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Encyclopedia > Washington D.C
Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC.

Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nation's Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United States of America. Washington, D.C. is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, which also includes parts of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. It should not be confused with the U.S. state of Washington, located in the Pacific Northwest. Download high resolution version (1200x782, 340 KB) 030926-F-2828D-080 Washington, D.C. (Sept. ... Download high resolution version (1200x782, 340 KB) 030926-F-2828D-080 Washington, D.C. (Sept. ... Washington Monument The Washington Monument is a large white-colored obelisk in the center of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built as a memorial to George Washington, the first President of the United States and the leader of the revolutionary Continental Army, which won independence from the British... This page is about the official residence of the President of the USA. For other White Houses see White House (disambiguation). ... This article concerns places that serve as centers of government and politics. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area is the metropolitan area consisting of Washington, DC, Baltimore, Maryland, Northern Virginia, Central Maryland, and Eastern West Virginia. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin Official languages None Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... This article deals with the U.S. state. ... Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. ...


The District of Columbia is a federal district as specified by the United States Constitution with limited—and sometimes contentious—local rule. Similar to the position of the 13 American colonies under the British Parliament, the District is ruled "in all cases whatsoever" by the U.S. Congress, while nevertheless going unrepresented in that body. (See and compare the Declaratory Act of 1766 by the British Parliament and the "District Clause" – Article I, Section 8, Clause 17 – of the American Constitution; see also the American Declaration of Independence, and "The American Crisis, Number 1," December 23, 1776, by Thomas Paine). The land was taken from both the states of Virginia and Maryland, though only the Maryland portion remains part of the district. The population of the District of Columbia, as of 2003 U.S. Census Bureau estimates, is 563,384. If Washington, D.C. were considered as a state, it would rank last in area behind Rhode Island, 50th in population ahead of Wyoming, and 36th in Gross State Product, ahead of 15 other states. Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Declaratory Act, issued by Britain during Americas colonial period, was one of a series of resolutions passed attempting to regulate the behavior of the colonies. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of a newly formed or reformed independent state from a part or the whole of the territory of another, or a document containing such a declaration. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The American Crisis The American Crisis was a series of pamphlets published in London in 1775-1783, by revolutionary author Thomas Paine, focusing on the American colonies increasing difficulties with Great Britain -- difficulties which ultimately led to an open breach in the... Thomas Paine Thomas Paine (January 29, 1737–June 8, 1809) was a widely recognized intellectual, scholar, and idealist who is considered to be one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January January 1 - Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ... State nickname: The Ocean State Other U.S. States Capital Providence Largest city Providence Governor Donald Carcieri Official languages None Area 4,005 km² (50th)  - Land 2,709 km²  - Water 1,296 km² (32. ... State nickname: Equality State Other U.S. States Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Governor Dave Freudenthal Official languages English Area 253,554 km² (10th)  - Land 251,706 km²  - Water 1,851 km² (0. ...


The centers of all three branches of the U.S. federal government are in Washington, D.C., as well as the headquarters of most federal agencies. Washington also serves as the headquarters for the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the Organization of American States, among other international (and national) institutions. All of this has made Washington the frequent focal point of massive political demonstrations and protests, particularly on the National Mall. Washington is also the site of numerous national landmarks, museums, and sports teams, and is a popular destination for tourists. ... Federal independent agencies were established through separate statutes passed by Congress. ... The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, in Romance languages: BIRD), better known as the World Bank, is an international organization whose original mission was to finance the reconstruction of nations devastated by WWII. Now, its mission has expanded to fight poverty by means of financing states. ... The flag of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the international organization entrusted with overseeing the global financial system by monitoring foreign exchange rates and balance of payments, as well as offering technical and financial assistance when asked. ... The Organization of American States (OAS; OEA in the other three official languages) is an international organization, headquartered in Washington, D.C., USA. Its members are the 35 independent nations of the Americas. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ... A tourist boat travels the River Seine in Paris, France Tourism can be defined as the act of travel for the purpose of recreation, and the provision of services for this act. ...


The official bird of Washington DC is the wood thrush. The official motto is Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All). Binomial name Hylocichla mustelina (Gmelin, 1789) The Wood Thrush, Hylocichla mustelina, is a medium-sized thrush. ...

Washington, District of Columbia
City flag City seal
City motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All)
Founded 16 July 1790
County Independent city
Mayor Anthony Williams (Dem)
Area
 - Total
 - Water

1,214.4 km² (468.9 mi²)
428.8 km² (165.6 mi²) 35.31%
Population
 - City (2003)
 - Metropolitan
 - Density

563,384
4,796,183
3,111.5/km&sup2
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5
Latitude
Longitude
39°17' N
76°36' W
www.dc.gov
Contents

2.1 Local government
2.2 Representation in federal government
Flag of the District of Columbia Ratio 10:19 490 × 260 pixels 1378 bytes File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... from a website; I know this is for DC (District Columbia), could anyone find something for the city itself? File links The following pages link to this file: Washington, D.C. User talk:El C ... French Tricolore flag A flag is a piece of cloth flown from a pole or mast, usually intended for signaling or identification. ... Seal as impression A seal is an impression, usually in wax or embossed on the paper itself, or other item attached to a legal instrument used to authenticate it in place of, or in addition to, a signature. ... A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Originally, a county was the land under the jurisdiction of a count (in Great Britain, an earl, though the original earldoms covered larger areas) by reason of that office. ... An independent city is a city in the United States of America that does not belong to any county, but rather interacts directly with the state government. ... A mayor (Latin maīor better) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... There are multiple well-known persons called Anthony Williams. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article explains the meaning of area as a physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ... In the most common sense of the word, a population is the collection of people—or organisms of a particular species—living in a given geographic area. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January January 1 - Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ... Density (symbol: ρ - Greek: rho) is a measure of mass per unit of volume. ... -1... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ...

Name

"Washington, D.C." is the most common way to refer to the District throughout the rest of the United States and the world. Residents of Washington and its surrounding suburbs refer to the city simply as the District or D.C., to contrast its greater metropolitan area. Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or hubs. ...


"Washington" or "Washington, D.C."' is also used as a metonym for the federal government. Politicians and candidates for office sometimes use these terms pejoratively to convey a sense of solidarity with their constituents by distancing themselves from the negative image of an out-of-touch centralized government. (The Washington Post criticized this common political tactic in a 2001 editorial (http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A22140-2001Aug30&notFound=true).) In rhetoric and cognitive linguistics, metonymy (in Greek meta = after/later and onoma = name) is the use of a single characteristic to identify a more complex entity. ... A constituent is someone who can or does appoint or elect (and often by implication can also remove or recall) another as her agent or representative. ... Alternative meaning: The Washington Post (march) Washington Post logo Screenshot from Washington Post website The Washington Post is the largest and oldest newspaper in Washington, D.C. It gained worldwide fame in the early 1970s for its Watergate investigation by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein which played a major role...


Law and government

The flag of Washington, DC is based on the coat of arms borne by the English ancestors of George Washington.

Flag of the District of Columbia Ratio 10:19 490 × 260 pixels 1378 bytes File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Flag of the District of Columbia Ratio 10:19 490 × 260 pixels 1378 bytes File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Order: 1st President Vice President: John Adams Term of office: April 30, 1789 – March 3, 1797 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: John Adams Date of birth: February 22, 1732 Place of birth: Westmoreland, Virginia Date of death: December 14, 1799 Place of death: Mount Vernon, Virginia First Lady: Martha Washington...

Local government

On a local level, the city is run by an elected mayor (currently Anthony A. Williams) and the D.C. Council. District schools are administered by a school board that has both elected and appointed members. The 37 elected Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs) provide the most direct access for residents to their local government. However, Congress has plenary power over the district. It has the right to review and overrule laws created locally, and has often done so. The Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution does not apply to the District of Columbia. Anthony A. Williams (born July 28, United States politician who has served as mayor of Washington, DC since 1999. ... The Council of the District of Columbia is the legislative branch of the local government of Washington, D.C.. As such, it is analogous to the city councils of other cities in the United States, but in some manners it is also analogous to state legislatures. ... Advisory Neighborhood Commissions are composed of elected officials called Commissioners who each represent about 2000 people within the District of Columbia. ... Amendment X (the Tenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, states: The Tenth Amendment is generally recognized to be a truism. ...


DC residents pay all federal taxes, such as income tax, as well as local taxes. The mayor and council adopt a budget of local money with Congress reserving the right to make any changes. Because so much of the valuable property in the district is federally owned and hence exempt from local property taxes, the city is frequently cash-strapped; public services in the city suffer as a result.


Representation in federal government

License plate reading "Washington, D.C." at the top and "Taxation Without Representation" at the bottom.

According to the U.S. Constitution, Washington, D.C. is under the direct jurisdiction of Congress. Congress has delegated various amounts of this authority to local government. Still, D.C. residents lack some representation that is enjoyed by residents of U.S. states. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of the United States of America and is... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ...


Residents of the District vote for the President but do not have voting representation in Congress. Citizens of Washington are represented in the House of Representatives by Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC At-Large), a non-voting delegate who sits on committees and participates in debate but cannot vote. DC does not have representation in the Senate. Citizens of Washington, DC are thus unique in the world, as citizens of the capital city of every other country have the same representation rights as other citizens. Attempts to change this situation, including the proposed District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment, have been unsuccessful. For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Eleanor Holmes Norton U.S. Delegate for the District of Columbia Eleanor Holmes Norton (born June 13, 1937) is the non-voting Delegate from the District of Columbia to the United States House of Representatives. ... A Delegate to Congress is a non-voting representative of a U.S. territory in the United States House of Representatives. ... The District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution. ...


The history of DC's relationship with the federal government, as well as the arguments for and against increased representation, are covered in the article District of Columbia voting rights. Many democracy activists argue for District of Columbia voting rights—i. ...


History

See main article History of Washington, DC. The history of Washington, DC is tied intrinsically to its role as the constitutionally mandated capital of the United States. ...

1888 German map of Washington, D.C.

A Southern site for the capital was agreed at a dinner between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. The initial plan for the Federal City was a diamond, ten miles wide on each side, giving it 100 square miles (260 square kilometers). The actual site on the Potomac River was chosen by President Washington. Washington may have chosen the site for its natural scenery, in the belief that the Potomac would become a great navigable waterway, or even in the hope of increasing the value of his land holdings in the area. 1888 German Map of Washington, DC File links The following pages link to this file: Washington, D.C. History of Washington, DC Categories: Meyers Konversations-Lexikon | Washington, D.C. maps | U.S. history images ... 1888 German Map of Washington, DC File links The following pages link to this file: Washington, D.C. History of Washington, DC Categories: Meyers Konversations-Lexikon | Washington, D.C. maps | U.S. history images ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... The Federal Republic of Germany (German: Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is one of the worlds leading industrialised countries, located in the heart of Europe. ... Order: 3rd President Vice President: Aaron Burr; George Clinton Term of office: March 4, 1801 – March 3, 1809 Preceded by: John Adams Succeeded by: James Madison Date of birth: April 13, 1743 Place of birth: Shadwell, Virginia Date of death: July 4, 1826 Place of death: Charlottesville, Virginia First Lady... A portrait of Alexander Hamilton by John Trumbull, 1792. ... Order: 1st President Vice President: John Adams Term of office: April 30, 1789 – March 3, 1797 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: John Adams Date of birth: February 22, 1732 Place of birth: Westmoreland, Virginia Date of death: December 14, 1799 Place of death: Mount Vernon, Virginia First Lady: Martha Washington...


On August 24, 1814, British forces burnt the capital during the most notable destructive raid of the War of 1812. President James Madison and U.S. forces fled and British forces burned public buildings including the Capitol, the Navy Yard, and the Treasury building. The Presidential Mansion was also gutted; repairs to cover up the damage would lead it to be redubbed the White House. August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... After the Battle of York in 1813 the British and Canadians wanted revenge on the United States for the destruction they had caused on the capitol of Upper Canada at York. ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought in North America between the United States and Great Britain. ... Order: 4th President Vice President: George Clinton; Elbridge Gerry Term of office: March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1817 Preceded by: Thomas Jefferson Succeeded by: James Monroe Date of birth: March 16, 1751 Place of birth: Port Conway, Virginia Date of death: June 28, 1836 Place of death: Montpelier, Virginia First...

Newspaper Row, Washington, D.C., 1874.

Washington remained a small city of a few thousand permanent residents until the outbreak of the U.S. Civil War in 1861. The significant expansion of the federal government to administer the war—and its legacies, such as veterans' pensions—led to notable growth in the city's population. But on April 14, 1865, just days after the end of the war, president Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth in Ford's Theater. Download high resolution version (1635x936, 443 KB)Newspaper Row, Washington, D.C. Engraving from Harpers New Monthly Magazine (January 1874). ... Download high resolution version (1635x936, 443 KB)Newspaper Row, Washington, D.C. Engraving from Harpers New Monthly Magazine (January 1874). ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (105th in leap years). ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838–April 26, 1865) was an American actor who is most famous for being the assassin of Abraham Lincoln. ... Fords Theatre in the 19th century Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. was the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. ...


In the early 1870s, Washington was given a territorial government, but governor Alexander Shepherd's reputation for extravagance resulted in Congress abolishing his office in favor of direct rule. Congressional governance of the District would continue for a century. Events and Trends Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) results in the collapse of the Second French Empire and in the formation of both the French Third Republic and the German Empire. ...


The Washington Monument opened in 1888. Plans were laid to further develop the monumental aspects of the city, with work contributed by such noted figures as Frederick Law Olmsted and Daniel Burnham. However, development of the Lincoln Memorial and other structures on the National Mall did not get underway until the early 20th century. Washington Monument The Washington Monument is a large white-colored obelisk in the center of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built as a memorial to George Washington, the first President of the United States and the leader of the revolutionary Continental Army, which won independence from the British... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Frederick Law Olmsted (April 27, 1822–August 28, 1903) was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well known urban parks, including Central Park in New York, New York, the oldest coordinated system of public parks and parkways in Buffalo, New York, Mount_Royal_Park in Montreal, the Metropolitan Parks... Masonic Temple Building Daniel Hudson Burnham (September 4, 1846 - June 1, 1912) was born in Henderson, New York and raised in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Lincoln Memorial, built 1915 - 1922 The Lincoln Memorial, on the National Mall in Washington, DC, is a memorial to United States President Abraham Lincoln. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ...

Aerial photo of Washington, DC (looking WSW, roughly along the National Mall)

The Twenty-third Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified on March 29, 1961 allowing residents of Washington, DC to vote for president and have their votes count in the Electoral College. Download high resolution version (1059x1220, 776 KB)public domain enlarged image This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1059x1220, 776 KB)public domain enlarged image This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Amendment XXIII (the Twenty-third Amendment) of the United States Constitution permits the District of Columbia to choose Electors for President and Vice President. ... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 1961 (As MAD Magazine pointed out on its first cover for the year) was the first upside-down year - i. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ...


The first 4.6 miles (7.4 kilometers) of the Washington Metro subway system opened on March 27, 1976. Bethesda Metro station. ... This page refers to urban rail mass transit systems. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (87th in Leap years). ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Walter Washington became the first elected mayor of the District in 1974. Marion Barry became mayor in 1978, but was arrested for drug use in an FBI sting on January 18, 1990, and would serve a six-month jail term. His successor, Sharon Pratt Kelly, became the first black woman to lead a city of that size and importance in the U.S. But Barry defeated her in the 1994 primary and was once again elected mayor for his fourth term, during which the city nearly became insolvent and was forced to give up some home rule to a Congressionally appointed financial control board. Walter Edward Washington (April 15, 1915 – October 27, 2003) was the first elected mayor (and first black mayor) of the District of Columbia (Washington, DC). ... 1974 is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... (Not to be confused with Marion Berry, U.S. Representative from Arkansas. ... Events January January 1 - The Copyright Act of 1976 takes effect, making sweeping changes to United States copyright law. ... Many drugs are provided in tablet form. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sharon Pratt Dixon (later Sharon Pratt Kelly; b. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...

Security camera image of the moment that American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon

The Washington area was the target of at least one of the four hijacked planes in the September 11, 2001 attacks. One plane struck the Pentagon in Arlington County, killing 125 people in addition to the 64 aboard the plane, while another that was downed in a field in Pennsylvania is believed by many to have been intended to hit either the White House or the U.S. Capitol. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Security Camera image of the moment that American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon American Airlines Flight 77 was a morning flight that routinely flew from Washington Dulles International Airport in Chantilly, Virginia, near Washington DC, to Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California (IAD-LAX). ... The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks carried out in the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... This page is about the official residence of the President of the USA. For other White Houses see White House (disambiguation). ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ...


Shortly thereafter, Washington endured an anthrax attack, when what may have been a domestic terrorist sent anthrax-contaminated mail to numerous members of Congress. Thirty-one staff members were infected, and two U.S. Postal Service employees at a contaminated mail sorting facility at Brentwood later died. (Redirected from 2001 anthrax attack) A letter sent to Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle containing weaponised anthrax powder caused the deaths of two postal workers. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... Anthrax bacteria. ... A USPS Truck at Night A U.S. Post Office sign The United States Postal Service (USPS) is the United States government organization responsible for providing postal service in the United States and is generally referred to as the post office. ... Brentwood is a neighborhood in Northeast Washington, DC and is named after the Brentwood Mansion built in the area in 1817 by Robert Brent, the first mayor of Washington City. ...


During three weeks of October 2002, John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo killed ten people and wounded three others in the region in what became known as the Beltway Sniper attacks. In March 2004, Muhammad was sentenced to death and Malvo to life imprisonment for the attacks by a Virginia court. 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Allen Muhammad (born John Allen Williams on December 31, 1960) carried out the Beltway sniper attacks. ... Lee Boyd Malvo Lee Boyd Malvo (alias John Lee Malvo) (born February 18, 1985), along with John Allen Muhammad, was arrested on October 24, 2002 in connection with the Beltway sniper attacks. ... Lee Boyd Malvo John Allen Muhammad The Beltway Sniper attacks took place during three weeks of October 2002 in the eastern United States. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in...


In November 2003, the toxin ricin was found in the mailroom of the White House, and in February 2004, in the mailroom of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist. As with the earlier anthrax attacks, no arrests have been made. 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January January 1 - Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ... Castor beans The protein ricin (pronounced rye-sin) is a poison manufactured from the castor bean (Ricinus communis). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bill Frist Dr. William Harrison Frist (born February 22, 1952 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee and a cardiac surgeon. ...


Partly in response to these events from the past few years, the Washington area has taken many steps to increase security. Screening devices for biological agents, metal detectors, and vehicle barriers are now much more commonplace at office buildings as well as government buildings, and in transportation facilities. A U.S. Army soldier uses a metal detector to search for weapons and ammunition in Iraq Metal detectors use electromagnetic induction to detect metal. ...


Geography

USGS satellite image of Washington, DC, taken April 26, 2002. The Potomac River and its eastern branch, the Anacostia River, are visible. Virginia lies across the Potomac from Washington, while Maryland surrounds it on all other sides. The orange lines in the image mark the quadrant divisions of Washington, with the U.S. Capitol at the center of the dividing lines. To the west of the Capitol extends the National Mall, visible as a slight green band in the image.

Washington is located at 38° 53′ 42″ N 77° 02′ 11″ W (http://kvaleberg.com/extensions/mapsources/index.php?params=38_53_42_N_77_02_11_W_) (the coordinates of the Zero Milestone, on The Ellipse). Download high resolution version (548x697, 43 KB)USGS satellite image of Washington, DC, taken April 26, 2002. ... Download high resolution version (548x697, 43 KB)USGS satellite image of Washington, DC, taken April 26, 2002. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... The Anacostia River is a river that flows about 8. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ... Zero Milestone, 1923 The Zero Milestone is a monument in Washington, D.C. intended as the initial milestone from which all road distances in the United States should be reckoned. ...


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 177.0 km² (68.3 mi²). 159.0 km² (61.4 mi²) of it is land and 18.0 km² (6.9 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 10.16% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... This article is about the unit of measure. ...


Washington is surrounded by the states of Virginia (on its southwest side, and a small part of its northwest one) and Maryland (on its southeast and northeast sides, and most of its northwest one); it interrupts those states' common border, which is the Potomac River both upstream and downstream from the District. The city contains the historic federal city, the territory of which was formerly part of those two adjacent states before they respectively ceded it for the national capital. The land ceded from Virginia was returned by Congress in 1846, so what remains of the modern District was all once part of Maryland. A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... The land originally ceded by the states of Virginia and Maryland, constituting the District of Columbia, was in the shape of a diamond and covered 100 square miles of area. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Physical geography

The physical geography of the District of Columbia is very similar to the physical geography of much of Maryland. The District has three natural flowing bodies of water: the Potomac River, the Anacostia River, and Rock Creek. Both Anacostia River and Rock Creek are tributaries of the Potomac. There are also three man-made reservoirs: Dalecarlia Reservoir, which crosses over the northwest border of the District from Maryland, McMillan Reservoir near Howard University, and Georgetown Reservoir upstream of Georgetown. Physical map of the Earth (Medium) (Large 2 MB) Geography is the scientific study of the locational and spatial variation in both physical and human phenomena on Earth. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... The Anacostia River is a river that flows about 8. ... Rock Creek is also the name of several cities in the United States: Rock Creek, Alabama, Rock Creek, Minnesota, Rock Creek, Ohio, and Rock Creek, Wisconsin. ... Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... A reservoir (French: réservoir) is an artificial lake created by flooding land behind a dam. ... Howard University is a historically black college in Washington, D.C. It was established by a congressional charter in 1867, and much of its early funding came from the Freedmens Bureau. ...


The highest point in the District of Columbia is 410 feet (125 m) above sea level at Tenleytown. The lowest point is 1 foot, which occurs at least as far up the Potomac River as 0.35 miles (0.57 km) upstream from the terminus of Rock Creek.


City layout

Washington, DC, was created to serve as the national capital from its inception. The original street layout was designed by Pierre Charles L'Enfant at the time of the city's founding. L'Enfant based his design on Paris, which incorporated a basic grid system, inter-cut with broad diagonal avenues radiating from circles and squares; according to a popular urban legend, the diagonal avenues also served as sightlines for the defense of the city in the event of an invasion. Pierre Charles LEnfant ( 2 August 1754 – 14 June 1825) designed the street plan of the Federal City in the United States, now known as Washington, DC. Born in France, he came to the American colonies as a military engineer with General Lafayette and became closely identified with the United... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


At the center of the design, is the United States Capitol Building, from which four quadrants radiate along the four compass directions: Northwest, Southwest, Northeast, and Southeast. The quadrants are separated by North Capitol Street, South Capitol Street and East Capitol Street, with the centerline of the National Mall taking the place of what would be western demarcation line. Two avenues, Constitution and Independence, line the sides of the Mall. United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Color-enhanced USGS satellite image of Washington, DC, taken April 26, 2002. ... Southwest DC is the southwestern quadrant of the city, located south of the National Mall and west of South Capital Street. ... Northeast DC is the northeastern quadrant of the city, located north of East Capitol Street and east of North Capital Street. ... Southeast DC is the southeastern quadrant of the city, located south of East Capitol Street and east of South Capital Street. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ...


Streets that are oriented north/south are designated by numbers and count upwards from east to west in Northwest and Southwest (1st St NW, 2nd St NW, 3rd St NW, etc.); these streets repeat in Northeast and Southeast, counting upwards from west to the east.


Streets that are oriented East/West utilize a single letter of the alphabet in the central city. Thus, east-to-west lettered streets (A St NW, B St NW, etc.) "count" upwards from south to north in NW and NE, and likewise repeat in the opposite direction in SW and SE. Street numbers count upwards traveling outward from the dividing lines of the quadrants. There is no J Street in any quadrant; there are several rumors for the reason of this, including one that L'Enfant simply disliked the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, John Jay. However, the most reasonable answer is that J and I look too much alike and could easily have been confused in the handwriting of the 18th century. (In a nod to this, the food court at The George Washington University is named J Street). North of the mall, the road that would be B street is known as Constitution, South of the mall the second east-west street is called Independence. A Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is the head judge in a supreme court. ... John Jay, first Chief Justice of the United States John Jay (December 12, 1745–May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat and jurist. ... Women waiting for pizza in the food court of the Staten Island Mall A food court is a type of indoor plaza contiguous with the counters of multiple food vendors and providing a common area for self-serve dining. ... The George Washington University (GWU) is a private university in Washington, D.C., founded in 1821 as The Columbian College. ...


Because both the numbers and the letters repeat for each quadrant, each street name is appended by the quadrant in which it is located (NE, NW, SE and SW). Use of these directional designations is required in giving directions and in the use of delivering mail.


Once single letters are exhausted as east-west street names the "alphabet" system continues anew with two syllable names beginning the first letter of the alphabet; streets in this set are commonly referred to as being in the "second alphabet" (for example, Calvert St. NW would be the third street of this second alphabet). In Northwest and Northeast DC, which are the largest quadrants, a "third alphabet" is started using three syllable words, i.e. Brandywine St NW. Diagonal avenues, generally named for states, are exempt from this syllabic rule, as are streets designated as "Place" or "Way" and streets laid out after the alpha-name was established for that area (For example, between E and F Streets in Southeast, you'll find Duddington Place).


The city's layout is best understood in terms of the Cartesian coordinate system. While the system may appear complex, once learned, it allows one to pinpoint not only where one is, but also where and how far one may need to travel. For example, if one needed to find 633 A Street SE, the address informs that the address is southeast of the Capitol, with A Street one block south of East Capitol Street, and that the location on that street is between 6th Street and 7th Streets SE. Another more familiar example would be the White House, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, is located at 16th Street NW (Lafayette Square) and Pennslvania Avenue NW. This works both ways; an address at 514 19th St NW would be on 19th St west of the Capitol, and since E is the fifth letter of the alphabet, the 514 address would be between E and F Streets NW. Cartesian means relating to the French mathematician and philosopher Descartes, who, among other things, worked to merge algebra and Euclidean geometry. ... This page is about the official residence of the President of the USA. For other White Houses see White House (disambiguation). ... Presidents Park is a unit of the National Park Service, located in Washington, D.C., USA at 38° 53′ 42″ N 77° 02′ 11″ W. It includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafeyette Square, and the Ellipse. ...


"I," "Q," and "U" streets properly utilize a single letter of the alphabet for their names. "Eye Street," "Que Street," and "You Street" have also appeared in some historical and comptemporary instances, however their use is informal.


Low Skyline

To preserve the grandeur of the National Mall, the White House, the Capitol, and various other key locations, the entire city is subject to strict height limits. This limitation was placed in effect just prior to the 20th century when government officials realized that structural steel "skyscrapers" could overwhelm the city. Thus, Washington has a relatively modest skyline in comparison to the majority of American cities. However the District is ringed by high-rise buildings in many nearby suburbs like Arlington, Virginia and Bethesda, Maryland. Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated area in Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, DC. It takes its name from a church once located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church (built 1820), which in turn was named from a passage in the Christian New Testament. ...


Neighborhoods

Main article: List of neighborhoods of the District of Columbia by ward The District of Columbia is divided into eight wards and 37 Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs) within these wards. ...

The District of Columbia is divided into eight wards and 37 Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs) within these wards. The total number of named neighborhoods is 127. Advisory Neighborhood Commissions are composed of elected officials called Commissioners who each represent about 2000 people within the District of Columbia. ...

DC wards Map
DC wards map (political) (2002 boundaries)

Download high resolution version (671x842, 105 KB)Current DC Ward Map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (671x842, 105 KB)Current DC Ward Map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... District of Columbia wards map File links The following pages link to this file: Washington, D.C. List of neighborhoods of the District of Columbia by ward Categories: GFDL images ... District of Columbia wards map File links The following pages link to this file: Washington, D.C. List of neighborhoods of the District of Columbia by ward Categories: GFDL images ...

History

The choice of the exact site on the Potomac River was left to the first president, George Washington. He chose a 10-mile-(16 km)-square area that included the existing villages of Georgetown and Alexandria, and another called Hamburg in the Foggy Bottom area. A new city, eventually named Washington City, was laid out in undeveloped area within the district. The remainder of the territory was designated Washington County (on the Maryland side of the Potomac) and Alexandria County (on the Virginia side). Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River is a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... Order: 1st President Vice President: John Adams Term of office: April 30, 1789 – March 3, 1797 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: John Adams Date of birth: February 22, 1732 Place of birth: Westmoreland, Virginia Date of death: December 14, 1799 Place of death: Mount Vernon, Virginia First Lady: Martha Washington... The County of Washington is one of the five political entities contained within the geographic region comprising what was originally the 100-square-mile District of Columbia. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia, directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. Originally part of the District of Columbia, by an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned (retroceded) to Virginia effective in 1847. ...


The land from the State of Virginia was eventually returned to the state in 1846. This land in Virginia makes up the modern area of Arlington County and the old part of Alexandria, Virginia, both which are considered suburbs of Washington. In fact, the Arlington National Cemetery and the Pentagon complex are both located in Arlington but are largely tied to the federal government in Washington. Between 1790 and 1846, Alexandria was referred to as "Alexandria, D.C." 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia, directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. Originally part of the District of Columbia, by an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned (retroceded) to Virginia effective in 1847. ... Alexandria is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Arlington Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, is an American military cemetery established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Robert E. Lees home. ... The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...



The Georgetown neighborhood was originally part of Maryland and was the only significant population in the area that would become the District of Columbia. Georgetown became part of the District in 1790 when the Federal City was first created, but Georgetown remained an independent city, referred to as "Georgetown, D.C.", until 1871, when it was merged with Washington City and Washington County, completing the process of Washington and the District of Columbia occupying the same geographic borders. 1790 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


The monumental core of the city consists of the National Mall and many key federal buildings, monuments, and museums, including the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, and the National Air and Space Museum. Its layout is based on that proposed by the McMillan Commission report in 1901. Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ... Washington Monument The Washington Monument is a large white-colored obelisk in the center of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built as a memorial to George Washington, the first President of the United States and the leader of the revolutionary Continental Army, which won independence from the British... The Lincoln Memorial, built 1915 - 1922 The Lincoln Memorial, on the National Mall in Washington, DC, is a memorial to United States President Abraham Lincoln. ... Interior of museum, with Gemini capsule, Soviet rockets, and Wright Flyer visible The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the United States Smithsonian Institution maintains the largest collection of aircraft and spacecraft in the world. ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Crime

DC homicide trends (1985-2004)
MPD Chief Charles H. Ramsey walking a police-line during a protest in the District of Columbia

"Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country." — former Mayor Marion Barry Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Charles H. Ramsey, Chief, Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. ... Charles H. Ramsey, Chief, Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. ... ... (Not to be confused with Marion Berry, U.S. Representative from Arkansas. ...


At the peak of the violent crime wave, in the early 1990s, Washington DC was known as the murder capital of the U.S. The number of homicides peaked in 1991, with 482 in that year. Despite the high rate of crime, violence was not evenly distributed across the city, but rather was primarily concentrated in specific neighborhoods, located east of Rock Creek Park. These areas included Columbia Heights, Adams Morgan, Logan Circle, Shaw, Le Droit Park and the East End of Downtown (Chinatown), all located to the north of the National Mall. As recently as 2001, many services such as baby sitters would not go east of 16th Street, into these neighborhoods due to the prevalence of violent crime. High rates of crime have also plagued substantial portions of Northeast Washington, including the Trinidad neighborhood, as well as most of the neighborhoods located east of the Anacostia River, in Southeast Washington. A violent crime or crime of violence is a crime in which the offender uses or threatens violent force upon the victim. ... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... Rock Creek Park is an urban natural area with public park facilities which bisects Washington, DC. East of the park, the city has a decidedly urban character. ... Columbia Heights is a neighborhood in Washington, DC. Geography Located in the northwest quadrant of Washington, DC, Columbia Heights borders the neighborhoods of Shaw, Adams Morgan, Mount Pleasant, Petworth, and Pleasant Plains. ... Adams Morgan is a neighborhood in Washington, DC, in the northwest quadrant of the city above Dupont Circle, focused at the crossroads of 18th Street and Columbia Road. ... Logan Circle is a neighborhood in Washington, DC. The actual traffic circle is the intersection of 13th Street, P Street, and Rhode Island Avenue in Northwest, with a grassy area in the middle. ... Shaw is a neighborhood in Washington, DC. It is roughly (and inconsistently) defined as the neighborhood north of Mount Vernon Square or Logan Circle, west of 7th Street NW, and south of Columbia Heights. ... Le Droit Park is a neighborhood in Washington, D.C. located immediately south of Howard University. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Northeast DC is the northeastern quadrant of the city, located north of East Capitol Street and east of North Capital Street. ... Trinidad, Washington, DC is located in Ward 6 of Washington, and is a historically working-class and student area, bounded on the north by Mt. ... The Anacostia River is a river that flows about 8. ... Southeast DC is the southeastern quadrant of the city, located south of East Capitol Street and east of South Capital Street. ...


The tide has since turned as gentrification is sweeping eastward across the District and has transformed the neighborhoods of Adams Morgan, Logan Circle, Columbia Heights, and the East End of Downtown (Chinatown). In the past ten years, the number of homicides has been halved, from 399 in 1994 to 198 in 2004. The gentrification of these neighborhoods was, in part, spurred by the extension of Metrorail's Green Line to the Shaw, U Street, Columbia Heights, and Petworth neighborhoods, during the late 1990s. The revitalization efforts began, first in the Adams Morgan and Logan Circle areas, and more recently in Columbia Heights. In 2005, gentrification is now beginning to reach Shaw, Le Droit Park, Petworth, Bloomingdale, Eckington, as well as Trinidad. The transformation of the Downtown/Chinatown areas into clean, safe areas was aided by the construction of the MCI Center, which opened in 1997, and the new Washington Convention Center that opened in 2004 at Mount Vernon Square. As a result of the revitalization efforts, the home values in these neighborhoods have skyrocketed, while the violent crime rates have plummeted. This once impoverished part of Jersey Citys historic downtown is quickly becoming gentrified. ... Chinatowns Friendship Archway, as seen looking west on H St. ... Bethesda Metro station. ... Greenbelt station, end of the Green line on the Washington Metro The Green Line of the Washington Metro consists of 21 subway stations from Greenbelt to Branch Ave. ... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM... Petworth is a small town in West Sussex, England. ... Bloomingdale is the name of some places in the United States of America: Bloomingdale, Florida Bloomingdale, Georgia Bloomingdale, Illinois Bloomingdale, Indiana Bloomingdale, Kentucky Bloomingdale, Michigan Bloomingdale, New Jersey (two places): in Passaic County in Somerset County Bloomingdale, New York Bloomingdale, North Carolina Bloomingdale, Ohio Bloomingdale, Pennsylvania (three places): in Carbon... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The MCI Center, view to the southeast across 7th St. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Reef. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Despite this gentrification, the Sursum Corda public housing project, located along North Capitol Street between K and M Streets, bordering the Downtown/Chinatown and Le Droit Park neighborhoods, has remained a magnet for drug dealers and crime. However, since a 14-year girl was murdered here in the beginning of 2004, the D.C. government has begun to tackle this hotspot. A plan is in the works to demolish the public housing and replace it with mixed-income housing. Helping to spur development in this area north of Union Station, is the New York Avenue metrorail station that opened in November 2004, and related economic development. Sursum Corda is a small neighborhood located in NW Washington, DC. Its boundaries are defined by North Capitol St, 2nd St. ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ... New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U is a Washington Metro station in Washington, DC on the Red Line. ...


It is advisable for visitors to Washington to acquaint themselves with the neighborhoods of the city and plan their visits accordingly, the same care that one would pay when visiting any major city is recommended. Tourist advice ("conventional wisdom") generally recommends that visitors do not venture east of the U.S. Capitol. An exception to that is the historic Capitol Hill neighborhood, located directly to the east of the U.S. Capitol Building. There are many attractions in the eastern half of the city, including the historic Eastern Market (the largest continually operated public market in the city) and the National Arboretum on New York Avenue. The visitor will also find countless historic residential neighborhoods in the eastern half of the city. This "common" tourist advice to remain west of the U.S. Capitol is seen by some locals as racially motivated, since most of the District's white residents live west of the U.S. Capitol and most of the property related crime also occurs west of the U.S. Capitol. Like any major city, it is advisable to use common sense and not be out alone at late hours of the night. Capitol Hill, aside from being the common nickname for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, DC, stretching easterly behind the U.S. Capitol along wide avenues. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... The Eastern Market The Eastern Market is a public market in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, DC, housed in a 19th century brick building. ...


An added impact of this wave of gentrification is that a substantial amount of violent crime has spilled across the District's eastern boundaries into Prince George's County, Maryland. In 2004, Prince George's County experienced 148 homicides, up from 128 in 2003. As of mid-April 2005, the suburban county had already had 44 homicides for the year. That level of violence contrasts unfavorably with the other major counties surrounding Washington, including Montgomery County, Maryland which had 17 homicides for 2004, and Fairfax County, Virginia, with 10 homicides in 2004. Prince Georges County is a suburban county located in the state of Maryland immediately east of Washington, D.C.. It is notable as the wealthiest majority-African-American county in the country. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... Montgomery County is a suburban county located in the state of Maryland north and west of Washington, D.C.. Its county seat is Rockville. ... Fairfax County is a county located in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


Like many other large cities, Washington D.C. has enacted a number of strict gun control laws. Handguns have been completely outlawed (unless registered as of February 5, 1977), carrying guns (concealed or not) is prohibited, and all guns and ammunition must be registered [1]  (http://www.nraila.org/GunLaws/StateLaws.aspx?ST=DC). Critics, citing numerous statistics, have questioned the efficacy of these restrictions. Due to its prominence both as the national capital and as the so-called "murder capital" of the US (although it does not currently hold that dubious honor), Washington has become something of a popular example [2] (http://www.lewrockwell.com/lott/lott31.html) in the wider debate on gun control. For a fuller perspective, see gun control. The phrase Gun politics refers to the views of different people within a particular country as to what degree of control (increased gun rights vs. ... A handgun is a firearm small enough to be carried and used in one hand. ... A concealed carry is the right to carry a handgun or other weapon in public in a concealed manner. ... This article is about firearms and similar devices. ... 5. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The phrase Gun politics refers to the views of different people within a particular country as to what degree of control (increased gun rights vs. ...


Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there are 572,059 people, 248,338 households, and 114,235 families residing in the city. The population density is 3,597.3/km² (9,316.4/mi²). There are 274,845 housing units at an average density of 1,728.3/km² (4,476.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 32.78% White, 60.01% African American, 0.30% Native American, 2.66% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 3.84% from other races, and 2.35% from two or more races. 7.86% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Population density can be used as a measurement of any tangible item. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 248,338 households out of which 19.8% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 22.8% are married couples living together, 18.9% have a female householder with no husband present, and 54.0% are non-families. 43.8% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.0% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.16 and the average family size is 3.07. Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 20.1% under the age of 18, 12.7% from 18 to 24, 33.1% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 35 years. For every 100 females there are 89.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 86.1 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $40,127, and the median income for a family is $46,283. Males have a median income of $40,513 versus $36,361 for females. The per capita income for the city is $28,659. 20.2% of the population and 16.7% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 31.1% of those under the age of 18 and 16.4% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for an area may be defined as the total personal income in an area, divided by the number of people in that area. ... The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Religion

The religious affiliations of the citizens of DC are:

  • Protestant: 68%
  • Roman Catholic: 16%
  • Other Christian: 1%
  • Other Religions: 3%
  • Non-Religious: 7%

The three largest Protestant denominations in DC are: Baptist (47% of the total population), Methodist (7%), Episcopalian (5%). Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The word Episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word however is used in religious terms to mean bishop. ...


Economy

Enlarge
Map depicting federal lands of D.C.

Washington had a Gross State Product in 2003 of $69.7 billion. Washington, D.C. is first and foremost a company town, the company being, of course, the federal government. Most (but by no means all) people who work in or around the District have some sort of connection to the federal government. In addition to government employees, many people work for the federal contractors headquartered in the area, and many also work for the numerous nonprofit organizations of all sizes and political orientations. Then there are the law firms and lobbying firms, catering and administrative services companies, and several other industries that are sustained by the enormous economic presence of the federal government. Download high resolution version (764x610, 46 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (764x610, 46 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ...


This arrangement has the effect of making the Washington economy virtually recession proof relative to the rest of the country, because the federal government will still operate no matter the state of the general economy.


Several major companies are based in Washington, including the Carlyle Group, Marriott, and XM Satellite Radio. The Carlyle Group is a Washington, D.C. based global private equity investment firm with more than $24 billion of equity capital. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... XM Satellite Radio (NASDAQ: XMSR) is a satellite radio service in the United States based in Washington, DC and controlled by News Corporations DirecTV, General Motors, American Honda, Hughes Electronics, and several private investment groups. ...


Just outside the District, mostly in the Northern Virginia suburbs of Washington, there are headquarters to many large corporations. America Online and Orbital Sciences Corporation are based in Dulles, Virginia; MCI is based in Ashburn, Virginia; Nextel and Unisys are based in Reston, Virginia; US Airways is based in Arlington, Virginia; Colgan Air is based in Manassas, Virginia; Lockheed Martin is based in Bethesda, Maryland; General Dynamics is based in Falls Church, Virginia; Alhurra is based in Springfield, Virginia; Independence Air is based at Dulles International Airport; and the Gannett Company and its newspaper USA TODAY are based in McLean, Virginia. Northern Virginia is an area is the northern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... America Online, or AOL for short, is a corporate online service provider and Internet service provider (ISP). ... Categories: Stub ... Dulles is an unincorporated area in Loudoun County, Virginia. ... MCIs corporate logo MCI, Inc. ... Ashburn, Virginia is an unincorporated area located in Loudoun county Virginia and is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area. ... Nextel Communications (NASDAQ: NXTL) is a telecommunications firm based in the United States which provides a national mobile communications system. ... Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS) is a provider of information technology services and solutions with operations across the world. ... Reston is an unincorporated planned city and census-designated place located in western Fairfax County, Virginia, in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... The US Airways logo A US Airways 737 at Chicago OHare US Airways is an airline based in Arlington, Virginia. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... Colgan Air, Inc. ... Manassas is an independent city located in the state of Virginia. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated area in Montgomery County, Maryland, near Washington, DC. It takes its name from a church once located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church (built 1820), which in turn was named from a passage in the Christian New Testament. ... General Dynamics (NYSE: GD) is a defense conglomerate formed by mergers and divestitures. ... Falls Church is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Alhurra or Al Hurra (الحرّة, United States-based satellite TV channel, sponsored by the U.S. government, that began broadcasting on February 14, 2004 in 22 countries across the Middle East. ... Springfield is a census-designated place and an unincorporated place located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Independence Air[1] is a low-cost air carrier with its major hub being Dulles International Airport of Washington DC. Since inception, it has made Dulles the largest low-cost hub in the United States. ... Aerial photo Washington Dulles International Airport (IATA airport code IAD, ICAO airport code KIAD) serves the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... USA TODAY is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... McLean is an unincorporated community located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ...


The American genomics industry is largely centered around the Maryland suburbs of Washington. Prominent players are Celera, The Institute for Genomic Research (also known as "TIGR"), and Human Genome Sciences (all of which are in the city of Rockville, Maryland). The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR), is a non-profit genomics research institute founded in 1992 by Craig Venter in Rockville, Maryland, United States. ... Human Genome Sciences is a biopharmaceutical corporation founded in 1992. ... Rockville is the name of some places in the United States of America: Rockville, Alabama Rockville, California Rockville, Connecticut Rockville, Georgia Rockville, Indiana Rockville, Iowa Rockville, Maine Rockville, Maryland Rockville, Massachusetts Rockville, Minnesota Rockville, Missouri Rockville, Nebraska Rockville, New York Rockville, Ohio Rockville, Oregon Rockville, Pennsylvania Rockville, Rhode Island Rockville...


Cultural features

Landmarks and museums

Washington is the home of numerous national landmarks and is a popular tourist destination. Landmarks include:

The Jefferson Memorial


The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception was built to honor the spiritual Patroness of the United States. ... Blair House is a guest house for state visitors to Washington, D.C. (in the United States of America). ... The Corcoran Museum of Art is the largest privately supported cultural institution in Washington, DC. The museums main focus is American art. ... Albert Einstein Memorial The Albert Einstein Memorial, located in central Washington DC, situated in a grove of trees at the southwest corner of the grounds of the National Academy of Sciences on Constitution Avenue, is a double life size statue depicting Albert Einstein seated with manuscript papers in hand. ... The Folger Shakespeare Library is an independent research library located on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. History Standard Oil president, then chairman of the board, Henry Clay Folger was an avid collector of Shakespeareana. ... Fords Theatre in the 19th century Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. was the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. ... FDR with his dog Fala, by sculptor Neil Estern Located along the famous Cherry Tree Walk on the Tidal Basin near the National Mall, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is a memorial not only to President of the United States Franklin Delano Roosevelt, but also to the era he represents. ... The Jefferson Memorial from across the tidal basin The Jefferson Memorial at night, pediment sculpture by Adolph Alexander Weinman Jefferson Memorial at dusk, illuminated The Jefferson Memorial is a monument in Washington, DC to Thomas Jefferson. ... Download high resolution version (1327x999, 133 KB)Picture of the Jefferson Memorial from across the tidal basin Taken by Raul654 on June 23, 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1327x999, 133 KB)Picture of the Jefferson Memorial from across the tidal basin Taken by Raul654 on June 23, 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... The International Spy Museum is a private museum in downtown Washington, DC, dedicated to the field of espionage. ... The memorial, showing the pool of rememberance The Korean War Veterans Memorial is located on The Mall in Washington, DC, in West Potomac Park southeast of the Lincoln Memorial. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ...

The Lincoln Memorial, built 1915 - 1922 The Lincoln Memorial, on the National Mall in Washington, DC, is a memorial to United States President Abraham Lincoln. ... Warning: gzuncompress(): data error in /usr/local/apache/common-local/php-1. ... Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Architecture museums ... This article is about the National Gallery of the United States, for other National Galleries, see National Gallery The East Building of the National Gallery of Art The National Gallery of Art is an art museum owned and managed by the government of the United States. ... Facing west across the Mall, with ones back towards the United States Capitol. ... Categories: Museum stubs | Art museums and galleries in the U.S. | Museums in Washington, DC ... Panorama of the Memorial, seen from the east. ... The Old Post Office Pavilion is located the intersection of 12th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, in Washington, DC. When completed in 1899, it was thought that the Post Office Building would stimulate revitalization of one of the worst neighborhoods in Washington, DC. It became evident that the hoped-for... The Phillips Collection is an art museum located in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. founded by Duncan Phillips in 1918 as the Phillips Memorial Gallery. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ... The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a museum in Washington, D.C. with an extensive collection of American art. ... The Anacostia Museum is the Smithsonian Institutions museum of African American history and culture, located in and focused on the Washington, DC neighborhood of Anacostia. ... The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery is an underground gallery of Asian art located on the National Mall (in Washington, D.C.), directly behind the Smithsonian Castle. ... Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Art museums and galleries in the U.S. | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall ... Interior of museum, with Gemini capsule, Soviet rockets, and Wright Flyer visible The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the United States Smithsonian Institution maintains the largest collection of aircraft and spacecraft in the world. ... The National Museum of American History is a museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall in Washington, DC. It opened in 1964 as the Museum of History and Technology. ... Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in New York City | Museums in Washington, DC | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall ... Categories: Museum stubs | Museums in Washington, DC | Smithsonian Institution | National Mall | Natural history museums ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in Washington, DC. It has been part of the Smithsonian Institution since 1968. ... The National Postal Museum in Washington, D.C. is located across the street from Union Station and houses many interactive displays about the history of the United States Postal Service and of mail service around the world. ... The elephant exibit at the National Zoo The Smithsonian National Zoological Park, commonly known in the United States as the National Zoo, is a zoo located in Washington, DC. Founded in 1889, it consists of two distinct installations: a 163 acre (0. ... Theodore Roosevelt Island is a national park located in the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. named after the 26th president of the United States. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Exterior of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is a national institution located adjacent to The National Mall in Washington, DC, dedicated to documenting, studying, and interpreting the history of the Holocaust. ... The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall is the most identified feature of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. ... Washington Monument The Washington Monument is a large white-colored obelisk in the center of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built as a memorial to George Washington, the first President of the United States and the leader of the revolutionary Continental Army, which won independence from the British... Washington National Cathedral was the site of two Presidential state funerals: for Dwight D. Eisenhower and Ronald W. Reagan, and a presidential burial in the cathedral mausoleum: Woodrow Wilson. ... This page is about the official residence of the President of the USA. For other White Houses see White House (disambiguation). ...

Professional sports

Washington is home to several professional sports teams: the MLS D.C. United, the NHL Washington Capitals, the WNBA Washington Mystics, the NBA Washington Wizards, and the MLB Washington Nationals. Washington also hosts the annual Legg Mason Tennis Classic tennis tournament. Major League Soccer (MLS) is the highest level soccer league in the United States sanctioned by the professional division of the United States Soccer Federation (USSF or U.S. Soccer), a member of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). ... Year Founded 1995 League Major League Soccer Stadium RFK Stadium Coach Peter Nowak, 2004- All-Time Leaders* Games Marco Etcheverry, 191 Goals Jaime Moreno, 76 Assists Marco Etcheverry, 101 Points Jaime Moreno, 218 Shutouts Nick Rimando, 18 First Game San Jose Clash 1 - 0 D.C. United (Spartan Stadium; April... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Washington Capitals are a National Hockey League team based in Washington, D.C. Founded: 1974 Formerly Known As: Arena: MCI Center Uniform colors: Blue and gold Logo design: Two logos: 1) The United States capitol dome, crossed hockey sticks, a puck, and the words WASHINGTON CAPITALS, and 2) A... The Womens National Basketball Association or WNBA is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ... The Washington Mystics are a Womens National Basketball Association team. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Washington Wizards are a National Basketball Association team based in Washington, D.C.. Founded: 1961 Formerly known as: Chicago Packers (1961-1962), Chicago Zephyrs (1962-1963), Baltimore Bullets (1963-1972), Capital Bullets (1973-1974), Washington Bullets (1974-1997) Home Arena: MCI Center Uniform colors: Blue, White, Gold, and Black... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... The Washington Nationals is a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Washington, D.C.. It relocated to Washington from Montréal, Québec, Canada after the 2004 season. ... Tennis is a racquet sport played between either two players (singles) or two teams of two players (doubles). It is officially called lawn tennis to distinguish it from real tennis (also known as royal tennis or court tennis), an older form of the game that is played indoors on a...


Other professional and semi-professional teams based in DC include the USAFL Baltimore Washington Eagles, the NWFA D.C. Divas, the Minor League Football DC Explosion, and the Washington Cricket League. It was also home to the WUSA Washington Freedom, and, during the 20002002 NLL seasons, the Washington Power was based in the city. Australian Rules redirects here. ... The National Womens Football Association (NWFA) is an American football league for women. ... Cricket (disambiguation). ... The Womens United Soccer Association formed in 2001 as a soccer league for women in the United States. ... The Washington Freedom is a professional soccer team that played in the Womens United Soccer Association. ... 2000 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Lacrosse League (NLL) is the professional league of mens indoor lacrosse in North America. ... Categories: Sports stubs | National Lacrosse League | Denver sports | Major Indoor Lacrosse League ...


The NFL Washington Redskins formerly played at R.F.K. Stadium in the District, but, although still named for the city, are now based at FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland. NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Washington Redskins are a National Football League team based in Ashburn, Virginia, a suburb of Washington, D.C. . Founded: 1932 Formerly known as: Boston Braves 1932, Boston Redskins 1933-1936 Home stadium: FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland (1997-) Head coach: Joe Gibbs (2004-) (Previously coached from 1981-1992) Uniform... Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium, informally known as RFK Stadium, is a sports stadium that opened in 1961. ... FedEx Field is located in Landover, Maryland. ... Landover is an area of Prince Georges County in the State of Maryland in the United States of America. ...


On September 29, 2004, Major League Baseball announced plans to relocate the Montreal Expos to Washington for the 2005 season; on November 22, a new name was announced for the team — the Washington Nationals. A very public back-and-forth between the city council and MLB threated to scuttle the agreement until December 21, when a plan for a new stadium in Southeast DC was finalized. The Nationals will play at R.F.K. Stadium for the 2005, 2006, and 2007 seasons, with the new stadium slated to be ready for 2008. The market is also home to many fans of the Baltimore Orioles whose owner opposed the move of the Expos to DC. September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years). ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Nationals is a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Washington, D.C.. It relocated to Washington from Montréal, Québec, Canada after the 2004 season. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Nationals is a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Washington, D.C.. It relocated to Washington from Montréal, Québec, Canada after the 2004 season. ... December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Southeast DC is the southeastern quadrant of the city, located south of East Capitol Street and east of South Capital Street. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 is a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City nickname: Charm City Location in the state of Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 1,214. ... Baltimore Orioles American League AAA Ottawa Lynx AA Bowie Baysox A Frederick Keys Delmarva Shorebirds Aberdeen IronBirds R Bluefield Orioles Sarasota Orioles The Baltimore Orioles are a Major League Baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. ...


There were two Major League Baseball teams named the Washington Senators in the early and mid-20th century, which left to become respectively the Minnesota Twins and the Texas Rangers. In the 19th century, the town was home to teams called the Washington Nationals, Washington Statesmen, and Washington Senators on and off from the 1870s to the turn of the century. Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in professional baseball in North America. ... The Washington Senators (officially named the Washington Nationals during the 1905–1956 seasons) were an American League baseball team from 1901 to 1960. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... The Minnesota Twins are a Major League Baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Texas Rangers is also the name of a statewide law enforcement agency in the state of Texas in the United States. ... The Washington Senators (officially named the Washington Nationals during the 1905–1956 seasons) were an American League baseball team from 1901 to 1960. ... Events and Trends Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) results in the collapse of the Second French Empire and in the formation of both the French Third Republic and the German Empire. ...


Washington was also home to several Negro League teams, including the Homestead Grays, Washington Black Senators, Washington Elite Giants, Washington Pilots, and Washington Potomacs. Part of the History of baseball series. ... The Homestead Grays were a professional baseball team that played in the Negro Leagues in the United States. ...


The MCI Center in Chinatown, home to the Capitals, Mystics, Wizards, and the Georgetown Hoyas, is also a major venue for concerts, WWE professional wrestling, and other events. The MCI Center, view to the southeast across 7th St. ... The second-largest Chinatown in North America is in San Francisco, California, where signs, storefronts, proprietors, and even lamp posts bring the culture of China to the United States. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, is a professional wrestling organization. ... Professional wrestling is a form of performance entertainment where the participants engage in simulated sporting matches. ...


See also: U.S. cities with teams from four major sports. In the United States, the four prominent major sports leagues are Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Football League (NFL), the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the National Hockey League (NHL). ...


Performing arts

The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts hosts the National Symphony Orchestra, the Washington Opera, the Washington Ballet, and other musical and stage performances. Notable local music clubs include Madam's Organ Blues Bar in Adams Morgan, and the Black Cat, the 9:30 Club, and the historic Bohemian Caverns jazz club, all in the U Street NW area. The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... The Washington National Opera is a world-class opera company in Washington, D.C., USA, Its artistic director is the Spanish tenor, Plácido Domingo. ... Black Cat can mean: Black cat, a symbol historically associated with witchcraft and evil. ... The 9:30 Club (officially known as Nightclub 9:30) is a nightclub in Washington, DC. It is located at the intersections of 9th Street, V Street, and Vermont Avenue in Northwest DC; it is served by the U St/African-Amer Civil War Memorial/Cardozo stop on the Washington...


The only native DC music genre is go-go, a post-funk, percussion-driven flavor of R&B that blends live sets with relentless dance rhythms (that "go and go and go.") The most accomplished practitioner of go-go was DC bandleader Chuck Brown, who brought go-go to the brink of national recognition with his 1979 LP Bustin' Loose. Alternate meanings: See Go go (disambiguation) Go Go is a form of funk music which arose in the 1980s in Washington D.C.. In the late 1970s, funk had gone electronic, influenced by then popular disco acts, and began using drum machines, synthesizers and other instruments that many purists derided. ... Chuck Brown is an African-American jazz guitarist. ...


Washington was also an important center in the genesis of punk rock in the United States. Punk bands of note from Washington include Fugazi, Bad Brains, and Minor Threat. Native Washingtonians continue to support punk bands, long after the punk movement's peak in popularity. The region also has a storied indie rock history and was home to TeenBeat and Simple Machines, among other indie record labels. Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Fugazi were Japanese deserters during World War II. Fugazi is the name of an alternative rock band from Washington, D.C. Fugazi was an American GI slang during the Vietnam war. ... Bad Brains was a rock music group, formed in Washington, DC in 1977. ... Minor Threat was a short-lived hardcore punk band from Washington DC. They have been hugely influential: Critics have called them and their work iconic, [1] and noted their groundbreaking music has held up better than most of their contemporaries. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ...


DC has also historically been a center for bluegrass music. Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music with its own roots in the English, Irish traditional music and Scottish traditional music of immigrants from the British Isles (particularly the Scotch-Irish immigrants of Appalachia), as well as the music of African_American slaves. ...


TV shows featuring Washington

Many television series featuring the District have had essential ties to the government (The West Wing) or security organizations (The District, Get Smart). Other programs had the nation's capital as a secondary focus, telling stories on their own that were not always tied to the infrastructure of the government either in the district or for the country. Murphy Brown focused on the lives of the reporters of a Washington-based television newsmagazine, FYI. The soap opera Capitol allowed for stories about political intrigue alongside the traditional class struggle sagas. The sitcom 227 mentioned the role of government in the District rarely, instead showing life of the African-American majority as seen through the eyes of residents in a Washington apartment building. This is a list of television shows set in Washington, D.C. 227 Capitol Capitol Critters The District Get Smart The Lyons Den Mister Sterling Murphy Brown The Powers That Be The Secret Diary of Desmond Pfeiffer The West Wing The X-Files Categories: Lists of TV series by... The primary cast of The West Wing (from left to right): John Spencer, Dulé Hill, Allison Janney, Stockard Channing, Martin Sheen, Bradley Whitford, Janel Moloney, and Richard Schiff The West Wing is an American television serial drama created by Aaron Sorkin for NBC, airing since 1999. ... The television crime drama The District aired on CBS from October 7, 2000 to May 1, 2004. ... Get Smart was a United States comedy television series that ran from September 18, 1965 until 1970. ... Murphy Brown was a American sitcom which aired on CBS from November 14, 1988 to May 18, 1998. ... Capitol was the name of a soap opera which aired on CBS from March 29, 1982 to March 20, 1987. ... 227 is an American sitcom that originally aired on the NBC network from 1985 to 1990. ...


Local media

The Washington Post is the oldest and most read daily newspaper in Washington. The Post is also one of the most reputable daily newspapers in the U.S. and is highly influential in its political reporting, particularly after the role of its reporters in cracking the Watergate scandal. The daily Washington Times and the free weekly Washington City Paper also have substantial readership in the District. On February 1, 2005 the free daily tabloid Washington Examiner debuted. It had formerly been a chain of suburban newspapers known as the Journal Newspapers. The weekly Washington Blade focuses on gay issues. Many neighborhoods in the city have their own small-circulation newspaper, usually a free weekly. They are sometimes published by each neighborhood's respective neighborhood association. Alternative meaning: The Washington Post (march) Washington Post logo Screenshot from Washington Post website The Washington Post is the largest and oldest newspaper in Washington, D.C. It gained worldwide fame in the early 1970s for its Watergate investigation by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein which played a major role... Reading the newspaper: Brookgreen Gardens in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. ... The Watergate building. ... The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Examiner is a daily tabloid newspaper published in Washington, D.C. The newspaper was formerly distributed only in the suburbs of Washington, under the titles of Montgomery Journal, Prince Georges Jounal, and Northern Virginia Journal, and published by Journal Newspapers Inc. ... The Washington Blade is the main gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered newspaper in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. ... For people whose family name is Gay see the list of people by name. ...


Neighborhood newspapers include:

Washington is served by the following local broadcast television stations: Aerial photograph of Dupont Circle. ... Aerial photograph of Dupont Circle. ... Logan Circle is a neighborhood in Washington, DC. The actual traffic circle is the intersection of 13th Street, P Street, and Rhode Island Avenue in Northwest, with a grassy area in the middle. ... Adams Morgan is a neighborhood in Washington, DC, in the northwest quadrant of the city above Dupont Circle, focused at the crossroads of 18th Street and Columbia Road. ... Capitol Hill, aside from being the common nickname for the United States Congress, is the largest historic residential neighborhood in Washington, DC, stretching easterly behind the U.S. Capitol along wide avenues. ... An American family watching television in the 1950s. ...

  • WBDC—Channel 50, a WB affiliate
  • WDCA—Channel 20, a UPN affiliate
  • WRC—Channel 4, an NBC affiliate
  • WETA—Channel 26, a PBS affiliate
  • WJLA—Channel 7, an ABC affiliate
  • WTTG—Channel 5, a FOX affiliate
  • WUSA—Channel 9, a CBS affiliate

Public Access on Cable Television is provided by the Public Access Corporation of the District of Columbia on 2 DCTV (http://www.onlinedctv.org/)channels simulcast to both local cable TV Systems. One channel is devoted to religious programming and the other channel provides a diversity of offerings. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... WDCA is the Washington, DC areas UPN affiliate, and is located on channel 20 (digital channel 35). ... The official logo for UPN. UPN is a television network in the United States, owned by Viacom Inc. ... WRC-TV is an NBC-affiliated broadcast television station in Washington, DC. It broadcasts on channel 4 and is owned by NBC Universal. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... This article is about the insect. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ... WJLA is the local ABC affiliate in Washington, DC, and is located on channel 7 (digital channel 39). ... 2002 identity of the ABC Circle logo, designed by Paul Rand in 1962. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... WUSA is a broadcast television station in Washington, DC, affliated with CBS and owned by Gannett. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ...


Some prominent radio stations in the District include: Radio transmission diagram and electromagnetic waves Radio is a technology that allows the transmission of signals by modulation of electromagnetic waves with frequencies below those of light. ...

  • WAMU, 88.5 FM, an NPR-affiliate run by American University. Plays the usual NPR programs, community programming, and BBC news. Once known for its daily bluegrass programming, bluegrass and oldtime country are now aired only on Sunday and on its online affiliate, bluegrasscountry.org  (http://www.bluegrasscountry.org/).
  • WETA, 90.9 FM, another NPR-affiliate. It previously ran a mixed program, but has recently abandoned most of its classical music programming in favor of round-the-clock news/analysis, broadcasting shows originating mainly from NPR, PRI and the BBC.
  • WHFS, 99.1 FM, long-time alternative rock station turned Latin.
  • WKYS, 93.9 FM, a Radio One station competing with WPGC for the young African-American market. Home to the regionally syndicated Russ Parr Morning Show.
  • WPGC, 95.5 FM, a highly rated rythmic CHR/hip-hop station.
  • WHUR, 96.3 FM, a commercial radio station run by Howard University, an "urban adult contemporary" station in radio industry parlance. Also highly rated.
  • WASH, 97.1 FM, a soft adult contemporary station; better known as "WASH-FM."
  • WMZQ, 98.7 FM, the city's country music station.
  • WIHT, 99.5 FM, a popular top-40 radio station run by Clear Channel Communications.
    Washington Monument
  • WWDC, 101.1 FM, also known as "DC 101," this is the District's "alternative rock" station. "Shock jock" Howard Stern worked at WWDC briefly in the early 1980s, when he made national headlines for prank-calling Air Florida the day after the fatal crash of the airline's Flight 90 into Washington's 14th Street Bridge.
  • WJZW, 105.9 FM, the city's smooth jazz station.
  • WJFK, 106.7 FM, an all-talk station owned by the Infinity Broadcasting network. It broadcasts personalities ranging from Howard Stern to Bill O'Reilly.
  • WMAL, 630 AM, long-running conservative talk station.
  • WTOP, 1500 AM, an all-news station. Claims to be the District's top-rated radio station.

XM Satellite Radio is based in Washington as well. WAMU is a public radio station that services the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... American University is a fully accredited university located at Ward Circle, straddling the Spring Valley and American University Park areas of Northwest Washington, DC. It currently has roughly 5,000 undergraduate students, and approximately the same number of graduate students. ... Bluegrass has three principal meanings, the second two both deriving from the first listed. ... Country music, once known as country and western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... This article is about the insect. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Classical music is music considered classical, as sophisticated and refined, in a regional tradition. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Public Radio International, or PRI, is a not-for-profit corporation based in the United States founded in 1983 to develop non-commercial audio programming for public radio and other audio venues. ... ... WHFS was a FM radio station broadcasting in the Washington, DC / Baltimore, Maryland market on various frequencies over 4 decades. ... WPGC is Washington, DCs largest urban format radio station located at 95. ... Hip hop is a cultural movement that began amongst urban African American youth in New York and has since spread around the world. ... Howard University is a historically black college in Washington, D.C. It was established by a congressional charter in 1867, and much of its early funding came from the Freedmens Bureau. ... Country music, once known as country and western music, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... Clear Channel Communications is a media company based in the United States of America. ... Download high resolution version (1863x1397, 1510 KB)Photo from Tidal Pool in Washington, DC of the Washington Monument framed by cherry blossoms. ... Download high resolution version (1863x1397, 1510 KB)Photo from Tidal Pool in Washington, DC of the Washington Monument framed by cherry blossoms. ... A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ... This article is about the radio personality; for Anna Nicole Smiths attorney, see her article. ... U.S. National Transportation Safety Board diagram of flight path for Air Florida flight 90 which crashed on take-off at Washington, DC on January 13, 1982, killing 78 persons. ... Smooth jazz is a controversial term, denoting a form of music that many jazz lovers do not consider to be a form of jazz, and that others do. ... 106. ... CBSs first color logo, which debuted in the fall of 1965. ... This article is about the radio personality; for Anna Nicole Smiths attorney, see her article. ... Bill OReilly William James Bill OReilly, Jr. ... WMAL is one of the oldest radio stations in Washington, D.C., broadcasting in the news-talk format at AM 630. ... WTOP is a radio station in Washington, DC,the call letters for WTOP are 1500 AM in Washington and 820 AM for Fredrick. ... XM Satellite Radio (NASDAQ: XMSR) is a satellite radio service in the United States based in Washington, DC and controlled by News Corporations DirecTV, General Motors, American Honda, Hughes Electronics, and several private investment groups. ...

List of D.C. radio stations (http://www.tvradioworld.com/region1/dc/Radio.asp?m=was)

Educational institutions

Colleges and universities

American University is a fully accredited university located at Ward Circle, straddling the Spring Valley and American University Park areas of Northwest Washington, DC. It currently has roughly 5,000 undergraduate students, and approximately the same number of graduate students. ... The Catholic University of America The Catholic University of America (abbreviated CUA), located in Washington, DC, is unique as the national university of the Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by the U.S. bishops. ... The Corcoran Museum of Art is the largest privately supported cultural institution in Washington, DC. The museums main focus is American art. ... Gallaudet University was the first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard-of-hearing. ... The George Washington University (GWU) is a private university in Washington, D.C., founded in 1821 as The Columbian College. ... Georgetown University Georgetown University is a Catholic university in Georgetown, Washington, DC. It is the oldest Catholic university in the United States of America, and the first Jesuit one, having been founded on January 23, 1789 by Archbishop John Carroll. ... Howard University is a historically black college in Washington, D.C. It was established by a congressional charter in 1867, and much of its early funding came from the Freedmens Bureau. ... Categories: Stub ... Southeastern University is a private, non-profit undergraduate and graduate institution of higher education. ... Strayer University (formerly called Strayer College) is an educational institution with locations in Washington, D.C. and several of its suburbs in Virginia, as well as other locations in Baltimore, Maryland, Richmond and Hampton, Virginia, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, and Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee. ... For other institutions of higher education using the name Trinity, see Trinity College, Trinity International University, or Trinity University (Texas) Trinity University is a Catholic university located in Washington, D.C.. Founded in 1897 by the Sisters of Notre Dame as a liberal arts college for women, the university now... The University of the District of Columbia (also known as UDC) is a public university located in Washington, DC. The university was formed in 1977 through the amalgamation of the Federal City College and Washington Technical Institute - which had both been established in 1966 as the result of a study...

High schools

Emerson Preparatory School is a small private high school in Northwest Washington, DC, founded in 1852 as the Emerson Institute. ... Gonzaga College High School is a Jesuit High School for boys located in Washington, DC. Gonzaga was founded by Father Antoine Kohlmann, an Alsatian Jesuit, in 1821. ... Sidwell Friends School is a Quaker private school located in Washington, DC and Bethesda, Maryland. ... Georgetown Day School is an independent, K-12 school in Washington, DC. It is familiarly called GDS, or less frequently Georgetown Day; its high school is sometimes abbreviated GDHS. It was founded in 1945 as the first integrated school in the District. ... St. ... Founded in 1942, St. ... == St. ... National Cathedral School is an all-girls school located on the grounds of the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. The all-boys school, St. ... Woodrow Wilson High School is the name of numerous High Schools throughout the United States which are named after the 28th president of the united states, Woodrow Wilson. ...

Other schools

Main article: Washington, DC schools These are public schools in Washington, DC. All are directly or indirectly (i. ...

Reformed Theological Seminary (RTS) is a non-denominational, Protestant seminary dedicated to training leaders in the evangelical church (especially its Presbyterian and Reformed branches) to be pastors, missionaries, educators, and Christian counselors. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ...

Transportation

Roadways

The Capital Beltway surrounds the Washington area. East of the Interstate_95 exits in Virginia and Maryland, the Beltway has a double route number: I-95 and I-495. West of those exits, the Beltway is designated simply as I-495. I-270 connects the Beltway with I-70. The Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway (I-395) breaks off of I-95 at the Beltway to connect northern Virginia with downtown Washington. I-66 begins at the east edge of Georgetown, connects to the Beltway, and continues through northern Virginia to I-81. I-295 comes up from the south starting at the eastern edge of the Woodrow Wilson Bridge on the Beltway and crosses the Anacostia River into downtown, linking up with I-395. Anacostia Freeway (DC-295), splits from I-295 on the south side of the Anacostia, and links with the unnumbered Baltimore-Washington Parkway via a short section of Maryland State Highway 201. The Capital Beltway (in green) The Capital Beltway (Interstate 495) is an expressway-class interstate highway which circles the Washington, DC area. ... Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north and south along the eastern United States coast. ... Interstate 270 is the designation for four tertiary interstate routes in the United States. ... I-70 looking westbound near Mile 326, Wabaunsee County, Kansas Interstate 70 is a long interstate highway in the United States. ... The Henry G. Shirley Memorial Highway was Virginias first limited access freeway. ... Interstate 395 in Virginia is a 13 mile long spur route that begins at a junction with Interstate 95 in Springfield, Virginia and ends in downtown Washington, District of Columbia. ... Interstate 95 or (I-95) is an interstate highway that runs 1907 miles (3070 kilometers) north and south along the eastern United States coast. ... Interstate 66 is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Georgetown is a neighborhood of Washington, DC, the capital of the United States. ... Interstate 81 is an interstate highway in the eastern part of the United States. ... The 8. ... Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge, on the Potomac River at Alexandria, Virginia, completed in 1961 The Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge is a drawbridge over the Potomac River connecting the independent city of Alexandria, Virginia and Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... The Anacostia River is a river that flows about 8. ... DC 295, also known as the Anacostia Freeway, is a freeway in the District of Columbia, and currently the only numbered route in the District that is not an Interstate Highway or U.S. Highway. ... The Baltimore-Washington Parkway (B-W Parkway) is a federally owned freeway, operated by the National Park Service, running parallel to Interstate 95 between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, DC. Signs at its termini dedicate it to Gladys Noon Spellman. ... MD 201 is a road near Washington, DC. Its most well-known section is not normally known as MD 201, but is usually considered to be part of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. ...


Among the major roads in Washington are MacArthur Boulevard, 14th Street NW, 16th Street NW, Connecticut Avenue, K Street NW, Rock Creek Parkway, Wisconsin Avenue, M Street NW, Pennsylvania Avenue, Constitution Avenue, Independence Avenue, Massachusetts Avenue, U Street NW, North Capitol Street, South Capitol Street, East Capitol Street, Georgia Avenue, Minnesota Avenue, Nannie Helen Boroughs Avenue, Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, New York Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue, the Anacostia Freeway, and the Suitland Parkway. The Whitehurst Freeway, an elevated freeway over K Street in Georgetown, allows U.S. Highway 29 traffic to bypass Georgetown between the Key Bridge and K Street downtown. In the Cartesian-coordinate-based street system of Washington, D.C., 14th Street refers to any of several north-south streets located 14 blocks east or west of the United States Capitol. ... K Street, epicenter of American lobbying. ... Pennsylvania Avenue street sign, 2004. ... In Washington, D.C., Constitution Avenue is a major east-west street running just north of the United States Capitol in the citys Northwest and Northeast quadrants. ... Massachusetts Avenue is the name shared by prominent streets located in Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Washington, D.C., USA; and Lawrence, Kansas, USA. Each Massachusetts Avenue is commonly called Mass. ... New York Avenue is one of the diagonal avenues radiating from the White House in Washington, D.C. It is a major east-west route in the citys Northwest and Northeast quadrants and connects downtown with points east and north of the city via the John Hanson Highway and... The Whitehurst Freeway is an elevated highway over K Street in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. It allows traffic on U.S. Highway 29 to bypass Georgetown between the Key Bridge and K Street downtown. ... Source and External Link U.S. Highways: from US 1 to (US 830) (Robert V. Droz) Categories: Stub | United States Highway system | U.S. Highways in Florida ... The Francis Scott Key Bridge, or, more commonly, the Key Bridge, is a reinforced concrete arch bridge conveying U.S. Highway 29 traffic across the Potomac River between the Rosslyn section of Arlington County, Virginia, and the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C. It was built by the U.S...


U.S. Highways 1, 29 and 50 pass through Washington, mostly on surface streets. The route numbers are not used by residents and the sparse signage reflects that. Current U.S. Highway shield The United States Highway System is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ... United States Highway 1 is a United States highway which parallels the east coast of the United States. ... Source and External Link U.S. Highways: from US 1 to (US 830) (Robert V. Droz) Categories: Stub | United States Highway system | U.S. Highways in Florida ... United States Highway 50 is an east-west United States highway. ...


Washington formerly had other District routes in addition to DC Route 295, signed using a modified U.S. Highway shield (a 1942 photo (http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8b14000/8b14400/8b14423r.jpg)), but these are long-gone. Current U.S. Highway shield The United States Highway System is an integrated system of roads in the United States numbered within a nationwide grid. ...


Bus and rail

The Washington area is serviced by the Washington Metro public transportation system, which operates public buses (Metrobus) and the region's subway system (Metrorail). Many of the jurisdictions around the region also run public buses that interconnect with the Metrobus/Metrorail system. Union Station is served by MARC and Virginia Railway Express commuter trains, and Amtrak intercity rail. Intercity bus service is available from the Greyhound Bus Terminal in Northeast and from dragon buses leaving from Chinatown. Bethesda Metro station. ... Burnhams Union Station: the central block of the immense front façade of Union Station Union Station is the grand ceremonial train station designed to be the entrance to Washington, DC when it opened in 1907. ... Marc, or MARC, may refer to or stand for one of the following: The lower-case word marc is a French style of pomace brandy. ... Categories: Rail stubs | Railway companies of the United States | Regional rail systems | Transportation in Virginia ... Amtrak is the trademark name of an intercity passenger train system created on May 1, 1971 in the United States. ... Northeast DC is the northeastern quadrant of the city, located north of East Capitol Street and east of North Capital Street. ... Passengers waiting at the Fung Wah Lines ticket window on Canal Street and the Bowery in Manhattan A 2000 Coach bus in NYC, August 2004 Chinatown bus lines, also known as dragon buses, refers to the private transportation industry that has arisen in the Chinatown communities of the East Coast... Chinatowns Friendship Archway, as seen looking west on H St. ...


Airports

No commercial airports lie within the District of Columbia itself, though three are situated nearby:

The first two are managed by a special body, the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, while the third is under the administration of the State of Maryland. Color enhanced USGS satellite image of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, taken April 26, 2002. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia, directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. Originally part of the District of Columbia, by an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned (retroceded) to Virginia effective in 1847. ... Aerial photo Washington Dulles International Airport (IATA airport code IAD, ICAO airport code KIAD) serves the greater Washington, DC metropolitan area. ... Dulles is an unincorporated area in Loudoun County, Virginia. ... Chantilly is an unincorporated area located in Fairfax County, Virginia. ... Baltimore/Washington International Airport serves the Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, DC metro-region. ... Linthicum is a census-designated place (CDP) and an unincorporated community located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. ... City nickname: Charm City Location in the state of Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 1,214. ...


Reagan National is favored for its close proximity and Metro access, but flights are heavily restricted on account of noise and security concerns. With a handful of exceptions, flights in and out of DCA are restricted to airports less than 1250 miles (2011.7 km) away. On the most common approach, pilots must negotiate a tight corridor over the Potomac between restricted airspace over the White House and Mall to the north and the Pentagon to the south, executing a ninety-degree turn just before touchdown.


Dulles is the busiest airport by passengers served, and the second busiest international gateway on the Eastern Seaboard. It is a hub of United Airlines and Independence Air, and on account of the latter the largest low-cost carrier hub in the U.S., although LCC Southwest Airlines notably maintains one of its largest East Coast operations at BWI. Categories: US geography stubs ... United Airlines Boeing 777 taking off at Schiphol, Amsterdam. ... Independence Air[1] is a low-cost air carrier with its major hub being Dulles International Airport of Washington DC. Since inception, it has made Dulles the largest low-cost hub in the United States. ... Boeing 737-200 of low-cost Irish airline Ryanair A low-cost carrier (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier) is an airline that offers low fares but eliminates most traditional passenger services. ... Southwest Airlines, Inc. ...


General aviation is additionally available at Montgomery County Airpark (Gaithersburg, Maryland), College Park Airport (College Park, Maryland), Potomac Airfield (Friendly, Maryland), and Manassas Regional Airport (Manassas, Virginia). Gaithersburg is a city in Montgomery County, Maryland. ... College Park is a city located in Prince Georges County, Maryland, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 24,657. ... Friendly is a census-designated place located in Prince Georges County, Maryland. ... Manassas is an independent city located in the state of Virginia. ...


External links

General information and activity guides

Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
District government headlines and news releases (http://www.dc.gov/more_news.asp)
  • Major DC entertainment guides: The Washington Post (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/artsandliving/entertainmentguide/?nav=globetop) | Washington City Paper (http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/arts.shtml)
  • Washington DC Hotels (http://www.washingtondchotelseye.com/)- guide to hotels in Washington DC

File links The following pages link to this file: Abu Dhabi Abraham Lincoln Australia Adolf Hitler Animation Andorra Alaska Anatomy Asia Albert Einstein Asterales Automobile Aircraft Alexander Graham Bell Apple Computer American Civil War Ancient Egypt Asteraceae Alps Arches National Park Aarhus Almond Caesar Augustus Acacia Acropolis Acupuncture Amaranth Alexander... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

DC Neighborhoods

District representation debate

Sources

Crime Statistics

  • Metropolitan Police Department (http://mpdc.dc.gov/)
  • Wilber, Del Quentin, Jamie Stockwell (January 1, 2005) Killings in D.C. Fewest Since '86 (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A39858-2004Dec31.html), The Washington Post, p. A01.
  • ABC 7 News - Homicides 'Huge Concern' for P.G. County (http://www.wjla.com/news/stories/0305/212355.html)

Other


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Federal district District of Columbia
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