nature, and the attribution of random accidents to divine providence (such as the train death of the Efrafans on the railway track) are notable in light of the cultural development of folk religion. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... The term Western Religion refers to those religions that originated in the Western Roman Empire, such as as seen in Roman religion, Nordic religion, etc. ... A folk hero is type of hero, real or mythological. ... The trickster figure Reynard the Fox as depicted in an 1869 childrens book by Michel Rodange. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Sol redirects here. ... A model of scientific inquiry has two functions, first, to provide a descriptive account of how scientific inquiry is carried out in practice, second, to provide an explanatory account of why scientific inquiry succeeds as well as it appears to do in arriving at genuine knowledge of its objects. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... In theology, Divine Providence, or simply Providence, is the sovereignty, superintendence, or agency of God over events in peoples lives and throughout history. ... Folk religion consists of beliefs, superstitions and rituals transmitted from generation to generation of a specific culture. ...


Literary significance and criticism

Watership Down is notable as an ensemble story, with multiple protagonists who each serve a useful function under quietly competent leadership. Although Adams has always stated that the book was intended to be a children's story, many fans see the book as a political allegory attacking fascism and appeasement as Animal Farm attacked Stalinism. This opinion is supported by a plot involving visits to two other warrens whose political philosophies are depicted as antagonistic and repugnant. One of these is known only as Cowslip's Warren: the rabbits there grow fat on food left out for them by a local farmer, yet it is common knowledge (but never openly said) that the farmer has wire traps set out to catch the rabbits; these rabbits accept the risk of sudden death for the benefit of an easy life. The other is Efrafa, ruled with a merciless iron fist by the powerful General Woundwort who becomes the story's principal antagonist. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... An ensemble cast is a cast in which the principal performers are assigned roughly equal amounts of importance in a dramatic production. ... Fascism is an authoritarian political ideology (generally tied to a mass movement) that considers individual and other societal interests subordinate to the interests of the state. ... Appeasement is a policy of accepting the imposed conditions of an aggressor in lieu of armed resistance, usually at the sacrifice of principles. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... For architecture, see Stalinist architecture. ... General Woundwort is a fictional rabbit villain in the Richard Adams novel Watership Down. ...


Myxomatosis (or in Lapine terminology, "The white blindness"), a terrible and highly infectious rabbit disease, is referred to early in the book. It was a threat that could have destroyed the Sandleford warren if not for the tough but reasonable leadership of the chief rabbit, who cast out any rabbits showing signs of sickness. The original impetus for General Woundwort keeping the Efrafan warren under tight control is to guard it against the dreaded illness. However, his strict measures went over the top and the Efrafan rabbits found themselves living under a military dictatorship where they couldn't even leave the burrows without presence of guards. The underlying message (as it's often interpreted) is that societies overrun with fear are more susceptible to accepting leadership that purports to offer safety in place of liberty. Myxomatosis (from the Greek μύξα (mucus), and ματώνω (to bleed)) is a disease which infects rabbits. ...


Adams has gone so far as to state that the personalities of the two principal hero rabbits, Hazel and Bigwig, are based on fellow officers he knew while a paratrooper during World War II. Thlayli is a fictional character, a rabbit, from the novel Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... An American USMC Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The overall storyline resembles that told in Homer's Odyssey; for example, the events in Cowslip's Warren can be compared to the Lotus Eaters episode (Book IX) in The Odyssey. This is confirmed by the quotation at the head of Chapter 13 from Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "The Lotos-Eaters": For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ...

In the afternoon they came unto a land
In which it seemed always afternoon.
All round the coast the languid air did swoon,
Breathing like one that hath a weary dream.

There are also similarities to Virgil's Aeneid. In the Aeneid a band of fugitives, lead by reluctant leader Aeneas, escape the destruction of Troy and journey to Italy, where they found a new city. On the way, they survive a storm and nearly decide to stay in Carthage. On arrival in Italy, they battle with the native inhabitants, due to Aeneas' desire to take the king's daughter as a wife. Eventually, Aeneas defeats the Italians' leader, Turnus, in single combat, Lavinia moves to the Trojan's city and a new city is set up composed of a mixture of Trojans and Italians. For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


Comparisons have also been made to Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.[citation needed] J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916, wearing his British Army uniform in a photograph from the middle years of WW1. ... This article is about the novel. ...


Awards and nominations

Watership Down has become a modern classic and won the Carnegie Medal in 1972.[citation needed] In the traditional sense, a classic book is one written in ancient Greece or ancient Rome (see classics). ... The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. ...

  • In 2003, Watership Down came 42nd in a public vote for the 100 greatest books of all time taken by the BBC.[3]

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...

Film, TV or theatrical adaptations

In 1978 the book was adapted as an animated film, directed by Martin Rosen. The violence portrayed led many reviewers to caution that the film is not for very young children, with the liberal blood and depictions of combat and death between the rabbits. The film generally follows the plot of the book with a few omissions. In the movie version, does are seen leaving the Sandleford warren with Hazel and the others. However, only bucks leave in the novel. The character of Violet, a doe attacked by a hawk in the film, seems to have been created just for the shock of a death within the party. In 1999, an animated television series, Watership Down, was also co-produced by Martin Rosen. Like the book, the animated series detailed General Woundwort's terrible upbringing, which twisted his outlook; the movie presented the General simply as an antagonist. Also, while the film used adult voices, the animated series has "child" voices for some characters. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Watership Down is an animated film directed by Martin Rosen and based on the book Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... Watership Down is an animated adaptation for television of the novel of the same name by Richard Adams, co-produced by Alltime Entertainment of the United Kingdom and Decode Entertainment of Canada. ... Watership Down is an animated film directed by Martin Rosen and based on the book Watership Down by Richard Adams. ... Martin Rosen is a British film director and producer. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... Watership Down is an animated adaptation for television of the novel of the same name by Richard Adams, co-produced by Alltime Entertainment of the United Kingdom and Decode Entertainment of Canada. ...


A picture book of the animated film was also produced, titled The Watership Down Film Picture Book. Two editions of the book were published, one a hard-cover, the other a reinforced cloth-bound edition. The contents include multiple stills from the film linked with a combination of narration and extracts from the script, as well as a preface written by Richard Adams and a foreword written by Martin Rosen. The First American Edition is copyrighted 1978 by Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc, 866 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10022. This book seems to be extremely rare.


The song "Bright Eyes", written by Mike Batt and sung by Art Garfunkel, was released as a single with a video of scenes from the film. The song was a UK no. 1 hit. The song was re-released in 2000 by Stephen Gately as a double A-side with 'A New Beginning'. Stephen had sung the cover of Bright Eyes for the TV Series. However, he wasn't as successful with the song as Art Garfunkel was. Bright Eyes is a song written by Mike Batt, and performed by Art Garfunkel. ... Image:MikeBatt. ... Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing (1980) Arthur Ira Garfunkel (born November 5, 1941) is an American white gollywog and actor, best known as half of the folk duo Simon and Garfunkel. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ...


Influences on popular culture

As a major 20th century novel, Watership Down has inspired many references in popular culture. These include references in television (e.g. The Goodies, Lost), cinema (e.g. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, Donnie Darko), literature (e.g. The Stand), and music (e.g. America, Atomship). Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Episode chronology White Rabbit is the 5th episode of Lost. ... For the fictional character, see Donald Darko. ... The Stand is a post-apocalyptic Horror/Science Fiction novel by Stephen King originally published in 1978. ... Hideaway is the sixth original studio album by American folk rock trio America, released by Warner Bros. ... Atomship is a progressive rock band hailing from southern Mississippi. ...


In addition to these (and many other) references, it was the major inspiration for the role-playing game Bunnies and Burrows, and has been credited by George Lucas for providing inspiration in creating a "fictional universe" in Star Wars.[4] This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Bunnies and Burrows (B&B) is a role-playing game (RPG) loosely (and unofficially) based upon the novel Watership Down about a group of talking rabbits seeking to found a new warren. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This article is about the series. ...


The mechanical designer of Mobile Suit Gundam: Advance of Zeta a Zeta Gundam side story featured in Dengeki Hobby Magazine; features Mobile Suits consistently named after words and characters in Watership Down. These include Mobile Suits, Booster, and Armor Units named "Fiver," "Hazel," "Hrududu," "OWSLA," "Bigwig," "Dandelion," "Woundwort," "Hazel Rah," and "Hyzenthlay." Furthermore, rabbits play a large thematic role in the story design-wise (crests and decals include a caricatures of rabbits in various poses holding or wearing relevant mecha equipment). Mobile Suit Gundam ) is a televised anime series, created by Sunrise. ... One-time rivals Amuro Ray and Char Aznable, new hero Kamille Bidan and the Zeta Gundam. ... Dengeki Hobby Magazine ) is a Japanese magazine published by MediaWorks centering around information relating to plastic models. ... Mobile Suits are humanoid weapon systems in the Gundam anime series. ... This article is about the term used in science fiction, anime, and manga. ...


Sequel

One sequel, Tales from Watership Down, has been published. It takes place after the events in Watership Down, but does not continue the main plotline. Instead, it is a collection of short stories taking place after Watership Down and involving some of the same characters, also telling stories like "The Fox in the Water" which Bigwig hears Bluebell telling to three-four does during the siege of Watership Down, and many more tales of "El-ahrairah" Tales from Watership Down was a follow-up to Richard Adams highly successful novel about rabbits, Watership Down, and was first published in the United Kingdom in 1996. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Bigwig is a programming language designed to run on web servers. ... The term bluebell can refer to the following: English Bluebell (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) or Spanish Bluebell () Bluebell of Scotland (Campanula rotundifolia, called harebell in England) and other Campanula species Virginia Bluebell (Mertensia virginica) Bluebell The name of one of the rabbits in the book Watership Down by Richard Adams BlueBell...


Editions

There have been over 300 editions of Watership Down in English — these are just a few of the ones known.[citation needed]


UK editions

  • ISBN 0-14-030601-3 (Puffin, paperback, 1973)
  • ISBN 0-14-003958-9 (Penguin, paperback, 1974)
  • ISBN 0-14-036453-6 (Puffin Modern Classics, paperback, 1993)
  • ISBN 0-14-118666-6 (Penguin Modern Classics, paperback, 2001)

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... It has been suggested that Penguin Modern Poets, Penguin Great Ideas be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

U.S. editions

Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A Prebound book is a book that was previously bound and has been rebound with a library quality hardcover binding. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | Books ... ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Hardcover books A hardcover (or hardback or hardbound) is a book bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with cloth, heavy paper, or sometimes leather). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Translations

  • Chinese: 魔幻的瓦特西普高原 (Rabbit's Special Watership Down)
  • Czech: Daleká cesta za domovem (The Long Way Home)
  • Danish: Kaninbjerget (The Rabbit Mountain)
  • Dutch: Waterschapsheuvel (Watership Hill)
  • Finnish: Ruohometsän Kansa (Folk of the Grass Forest)
  • French: Les Garennes de Watership Down (The Warrens of Watership Down)
  • German: Unten am Fluss (Down by the River)
  • Hebrew: גבעת ווטרשיפ (Watership Hill)
  • Hungarian: Gesztenye, a honalapító (Hazel, the Founding Father)
  • Italian: La collina dei conigli (The Rabbits' Hill)
  • Japanese: ウォーターシップ・ダウンのうさぎたち (Watership Down no Usagi-tachi, "The Rabbits of Watership Down")
  • Korean: 워터십 다운의 토끼 (Woteosip Daunui Tokki, "Rabbits of Watership Down") and 워터십 다운의 열한 마리 토끼 (Woteosip Daunui Yeolhan Mari Tokki, "Eleven Rabbits of Watership Down")
  • Norwegian: Flukten til Watership (The Escape to Watership)
  • Polish: Wodnikowe wzgórze (Aquarius Hill)
  • Portuguese: Era uma vez em Watership Down (Once Upon a Time in Watership Down)
  • Brazilian Portuguese: A Longa Jornada (The Long Journey)
  • Russian: Обитатели холмов (Dwellers of the Hills)
  • Serbian: Брежуљак Вотершип/Brežuljak Voteršip (Watership Mound or Watership Ridge)
  • Slovenian: Vodovnikova vesina (Watership Down)
  • Spanish: La Colina de Watership (Watership Hill)
  • Swedish: Den långa flykten (The Long Escape)
  • Ukrainian: Небезпечні Мандри (The Dangerous Travel)

Hebrew redirects here. ... Founding Fathers are persons instrumental not only in the establishment (founding) of a political institution, but also in the origination of the idea of the institution. ... Brazilian Portuguese (português do Brasil in Portuguese) is a group of dialects of Portuguese written and spoken by virtually all the 190 million inhabitants of Brazil and by a couple of million Brazilian emigrants, mainly in the United States, United Kingdom, Portugal, Canada, Japan, and Paraguay. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Look up mound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the use of the term in geography and physical geology. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Classics of Fantasy
  2. ^ Interview: Richard Adams BBC Berkshire, via bbc.co.uk, 2007-03-16. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  3. ^ The Big Read: Top 100 bbc.co.uk, April 2003. Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  4. ^ The Unemployed Writer (2007-02-27). The Influences Behind George Lucas's Star Wars Trilogies. Associated Content. Retrieved on 2007-09-11.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mike Batt - The Official Website (234 words)
The new album "Watership Down - Original Soundtrack Music and Songs" was released by Polydor Records on October 2nd 2000.
The ITV series (26 half hours, based on Richard Adams' novel) "Watership Down"was scored by Mike,- or more accurately, he provided a newly-scored "library" of hundreds of specially composed symphonic pieces- from 2 seconds to 6 minutes- for the animators and producers to use in post production of the series.
The song, "Bright Eyes" which Mike wrote for the "Watership Down" movie back in 1976 (released 1979) was re-recorded with Stephen Gately of Boyzone, singing.
Watership Down (1978) (1153 words)
It's clear from the beginning that Watership Down is a tale about the dance with death — both avoiding and accepting it — as the film opens with an imaginatively rendered depiction of rabbitdom's blood-stained creation myth, the story of their ancestor, El-ahrairah.
Watership Down lies somewhere between Animal Farm, The Seven Samurai, and the works of Sam Peckinpah in its mature themes and depiction of violence.
Watership Down is a long, long way from the land of warm-'n'-fuzzy bunnies and kittens — but it's a difficult road well worth traveling.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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