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Encyclopedia > Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis Look up Washington in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Latin: Universitatis Washingtonianae

Motto Per veritatem vis
(Strength through truth)
Established February 22, 1853
Type Private
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $5.658 billion
Chancellor Mark Stephen Wrighton
Faculty 3,054
Undergraduates 6,223
Postgraduates 6,067[1]
Other students 1,227 part time students[1]
Location Flag of the United States St. Louis, MO, USA
Campus Urban and Suburban
2,227 acres (9.01 km²)
Danforth Campus, 169 acres (0.7 km²)
Medical Campus, 59 acres
Tyson Research Area, 2,000 acres (8 km²)
Former names Eliot Seminary, Washington Institute in St. Louis
Colors Red and Green[2]            
Mascot Bears
Athletics NCAA Division III UAA
18 varsity teams
Website www.wustl.edu
Public transit access Skinker (Metrolink)
U-City-Big Bend (Metrolink)

Washington University in St. Louis is a private, coeducational, research university located in St. Louis and St. Louis County, Missouri. The University was co-founded in 1853 by William Greenleaf Eliot and Wayman Crow[3] as Eliot Seminary. In 1857, the University was renamed "Washington University" in honor of George Washington[4]. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Mark Stephen Wrighton (born 1949) is an American academic, a chemist, and the current Chancellor of Washington University in St. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article is about the unit of measure known as the acre. ... Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... The Tyson Research Area is a 2,000 acre (8 km²) field stations operated by Washington University in the United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other meanings, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Other information Opened August 26, 2006 Accessible Owned by Bi-State Development Agency dba Metro Traffic Passengers (FY2007) 736 daily 0% The Skinker St. ... The University City-Big Bend St. ... Image File history File links Wustllogo. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... St. ... W.G. Eliot, from UUA Archives William Greenleaf Eliot (1811 - 1887) was a American educator, Unitarian clergyman, and civic leader in Missouri. ... Wayman Crow (1808-1885) was one of the founders of Washington University, a St. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


The University has students and faculty from all 50 states and more than 120 nations[5]. Twenty-two Nobel laureates have been associated with Washington University, nine doing the major part of their pioneering research at the University [5]. Washington University is made up of 7 graduate and undergraduate schools[6] that encompass a broad range of academic fields. In the 2007 U.S. News & World Report rankings, its undergraduate program is ranked 12th overall (tied with Cornell University) and admissions selectivity is ranked 6th (tied with Columbia University). Highly-ranked schools include the Medical School, which is tied for 4th, architecture which is ranked 6th, and the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, ranked 2nd[7]. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... // An academic discipline, or field of study, is a branch of knowledge which is taught or researched at the college or university level. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The George Warren Brown School of Social Work more commonly known as the Brown School of Social Work is one of the worlds leading schools for the training of social workers, ranking 2nd (US News)and 9th (Gourman Report). ...


Despite its official letterhead name, the school is legally incorporated as The Washington University, and popular nicknames for the university include Wash. U. and WUSTL, derived from the initials of the university's name. To prevent confusion over its location, the Board of Trustees added the phrase “in St. Louis” in 1976 [4]. A letterhead is the heading at the top of a sheet of letter paper, usually consisting of a name and an address, and for corporate use, their Corporate design. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ...


The University has an endowment of $5.65 billion. [8] The current Chancellor is Mark S. Wrighton, who has led the university since 1995. He is among the highest paid university heads in the United States [9]. Mark S. Wrighton, Ph. ...


Washington University is well known for hosting United States Presidential and Vice Presidential debates. The University has been selected to host a presidential or vice presidential debate in every United States Presidential election since 1992. Presidential Debates were held at the Washington University Field House in 1992, 2000, and 2004. A Presidential Debate was planned to occur in 1996, but scheduling difficulties between the candidates canceled the debate.[10] Recently, on Monday, November 19, 2007, it was announced that the university was selected to host the only 2008 Vice Presidential Debate on October 2, 2008.[11]

Contents

History

Washington University was co-founded as a nonsectarian, private institution in 1853 by St. Louis leader Wayman Crow, and the Unitarian minister William Greenleaf Eliot, grandfather of the Nobel Prize laureate poet T. S. Eliot. The University's original name at the time of foundation was Eliot Seminary. Eliot, however, was not in favor of the name, and in 1854, the Board of Trustees changed it to Washington Institute in St. Louis in honor of George Washington[4]. In 1857, the name was changed to Washington University. To avoid confusion with over 20 other institutions sharing the Washington name in their titles, the university again changed its name in 1976, restoring the "in St. Louis" suffix to distinguish it in the national media. Washington University in St. ... Wayman Crow (1808-1885) was one of the founders of Washington University, a St. ... W.G. Eliot, from UUA Archives William Greenleaf Eliot (1811 - 1887) was a American educator, Unitarian clergyman, and civic leader in Missouri. ... Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965), was a poet, dramatist and literary critic. ... Zoe 05:30, August 15, 2005 (UTC) . Categories: Possible copyright violations ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Campuses

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Danforth Campus

Main article: Danforth Campus
Brookings Hall
Brookings Hall

Distinguished by its collegiate gothic architecture, the 169-acre (0.7 km²) Danforth Campus lies at the western boundary of Forest Park, partially in the City of St. Louis. Most of the campus is in unincorporated St. Louis County, and the southern part is in suburban Clayton. Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 524 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1845 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 524 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1845 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Brookings Hall is a prominent Collegiate Gothic structure on the campus of Washington University. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... Forest Park may refer to: Towns: Forest Park, Georgia, USA Forest Park, Illinois, USA Forest Park, Ohio, USA Parks: Forest Park (Queens), New York City, USA Forest Park (St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... St. ... Clayton is the county seat of St. ...


Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus was officially dedicated on September 17, 2006, in honor of William H. Danforth, the 13th Chancellor of the University, his family, and the Danforth Foundation. is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Bill H. Danforth is a retired physician, professor of medicine, and academic administrator. ...


Danforth Campus construction was accelerated through a profitable lease of several buildings to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. Through the efforts and influence of David R. Francis, an alumnus and former mayor of St. Louis, Missouri governor and U.S. Interior Secretary, newly-constructed campus buildings on the edge of Forest Park began use for classes when the Fair was over. This included facilities used by the 1904 Summer Olympics, such as Francis Field and Francis Gymnasium [12]. Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... David Rowland Francis (October 1, 1850 - January 15, 1927) was an American Politician. ... This is a listing of all those that have served as the Mayor of the City of St. ... The Governors of Missouri since its statehood in 1820 are: Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Missouri ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... For the park in New York see Forest Park (Queens) McDonnell Planetarium Jewel Box in Forest Park Old Footbridge in Forest Park Forest Park in St. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Francis Field is a stadium in St Louis. ...


The Danforth Campus is accessible by the University City-Big Bend and Skinker MetroLink Stations on MetroLink's recently-opened cross-county extension, which provide easy access to the Medical, North, and West Campuses. MetroLink is a light rail transit system in the Greater St. ...


Medical campus

Washington University Medical Center comprises 135 acres (0.5 km²) spread over approximately 12 city blocks, located along the eastern edge of Forest Park within the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The campus is home to the School of Medicine and its associated teaching hospitals, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children's Hospital. Many of the buildings are connected via a series of sky bridges and corridors. Forest Park may refer to: Towns: Forest Park, Georgia, USA Forest Park, Illinois, USA Forest Park, Ohio, USA Parks: Forest Park (Queens), New York City, USA Forest Park (St. ... The Central West End is a distinct neighborhood in St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Barnes-Jewish Hospital is located in St. ... St. ... A skyway is a path that is traversed without touching the ground. ...


The School's 2,100 employed and volunteer faculty physicians also serve as the medical staff of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children's hospitals, which are part of BJC Healthcare. Washington University and BJC have taken on many joint venture projects, such as the Center for Advanced Medicine, completed in December 2001.


Olin Residence Hall, named for Spencer T. Olin, provides residential services for 200 medical and graduate students[13]. A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


The medical campus is accessible via the Central West End MetroLink Station, which provides a quick link to the Danforth, North, and West Campuses. A MetroLink Train at the Central West End Station Central West End is a St. ...


Medical Campus Includes:

Barnes-Jewish Hospital is located in St. ... The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) is a school for the deaf that teaches students using the oralism approach to education. ... St. ...

North and West campuses

Washington University's North Campus and West Campus principally house administrative functions that are not student-focused. North Campus lies in St. Louis City, near the Delmar Loop. The University acquired the building and adjacent property in 2004, formerly home to the Angelica Uniform Factory[14]. Several University administrative departments are located at the North Campus location, including offices for Quadrangle Housing, Accounting and Treasury Services, Parking and Transportation Services, Army ROTC, and Network Technology Services. The North Campus location also provides off-site storage space for the Performing Arts Department. Renovations are still ongoing; the most recent addition to the North Campus space was a small eatery operated by Bon Appétit Management Company, the University's on-campus food provider, completed during spring semester 2007. The Delmar Loop is an entertainment, cultural and restaurant district located on the western edge of Saint Louis, Missouri in the small city of University City, Missouri. ... ROTC links here. ... This box:  • • The Quaternary sector of industry is the sector of industry that involves the intellectual services. ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... The Bon Appétit Management Company is an onsite custom restaurant company that provides café and catering services to corporations, colleges and universities, and specialty venues. ...


The West Campus is located about a mile to the west of the Danforth Campus in Clayton, Missouri, and primarily consists of a three story former department store building housing mostly administrative space. The West Campus building was home to the Clayton branch of the Famous-Barr department store until 1990, when the University acquired the property and adjacent parking and began a series of renovations[15]. Today, the basement level houses the Library archives, a conference center, and the Writing Center. The ground level still remains a retail space. The upper floors consolidated capital gifts, portions of alumni and development, and information systems offices from across the Danforth and Medical School campuses. There is a music rehearsal room on the second floor where the WUSTL Symphony Orchestra currently practices. The West Campus is also home to the Center for Application of Information Technologies (CAIT), which provides IT training services. Clayton is the county seat of St. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Famous-Barr, St. ... Most colleges, universities, and many secondary schools maintain a Writing Center, which provides students with free assistance on their papers, projects, and reports from trained professionals or peer tutors. ... Information System (example) An Information System (IS) is the system of persons, data records and activities that process the data and information in a given organization, including manual processes or automated processes. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ...


Both the North and West Campuses are accessible by the St. Louis Metrolink, with the Delmar Loop and Forsyth MetroLink Stations directly adjacent to these campuses, which provides easy access around the St. Louis metropolitan area, including all of Washington University's campuses. MetroLink is a light rail transit system in the Greater St. ... Delmar Loop is a St. ... The Forsyth Metrolink Station in St. ...


Tyson Research Center

Main article: Tyson Research Center

Tyson Research Center is a 2,000-acre (8 km²) field station located West of St. Louis on the Meramec River. Washington University obtained Tyson as surplus property from the federal government in 1963. It is used by the University as a biological field station and research/education center. The Tyson Research Center is a 2,000 acre (8 km²) field station owned and operated by Washington University in St. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... The Meramec River Looking North from Route 66 State Park Canoers enjoy a float trip on the Meramec below Leasburg The Meramec River is the longest free-flowing waterway in Missouri -- it wanders some 350 kilometers (220 miles) through six Missouri Ozark Highland counties: Dent, Phelps, Crawford, Franklin, Jefferson, and...


Academics

Arts & Sciences

Holmes Lounge, the central reading room on campus, where students may eat and study
Holmes Lounge, the central reading room on campus, where students may eat and study
Main article: Arts and Sciences at Washington University

The Arts and Sciences at Washington University are composed of three divisions: the College of Arts & Sciences, the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, and University College in Arts & Sciences. Edward S. Macias is Executive Vice Chancellor and Dean of Arts & Sciences. James E. McLeod is the Vice Chancellor for students and Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences. Robert E Thach is Dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...

  • The College of Arts & Sciences is the central undergraduate unit of the University with 330 tenured and tenure-track faculty along with over 100 research scientists, lecturers, artists in residence, and visitors serving about 3,000 undergraduates in 40 academic departments divided into divisions of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences and Mathematics.
  • The Graduate School serves over 1,500 students pursuing Masters and Ph.D. degrees.
  • University College at Washington University in St. Louis grants both graduate and undergraduate degrees, offering courses primarily in the evenings for adult and continuing education.

Look up tenure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Artist-in-residence programs and other residency opportunities allow artists to stay and work elsewhere for arts sake. They offer conditions that are conducive to creativity and they provide for working facilities, ready to be used by individual artists. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ...

Business

The Knight Executive Education Center is a part of the John M. Olin School of Business.
The Knight Executive Education Center is a part of the John M. Olin School of Business.

Founded as the School of Commerce and Finance in 1917, The John M. Olin School of Business was named after entrepreneur John M. Olin in 1988. The school provides degree programs including BSBA, MBA, MS in Finance, Masters in Accounting, part-time Professional MBA, Executive MBA and PhD, as well as non-degree executive education. In 2002, an Executive MBA program was established in Shanghai, in cooperation with Fudan University. The John M. Olin School of Business is a part of Washington University in St. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... The John M. Olin School of Business is a part of Washington University in St. ... The John M. Olin School of Business is a part of Washington University in St. ... John Merrill Olin (November 10, 1892 - September 8, 1982) was an American businessman and conservationist. ... A part-time job carries less hours per week than a full-time job, and usually pays less than a full-time job. ... Executive Education is the term used for programs at graduate-level business schools in the United States that aim to give classes for Chief Executives and other top managers or entrepreneurs. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... For other uses, see Shanghai (disambiguation). ... Fudan University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), located in Shanghai, China, is one of the oldest leading and most selective universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Olin has a network of about 15,000 alumni worldwide[citation needed]. Over the last several years, the school’s endowment has increased to $213 million (2004) and annual gifts average $12 million per year[citation needed]. Simon Hall was opened in 1986 after a donation from John E. Simon. Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Undergraduate BSBA students take 40-60% of their courses at Olin and are able to formally declare majors in eight areas: accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, marketing, managerial economics and strategy, organization and human resources, international business, or operations and supply chain management. Graduate students are able to pursue the MBA degree either full-time or part-time. Students may also take elective courses from other areas in Washington University including law, health administration and many other fields. Mahendra R. Gupta is the Dean of the Olin Business School. Managerial economics (also called business economics), is a branch of economics that applies microeconomic analysis to specific business decisions. ... This article is about human resources as it applies to business, labor, and economies. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ... Supply chain management (SCM) is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the operations of the supply chain as efficiently as possible. ...


Olin graduates are well represented in leadership positions at companies across various industries, including: A. G. Edwards, Anheuser-Busch, Bank of America, Bear Stearns, Deloitte Consulting, Exxon-Mobil, General Mills, IBM, Marriott, Monsanto, JPMorgan Chase, Samsung, and UBS. A.G. Edwards, Inc. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... Bank of America (NYSE: BAC TYO: 8648) is the largest commercial bank in the United States in terms of deposits, and the largest company of its kind in the world. ... The Bear Stearns Companies, Inc. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Exxon-branded gas station in California (actually operated by Valero) Greenpeace protest against Exxon Mobil Exxon Mobil Corporation or ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM), headquartered in Irving, Texas, is an oil producer and distributor formed on November 30, 1999, by the merger of Exxon and Mobil. ... General Mills (NYSE: GIS) is a Fortune 500 corporation, mainly concerned with food products, which is headquartered in Golden Valley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... The Monsanto Company (NYSE: MON) is a multinational agricultural biotechnology corporation. ... JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) is one of the oldest financial services firms in the world. ... Samsung Group is one of the largest South Korean business groupings. ... UBS can refer to: UBS AG, a banking group Unbundled Bitstream Services United Building Society - the name of several financial institutions in different countries around the world. ...


Design & Visual Arts

Created in 2005, the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts combines the strengths of art and architecture into a single collaborative unit offering both undergraduate and graduate programs. The School comprises the following:

  • College of Architecture
  • Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Design
  • College of Art
  • Graduate School of Art
  • Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, considered one of the most distinguished university art collections in the country[citation needed]

Architecture offers BS and BA degrees as well as M.Arch. There is a combined six-year BS/M.Arch degree program as well as joint M.Arch programs with most of the other schools in the University. In 2007, the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Design was ranked 6th in the nation by Design Intelligence[citation needed]. The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, part of the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, is an art museum located on the campus of Washington University in St. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Art offers the BFA and MFA in Art in the context of a full university environment. Students take courses in the College of Arts & Sciences as well as courses in the School of Art to provide a well rounded background. One third of students in the school pursue a combined study degree program, second major, and/or minors in other undergraduate divisions at Washington University[citation needed]. U.S. News & World Report ranked the MFA program 21st in the nation[citation needed]. Marie Bashkirtseff, In the Studio, 1881, Dnipropetrovsk State Art Museum, Dnipropetrovsk. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


In October 2006 the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum moved into new facilities designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect, and former faculty member, Fumihiko Maki[citation needed]. The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually by the Hyatt Foundation to honor a living architect. ... Spiral house in Tokyo Fumihiko Maki (槇文彦, Maki Fumihiko) (born Tokyo, September 6, 1928) is a Japanese architect. ...


Carmon Colangelo is the Dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts. Bruce Lindsey is Dean of the College of Architecture and the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Design. Jeff Pike is Dean of the College and Graduate School of Art.


Engineering

Cupples Hall
Cupples Hall
Main article: Washington University School of Engineering

The Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science was ranked 41 in the 2005-2006 U.S. News undergraduate engineering program ratings[citation needed]. Graduate programs are nominally offered through the Sever Institute of Technology. Its current head is Dean Mary J. Sansalone. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 514 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 514 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Washington University School of Engineering is a part of Washington University in St. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Departments include:

(In summer 2007, Civil Engineering and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering will be merged into the new Mechanical, Aerospace, and Structural Engineering Department. The Engineering Physics Major is no longer offered via the Engineering School for students who did not declare their major prior to Fall 2006.) The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Computer Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) and Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) are names of majors at colleges and universities that involve both the subject of computer engineering and computer science. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Systems engineering techniques are used in complex projects: from spacecrafts to chip design, from robotics to creating large software products to building bridges, Systems engineering uses a host of tools that include modeling & simulation, requirements analysis, and scheduling to manage complexity Systems Engineering (SE) is an interdisciplinary approach and means... Environmental engineering[1][2] is the application of science and engineering principles to improve the environment (air, water, and/or land resources), to provide healthy water, air, and land for human habitation and for other organisms, and to remediate polluted sites. ... Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with the application of physical science (e. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest building as of 2004. ... Engineering physics (EP) is an academic degree, usually at the level of Bachelor of Science. ...


Law

Anheuser Busch Hall, home to the School of Law
Anheuser Busch Hall, home to the School of Law

The Washington University School of Law offers eight joint-degree programs, including JD/MSW, JD/East Asian Studies, and JD/MBA programs. It also offers two graduate degrees in law, the LLM and the MJS (Master of Juridical Studies). The law school offers 3 semesters of courses in the Spring, Summer, and Fall, and requires at least 85 hours of coursework for the JD. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Anheuser-Busch Hall the main Law school building Washington University School of Law, is a private American law school located in Clayton, Missouri. ... Anheuser-Busch Hall the main Law school building Washington University School of Law, is a private American law school located in Clayton, Missouri. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ...


In the 2007 US News & World Report, the law school is ranked 19th nationally, out of 190 law schools[citation needed]. In particular, its Clinical Education Program is currently ranked 4th in the nation[citation needed]. The median LSAT score consistently ranks in the 90th percentile and above[citation needed]. This year, the median score placed the average student in the 96th percentile of test takers[citation needed]. The law school offers a full-time day program, beginning in August, for the J.D. degree. The law school is located in a state-of-the-art building, Anheuser-Busch Hall (opened in 1997). The building combines traditional architecture, a five-story open-stacks library, an integration of indoor and outdoor spaces, and the latest wireless and other technologies. National Jurist ranked Washington University 4th among the "25 Most Wired Law Schools"[citation needed]. The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used for admission to law schools in the United States of America and Canada that are members of the Law School Admissions Council. ... A full time job usually has benefits (such as health insurance) and are often considered careers. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ...


Kent D. Syverud is the Dean of the School of Law. Kent Syverud is Dean of the Washington University School of Law and the Ethan A. H. Shepley University Professor. ...


Medicine

The Washington University School of Medicine is highly regarded as one of the world's leading centers for medical research and training[citation needed]. Among its many recent initiatives, the School played a leadership role in the Human Genome Project, having contributed 25% of the finished sequence [16]. The School pioneered bedside teaching and led in the transformation of empirical knowledge into scientific medicine. The Medical School partners with St. Louis Children's Hospital and Barnes-Jewish Hospital (part of BJC HealthCare), where all physicians are members of the school's faculty. Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. ... The Human Genome Projects (HGP) goal is to understand the genetic make-up of the human species by determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and the genome of a few model organisms. ... Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. ... St. ... Barnes-Jewish Hospital is located in St. ...


Within the Medical School, the Program in Physical Therapy is also highly reputable. It is ranked 2nd in the nation for "Best Physical Therapy Schools" according to U.S. News & World Report[17]. In 1999, the Program was granted approval by Washington University to offer a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) at both the professional and post-professional levels. The two new clinical doctorate programs replaced the Master of Science in Physical Therapy and the Master of Health Science (MHS). With the transition to the DPT, the program would best equip students to manage the changing needs of the healthcare environment and the growing responsibilities of the profession. In its 60-year history, more than 1500 students, most of whom are still actively involved in the physical therapy profession, have graduated from the Program[citation needed]. Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. ... Physical therapy (or physiotherapy[1]) is the provision of services to people and populations to develop, maintain and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) is a postbaccaluareate degree conferred upon successful completion of a doctoral level professional (entry-level) or postprofessional education program. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Health Sciences are the group of disciplines of applied science dealing with human and animal health. ...


The Program in Occupational Therapy is currently ranked 3rd in the nation for "Best Occupational Therapy Schools" according to U.S. News & World Report[citation needed]. The Program offers a Master of Science degree as well as the Occupational Therapy Doctorate (OTD) at the professional and post-professional levels. M. Carolyn Baum, Ph.D. serves as the program director and was the most recent president of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Larry Shapiro is Executive Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs and the Dean of the School of Medicine.


Social Work

Main article: George Warren Brown School of Social Work

The George Warren Brown School of Social Work (commonly called Brown or "GWB") is currently ranked second among Master of Social Work (MSW) programs in the United States[18]. Brown also offers a Ph.D. in Social Work, in cooperation with the Graduate School. The school was endowed by Bettie Bofinger Brown and named for her husband - George Warren Brown - a St. Louis philanthropist and founder of the Brown Shoe Company. The school is housed within Brown and Goldfarb halls. It has a center for Native American research, as well as acclaimed scholars in social security, health, individual development accounts, etc. The George Warren Brown School of Social Work more commonly known as the Brown School of Social Work is one of the worlds leading schools for the training of social workers, ranking 2nd (US News)and 9th (Gourman Report). ... The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a type of masters degree in the field of social work which is received from a graduate school that has been approved by the Council on Social Work Education. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Brown Shoe Company is a footwear company that owns a variety of popular footwear brands in the United States and Canada. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Social security primarily refers to social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment and others. ...


The school's current dean is Edward F. Lawlor.


Museums and library system

With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3.8 million volumes[19]. The main library, Olin Library, is centrally located on the Danforth Campus. Other libraries in the system include: It has been suggested that John M. Olin Library be merged into this article or section. ...

  • Art & Architecture Library
  • Biology Library
  • Business Library
  • Chemistry Library
  • Digital Gateway
  • Earth & Planetary Sciences Library (Ronald Rettner)
  • East Asian Library
  • Law Library
  • Mathematics Library
  • Medical Library (Becker)
  • Music Library
  • Physics Library
  • Social Work Library
  • Special Collections & Archives
  • West Campus Library

The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, established in 1881, is one of the oldest teaching museums in the country and the first art museum established west of the Mississippi river[citation needed]. The collection includes works from 19th, 20th, and 21st century American and European artists, including George Caleb Bingham, Thomas Cole, Pablo Picasso, Max Ernst, Alexander Calder, Jackson Pollock, Rembrandt, Robert Rauschenberg, Barbara Kruger, and Christian Boltanski. Also in the complex is the 3,000 sq ft (300 m²) Newman Money Museum. In October 2006, the Kemper Art museum moved from its original location Steinberg Hall into a new facility designed by Fumihiko Maki. Interestingly, Maki's very first commission was in fact that very same Steinberg Hall on Washington University's campus in 1959, which is directly in front of his newest building, the Kemper Art Museum complex, nearly 40 years after Steinberg. With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... With 14 libraries, the Washington University library system is the largest in the state of Missouri, containing over 3. ... The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, part of the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts, is an art museum located on the campus of Washington University in St. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Fur traders on Missouri River, c. ... Thomas Cole, ca. ... Picasso redirects here. ... Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning in 1948. ... For other persons named Alexander Calder, see Alexander Calder (disambiguation). ... Controversy swirls over the alleged sale of No. ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ... Robert Rauschenberg, Canyon, 1959. ... I Shop, Therefore I Am Barbara Kruger (b. ... Christian Boltanski is a French photographer, sculptor and installation artist (although he refers to himself as a painter, with regard to his concerns in all media). ... Spiral house in Tokyo Fumihiko Maki (槇文彦, Maki Fumihiko) (born Tokyo, September 6, 1928) is a Japanese architect. ...


Research centers and institutes

Psychology Building
Psychology Building

Virtually all faculty members at Washington University engage in academic research, offering opportunities for both undergraduate and graduate students across the University's 7 schools. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 497 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (768 × 1,024 pixels, file size: 497 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... // Tyson Research Center International Society for New Institutional Economics (ISNIE) - an interdisciplinary enterprise combining economics, law, organization theory, political science, sociology and anthropology to understand the institutions of social, political and commercial life, using economics as a common language. ...


During fiscal 2006, $546.3 million was received in total research support, including $451.8 million in federal obligations. The University ranks 5th among all educational institutions receiving research support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the School of Medicine ranks 4th among all medical schools [20].


The Washington University School of Law has five Centers and Institutes, which are mostly housed at the Anheuser-Busch building: Anheuser-Busch Hall the main Law school building Washington University School of Law, is a private American law school located in Clayton, Missouri. ...

  • Center for Empirical Research in the Law - focuses on applying sophisticated empiral methodology to legal studies research.
  • Center for Interdisciplinary Studies - supports interdisciplinary legal research and scholarship.
  • Center for Research on Innovation and Entrepreneurship - provides law students with the ability to work with intellectual property counsel and provide legal advice to both the University and the wider community. Law students collaborate with students from the School of Medicine, Olin Business School, the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, and Arts & Sciences.
  • Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse - collection of documents and information about civil rights cases in specific topics.
  • Whitney R. Harris Institute for Global Legal Studies - focuses as a center for instruction and research in international and comparative law to prepare students for a global society.

Empirical research is any activity that uses direct or indirect observation as its test of reality. ... // Legal research is the process of identifying and retrieving information necessary to support legal decision-making. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ... Legal advice is the giving of a formal and binding opinion regarding the substance or procedure of the law in exchange for financial or other compensation. ... Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. ... The John M. Olin Business School is one of seven academic schools at Washington University in St. ... The George Warren Brown School of Social Work more commonly known as the Brown School of Social Work is one of the worlds leading schools for the training of social workers, ranking 2nd (US News)and 9th (Gourman Report). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Holding The Equal Protection clause applies only to state action, not segregation by privately owned businesses. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The rise of multinational corporations and outsourcing have played a crucial part in globalization. ...

Rankings and reputation

In 2006, Washington University received 22,251 applications for 1,470 Class of 2010 positions [21]. The acceptance rate for the Class of 2010 was 19%. More than 90% of incoming freshmen were ranked in the top 10% of their high school class. Also in 2006, the University ranked fourth overall and second amongst private universities in the number of enrolled National Merit Scholar freshmen, according to the National Merit Scholar Corp.'s annual report[citation needed].


Currently, the undergraduate program is ranked 12th overall, tied with Cornell University, and 6th in admissions selectivity, tied with Columbia University, in the 2007 U.S. News & World Report National Universities ranking[citation needed]. Additionally, 19 undergraduate disciplines are ranked among the top 10 programs in the country.[22] Global rankings include 28th in a ranking of world universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2006 that assesses quality of scientific research leading toward a Nobel Prize.[23] Britain's Times Higher Education Supplement ranked Washington University 48th in the world in 2006.[24] Washington University was ranked 45th nationally in The Washington Monthly's 2006 ranking of universities' contributions to research, community service, and social mobility.[25] In addition, the Olin Business School's undergraduate program is among the top 15 in the country[citation needed]. Cornell redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena, acquiring new knowledge, or correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... Social mobility is the degree to which, in a given society, an individuals social status can change throughout the course of their life (known as intragenerational mobility), or the degree to which that individuals offspring and subsequent generations move up and down the class system (intergenerational mobility). ...


Graduate schools include the School of Medicine, currently ranked 4th in the nation, and the George Warren Brown School of Social Work, currently ranked 2nd. In 2007, the School of Law was ranked 19th while the Olin Business School was ranked in the top 30. [26] Additionally, the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Design was ranked 6th in the nation by Design Intelligence. Washington University School of Medicine, located in St. ... Anheuser-Busch Hall the main Law school building Washington University School of Law, is a private American law school located in Clayton, Missouri. ... The John M. Olin Business School is one of seven academic schools at Washington University in St. ...


Campus life

// Washington University has over 200 undergraduate student organizations on campus. ...

Student organizations

Washington University has over 200 undergraduate student organizations on campus[27]. All are funded by the Washington University Student Union, which has a $2 million plus annual budget that is completely student controlled and is one of the largest student government budgets in the country. Known as SU for short, it sponsors large-scale campus programs including WILD (a semesterly concert in the quad), free copies of the New York Times, USA Today, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch through The Collegiate Readership Program; the Assembly Series, a weekly lecture series; and the campus television station, WUTV and the radio station, KWUR. KWUR was named best radio station in St. Louis of 2003 by the Riverfront Times despite the fact that its signal reaches only a few blocks beyond the boundaries of the campus[28]. There are 12 fraternities and 6 sororities. Student Union is the undergraduate student government of Washington University in St. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The St. ... WUTV is Washington Universitys student run television station. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... KWUR is a radio station in St. ...


Much of these organizations and other campus life amenities will be housed in the new $41 million student center being built on the Danforth Campus, also to be dedicated in honor of the Danforth family. The building will be completed by Fall 2008 and is expected to earn a LEED rating of Gold for environmentally-friendly design. Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... 7 World Trade Center, considered New York Citys first green office tower by gaining gold status in the U.S. Green Building Councils LEED program. ...


Residences

The clocktower at the edge of the South 40.
The clocktower at the edge of the South 40.

75% of undergraduate students live on campus. Most of the dormitories on campus are located on the South 40, named because of its adjacent location south of the Danforth Campus and its size of 40 acres. It is the location of all the freshman dorms as well as several upperclassman dorms. All of the dorms are co-ed. The South 40 is organized as a pedestrian-friendly environment where residences surround a central recreational lawn known as the Swamp. Wohl Student Center, the Habif Health and Wellness Center (Student Health Services), the Residential Life Office, University Police Headquarters, various student owned businesses (e.g. the laundry service, "Wash U Wash"), and the baseball, softball, and intramural fields are also located on the South 40. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (666x845, 270 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Washington University in St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (666x845, 270 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Washington University in St. ... Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ... A student activity center or SAC, is a type of building found on university campuses. ... University police (or campus police) in the United States are sworn police officers employed by a college or university to protect the campus and surrounding areas and the people who live on, work on and visit it. ...


Another group of residences, known as the North Side, is located in the northwest corner of Danforth Campus. Only open to upperclassmen and January Scholars, the North Side consists of Millbrook Apartments, The Village, and all fraternity houses except the Zeta Beta Tau house, which is off campus and located just northwest of the South 40. Sororities at Washington University do not have houses by their own accord. The Village is a group of residences where students who have similar interests or academic goals apply as small groups of 4 to 24, known as BLOCs, to live together in clustered suites. Like the South 40, the residences around the Village also surround a recreational lawn as well as its own student center. Formerly known as The Hilltop Campus, Danforth Campus at Washington University in St. ...


Student media

Washington University supports four major student-run media outlets. The university's student newspaper, Student Life, is the main source for on-campus news for students. KWUR (90.3 FM) serves as the students' official radio station; the station also attracts an audience in the immediately surrounding community due to its eclectic and free-form musical programming. Though KWUR offers streaming content through the Internet, the station only broadcasts at 10 watts[28], and its frequent applications to the FCC to increase its power have been unsuccessful. WUTV is the university's closed-circuit television channel. The university's main political publication is the Washington University Political Review (nicknamed "WUPR"), a student-run nonpartisan biweekly magazine. The Washington Witness, part of the national Collegiate Network, is a nonpartisan conservative and contrarian biweekly published by the school's Conservative Leadership Association. Washington University undergraduates publish two literary and art journals, The Eliot Review and Spires Intercollegiate Arts and Literary Magazine. A variety of other publications also serve the university community, ranging from in-house academic journals to glossy alumni magazines to organization newsletters. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ... Student Life is the independent student-run newspaper of Washington University in St. ... KWUR is a radio station in St. ... FCC redirects here. ... WUTV is Washington Universitys student run television station. ... television cameras for surveillance. ... The term television channel generally refers to either a television station or its cable/satellite counterpart (both outlined below). ... The Washington University Political Review, nicknamed WUPR, is a student-run biweekly political magazine at Washington University in St. ... Collegiate Network The Collegiate Network (also, CN) is a non-profit, non-partisan tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization that provides financial and technical assistance to student editors and writers of almost 100 independent, largely conservative, publications at leading colleges and universities around the country. ... Spires Fall 2001 Cover Spires is an intercollegiate arts and literary magazine established in 1994 by undergraduates at Washington University in St. ... Scientific journals are one type of academic journal An academic journal is a regularly-published, peer-reviewed publication that publishes scholarship relating to an academic discipline. ...


Athletics

WUSTL's sports teams are called the Bears. They participate in the University Athletic Association and the NCAA Division III. The Bears have won 13 NCAA Division III Championships, four in women's basketball (1998-2001)[29], nine in women's volleyball (1989, 1991-1996, 2003, 2007)[30], and 122 UAA titles in 14 different sports[31]. The Athletic Department is headed by John Schael who has served as director of athletics since 1978. The 2000 Division III Central Region winner of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics/Continental Airlines Athletics Director of the Year award[32], Schael has helped orchestrate the Bears athletics transformation into one of the top departments in Division III[33]. Washington University in St. Louis is home of Francis Field, site of the 1904 Summer Olympics. Francis Field is also home of the Washington University in St. Louis Football, Soccer, and Track and Field teams. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... This article is about the sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... UAA is an acronym for Undeliverable As Addressed Unified Access Architecture Uniform Adoption Act Universal Administered Address University Athletic Association University Aviation Association University of Alaska Anchorage This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... blah blah Modern athletic directors are often in a coaching misconduct being proven, often the athletic director will be terminated along with the offending coach. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... Francis Field is a stadium in St Louis. ... The 1904 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the III Olympiad, were held in St. ... Francis Field is a stadium in St Louis. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ...

  • WUSTL women's volleyball team has enjoyed Division III national champions in 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2003, 2007. In 2007 the Bears defeated University of Wisconsin-Whitewater in the Championship game and finished the season 33-5[34].
  • In Men's Basketball WUSTL lost to Virginia Wesleyan College in the 2007 NCAA Final Four, but defeated Wooster in the third place game. Junior forward Troy Ruths earned first-team All-America honors by DIII News, third-team accolades by the NABC, and honorable-mention honors by D3hoops.com. Freshman guard Aaron Thompson was named to the DIII News All-Freshman Team[35].
  • The women's Basketball team has had four consecutive national titles from 1998-2001. In 2007 both the men's and women's teams made the Final Four. The women lost to DePauw in the title game[36].
  • Having made 17 NCAA Tournament appearances, the WUSTL's men's soccer program is one of the nation's most storied. Since the inception of the Division III tournament in 1974, the Bears have finished as national runners-up three times (1978, 1985, 1987). The Bears have also posted a 22-16-4NCAA Tournament record (.585). The Bears have endured just three losing seasons out of the last 18, and none since 1994. Washington University has a 193-91-26 (.665) record over that span, including five NCAA Tournament appearances, two University Athletic Association (UAA) titles and a Division III Final Four appearance in 1997[37].
  • The Swimming and Diving teams are led by eight year head coach Brad Shively. In 2005-2006, Shively led the Red and Green to their top finishes in program history. The women placed fifth at the NCAA Championships, while the men took sixth. Additionally, Seniors Michael Slavik (24-time All-American) and Eric Triebe (26-time All-American) won the first (50 free - 20.46 Michael Slavik) and second (200 free - 1:39.12 Eric Triebe) individual national titles in Washington University history. [38] Since 1979, 56 Bears student-athletes have earned 304 All-America citations. Additionally, the women's team has produced a composite dual meet record of 165-57, while the men's team has compiled a 144-90 mark[39].
  • The cross-country teams are managed by sixth-year head coach Jeff Stiles. The women won their second-straight Midwest Region title in 2006, and placed fourth for their fourth top-four finish in the last five seasons. The men qualified for the NCAA Championships for the first time since 1997 and fourth time overall. All told, the men's and women's cross country teams have won 12 UAA titles (eight women, four men), qualified as a team for the NCAA Championships 10 times (six women, four men) and sent 32 individual qualifiers to the Championships. Since 1997, the Bears have also produced 10 All-Americans; seven individuals have combined to total All-America 11 honors[citation needed].
  • Since the inception of the Washington University softball program in 2000, the team has captured 5 UAA championships and has made 6 consecutive trips to the NCAA Tournament, including its 2007 College World Series runner-up finish. [40]
  • The men's roller hockey team has made the national tournament from 2003-2006, finishing as high as #3 in the nation for Division II [citation needed].

Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The University of Wisconsin–Whitewater (also known as UW-Whitewater) is part of the University of Wisconsin System, located in Whitewater, Wisconsin. ... Virginia Wesleyan College is a small Methodist liberal arts college on the border of Virginia Beach and Norfolk, Virginia offering a Bachelor of Arts in many disciplines and has added Bachelor of Science programs as well. ... This article is about the manufacturer of model airplanes. ... NABC is an initialism that may refer to any of the following: National Association of Basketball Coaches, a trade association of mens college basketball coaches in the United States North American Boxing Council, a sanctioning body for boxing in North America Category: ... D3hoops. ... This article is about the sport. ... Founded in 1837, DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, is a selective private liberal arts college with a 2002 enrollment of 2,339. ... The NCAA began conducting a mens soccer national championship tournament in 1959 with an eight-team tournament. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Washington University in St. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...

Traditions

Gates at Francis Field
Gates at Francis Field
  • WILD - Walk In, Lay Down, the semesterly concert in the Quad which brings in popular acts such as Guster, Lil' Jon, Ben Folds, Busta Rhymes, Live, and the Black Eyed Peas.
  • Bauhaus - Annual Halloween costume party sponsored by the Architecture Student Council, held in a giant tent in front of the architecture school.
  • Thurtene carnival - The oldest and largest student-run carnival in the nation, run by Thurtene Honorary[41].
  • Mr. WU - A contest to select and crown one undergraduate male who exemplifies the epitome of a Washington University student through personality, character, integrity, extra-curricular involvement and contribution to the Washington University and extending community. Candidates raise money for a local charity during the weeks leading up to the event, and all ticket sales benefit this charity.
  • Vertigo - A dance party put on by the Engineering School Council (EnCouncil), featuring an innovative 8'x16' computer-controlled modular LED light-up dance floor built by students. The dance floor has since become a hit in St. Louis[citation needed].
  • Cultural Shows - Washington University student groups put on several multicultural shows held each year, all of which sell out within hours of tickets going on sale. Ashoka, the Indian student group, puts on a performance for Diwali, the Indian festival of lights, that includes a skit and dances; Black Anthology is a student-run performance arts show celebrating Black culture; Lunar New Year Festival is a collaboration between the many Asian organizations on campus culminating in a show to celebrate the holiday with a skit and dances from Chinese, Japanese and Korean cultures; the Association of Latin American Students showcases various forms of Latin and Spanish dances during their performance, Carnaval.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 374 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 374 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Guster is an alternative rock band that is known for its live performances, unique sound, humor, and cult following formed by Adam Gardner, Ryan Miller, and Brian Rosenworcelin 1991 while attending Tufts University in Boston. ... Lil Jon This article is about the American rap producer. ... Benjamin Scott Folds (born September 12, 1966, in Winston-Salem, North Carolina[1]) is an American singer-songwriter and the former frontman of the musical group Ben Folds Five. ... Trevor Smith (born on May 20, 1972), better known as Busta Rhymes, is an American hip hop musician and actor. ... Live (IPA pronunciation: , rhymes with five)[2] (also typeset as LIVE) is an American alternative rock band from York, Pennsylvania, comprised of Ed Kowalczyk (lead vocals and guitar), Chad Taylor (lead guitar), Patrick Dahlheimer (bass guitar) and Chad Gracey (drums). ... This article is about the American hip hop group. ... College students dressed up for Halloween. ... Thurtene Honorary is an honorary society for junior students at Washington University in St. ... Diwali,or Deepawali, (also called Tihar and Swanti in Nepal) (Markiscarali) is a major Indian and Nepalese festive holiday. ... African American culture or Black culture, in the United States, includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Notable Washington University people

// Playwright Tennessee Williams Morris Carnovsky (AB): stage and film actor; target of Hollywood blacklist; Theatre Hall of Fame inductee Anita Diamant (AB 1973): novelist Jon Feltheimer (AB): CEO of Lionsgate Films Bernard Fuchs (MFA 1954): painter and illustrator John Gardner (AB 1955): novelist Robert Guillaume: stage and television actor Henry... Chemistry 1970: Luis F. Leloir, Faculty of Medicine 1944 1980: Paul Berg, Faculty of Medicine 1954-1959 2004: Aaron Ciechanover, M.D., D.Sc. ... Douglass Cecil North (born November 5, 1920) is co-recipient of the 1993 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... Carl Ferdinand Cori (December 5, 1896 – October 20, 1984) was an American biochemist born in Prague (then in Austria-Hungary) who, together with his wife Gerty Cori and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, received a Nobel Prize in 1947 for their discovery of how glycogen (animal starch) - a derivative of glucose... Dr. Gerty Cori Dr. Gerty Theresa Cori, née Radnitz, (August 15, 1896 – October 26, 1957) was an American biochemist born in Prague (then Austria-Hungary) who, together with her husband Carl Ferdinand Cori and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, received a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1947 for... Arthur Holly Compton (September 10, 1892 – March 15, 1962) won the Nobel Prize in Physics (1927) for discovery of the Compton effect named in his honor. ... Stanley Elkin (May 11, 1930 - May 31, 1995) was the author of satirical novels which gently poked fun at American consumerism, popular culture and male-female relationships. ... William H. Gass (born July 30, 1924 in Fargo, North Dakota) is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, critic and teacher. ... Rita Levi-Montalcini (born April 22, 1909) is an Italian neurologist who, together with colleague Stanley Cohen, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of growth factors. ... Sexology is the systematic study of human sexuality. ... Time magazine, May 25, 1970 The Masters and Johnson research team, made up of William Masters and Virginia E. Johnson, pioneered research into the nature of human sexual response and the diagnosis and treatment of sexual disorders and dysfunctions from 1957 until the 1990s. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Howard Nemerov (February 29, 1920 – July 5, 1991) was United States Poet Laureate on two separate occasions: from 1963 to 1964, and from 1988 to 1990. ... Mona Jane Van Duyn (May 9, 1921 - December 2, 2004) was an American poet. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Charles W. Burson was a legal counsel and Chief of Staff to United States Vice President Al Gore. ... Gerald Early (b. ... Reagan redirects here. ... Murray Lew Weidenbaum (born 1927), United States is an American economist. ...

Further reading

  • Ralph E. Morrow, Washington University in St. Louis: A History St. Louis: Missouri Historical Society Press, 1996.
  • Candace O'Connor, Beginning a Great Work: Washington University, 1853-2003 St. Louis: Washington University in St. Louis, 2003.

References

  1. ^ a b Enrollments, degrees, and admissions. FACTS 2007.
  2. ^ Washington University in St. Louis New Logotype. Washington University in St. Louis: University Libraries.
  3. ^ Co-Founders of Washington University in St. Louis: Wayman Crow and William Greenleaf Eliot. Washington University in St. Louis: University Libraries.
  4. ^ a b c Origin of the "Washington" Name. Washington University in St. Louis: University Libraries.
  5. ^ a b A distinguished faculty. FACTS 2007.
  6. ^ Schools and Academic Departments. Washington University in St. Louis homepage.
  7. ^ Rankings from Washington University School Rankings. The Medical School and Social Work rankings are from US News and World Report, while the architecture ranking is from Design Intelligence.
  8. ^ Fiscal Year 2007 Financial Highlights. Annual Report 2006-2007.
  9. ^ Lewis, Elizabeth. "Chancellor's salary higher than Harvard, Duke", Student Life, October 26, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-10-28. 
  10. ^ http://record.wustl.edu/archive/1996/09-26-96/7800.html
  11. ^ http://media.www.studlife.com/media/storage/paper337/news/2007/11/19/News/University.To.Host.2008.Vice.Presidential.Debate-3110565.shtml
  12. ^ O'Connor, Candace. "A Glorious World's Fair Transforms a University Campus", Washington University in St. Louis Magazine, Summer 2004. Retrieved on 2007-10-27. 
  13. ^ Olin Hall. Washington University School of Medicine.
  14. ^ Clendennen, Andy. "Sun rises on University's North Campus", Record, July 23, 2004. 
  15. ^ Historical Campus Tour: West Campus. Washington University in St. Louis homepage.
  16. ^ GSC: Information. Genome Sequencing Center.
  17. ^ "The Best Graduate Schools 2006". U.S. News & World Report.
  18. ^ America's Best Graduate Schools 2008: Health: Social Work. U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-10-27.
  19. ^ Library Facts: By the Numbers. Washington University in St. Louis Libraries.
  20. ^ Research support exceeds $546 million. FACTS 2007.
  21. ^ Full-time students top 10,800. FACTS 2007.
  22. ^ WUSTL is top 10 in 19 disciplines. Washington University Record. Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  23. ^ USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities: Top Schools. U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved on 2006-08-21.
  24. ^ The Times Higher World University Rankings. The Times Higher Education Supplement. Retrieved on 2007-01-14.
  25. ^ National Rankings. The Washington Monthly. Retrieved on 2006-08-12.
  26. ^ National Rankings. US News. Retrieved on 2007-09-01.
  27. ^ Directory of Student Groups. Washington University Student Union.
  28. ^ a b Best of St. Louis. Riverfront Times.
  29. ^ Women's Basketball. Washington University Athletics.
  30. ^ Volleyball. Washington University Athletics.
  31. ^ Athletic Titles. Washington University Athletics.
  32. ^ John Schael. Washington University Athletics.
  33. ^ John Schael. Washington University Athletics.
  34. ^ Volleyball. Washington University Athletics.
  35. ^ Men's Basketball. Washington University Athletics.
  36. ^ Women's Basketball. Washington University Athletics.
  37. ^ Womens Soccer. Washington University Athletics.
  38. ^ http://d3swimming.com/results/results-view.php?type=Finals&meetid=398
  39. ^ Volleyball. Washington University Athletics.
  40. ^ 2007 Washington University Softball Media Guide
  41. ^ Schoenherr, Neil. "Let your imagination ride at Thurtene Carnival April 22-23", Washington University in St. Louis News & Information, April 19, 2006. 

is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Student Union is the undergraduate student government of Washington University in St. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

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