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Encyclopedia > Washington Heights, Manhattan
Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge. Note Little Red Lighthouse at base of east tower.
Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge. Note Little Red Lighthouse at base of east tower.

Washington Heights is a New York City neighborhood in the northern reaches of the borough of Manhattan. It is named for Fort Washington, a fortification constructed by Continental Army troops during the American Revolutionary War at the highest point on Manhattan island to defend the area from the British forces. During the Battle of Fort Washington, on November 16, 1776, the fort was captured by the British at great cost to the American forces; 130 soldiers were killed or wounded, and an additional 2,700 captured and held as prisoners, many of whom died on prison ships anchored in New York Harbor. The progress of the battle is marked by a series of bronze plaques along Broadway. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 420 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1681 × 2400 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 420 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1681 × 2400 pixel, file size: 2. ... For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge. ... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Five Boroughs redirects here. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... Fort Washington was a fortified position near the north end of Manhattan Island (now part of New York City) and was located at the highest point on the island. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Combatants United States Britain Hessian Army Commanders George Washington Robert Magaw William Howe Wilhelm Knyphausen Strength 2,900 8,000 Casualties 53 killed, 96 wounded, & 2,818 captured 78 killed, 374 wounded Fort Washington was a fort located at the upermost tip of Manhattan, New York overlooking the Hudson River... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... A prison police boat on its way in Venice A prison ship, or hulk, is a vessel used as a prison, often to hold convicts awaiting transportion to prison colonies such as New South Wales. ... New York Harbor, a geographic term, refers collectively to the rivers, bays, and tidal estuaries near the mouth of the Hudson River in the vicinity of New York City. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ...

Contents

Geography

Washington Heights is on the high ridge in Upper Manhattan that rises steeply north of the narrow valley that carries 125th Street to the former ferry landing on the Hudson River. Though the neighborhood was once considered to run as far south as 125th Street, modern usage defines the neighborhood as running north from Harlem (Hamilton Heights) at 155th Street to Inwood, topping out just below Dyckman Street.[1] Upper Manhattan is an area in New York City consisting of the thin, northern neck of the island of Manhattan. ... 125th Street between Park Avenue and Madison Avenue Christmas shopping on 125th Street 125th Street is a two-way street that runs east-west in the New York City borough of Manhattan, considered the Main Street of Harlem; It is also called Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Hamilton Heights is a neighborhood in Northern Manhattan in New York City. ... 155th Street is a major crosstown street in the Washington Heights neighborhood, in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Broadway and Dyckman Street intersection in Inwood. ... Dyckman Street is a station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ...


Manhattan's Highest Point

Ten blocks from the northern end of Washington Heights, in its Hudson Heights neighborhood near Pinehurst Avenue and 183rd Street in Bennett Park, is a plaque marking Manhattan's highest natural elevation, 265 ft (80.8 m) above sea level, at what was the location of Fort Washington, the Revolutionary War camp of General George Washington and his troop. It is from the general, who later become the first United States president, that Washington Heights takes its name.[2] Bennett Park (James Gordon Bennett Park) is a public park in New York City. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


Transportation

Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (a pedestrian bridge that has been closed for many years); the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge. In this photo, looking north, the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan is on the left and the Bronx is on the right)
Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (a pedestrian bridge that has been closed for many years); the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge. In this photo, looking north, the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan is on the left and the Bronx is on the right)

Washington Heights is connected to Fort Lee, New Jersey via the George Washington Bridge. The George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal is located at the Manhattan end of the bridge. The Trans-Manhattan Expressway, a portion of Interstate 95, proceeds from the George Washington Bridge in a trench between 178th and 179th Streets. To the east, the Highway leads to the Alexander Hamilton Bridge across the Harlem River to the Bronx and the Cross-Bronx Expressway. The Washington Bridge crosses the Harlem River just north of the Alexander Hamilton Bridge. High Bridge is the oldest Harlem River span still in existence, crossing the river just south of the Alexander Hamilton Bridge. Originally it carried the Croton Aqueduct as part of the New York City water system and later functioned as a pedestrian bridge that has been closed since 1970. It has been recently announced High Bridge will reopen after a 20 million dollar renovation project. Image File history File links Harlem River with the High Bridge, the Alexander Hamilton Bridge and the Washington Bridge visible, looking north, mid-December 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Harlem River with the High Bridge, the Alexander Hamilton Bridge and the Washington Bridge visible, looking north, mid-December 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The High Bridge over the Harlem River as seen in 1890. ... Interstate 95, the major Interstate Highway along the East Coast of the United States, runs 23. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Map highlighting Fort Lees location within Bergen County. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge. ... The George Washington Bridge Bus Station is a commuter bus terminal located at the Manhattan end of the George Washington Bridge in Washington Heights. ... The Trans-Manhattan Expressway is a highway in New York City. ... Interstate 95, the major Interstate Highway along the East Coast of the United States, runs 23. ... Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (closed to traffic) in the foreground; the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge furthest away. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... The Cross-Bronx Expressway is a major expressway in New York City. ... Three of the bridges that cross the Harlem River are visible in this photo of the river: the High Bridge (closed to traffic) in the foreground; the Alexander Hamilton Bridge (part of Interstate 95); and the Washington Bridge furthest away. ... The High Bridge over the Harlem River as seen in 1890. ... The Croton Aqueduct was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City between 1837 and 1842. ...


Subways

Washington Heights is served by the New York City Subway. On the Eighth Avenue Line (A and C) service is available at the 155th Street, 163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue, 168th Street station. The C line ends at 168th St. The A train continues and stops at 175th Street–George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal, 181st Street, 190th Street, and Dyckman Street. Along the Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line, the 1 train has stations at 157th Street, 168th Street, 181st Street, and 191st Street. Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ... A 1941 view of a sign for the Eighth Avenue Subway The Eighth Avenue Line is the original rapid transit line of the Independent Subway System (IND), now run by the New York City Transit Authority as part of the New York City Subway system. ... 207th Street to Lefferts Boulevard, Far Rockaway, or Rockaway Park note: dashed line shows rush hour only service The A Eighth Avenue Express is a rapid transit service of the New York City Subway. ... The A Eighth Avenue Express and C Eighth Avenue Local are two services of the New York City Subway. ... 155th Street is a subway station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ... 163 St-Amsterdam Ave is a New York Subway station located in Washington Heights, one of the northermost neighborhoods in Manhattan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it easier to understand, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 175th Street–George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal (usually shortened to simply 175th Street) is a station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway; it is served at all times by the A train. ... 181st Street is a station on the New York City Subways IND Eighth Avenue Line, located on Fort Washington Avenue and 181st Street, a main shopping district. ... 190th Street (originally 190th Street-Overlook Terrace), located on Fort Washington Avenue, about 200 yards (meters) north of 190th Street, has two tracks and two side platforms. ... The Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line, also known as the IRT West Side Line, is one of the lines of the IRT division of the New York City Subway. ... The 1 Broadway–Seventh Avenue Local is a service of the New York City Subway. ... 157th Street is a station on the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ... 168th Street, or 168th Street–Washington Heights, is a station on the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ... 181st Street is a station on the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ... 191st Street is a station on the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. ...


Noted sites

Among the Heights' now-vanished riverfront estates was "Minnie's Land," the home of artist John James Audubon, who is buried in Trinity Church Cemetery churchyard of the neighborhood's Church of the Intercession (1915), a masterpiece by architect Bertram Goodhue. At Audubon Terrace is a cluster of five underused Beaux Arts museum buildings of distinguished architecture. Columbia University Medical Center and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, the medical campus and school, respectively, of Columbia University, lie in the area of 168th Street and Broadway, occupying the former site of Hilltop Park, the home of the New York Highlanders (now known as the New York Yankees) from 1903 to 1912. Across the street is the New Balance Track and Field center, the nation's premier indoor track and home to the Track and Field hall of fame. John James Audubon (April 26, 1785 – January 27, 1851) was an American ornithologist, naturalist, hunter, and painter. ... Trinity Church Close-up of Trinity Church Trinity Church, at the corner of Broadway and Wall Street in New York City, viewed from the World Trade Center A glimpse of New York from Trinity Church steeple. ... Goodhue by Lee Lawrie, holding the Rockefeller Chapel, Chicago, Illinois Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue (April 28, 1869–April 23, 1924) was a renowned American architect celebrated for his work in neo-gothic design. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... Columbia University Medical Center is name of the medical complex associated with Columbia University located in Washington Heights area of Manhattan. ... Seal of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons The Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, abbreviated P&S, is a graduate school of Columbia University located on the health sciences campus in the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...

The Cuxa Cloister, at The Cloisters
The Cuxa Cloister, at The Cloisters

The best known cultural site and tourist attraction in Washington Heights is The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park at the northern end of the neighborhood, with spectacular views across the Hudson to the New Jersey Palisades. This branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is devoted to Medieval art and culture, and is located in a medieval-style building, portions of which were purchased in Europe, brought to the United States, and reassembled. Another major museum, though little visited, is The Hispanic Society of America, which has the largest collection of works from El Greco and Goya outside of the Museo del Prado, including one of Goya's famous paintings of Cayetana, Duchess of Alba. The Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum, 300 pixels x 400 pixels, © 2003, by Wikipedia user:alex756, all rights reserved; the license granted herein is to Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. ... The Cloisters, Metropolitan Museum, 300 pixels x 400 pixels, © 2003, by Wikipedia user:alex756, all rights reserved; the license granted herein is to Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... The Park in late March 2007 Fort Tryon Fort Tryon Park is a public park located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, USA, . It is situated on a 67-acre (270,000 m²) ridge in Upper Manhattan, with a commanding view of the... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as the Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Byzantine monumental Church mosaics are a crowning glory of Medieval Art. ... The Hispanic Society of America is a museum of Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American art and artifacts, as well as a rare books and manuscripts research library. ... For the Vangelis album, see El Greco (album). ... Goya redirects here. ... Bold text The Museo del Prado is a famous museum and art gallery located in Madrid; the capital of Spain. ...


Manhattan's oldest remaining house, the Morris-Jumel Mansion, is located in the landmarked Jumel Terrace Historic District, located between West 160th and West 162nd Street, just east of St. Nicholas Avenue. An AAM-accredited historic house museum, the Mansion interprets the colonial era, the period when General George Washington occupied it during the American Revolutionary War, and the early 19th century in New York. The Morris-Jumel Mansion is located in historic Washington Heights and is the oldest house in Manhattan. ... The American Association of Museums (AAM) is a non-profit association that has been bringing museums together since its founding in 1906, helping to develop standards and best practices, gathering and sharing knowledge, and providing advocacy on issues of concern to the entire museum community. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


In Fort Washington Park[3] you'll find the Little Red Lighthouse, a small lighthouse located at the tip of Jeffrey's Hook on the Hudson River at the base of the eastern stanchion of the George Washington Bridge. It was made famous by a 1942 children's book and is the site of a namesake festival in the late summer. A a 5.85-mile recreational swim finishes there in early autumn.[4] It's also a popular place to watch for peregrine falcons.[5] The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ...


Parks

Bennett Park (James Gordon Bennett Park) is a public park in New York City. ... The Park in late March 2007 Fort Tryon Fort Tryon Park is a public park located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, USA, . It is situated on a 67-acre (270,000 m²) ridge in Upper Manhattan, with a commanding view of the... Garden at The Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park, New York City The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European Middle Ages. ... The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ... Highbridge Park is located in Washington Heights on the banks of the Harlem River near the northernmost tip of the New York City borough of Manhattan, between 155th St. ... Riverside Park is a scenic waterfront public park on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, consisting of a narrow four-mile strip of land between the Hudson River and the gently curving rise-and-fall of Riverside Drive. ...

Community

The neighborhood has a majority Dominican population (the area is sometimes referred to as "Quisqueya Heights"), and Spanish is frequently heard being spoken on the streets.[7] Washington Heights has been the most important base for Dominican accomplishment in political, non-profit, cultural, and athletic arenas in the United States since the 1960s. Most of the neighborhood businesses are Dominican owned, driving the local economy.[1]


Heralding the arts scene north of Central Park is the annual Uptown Arts Stroll (www.artsstroll2007.com). Artists from Washington Heights, Inwood and Marble Hill are featured in public locations throughout the upper Manhattan each summer for several weeks.


The Manhattan Times publishes news about Washington Heights weekly in Spanish and English. The annual restaurant guide highlights the neighborhood's top restaurants. www.manhattantimes.com


Fort Tryon, Frankfurt-on-the-Hudson and Hudson Heights

Main article: Hudson Heights

In the years after World War I, the area south of Fort Tryon Park borrowed the park's name. Fort Tryon was the name of the area between Broadway and the Hudson River, and south of the park to W. 179th Street.[8] References to the old name survive in the Fort Tryon Jewish Center (on Fort Washington Avenue between W. 183rd and W. 185th Streets (there is no W. 184th Street on Fort Washington Avenue)), the Fort Tryon Deli and Grocery (also on Fort Washington Avenue, at W. 187th Street), and in the pages of the Not for Tourists Guide to New York City[9] Hudson Heights is a Manhattan neighborhood located within the larger area known as Washington Heights in New York City. ... The Park in late March 2007 Fort Tryon Fort Tryon Park is a public park located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, USA, . It is situated on a 67-acre (270,000 m²) ridge in Upper Manhattan, with a commanding view of the...


The neighborhood's name had changed by the late 1940s. Jews from Germany and Austria were leaving home as the Nazi party came to party. A disproportionately large number of Germans who settled in the area had come from Frankfurt-am-Main, giving rise to Frankfurt-on-the-Hudson.[10] So many Jewish immigrants lived in Washington Heights after World War II that the neighborhood around Broadway and W. 160th Street was jokingly referred to as the Fourth Reich.[11] There remains a significant Jewish population, particularly on the west side of Broadway, descended from the previous wave of immigration, as well as students (and recent graduates) of the neighborhood's Yeshiva University. Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ...


Currently the area is referred to as "Hudson Heights," especially among residents, real estate agents and in the media. Hudson Heights is generally considered to extend as far east as Broadway,[12][13], although others shrink it to the blocks between Fort Washington Avenue and the Hudson River. Hudson Heights is a Manhattan neighborhood located within the larger area known as Washington Heights in New York City. ...


The name seems to have stuck starting in the 1990s, when neighborhood activists started using it.[13] By then, the neighborhood's previous name, Frankfurt-on-the-Hudson, no longer fit.


As Soviet (and, later, Russian) immigrants filled the area, Russian became far more common than German. Once Spanish become prevalent, and English was the lingua franca, the German nickname fell by the wayside. Even though Hudson Heights isn't a terribly original name, it makes sense since the highest natural point on Manhattan is in Bennett Park. Lingua franca, literally Frankish language in Italian, was originally a mixed language consisting largely of Italian plus a vocabulary drawn from Turkish, Persian, French, Greek and Arabic and used for communication throughout the Middle East. ... Bennett Park was a baseball park, named after Charlie Bennett, that formerly existed in Detroit, Michigan, at Michigan and Trumbull. ...


Fort George

Hudson Heights isn't the only Washington Heights neighborhood with a distinct name. Historically, Fort George runs from Broadway east to the Harlem River, and from West 181st Street north to Dyckman Street and Sherman Creek. The largest institution in Fort George is Yeshiva University, whose main campus sits east of Amsterdam Avenue in Highbridge Park. A branch of the Young Men's & Women's Hebrew Association is in the neighborhood, and George Washington High School sits on the site of the original Fort George. Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... Highbridge Park is located in Washington Heights on the banks of the Harlem River near the northernmost tip of the New York City borough of Manhattan, between 155th St. ... George Washington High School was a secondary school located in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in New York City, New York. ...


One of Manhattan's rare semi-private streets is there. Washington Terrace runs south of West 186th Street for a half-block between Audubon and Amsterdam Avenues. The single-family homes there were built for middle-class families but some have been unoccupied for years.


It should be noted that younger people and new arrivals don't use the old Fort George name, preferring to refer to the neighborhood simply as Washington Heights.


Sherman Creek and El Alto

Sherman Creek is a small inlet of the Harlem River located south of West 201st Street, north of the Harlem River Drive, and east of Tenth Avenue. As a name for the several blocks around it, Sherman Creek is something of a historical relic, as many people don't care to distinguish it from the surrounding parts of Washington Heights. The name "Sherman Creek" in reference to a residential neighborhood, may make a re-appearance if a much-discussed huge condo complex one day gets off the ground there.


Municipal planners haven't stopped using the name, however. The Manhattan Institute held a forum, "Saving Sherman Creek," in January 2006 at the Harvard Club of New York.[14] The New York City Economic Development Council is studying a $9.1 billion plan to reinvigorate the area.[15] The Daily News (New York) has written about the project.[16] The Harvard Club of New York, incorporated in 1887, is housed in adjoining lots at 27 West 44th Street and 35 West 44th Street. ... Daily News Building, John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood, architects, rendering by Hugh Ferriss. ...


Interestingly, new names for neighborhoods are generally considered to be ersatz creations of real estate agents and, therefore, emblematic of gentrification. However, the newest name for Washington Heights -- an alternative, really -- comes not from people with dollar signs in their eyes. The Spanish-speaking Caribbean immigrants who have flocked here for decades call Washington Heights a name worthy of its elevation: El Alto.


Crime Epidemic

Washington Heights was severely affected by the crack cocaine epidemic of the early/mid-1980s. This was due, in part, to the neighborhood crack gang, known as the Wild Cowboys or the Red Top Gang, who were associated with Yayo. The Wild Cowboys were responsible for the higher number of crimes, especially murders, during the late 80s and early 90s. Robert Jackall wrote a book, Wild Cowboys: Urban Marauders and the Forces of Order,[17] describing the events that took place during that period of lawlessness. Homelessness was rampant. Washington Heights had become the largest drug distribution center in the Northeastern United States during that time.[citation needed] A housing project in the neighborhood was nicknamed “Crack City,” [18] an epithet commonly bestowed upon rough areas at the time. In fact, so common was the name that Crack City was also used to refer to the Far West Side of Manhattan [19]; Boerum Hill, Brooklyn[20]; Roslyn Heights, N.Y.[21]; Atlantic City, N.J.[22]; Richmond, Calif.[23]; and the Kilburn neighborhood of London[24]. Crack Cocaine The crack epidemic refers to a six year period between 1984 and 1990 in the United States during which there was a huge surge in the use of crack cocaine in major cities, and crack-houses all over the USA. Fallout from the crack epidemic included a huge... Bag lady redirects here. ...


On October 18, 1988, 24 year old Police Officer Michael Buczek was murdered by Dominican drug dealers in Washington Heights. The killers fled to the Dominican Republic where one later died in police custody and a second was apprehended by U.S. Marshals in 2000. The third suspect was apprehended in the Dominican Republic in May 2002. Fifteen years after the shooting, Pablo Almonte, 51, and Jose Fernandez, 52, received the maximum sentence, 25 years to life, for their roles in the murder of Officer Michael Buczek. Daniel Mirambeaux, the alleged shooter, died in June 1989, plunging to his death under mysterious circumstances after he was ordered turned over to the United States.


In the ensuing years, the Buczek family founded the Michael John Buczek Foundation. There is a street, an elementary school, and a little league baseball field named in honor of Michael John Buczek. The Michael Buczek Little League hosts 30 teams with over 350 boys and girls, and is coached by officers from the 34th precinct.


Crime subsequently fell quickly due to aggressive police tactics. Police presence increased, and building landlords allowed police to patrol in apartment buildings, which led to the arrests of thousands of drug dealers a year in Washington Heights. People were also being stopped for quality of life crimes, which deterred people from carrying guns. A new police precinct was also added in the area.[25] Today, its crime rate, along with that of neighboring Harlem, is much lower[26] yet still a very real problem in Washington Heights.[citation needed] For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ...


Even though crime complaints were down 5.88% in 2007 over 2001 (and down 65.47% from 1993), there were 5 murders in lower Washington Heights (that is, below W. 178th St.) in 2007 [27]. By comparison, in the upper portion of Washington Heights, where the 34th Precinct includes Fort George, Hudson Heights and Sherman Creek (as well as Inwood), there was only 1 murder in 2007; likewise, above W. 179th Street, crime complaints were down 21.05% in 2007 over 2001 (and down 83.15% from 1993) [28].


That puts lower Washington Heights on par with Harlem, where the 30th Precinct also recorded five murders in 2007 [29]. By comparison, the 13th Precinct (Flatiron, Stuyvesant Town and Union Square) recorded three murders in 2007 [30] and the 20th Precinct (the Upper West Side) recorded none. [31].


Sports

Historic

Five clubs in American professional sports played in the Washington Heights area: the New York Giants, who are now the San Francisco Giants, the New York Mets, the New York Yankees, the Football New York Giants and the New York Jets. The baseball Giants played at the Polo Grounds at West 155th Street and Eighth Avenue from 1911-1957, the Yankees played there from 1913-1922 and the New York Mets played their inaugural 1962-1963 season there. Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (current) (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... The Polo Grounds was the name given to four different stadiums in Manhattan, New York City used by baseballs New York Giants from 1883 until 1957, New York Metropolitans from 1883 until 1885, the New York Yankees from 1912 until 1922, and by the New York Mets in their... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (current) (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major...


Before the Yankees played at the Polo Grounds, they played in Hilltop Park on Broadway between 165th and 168th from 1903-1912; at the time they were know as the New York Highlanders. On May 15, 1912, after being heckled for several innings, the great Ty Cobb leaped the fence and attacked his tormentor. He was suspended indefinitely by league president Ban Johnson, but his suspension was eventually reduced to 10 days and $50. One of the most amazing pitching performances of all time took place at Hilltop Park. On September 4, 1908, 20 year-old Walter Johnson shut out New York 3-0 with a five-hitter. The park is now the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, a major hospital, which opened on that location in 1928. Washington Heights was the birth place of Yankee star Alex Rodriguez. Boston Red Sox slugger Manny Ramírez grew up in the neighborhood, moving there from the Dominican Republic when he was thirteen years old and attending George Washington High School, where he was one of the nation's top prospects. Hall-of-Fame infielder Rod Carew, a perennial batting champion in the 1970s, also grew up in Washington Heights, having emigrated with his family from Panama at the age of fourteen. Hilltop Park was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. ... The New York Yankees are a Major League baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... For other persons of the same name, see Manuel Ramirez. ... George Washington High School was a secondary school located in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in New York City, New York. ... Rodney Cline Rod Carew (born October 1, 1945), is a former Major League Baseball player for the Minnesota Twins and California Angels from 1967 to 1985. ...


The New York Mets and New York Jets both began play at the Polo Grounds, while Shea Stadium in Queens was under construction. Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (current) (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in New York City. ... For other uses, see Queens (disambiguation) and Queen. ...


Modern

The New Balance Track and Field Center, located in the 168th Street Armory on Fort Washington Avenue, maintains an Olympic-caliber track that is one of the fastest in the world.[32] High school and colleges hold meets there regularly, and it is open to the public, for a fee, for training. The auditorium seats 60,000 people.


The Armory is the starting point for an annual road race, the Coogan’s Salsa, Blues, and Shamrocks 5K, which is run in March.[33] The race is sanctioned by the New York Road Runners, and counts toward a guaranteed starting spot in the New York Marathon. Founded in 1958 with 47 members, New York Road Runners (NYRR) has grown into the foremost running organization, with a membership of 40,000. ...


Also at the Armory is The National Track and Field Hall of Fame, along with the Charles B. Rangel Technology & Learning Center for children and students in middle school and high school.


The facility is operated by the Armory Foundation, which was created in 1993.


Extreme swimmers take part in the Little Red Lighthouse Swim, a 5.85-mile swim in the Hudson River from Clinton Cove (Pier 96) to Jeffrey’s Hook, the location of the Little Red Lighthouse. [34] The annual race, sponsored by the Manhattan Island Foundation, attracts more than 200 competitors. The course records for men and women were both set in 1998. Jeffrey Jotz, 28, of Rahway, N.J., finished in 1 hour, 7 minutes and 36 seconds. Julie Walsh-Arlis, 31, of New York, finished in 1:12:45. The George Washington Bridge as seen from the Hudson River, July 2005. ...


Education

University education includes Yeshiva University and Boricua College. The medical campus of Columbia University hosts the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the College of Dental Medicine, the Mailman School of Public Health, the School of Nursing, and the Graduate School of Basic Sciences, which offers doctoral programs in biomedical sciences. These schools are among the departments that comprise the Columbia University Medical Center, whose full name is the New York-Presbyterian/Columbia Medical Center. Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... Boricua College is a post-secondary educational institution located in New York City. ...


Private primary and secondary schools include Mother Cabrini High School, The School of The Incarnation, and the City College Academy of the Arts, a project funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. History and Background Mother Cabrini High School was founded in 1899 by St. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF) is the largest transparently operated[2] charitable foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates in 2000 and doubled in size by Warren Buffett in 2006. ...


Other private schools include the Herbert G. Birch School for Exceptional Children and Medical Center Nursery School.


Public primary and secondary schools are assigned to schools in the New York City Department of Education. High Schools include: George Washington High School The Official Seal of the City of New York The New York City Department of Education is the branch of municipal government in New York City that manages the citys public school system. ... George Washington High School was a secondary school located in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in New York City, New York. ...


Zoned middle schools include:

Grade 6 and 7 option schools include:

Zoned elementary schools include:

It's worth noting that despite its name, CUNY in the Heights, the uptown campus of the City University of New York, is not in the Heights, but in Inwood[35]. The CUNY XPress Center, however, is in the Fort George neighborhood of Washington Heights, but it is not a campus. Instead, its purpose is to assist immigrants and to help students enroll in one of the CUNY schools[36]. The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... Inwood is the name of some places in the United States of America; see: Inwood, Florida Inwood, Iowa Inwood, New York Inwood, West Virginia Inwood Township, Michigan Inwood is also a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City: see Inwood, Manhattan. ...


Notable residents

Alejandro Arias (born November 20, 1967 in New York City, New York) is a former infielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1992-2002. ... Young Blaze, (born Michael Enriquez in Washington Heights, New York on February 18, 1989) is an American Hip Hop producer and artist of Dominican and Cuban decent. ... Héctor Pacheco (Pipo) Carrasco (born October 22, 1969 in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic) is a Major League Baseball relief pitcher for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. ... Gene Colan (born September 1, 1926, the Bronx, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist who sometimes worked under the name Adam Austin. ... Frances Conroy as Ruth Fisher in Six Feet Under. ... Jose Manuel Guitian, popularly known as Don Dinero, is an American-born Cuban Reggaeton Artist living in Miami. ... Reggaeton (also spelled Reggaetón, and known as Reguetón and Reggaetón in Spanish) is a form of urban music which became popular with Latin American (or Latino) youth during the early 1990s and spread over the course of 10 years to North American, European, Asian, and Australian audiences. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Dr. Leonel Antonio Fernández Reyna (born 26 December 1953) is a Dominican politician and the current president of the Dominican Republic. ... Laurence Fishburne (born July 30, 1961 in Augusta, Georgia, USA) is a notable United States movie actor. ... Luis Alberto Flores (Born April 11, 1981 in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic) is a professional basketball player. ... Squalltoonix (born March 6, 1926 in New York City) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ... Clifton Hyde (b. ... Jacob Koppel Javits (May 18, 1904–March 7, 1986) was an American politician. ... Example of a Julio 204 tag JULIO 204 was the first graffiti writer in New York City and inspired early graffiti pioneers like Taki 183 and Stay High 149. Julio was a Puerto Rican who lived on 204th street and was a member of the Savage Skulls gang. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Julio Cesar Lugo (born on November 16, 1975 in Barahona, Dominican Republic) is a major league shortstop for the Boston Red Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Magic Juan is a bilingual rapper from Washington Heights in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the musician. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Third Watch is an NBC television drama set in New York City that ran from 1999 to 2005. ... Frederick Karl Pruetzel (22 June 1954 – 29 January 1977), better known as “Freddie Prinze” was an American stand-up comedian and actor. ... Chico and the Man was an American sitcom which ran on NBC from September 13, 1974 to July 21, 1978, starring Jack Albertson as Ed Brown (The Man), the cantankerous owner of a run down garage in an East Los Angeles barrio, and introducing Freddie Prinze as Chico Rodriguez, an... Jonathan George Jack Albertson (June 16, 1907 – November 25, 1981) was an Academy Award, Emmy Award and Tony Award-winning American actor (dating back to Vaudeville), comedian, dancer, singer, and musician, and he performed on stage, radio, movies, and television. ... For other persons of the same name, see Manuel Ramirez. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Alfonso Lincoln Ribeiro (born September 21, 1971 in New York City) is an American actor, singer, and dancer of Dominican descent. ... Information Gender Male Occupation student at Harvard University Family Philip Banks (father), Vivian Smith Banks (mother), Hilary Banks (sister), Ashley Banks (sister), Nicky Banks (brother), Will Smith (cousin) Portrayed by Alfonso Ribeiro Carlton Banks is a fictional character from the tv-series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air ... The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an Emmy, BAFTA, and RTS-award winning popular American television sitcom that aired on NBC from September 10, 1990, to May 20, 1996. ... Alexander Emmanuel Alex Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975, in New York, New York), commonly nicknamed A-Rod, is a Dominican-American baseball infielder. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... LaRon Louis James (born on February 18, 1983), better known by his stage name Juelz Santana, is a rapper, producer and small time actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the American architecture historian, see Vincent Scully. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... New York Citys TAKI 183 One of the originators of New York graffiti was TAKI 183 – a foot messenger who would tag his nickname around New York streets that he daily frequented en route in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... For other uses, see Graffiti (disambiguation). ... Gina Torres (born April 25, 1969) is an American television and movie actress. ... 2 In A Room is a Dominican hip hop, Freestyle music and house music duo from Washington Heights, New York, which includes rapper Rafael Dose Vargas and producer/remixer Roger Rog Nice Pauletta, later replaced by Edwin Floodlight Ovalles after 1990. ... Ruth Westheimer, Ed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Nguyen, Pauline and Sanchez, Josephine. "Ethnic Communities in New York City: Dominicans in Washington Heights", New York University. Accessed May 21, 2007. "Washington Heights stretches roughly thirty-five blocks across the northern tip of Manhattan island. It encompasses a broad tract of land, taking in 160th Street to about 189th Street and all that lies between the wide avenues of Broadway, St. Nicholas Boulevard, and Fort Washington Avenue. The majority of its occupants are the smiling, chestnut-skinned immigrants of the Dominican Republic, whose steady arrival accounts for 7 percent of New York City's total population, and makes up its highest immigrant group."
  2. ^ New York Department of Parks and Recreation: Bennett Park, accessed June 24, 2006
  3. ^ Fort Washington Park, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. [1]
  4. ^ Little Red Lighthouse Swim, Manhattan Island Foundation [2]
  5. ^ Fort Washington Park: Peregrine Falcons in New York City, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. [3]
  6. ^ J. Hood Wright Park, accessed December 24, 2006
  7. ^ Fernandez, Manny. "New Winds at an Island Outpost". The New York Times, March 4, 2007. Accessed May 21, 2007. "Dominicans, in fact, increased as a percentage of the total population in Washington Heights and Inwood, from 43 percent in 1990 to 53 percent in 2005."
  8. ^ Lowenstein, Steven M. Frankfurt on the Hudson, p. 44. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1989.
  9. ^ Not for Tourists Guide to New York City. [[4]]
  10. ^ Lowenstein, Steven M. Frankfurt on the Hudson, p. 44. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1989.
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  12. ^ "Our boundaries are ... west of Broadway." Hudson Heights Owners' Coalition. hhoc.org
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  14. ^ [6] Saving Sherman Creek, The Manhattan Institute.
  15. ^ [7] New York City Economic Development Council: Sherman Creek Study.
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  17. ^ "Wild Cowboys: Urban Marauders & the Forces of Order", Amazon.com. Retrieved 30-01-2007.
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  19. ^ " 'This neighborhood used to be crack city,' says Herminio Torres, who lives in one of the buildings with his family, adding that it wasn't until about 1987 that things began to turn around." (Referring to the Far West Side of Manhattan, around West 36th Street.) "Far West Side Story," Doherty, Matthew. The New York Times, Nov. 7, 2004. [[10]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
  20. ^ “Boerum Hill, the neighborhood directly behind the restaurant, where brownstones needing work now start at $1.5 million, was known locally as crack city … ” Hamlin, Suzanne. “The Benefits of Living Above the Story,” The New York Times. Sept. 19, 2004. [[11]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
  21. ^ Of low-income housing in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., in Nassau County on Long Island: “The operator of a beauty shop who lives near the project, Christina Dziomba, said: ‘It's Crack City U.S.A. in there.’ ” King, Wayne. “Pitched Battle: Six Apartments for the Homeless,” The New York Times, Jan. 26, 1990. [[12]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
  22. ^ " 'You're in the middle of crack city' Mr. Boccino said yesterday at his restaurant, surveying this blighted corner of Atlantic City ..." "Broken Lives And Victims In Shadow Of Taj Mahal," Confessore, Nicholas, and Schweber, Nate. The New York Times, Nov. 26, 2006. [[13]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
  23. ^ Jackson, Renay. Crack City. Berkeley: Frog Ltd., 2006. "This brand new novel takes readers to the streets and the seedy undersides of Richmond,(Calif.,) where crack cocaine is king." [[14]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
  24. ^ "... one of the most notorious housing estates in the country, nick-named 'Crack City'. Today there is a mood of optimism on the Mozart Estate in Kilburn, north-west London ..." "Design for Living Transforms Crack City," Bennetto, Jason. The Independent, April 26, 1994. [[15]] Retrieved 31-01-2008
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  30. ^ CompStat, 13th Precinct. Police Department, City of New York. [[20]]
  31. ^ CompStat, 20th Precinct. Police Department, City of New York. [[21]]
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  33. ^ Coogan's Salsa, Blues and Shamrocks 5K, New York Road Runners. [[23]]
  34. ^ Manhattan Island Foundation. [[24]]
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  36. ^ CUNY Citizenship & Immigration Project. [26]
  37. ^ Mickle, Tripp. "At George Washington High School, Beisbol is a Hit", New Media Workshop at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Accessed May 21, 2007. "Since the mid-1980s, the school has produced two World Series winners in the Major Leagues: Manny Ramírez of the Boston Red Sox and former Florida Marlins shortstop Alex Arias."
  38. ^ Gonz?lez-Andino, Heriberto. "Rapero Don Dinero se presenta hoy en NJ", El Diario La Prensa, July 27, 2005. Accessed June 7, 2007. "Mientras el reggaet?n ha irrumpido con fuerza en el mercado musical, Don Dinero se mantiene fiel en el hip hop."
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  40. ^ Staff. "Hudson Heights delivers", New York Daily News, March 7, 2008. Accessed March 20, 2008. "Hudson Heights continues to deliver on big space, river views and affordable apartments. And celebrities. Actor Laurence Fishburne lives in historic Castle Village overlooking the Hudson."
  41. ^ Weiss, Dick. "Flores, from Dominican Republic, takes unusual journey.", New York Daily News, March 20, 2004. Accessed June 7, 2007. "Luis Flores never figured his future would be in basketball when he was growing up in San Pedro de Marcos, a Dominican Republic hotbed for major league baseball prospects.... But all that changed when his parents sent him from that sun-drenched Caribbean island to live with his grandparents Basilio and Juanita Flores in Washington Heights when he was just 8 years old. "
  42. ^ Martin, Justin. "Greenspan: The Man Behind the Money", Perseus Publishing. Accessed June 7, 2007. "A few years prior to the great stock market crash of 1929, Alan Greenspan's parents moved into an apartment in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan."
  43. ^ Jacon K. Javits Playground, accessed December 27, 2006. "Jacob Javits was born on the Lower East Side to Russian Jewish parents. He lived variously in Brooklyn and Manhattan, including this neighborhood, on West 192nd Street, when he was 15."
  44. ^ Cold War Files: Henry Kissinger, accessed December 27, 2006. "He spent his high-school years in the Washington Heights section of upper Manhattan but never lost his pronounced German accent. Kissinger attended George Washington High School at night and worked in a shaving-brush factory during the day."
  45. ^ Sinclair, Tom. "Still a Marvel! Meet Stan Lee: The mind behind Spider-Man and Hulk. EW talks with the legend who rewrote the book on comics in the '60s, and planted seeds for today's biggest summer movies", Entertainment Weekly, June 20, 2003. Accessed June 7, 2007. "To fully understand how Lee, a poor Jewish kid from New York's Washington Heights, came to be the Munificent Monarch of the Mighty Marvel Universe, we must journey back through the mists of time, all the way to the first quarter of the last century, to reveal...the Origin of Stan Lee!"
  46. ^ "Magic Juan Readies Hip-Hop Masterpiece The Sure Bet, Tours The World, Preps Other Business Ventures; Second Album from Former Lead Vocalist of Latin Hip-Hop Pioneers Proyecto Uno Due Later This Year on M.O.B. Recordings", Hispanic Business., October 13, 2005. Accessed June 7, 2007. "Magic Juan's current ventures should not surprise his loyal fans.... The Washington Heights, New York, native also flexed his acting skills in independent films such as Harlem Blues and Buscando Un Sueno with Lauren Velez."
  47. ^ Sanneh, Kelefa. "In Search of New York at a Hip-Hop Summit", The New York Times, June 5, 2007. Accessed June 7, 2007. "Sometime around 6:30 the Washington Heights-raised rapper Mims ? better known as the ?This Is Why I?m Hot? guy ? hit the stage to tell the crowd why he is hot. (It?s related somehow to his flyness.)"
  48. ^ Guzman, Sandra. "'MANNY' OF THE YEAR: DOMINICAN ACTOR PEREZ IS SET TO STAR IN A DOZEN (!) NEW MOVIES", The New York Post, August 8, 2007. Accessed September 23, 2007. "Perez, who was raised in Providence, Rhode Island, where most of his family still lives, decided long ago that he was not moving to Los Angeles to make it. He lives in and loves Washington Heights."
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  52. ^ Sandomir, Richard. "Daffy Days of Brooklyn Return for Vin Scully", The New York Times, October 5, 2006. Accessed May 21, 2007. "Scully?s lyrical voice has belonged to Los Angeles for so long that only older fans can recall Scully?s time with the Dodgers in Brooklyn from 1950 to 1957 after growing up in the Bronx and in Washington Heights. His last known address in New York was 869 West 180th Street; he took the subway to Ebbets Field during his first Dodgers season."
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Rod Carew - Professional Baseball Player New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Amazon. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is the only journalism school in the Ivy League; it awards the Pulitzer Prize and duPont-Columbia Award; co-sponsors the National Magazine Award and publishes the Columbia Journalism Review. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... El Diario la Prensa is the largest Spanish-language daily newspaper in New York City and the oldest in the United States. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Washington High School was a secondary school located in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in New York City, New York. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Museum of Broadcast Communications is located in Chicago, Illinois. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Baseball Digest is a baseball magazine resource that was first published in August of 1942, and is the oldest baseball magazine in the country. ... Interview is a magazine founded by artist Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga in 1969. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


External links

Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

References

  • The WPA Guide to New York City, 1938; reprinted 1982, pp 294ff.
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 221 KB) Summary The top floors of the Chrysler building seen from the east on 42nd Street in morning light. ... Community Boards of Manhattan are local government bodies in the New York City borough of Manhattan, which are appointed by the Borough President. ... The Manhattan Community Board 1 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tribeca and Lower Manhattan in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 2 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Greenwich Village, West Village, NoHo, SoHo, Lower East Side, Chinatown, and Little Italy in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 3 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Tompkins Square, East Village, Lower East Side, Chinatown and Two Bridges, in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 4 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhoods of Clinton and Chelsea in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 5 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Midtown in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 6 is a local government unit of the City of New York, encompassing the East Side of Manhattan from 14th to 59th Streets. ... The Manhattan Community Board 7 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, and Lincoln Square in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 8 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Upper East Side, LenoxHill, Yorkville, and Roosevelt Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 9 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Hamilton Heights, Manhattanville, and Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 10 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Harlem and Polo Grounds in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 11 is a local governement unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of East Harlem, El Barrio/Spanish Harlem, Wards and Randalls Island in the borough of Manhattan. ... The Manhattan Community Board 12 is a local government unit of the city of New York, encompassing the neighborhood of Inwood and Washington Heights in the borough of Manhattan. ...

 
 

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