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Encyclopedia > Waterford
Waterford
Port Láirge
Urbs Intacta Manet Waterfordia
"Waterford remains the untaken city"
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
52°15′30″N 7°07′08″W / 52.2583, -7.119
Irish Grid Reference
S604123
Statistics
Province: Munster
County: County Waterford
Area: 41.58 km²
Elevation: 6 m (22 ft)
Population (2006) 49,240
City: 45,775
Suburbs: 3,465
Website: www.waterfordcity.ie

Waterford (from the Old Norse: Veðrafjǫrðr meaning "windy fjord" or "haven from the wind-swept sea"; in Irish: Port Láirge) is a city in the Republic of Ireland. It is the primary city of the South East region, and the fifth largest in the country. Founded in 914 AD, by the Vikings, it is Ireland's oldest city.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Image File history File links Ireland_map_County_Waterford_Magnified. ... GPS redirects here. ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... County Waterford (Port Láirge in Irish) is a county in the province of Munster on the south coast of Ireland. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... Waterford is: Waterford - a type of crystal glassware. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Events Town of Warwick, England founded on the River Avon Vikings conquer much of Ireland Byzantine Empire battles with Bulgaria over city of Adrianople, which changes hands several times Reconstruction of Nanjing after a long dissertation; it marked the beginning of contemporary Nanjing City. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ...


Waterford is the largest city in Ireland to retain its Viking-derived name, Vedrarfjord.[2] Reginald's Tower is the oldest urban civic building in Ireland, and the oldest monument to retain its Viking name. It is to this day Waterford's most recognisable landmark. The tower is believed to be the first building in Ireland to use mortar.


The population of the city in 2006 was 49,240; of which 45,775 lived within the city limits, and 3,465 lived in the city's suburbs in County Kilkenny.[3] Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Kilkenny Code: KK Area: 2,061 km² Population (2006) 87,394 Website: www. ...


The River Suir flows through Waterford city and has provided the basis for Waterford's long maritime history. Waterford Port has been one of Ireland's major ports for over a millennium. In the 19th century shipbuilding was a major industry in the city. The owners of the Neptune Shipyard, the Malcomson family, built and operated the largest fleet of iron steamers in the world between the mid-1850s and the late-1860s, including five trans-atlantic passenger liners.[4] Today, Waterford is synonymous with Waterford Crystal the world over, a legacy of one of the city's most successful and enduring industries, glass making. Glass, or crystal, has been manufactured in the city since 1783. Waterford is the sister city of St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador The River Suir (IPA: , Irish An tSiúr or Abhainn na Siúire) is a river in Ireland that flows into the Atlantic Ocean near Waterford after a distance of 183 kilometres (114 miles). ... The Port of Waterford is situated several kilometres downstream of Waterford City on the northern side of the Suir river in South County Kilkenny, and is called Belview. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The world-famous Waterford Crystal Ball is lowered in Times Square, New York City, on New Years Eve Waterford Crystal is a trademark brand of crystal glassware produced in Waterford, Ireland, by the company Waterford Wedgwood plc. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ...

See also: List of Waterford people

Contents

Waterford is a significant urban center in the south-east of Ireland and it a city of Ireland. ...

History

Main article - History of Waterford Waterford city is situated in south eastern Ireland, on the river Suir [pronounced Shure] about seventeen miles from where the river enters the sea. ...

Waterford born Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher
Waterford born Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher

Viking raiders first established a settlement at Waterford in 853. Waterford and all the other longphorts were vacated in 902, the Vikings having been driven out by the native Irish. The Vikings re-established themselves in Ireland at Waterford in 914 and built what would be Ireland's first city. A list of the city's rulers from this date to the mayors of the present day can be found in Rulers of Waterford. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 547 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (706 × 773 pixel, file size: 222 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image from Harpers New Monthly Magazine, October 1867. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 547 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (706 × 773 pixel, file size: 222 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Image from Harpers New Monthly Magazine, October 1867. ... Thomas Francis Meagher aka: OMeagher, or Meagher of the Sword (August 3, 1823 – July 1, 1867) was an Irish revolutionary, who also served in the United States Army as a Brigadier General during the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... // The Vikings, who had created a Longphort at Waterford in 853, finally settled and created a town in 914. ...


In 1137, Diarmuid MacMorrough, King of Leinster, failed in an attempt to take Waterford. He returned in 1170 with Norman mercenaries under Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke (Strongbow); together they besieged and took Waterford after a desperate defence. This was the introduction of the Anglo-Normans into Ireland. In 1171, Henry II of England landed at Waterford. Waterford and then Dublin were declared royal cities, Dublin was declared capital of Ireland. Dermot MacMorrough, is considered the most noted traitor of Irish history, also commonly known as Dermot naNGhall (Dermot of the foreigners) was the King of the eastern Irish province of Leinster who invited King Henry II of England to invade Ireland to assist him in regaining his throne of Leinster... Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, Lord of Leicester, Justiciar of Ireland (1130 – 20 April 1176), known as Strongbow, was a Cambro-Norman lord notable for his leading role in the Norman invasion of Ireland. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Throughout the medieval period, Waterford was Ireland's second city after Dublin. In the 15th century Waterford repelled two pretenders to the English throne: Lambert Simnel and Perkin Warbeck. As a result, King Henry VII gave the city its motto: Urbs Intacta Manet Waterfordia (Waterford remains the untaken city). (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Lambert Simnel (c. ... Contemporary painting of Warbeck Perkin Warbeck (c. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ...


After the Protestant Reformation, Waterford remained a Catholic city and participated in the confederation of Kilkenny - an independent Catholic government from 1642-49. This was ended abruptly by Oliver Cromwell, who brought the country back under English rule; his nephew Henry Ireton finally took Waterford in 1650 after a major siege. Kilkenny Castle, where the Confederate General Assembly met. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... Combatants English Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops English Parliamentarian New Model Army troops and allied Protestants in Ireland Commanders James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde (1649 - Dec. ... Henry Ireton Henry Ireton (1611 - November 26, 1651), was an English general in the army of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... The city of Waterford in south eastern Ireland was besieged from 1649-50 during the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland. ...


The 18th century was a period of huge prosperity for Waterford. Most of the city's best architecture appeared during this time. In the 19th century, great industries such as glass making and ship building thrived in the city.


In July 1922, Waterford was the scene of fighting between Irish Free State and Irish Republican troops during the Irish Civil War. This article is about the prior state. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (Pronounced fee-na fall.) (English: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ...


Places of interest

A view from The Quays: "The Three Sisters" mix near the city before flowing into the harbour.

The old city of Waterford consists of various cultural quarters. The oldest is what has been referred to as the Viking triangle. This is the part of the city surrounded by the original 10th century fortifications, which is triangular in shape with its apex at Reginald's tower. Though this was once the site of a thriving Viking town, the city centre has shifted to the west over the years, and it is now a quiet and tranquil area, dominated by narrow streets, medieval architecture, and civic spaces. Over the past decade, a number of restaurants have opened in High Street and Henrietta Street, taking advantage of the charming character of the area. Much of Waterford's impressive architecture is to be found in the Viking triangle. The Quay, Waterford File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Quay, Waterford File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Three Sisters are an extensive network of three rivers which drain a large part of Ireland including County Tipperary, County Carlow, County Kilkenny and County Waterford, among others, the rivers enter the sea near Waterford City. ...


In the 15th century, the city was enlarged with the building of an outer wall on the west side. Today Waterford retains more of its city walls than any other city in Ireland with the exception of Derry, whose walls were built much later. Tours of Waterford's city walls are conducted daily. For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ...


The Quay, once termed by historian Mark Girouard 'the noblest quay in Europe', is a mile long from Grattan Quay to Adelphi Quay, though Adelphi Quay is now a residential area. It is still a major focal point for Waterford, commercially and socially, and the face that Waterford presents to those traveling into the city from the north. Near Reginald's Tower is the William Vincent Wallace Plaza, a monument and amenity built around the time of the millennium that commemorates the Waterford born composer.


John Roberts Square is a pedestrianised area that is one of the main focal points of Waterford's modern day commercial centre.

Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Barronstrand Street, Waterford
Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity, Barronstrand Street, Waterford

It was named after the city's most celebrated architect, John Roberts, and was formed from the junction of Barronstrand Street, Broad Street and George's Street. It is often referred to locally as Red Square, due to the red paving that was used when the area was first pedestrianised. A short distance to the east of John Roberts Square is Arundel Square, another square with a fine commercial tradition, which the City Square shopping centre opens onto. Waterford Holy Trinity Cathedral (catholic) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Waterford Holy Trinity Cathedral (catholic) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Ballybricken, in the west, just outside the city walls, is thought to have been Waterford's Irishtown, a type of settlement that often formed outside Irish cities to house the Vikings and Irish that had been expelled during the Norman conquest of Ireland. Ballybricken is an inner city neighbourhood with a long tradition, centred around Ballybricken hill, which was a large, open market-square. Today it has been converted into a green, civic space, but the Bull Post, where livestock was once bought and sold, still stands as a remnant of the hill's past.


The Mall is a fine Georgian thoroughfare, built by the Wide Streets Commission in order to extend the city southwards. It contains some of the city's finest Georgian architecture. The People's Park, Waterford's largest and finest park, is located nearby. The Peoples Park is the largest public park in Waterford city. ...


Ferrybank is Waterford city's only suburb north of the river. It contains a village centre of its own, and is often perceived as being somewhat isolated from the city, probably due to the wide expanse of the Suir, and the lack of convenient access between north and south of the river.


In April 2003 an important site combining a 5th century Iron Age and 9th century Viking settlement was discovered at Woodstown near the city, which appears to have been a Viking town that predates all such settlements in Ireland.[5] Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... Woodstown is home to a historic settlement measuring 1. ...

Scotch Quay, Waterford
Scotch Quay, Waterford

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 492 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken October 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 492 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo taken October 2006 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Crime

Official statistics show that Waterford's serious crime figures are on a par with other urban areas in Ireland and are significantly lower than the Dublin Metropolitan area. Nevertheless, there has been significant disquiet in recent years with regard to anti-social behaviour and violent assaults.[6] In 2006, there were two murders recorded in Waterford city.[7]


Culture

Museums

  • Waterford Museum of Treasures

Waterford Museum of Treasures [1], in the Granary on Merchant's Quay, is the city's foremost museum, housing a collection spanning over 1,000 years of the city's history. The Waterford Museum of Treasures is a museum for historical artifacts associated with the city of Waterford. ...

  • Reginald's Tower

Reginald's Tower, the oldest urban civic building in the country, has performed numerous functions over the years. Today it is a civic museum.


Art galleries

  • Waterford Municipal Art Gallery

The Waterford Municipal Art Gallery has been housed in Greyfriars since 2001. It is the permanent home for the Municipal Art Collection, "A Gem Among Municipal Collections", over 200 paintings by Irish and International artists, including pieces from renowned artists such as Jack B Yeats, Paul Henry, Charles Lamb and Louis Le Brocquy.

  • Garter Lane

See below. Art exhibitions are often held here.

  • Dyehouse Gallery

Situated in Dyehouse Lane, the Dyehouse Gallery [2] is the home of an art gallery and pottery works operated by the renowned Waterford potter Liz McKay.

  • Manifesto Gallery & Retail Emporium

Located in the historic "Port of Waterford" building in Georges Street. This landmark building was finished at the end of the 18th century for William Morris and was designed by celebrated local architect John Roberts. Manifesto occupies the ground floor of the building and features original work from national and international artists, sculptors, jewellers, ceramacists & wood turners.


Theatre

Waterford has two theatres: the Theatre Royal and Garter Lane.

  • The Theatre Royal
The Theatre Royal [3], on The Mall, was built in 1876, as part of a remodelled section of City Hall. It is a U-shaped, Victorian theatre, seating about 600 people.
  • Garter Lane
The Garter Lane Arts Centre [4], on O'Connell St., is housed in a Quaker meeting house that was built in 1792. The old meeting hall has been converted into a 200 seat theatre.

Waterford has three theatre companies: Red Kettle, Spraoi and Waterford Youth Arts.

  • Red Kettle
Red Kettle [5] is a professional theatre company based in Waterford that regularly performs in Garter Lane.
  • Spraoi
Spraoi [6] is a street theatre company based in Waterford. It produces the Spraoi festival (see below), and has participated regularly in the Waterford and Dublin St. Patrick's day parades, often winning best float. In January 2005 the company staged its biggest and most prestigious production to date, "Awakening", the Opening Show for Cork 2005 European Capital of Culture.
  • Waterford Youth Arts
Waterford Youth Arts (WYA) [7], formerly known as Waterford Youth Drama, was established in August 1985. WYA has grown from the voluntary efforts of two individuals and 25 young people, to a fully-structured youth arts organisation with a paid staff and 400 young people taking part each week.

Spraoi is a professional arts organisation based in Waterford City, Ireland. ...

Events

  • Spraoi

The Spraoi festival, organised by the Spraoi theatre company, is held in Waterford during the summer each year. It attracts crowds in the region of anywhere up to 80,000 people.

  • Waterford International Festival of Light Opera

The Waterford International Festival of Light Opera [8] is an annual event that has been held in the Theatre Royal since 1959.

  • The Tall Ships

The Tall Ships festival, held in Waterford in 2005, marked the start of the Tall Ships race of that year. The Suir river provided a perfect berthing location for the numerous tall ships that lined the north and south quays, for almost a week. The festival attracted in the region of 450,000 people to the city in what was the biggest event ever held in Waterford or the south east. On the 27th of March, 2007, it was confirmed that Waterford will host the start of the Tall Ships race again in 2011.


Cinema

  • Storm Cinema Waterford

Storm Cinema Waterford [9] is an 8-screen, 1,112 seater cinema situated in the Railway square complex. It is the city's newest cinema that opened for business on the 8th of June, 2007.

  • Waterford Cineplex

The Waterford Cineplex [10] is a 5-screen cinema on Patrick st. in the city centre. It was for many years the city's only cinema.

  • Waterford Film For All

Waterford Film For All [11] (WFFA) is a non-profit film society whose aim is to offer an alternative to the cineplex experience in Waterford. WFFA conduct much of the their activities on the Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) campus. The crest of WIT Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) is a state funded university-level educational institution situated in Waterford, Ireland. ...


Libraries

There are three public libraries in the city, all operated by Waterford City Council: Central Library, in Lady Lane; Ardkeen Library, in the Ardkeen shopping centre on the Dunmore Rd.; and Brown's Road Library, on Paddy Brown's Rd.


Central Library, or Waterford City Library, opened in 1905. It was the first of many Irish libraries funded by businessman Andrew Carnegie (Carnegie funded 2,509 libraries across the world). It was renovated in 2004 for its centenary. Andrew Carnegie (last name pronounced IPA: )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ...


Sport

Mount Sion is a Gaelic Athletic Association club located in Waterford City, Ireland, founded by Brs OConnor and Malone, teachers in the above school. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ...

Politics

Waterford City has 15 elected representatives (councillors) who sit on Waterford City Council. The city is divided into 3 "wards" (or areas) and residents in these areas are restricted to voting for candidates located in their ward for local elections. A mayor is then elected by the councillors every year. Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Local elections vary widely across jurisdictions. ...


For general elections, Waterford has been allocated 4 Dáil seats. There are no such ward restrictions for these elections and voters are entitled to vote for any candidate throughout the city and county. A general election is an election in which all members of a given political body are up for election. ... Dáil Éireann[1] is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ...


Media

Radio

Available on 97.5fm in the city, 95.1 in the county and 94.8fm on the coast, WLR is Waterford's local radio station. It serves a potential audience of 170,000 people, and 75% of all adults in Waterford tune in weekly. WLR FM is an Independent Local Radio station, licensed by the Broadcasting Commission of Ireland, broadcasting to Waterford City and County Waterford. ...

  • Beat 102-103

Beat 102-103 is the regional radio station for the south east of Ireland, based in Waterford. It serves a population of about 450,000, and in August 2006 it had a 49% share of the south east market.


Television

  • Radio Telefís Éireann, the national broadcaster, has a studio in City Square shopping centre, in the city.
  • City Channel Waterford is a local TV offering provided by UPC, the parent company of NTL served by cable and MMDS. The service began on the 1st of November, 2006, and broadcasts to 19,000 homes.

Radio Telefís Éireann[1] (RTÉ; IPA: ,  ) is the Public Service Broadcaster of the Republic of Ireland. ...

Print media

The Waterford News & Star and The Munster Express are both newspapers that cover Waterford city and county. Waterford Today is a newspaper that is supported by advertising revenue and delivered free to residents in the city. All three newspapers appear weekly.


Education

The city is served by 21 primary schools[8] and 9 secondary schools.[9]


There are 2 third level institutions in Waterford: Waterford Institute of Technology, which is currently being considered for university status [12] and the Waterford College of Further Education [13]. The crest of WIT Waterford Institute of Technology (WIT) is a state funded university-level educational institution situated in Waterford, Ireland. ... The Waterford College of Further Education (WCFE) [1], previously called the Central Technical Institute (CTI), is a 3rd level institute located on Parnell St. ...


The Quaker co-educational boarding school, Newtown School is situated in Waterford, east of the city centre. The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Newtown School is a coeducational day and boarding secondary school in Waterford, Ireland. ...


Transport and infrastructure

Roads

Waterford is connected to other major centres via the N9 to Dublin, the N25 to Cork (west) and Rosslare (east) and the N24 to Limerick.


In and around the city itself, the N25 is soon to be re-routed to include the Waterford City Bypass, currently under construction, which will feature a second river crossing for the city. This project will include the Western Link road that will connect the bypass to the Outer Ring Road. The Outer Ring Road (R710), is a major road that encircles the south of the city. When the bypass and Western Link are finished by 2010, it will be possible to travel in a circle almost the entire way around the city, from the Dunmore Rd. to Slieverue in Co. Kilkenny. The R710 is a Regional Road in the Republic of Ireland. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Kilkenny Code: KK Area: 2,061 km² Population (2006) 87,394 Website: www. ...


Rail

The main train station at Waterford City is Plunkett station. It is located across Edmund Rice bridge on the north side of the Suir. Waterford railway station opened on 26 August 1864.[10] For other persons named Edmund Rice, see Edmund Rice (disambiguation). ... Waterford railway station serves the town of Waterford in County Waterford Category: ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


There are seven daily connections to Dublin, including the new early commuter departure at 06:10, implemented in 2006; 3 daily connections to Limerick Junction; and 1 daily connection to Rosslare Europort. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... Limerick Junction is an important railway station located in County Tipperary in Ireland and in its earliest existence was named Tipperary Junction, Tipperary Town itself is about two miles away to the south-east, though Limerick Junction, with a cluster of pleasantly presented railway cottages and a pub, is a... Rosslare Europort is a modern seaport located at Rosslare Harbour in County Wexford, at the southeasternmost point of Irelands coastline, handling passenger and freight ferries to and from the United Kingdom and France. ...


There are no direct lines between Waterford and Cork, although a change at Limerick Junction allows passengers to join the Dublin-Cork line. There is a direct line between Waterford and Limerick, but passengers must change at Limerick Junction on all services. There is also a direct line to Rosslare Europort. This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


A western rail corridor [14], linking Claremorris and Ennis, is included in the government's Transport 21 plan, due to complete in 2014. This corridor will make services between Waterford and Galway and Westport possible. It is also intended in the future to develop the line between Claremorris to Collooney, which will make services between Waterford and Sligo possible. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For people named Ennis, see Ennis (surname). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M300256 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M004841 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 80 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   5,140  1,458 Westport (Irish: , meaning City of the Beeves) is a town in County Mayo in the Republic of Ireland. ... Collooney (Cúil Mhuine in Irish) is a town in County Sligo, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ...


The Waterford & Suir Valley Railway [15] follows 6 km of the old Waterford to Dungarvan/Cork route on a narrow gauge line. It is a heritage route that runs between Waterford and Kilmeaden. The panoramic views from this line are considered to be exceptional. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference X259930 Statistics Province: Munster County: Elevation: 1m (3 ft) Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   7,220  232 Website: www. ...


Bus

Bus services are provided by Bus Éireann to all major Irish centres, and by JJ Kavanagh & Sons [16] to locations such as Dublin and Carlow. The Bus Éireann station is located on the quays opposite Dooleys Hotel and J.J. Kavanagh & Sons stop at both the Bus Éireann station and on Parnell St. Bus Éireann have ten daily services to Dublin Monday to Saturday with five on a Sunday. J.J. Kavanagh & Sons have ten daily departures to Dublin Monday to Saturday and nine on a Sunday. Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ... Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ...


City bus services are provided by Bus Éireann and by JJ Kavanagh & Sons [17] Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ...


Air

Waterford Airport,[11] or South East Regional Airport, serves Waterford and the south east region. Aer Arann is currently the only carrier operating out of the airport. It is currently possible to fly between Waterford and Birmingham, London Luton, Lorient (France),Bordeau (France), Faro (Portugal),Malaga (Spain) and Manchester. All users of the airport are subject to a €5 tax which must be paid in cash. Waterford Airport or Aerphort Phort Láirge in Irish (IATA: WAT, ICAO: EIWF), also known as the South East Regional Airport, is located near Waterford on the south-east coast of the Republic of Ireland. ... Aer Arann is a regional airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ...


There is an air sea rescue service operating out of Waterford Airport.[12] This operation is currently contracted to a private operator, CHC Ireland. Rescue cover is provided by A Sikorsky S-61 For the original Viking use of the name, see Sea-King. ...


Sea

The Port of Waterford is a major Irish port, and the closest one to mainland Europe. The port is on the River Suir, at Belview, County Kilkenny, 16 km (10 miles) from the open sea. It handles lo-lo, bulk liquid, bulk solid and breakbulk/general cargoes. It is the fastest growing port in Ireland. In 2005, 776 vessels called at the port carrying a total of 2.6 million tonnes of cargo. Container throughput in 2005 was 137,453 laden 6m (20ft) equivalent units. The Port of Waterford is situated several kilometres downstream of Waterford City on the northern side of the Suir river in South County Kilkenny, and is called Belview. ... Continental Europe refers to the continent of Europe, explicitly excluding European islands and peninsulae. ... The River Suir (IPA: , Irish An tSiúr or Abhainn na Siúire) is a river in Ireland that flows into the Atlantic Ocean near Waterford after a distance of 183 kilometres (114 miles). ... Belview is a city in Redwood County, Minnesota, United States. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Kilkenny Code: KK Area: 2,061 km² Population (2006) 87,394 Website: www. ...


The closest passenger port is Rosslare Europort (72 km (45 miles) away by road), which has services to Fishguard, Pembroke Dock, Cherbourg, Roscoff and Le Havre. Lower Fishguard Fishguard (Welsh: = Mouth of the River Gwaun) is a coastal town in Pembrokeshire, Wales, with a population of 3,300 (est. ... Pembroke Dock (Welsh: Doc Penfro) is a town in South Pembrokeshire, Wales, lying north of Pembroke at the end of Milford Haven. ... Cherbourg is a city of Normandy, in northwestern France, in the Manche département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... Roscoff (whose name in Breton is Rosko) is a commune in the district of Morlaix in the département of Finistère, in Frances Bretagne région. ... Le Havre is a city in Normandy, northern France, on the English Channel, at the mouth of the Seine. ...


Climate

Climate Table
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average daily maximum temperature (°C) 8 8 10 13 16 18 20 20 18 14 10 8 14
Average daily minimum temperature (°C) 3 3 4 5 7 10 12 12 10 7 5 4 7
Mean total rainfall (cm) 5.34 4.29 3.84 3.98 3.40 3.72 3.38 4.22 4.33 6.35 5.07 5.03 52.95
Source: MSN Weather

Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... A centimetre (American spelling centimeter, symbol cm) is a unit of length that is equal to one hundredth of a metre, the current SI base unit of length. ...

Colloquialisms

Waterford colloquialisms include:


"Well boy" (hello) "Well butty?" (hello / how are you);
"Shellakybooky" (A snail.);
"Twas like bunkers" (Very tall or steep. Referring to Bunker Hill, a steep local hill);
"De lack" (My girlfriend);
"Up the Deise" (Up Waterford);
"Gallybander" (Catapult typically made from rubber bands);
"Red lead" or "ballybeg ham" (luncheon sausage)
"Stall" (Kiss)
"And well/I'm well I am" (I agree)
"A blaa" A soft bread roll. Two Blaas A Blaa is a doughy, white bread bun (roll) speciality which is particular to Waterford City and County, Ireland. ...

Sister cities

Nickname: Motto: Avancez (Go forward) Coordinates: , Country Province Established August 5, 1583 by Royal Charter of Queen Elizabeth I Government  - City Mayor Andy Wells  - Governing body St. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... This article is about the city of Rochester in Monroe County. ... This article is about the state. ... Saint-Herblain is a commune of the Loire-Atlantique département, in France. ... Traditional city flag City coat of arms Motto: Favet Neptunus eunti (Latin: Shall Neptune favour the traveller) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Pays de la Loire Department Loire-Atlantique (44) Mayor Jean-Marc Ayrault  (PS) (since 1989) City Statistics Land area¹ 65. ...

See also

The Three Sisters are an extensive network of three rivers which drain a large part of Ireland including County Tipperary, County Carlow, County Kilkenny and County Waterford, among others, the rivers enter the sea near Waterford City. ... The River Barrow (Irish: Abhainn na Bearú or An Bhearú) is a river in Ireland. ... The River Nore (Irish: An Fheoir or Abhainn na Feoire) is one of the Three Sisters rivers which flow into the sea at Waterford Harbour in the Republic of Ireland. ... The River Suir (IPA: , Irish An tSiúr or Abhainn na Siúire) is a river in Ireland that flows into the Atlantic Ocean near Waterford after a distance of 183 kilometres (114 miles). ... Little Island is an island on the eastern outskirts of Waterford City in Ireland. ... Johns river is a small river that snakes its way through Waterford city before joining the River Suir at Adelphi Quay. ... The Peoples Park is the largest public park in Waterford city. ... Two Blaas A Blaa is a doughy, white bread bun (roll) speciality which is particular to Waterford City and County, Ireland. ... Woodstown is home to a historic settlement measuring 1. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... The River Suir (IPA: , Irish An tSiúr or Abhainn na Siúire) is a river in Ireland that flows into the Atlantic Ocean near Waterford after a distance of 183 kilometres (114 miles). ... The Waterford Museum of Treasures is a museum for historical artifacts associated with the city of Waterford. ... History The Deise is a region in Ireland that was settled in by a tribe of Native Gaelic people called the Deisi circa 3rd Century AD. They were driven from central parts of the country and settled in the area now known as Co. ...

External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

General

Media

Additional reading

  • Shipbuilding in Waterford 1820-1882, by Bill Irish, ISBN 1 86985791 7
  • History of Waterford, by Joseph Hansard, ISBN 0 9532022 0 8
  • The Déise Dictionary of Waterford Slang boy!, by Cian Foley ISBN 0 9554755 0 3

References

  1. ^ Discover Waterford, by Eamon McEneaney (2001). (ISBN 0-86278-656-8)
  2. ^ Discover Waterford, by Eamon McEneaney (2001). (ISBN 0-86278-656-8)
  3. ^ Census 2006: Population classified by area - cso.ie
  4. ^ Discover Waterford, by Eamon McEneaney (2001). (ISBN 0-86278-656-8)
  5. ^ 9th Century Settlement found at Woodstown - vikingwaterford.com
  6. ^ Waterford News And Star 29/04/2005
  7. ^ Sunday Business Post 31/12/2006
  8. ^ Primary Schools in Waterford City- Education Ireland
  9. ^ Secondary Schools in Waterford City- Education Ireland
  10. ^ Waterford ststion. Railscot - Irish Railways. Retrieved on 2007-09-07.
  11. ^ Waterford Airport
  12. ^ CHC Ireland

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Waterford Foundation - Waterford, Virginia (0 words)
The Waterford Foundation endeavors to preserve the historic buildings and the open spaces of the National Historic Landmark District of Waterford, Virginia; and through education, to increase the public's knowledge of life and work in an early American rural community.
The Board of Directors of the Waterford Foundation has requested recommendations from the public for the new facility to replace the Old School auditorium which was destroy by the January fire.
Kathleen Hughes, president of the Waterford Foundation, announced the appointment of Nancy Doane as the new Executive Director of the Waterford Foundation.
The Waterford School (0 words)
Waterford School provides liberal arts, college preparatory education for students in preschool through twelfth grade.
The benefits of a Waterford education are found in the richness of its curriculum, the quality of its teachers, and the commitment of its students.
Waterford's new Science Center will be the first major project that supports the school's recent Master Campus commitment to become more environmentally responsible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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