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Encyclopedia > Washington College
Washington College

Established: 1782
Type: Private
President: Baird Tipson
Staff: 468
Undergraduates: 1,350
Postgraduates: 100
Location: Chestertown, Maryland, USA
Campus: Rural
Colors: Maroon and Black
Mascot: The Shoremen, The Shorewomen
Website: www.washcoll.edu
See Washington (disambiguation) for institutions with similar names.

Washington College is a private, selective, independent liberal arts college located on a 112 acre (45.3 ha) campus in Chestertown, Maryland, on the Eastern Shore. Maryland granted Washington College its charter in 1782. George Washington supported the founding of WC by consenting to have the "College at Chester" named in his honor, through generous financial support, and through service on the College's Board of Visitors and Governors. Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the United States and was the first college chartered after American independence. The school became coeducational in 1891. Image File history File links Wc_logo. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... tool ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... High Street in Chestertown Chestertown is a town located in Kent County, Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Look up Washington in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... High Street in Chestertown Chestertown is a town located in Kent County, Maryland. ... The Eastern Shore of Maryland is composed of the states nine counties east of Chesapeake Bay. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...

Contents

Overview

Chestertown's historic waterfront
Chestertown's historic waterfront

Approximately 1,300 undergraduates and 100 graduate students attend Washington College, 47% from Maryland and the balance from 35 other states and forty foreign nations. Approximately 8% of the American undergraduates are minority students and approximately 8% are international citizens. Approximately 5% of the WC student body is "non-traditional" (25 years old or older). Approximately 80% of all students live in college residence halls; the rest commute either from off-campus housing or from home. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1990x1271, 288 KB) Seen from the Chester River, a partial view of the historic, colonial era waterfront of Chestertown, MD, home of Washington College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1990x1271, 288 KB) Seen from the Chester River, a partial view of the historic, colonial era waterfront of Chestertown, MD, home of Washington College. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has...


Annual tuition is $29,640 and total expenses per annum (including room, board, and fees) are $36,650. Approximately 85% of the student body receives some form of need-based financial aid or merit-based scholarship award. The cost of attendance has been rising in recent years, with the overall costs (including room and board) increasing to roughly $37,000. Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


The school has over 90 student clubs. Freshmen, unless local, are required to live on-campus. On-campus housing is available for approximately 900 students. Most students (70-75%) stay on-campus over the weekend to participate in various social and recreational activities. Approximately 30% of students attend graduate school in the first year following graduation and approximately 45% do so within five years. Student/faculty ratio: 12/1. Average class size is 17. The school confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts (in English, Psychology & History). Freshman redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...


The college awards the Sophie Kerr prize, the largest monetary undergraduate award in the country. The graduating senior with the greatest literary potential is chosen by a faculty committee for this honor each year. The award has grown to over $60,000. Sophie Kerr (1880-1965) was an author who wrote 23 novels and many poems and short stories. ...


In 2005, Washington College inaugurated another literary prize, the George Washington Book Prize, administered by the college's C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and awarded in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and George Washington's Mount Vernon. The prize is awarded annually to the most significant new book about the founding era. At $50,000, the prize is one of the most generous book awards in the United States. The George Washington Book Prize was instituted in 2005 and is awarded annually to recognize outstanding published works that contribute to a greater understanding of the life and career of George Washington and/or the nation’s founding era. ... The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, founded in New York by Richard Gilder and Lewis E. Lehrman in 1994, was set up to promote the study and love of American history. ...


Washington College is host to the Harwood Series, a collection of speaking engagements by national politicians, media pundits, and so forth. In recent years, Haley Barbour, Howard Dean, John McCain, James Carville, Ellen Sauerbrey, Donna Shalala, Eugene McCarthy, Cornel West, Birch Bayh, Gary Hart, Richard Lugar, and Karl Rove have appeared on campus. Recreationally speaking, WC attracts decent talent to entertain the student body: the Counting Crows, Bruce Hornsby, Wayne Brady, DJ Kool, and Larry Hagman have all appeared on campus in one capacity or another recently. Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current Republican governor of Mississippi. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... McCain redirects here. ... James Carville James Carville (born October 25, 1944) is an American political consultant, commentator, media personality and pundit. ... Ellen Sauerbrey (born September 9, 1937, in Baltimore) is a Maryland politician and the head of the United States Department of States Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. ... Donna Edna Shalala (surname pronounced IPA: ; born February 14, 1941) has served as president of the University of Miami, a private university in Coral Gables, Florida, since 2001. ... Not to be confused with the anti-Communist senator Joseph Raymond McCarthy. ... Cornell West redirects here. ... Birch Evans Bayh II (born January 22, 1928) was a U.S. Senator from Indiana between 1963 and 1981. ... For other persons named Gary Hart, see Gary Hart (disambiguation). ... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Indiana. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush until the end of August 2007. ... Counting Crows is an American Folk Rock band originating from Berkeley, California. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... Wayne Alphonso[1] Brady (born June 2, 1972 in Orlando, Florida) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, singer and television personality, known for his role on the ABC television show Whose Line Is It Anyway? and for his daytime talk show, The Wayne Brady Show. ... DJ Kool was a rapper in the late 1990s who produced various popular rap singles. ... Larry Hagman (born on September 21, 1931) is a popular American actor who is famous for playing J.R. Ewing in the 1980s television soap opera Dallas and Major Anthony Nelson on the sitcom I Dream of Jeannie. ...


There are four fraternities and three sororities on campus: male Greek life includes Kappa Alpha Order, Kappa Sigma, Phi Delta Theta, and Theta Chi. The Kappa Alpha, Theta Chi, and Phi Delta Theta housing can be found in the specialty housing known as The Quad (three buildings found at the center of campus). The female organizations are Alpha Chi Omega, Zeta Tau Alpha, and Alpha Omicron Pi. In 2005, Kappa Alpha Order and Phi Delta Theta were found guilty of hazing as well as violating other college policies. Punishment for such crimes included both fraternities being removed from their respective housings and serving academic probation. Both fraternities served their probationary period, and have since been returned to their respective housing. [1][2][3] As a reaction to such incidents, a chapter of the Kappa Sigma Fraternity was established on April 14, 2007. [4] Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international womens fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ...


The campus newspaper of record is The Elm. Other campus publications include The Collegian (features) and The Medium (creative writing).


It is a Washington College tradition to celebrate May Day (May 1) by liberating oneself from one's restrictive and oppressive clothing and partying desnudo with fellow students mostly by the flagpole. The celebration takes place over two nights with hundreds participating. On a similar note, the east side of campus has enjoyed free Cinemax cable for years due to an oversight.[citation needed] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Washington College has had a regional reputation for excellence for some time, especially in Maryland. However, under the new President, national recognition has been a goal. The fruits of this effort are visible with Washington College's recent ranking among the top Liberal Arts institutions in the United States according to U.S. News rankings.[citation needed]


Academic departments and programs

(+)=major; (#)=minor; (!)=academic program

  • American Studies (+)
  • Anthropology (+ #)
  • Art (+ #)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience (!)
  • Biology (+ #)
  • Black Studies (#)
  • Business Management (+ #)
  • Chemistry (+ #)
  • Chesapeake Regional Studies (!)
  • Computer Science (+ #)
  • Creative Writing (#)
  • Drama (+ #)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (#)
  • Economics (+ #)
  • Education (Elementary and Secondary) (!)
  • Engineering (!)
  • English (+ #)
  • Environmental Studies (+)
  • Foreign Languages (French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Arabic, Italian) (+ #)
  • Gender Studies (#)
  • History (+ #)
  • Human Development (+)
  • Humanities (+)
  • International Studies (+)
  • Mathematics (+ #)
  • Music (+ #)
  • Nursing (!)
  • Pharmacy (!)
  • Philosophy and Religion (+ #)
  • Physical Education (!)
  • Physics (+ #)
  • Political Science (+ #)
  • Pre-Law (!)
  • Premedical (!)
  • Psychology (+ #)
  • Sociology (+ #)

Honorary societies

Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) is an international sociology honor society. ... Beta Beta Beta, or TriBeta, is a National Biological Honor Society. ... Omicron Delta Epsilon is a international honor society in the field of economics. ... Omicron Delta Kappa, or OΔK, is a national leadership honor society. ... Phi Alpha Theta is an American honor society for undergraduate students, graduate students, and professors of history. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... The Phi Sigma Tau key Phi Sigma Tau is an international honor society for philosophers. ... // Pi Sigma Alpha (Π Σ Α), National Political Science Honor Society, was founded in 1920 at the University of Texas for the purpose of bringing together students and faculty interested in the study of government and politics. ... It has been suggested that Psi chi be merged into this article or section. ... Sigma Tau Delta is an international honor society for collegiate students of English. ... Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society, founded in 1886, is a non-profit honor society of about 62,000 scientists and engineers elected on the basis of their research achievements or potential. ...

Notable alumni and affiliates

For a complete list see List of Washington College alumni

The college boasts of a notable list of persons who served on the original Board of visitors and governors, including: Notable Washington College alumni: // Colonel Hiram Staunton Brown, Class of 1900, New York banker, businessman, multimillionaire and president of the RKO Movie Corporation; Served as President of Colleges Board of Visitors and Governors. ...

George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... William Paca portrait by Charles Willson Peale. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... Joshua Seney (March 4, 1756– October 10, 1798) was an American farmer and lawyer from Queen Annes County, Maryland. ... Robert Goldsborough (December 3, 1733–December 22, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Maryland. ...

Varsity athletics

Washington College is perhaps best known athletically for its men's lacrosse team. It has advanced to the NCAA Division III championship game eight times, winning the title in 1998. The men's tennis team won NCAA Division III national championships in 1994 and 1997. For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

  • Baseball (M)
  • Basketball (M, W)
  • Field Hockey (W)
  • Lacrosse (M, W)
  • Rowing (M, W)
  • Sailing (CoEd)
  • Soccer (M, W)
  • Softball (W)
  • Swimming (M, W)
  • Tennis (M, W)
  • Volleyball (W)

Facilities

Washington College campus
Washington College campus

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x725, 207 KB) An aerial view of the Washington College campus and Chestertown, MD Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x725, 207 KB) An aerial view of the Washington College campus and Chestertown, MD Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...

Residence halls

  • Caroline House -- This three-floor coed building houses men on the first floor, and women on the second and third floors.
  • Cecil House -- This building is configured to accommodate four three-student suites and two six-student suites.
  • Dorchester House -- This building is configured to accommodate four three-man suites and two six-man suites.
  • East Hall -- The International House is a three-floor coed building that serves as a home for students interested in international relation and foreign language study. This theme house has a faculty advisor and has limited housing available for new students.
  • Harford House -- This three-floor building is configured to accommodate four seven-person suites per floor.
  • Kent House -- This is a two-floor building, co-ed by hallway.
  • Middle Hall -- The Creative Arts House is a coed building for students interested in drama, music, visual art, literature, and the creative arts in general. Limited housing available for new students.
  • Minta Martin -- This single-sex building houses women only; residents include but are not limited to members of the Alpha Chi Omega and Zeta Tau Alpha sororities.
  • North Campus/Western Shore Residence Halls (Allegany, Anne Arundel, Calvert, Carroll, Charles, Frederick, Garrett, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's, St. Mary's) -- These eleven buildings contain four apartment-style suites. Each suite contains four single bedrooms, two baths, a common area, and kitchenette. These halls are limited to upperclassmen. Two new apartment-style suite buildings, Sassafras and Chester, will open in the Fall semester of 2008.
  • Queen Anne House -- This two-floor, co-ed building is home to the substance-free program. Alcohol and tobacco products are prohibited in this building.
  • Reid Hall -- This three-floor building is for women only.
  • Somerset House -- This four-floor building houses only men.
  • Talbot House -- This building is configured to accommodate four three-student suites and two six-student suites.
  • West Hall -- The Science House is a three-floor coed building that serves as a home for students interested in the natural sciences. This theme house has a faculty advisor and is limited to upperclassmen.
  • Wicomico House -- This is a two-floor coed building. Men are housed on the first floor, with women on the second floor.
  • Worcester House -- This is a two-floor coed building, housing men on the first floor and women on the second floor.

A kitchenette is a cooking area in small apartments, hotel rooms, college dormitories, or office buildings. ...

Academic buildings

  • Casey Academic Center
  • Daly Hall
  • Gibson Performing Arts Center (renovations to be complete Fall 2008)
  • Larabee Art Center
  • Louis Goldstein Hall
  • Miller Library
  • Rose O'Neill Literary House
  • Sears House
  • Toll Science Complex (Dunning Hall, Decker Hall)
  • William Smith Hall

Louis L. Goldstein (1913 - 1998) served as Comptroller of the Treasury of the State of Maryland from 1959 to 1998. ... The Rev. ...

Athletic facilities

  • Athey Field
  • Benjamin Johnson Lifetime Fitness Center
  • Cain Athletic Center
  • Casey Swim Center
  • Kibler Field at Roy Kirby Jr. Stadium
  • Schottland Tennis Pavilion
  • Truslow Boat House (off-campus near Chester River)
  • Washington College Softball Field
Washington College's 18th C. Custom House
Washington College's 18th C. Custom House

John Thomas Tom Kibler (born in 1886 in Queen Annes County, Maryland) was a coach at Washington College, in various capacities, for over half a century. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (942x828, 200 KB) Washington Colleges 18th century Custom House is located on the Chester Riverfront. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (942x828, 200 KB) Washington Colleges 18th century Custom House is located on the Chester Riverfront. ...

Administrative buildings

  • Alumni House
  • Bunting Hall
  • Custom House
  • Spanish House

Other

  • Brown Cottage
  • Hodson Hall (Dining Hall, Cafe, Quick Shop Eatery, Hynson Study Lounge)
  • Hynson Pavilion (off-campus near Chester River)
  • Hynson-Ringgold House (President's House)
  • Nussbaum House
  • White Cottage

Traditions

George Washington Birthday Ball - A college-wide dance where students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends of the college come together to celebrate George Washington's birthday. The event usually takes place on, or around, the actual date of George Washington's birth. Formal dress is required for all in attendance.[5]


The All Campus Picnic- A Carnival held for the students and community members before the beginning of the academic year.[6]


The Renaissance Christmas Dinner- Held before the beginning of Winter Break and features performances by the Early Music Consort and Vocal Consort of the College.[7]


War on the Shore- The annual men's lacrosse game, held in late spring between Washington College and Salisbury University, two of Maryland's Eastern Shore's undergraduate schools. Beginning in 2004, the winner of the game has been awarded the Charles B. Clark Cup. [8] Salisbury University (Salisbury State University prior to 2001) is a nationally accredited, four-year comprehensive public university located in the city of Salisbury, Maryland, on the Delmarva Peninsula. ...


May Day- started in 1968 by Professor Bennett Lamond of the English Department, who retired in 2004. He brought a class out onto the green, where they read poetry and drank wine. Later that night some of the students returned, and May Day was born. Since then, May Day has become a two-night party on April 30 and May 1, often involving public nudity. As the event has gained more notoriety and spectators, however, it has also become more seedy.[9]


Past Washington College Presidents

  • William Smith 1782-1789
  • Colin Ferguson 1793-1805
  • Hugh McGuire 1813-1815
  • Joab G. Cooper 1816-1817
  • Gerard E. Stack 1817-1818
  • Francis Waters 1818-1823
  • Timothy Clowes 1823-1829
  • Peter Clark 1829-1832
  • Richard W. Ringgold 1832-1854
  • Francis Waters 1854-1860
  • Andrew J. Sutton 1860-1867
  • Robert C. Berkeley 1867-1873
  • William J. Rivers 1873-1887
  • Thomas N. Williams 1887-1889
  • Charles W. Reid 1889-1903
  • James W. Cain 1903-1918
  • Clarence P. Gould 1919-1923
  • Paul E. Titsworth 1923-1933
  • Gilbert W. Mead 1933-1949
  • Daniel Z. Gibson 1950-1970
  • Charles J. Merdinger 1970-1973
  • Joseph H. McLain 1973-1981
  • Garry E. Clarke (acting), 1981-1982
  • Douglass Cater 1982-1990
  • Charles H. Trout 1990-1995
  • John S. Toll 1995-2004
  • Baird Tipson 2004-

Francis G. Waters, D.D., LL.D., (? – April 23, 1868) was a methodist minister from Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., and a founding member of the Methodist Protestant Church. ... John S. Toll is a physicist and well-known educational administrator. ... tool ...

References

  1. ^ Borukhova, T. (2005). Letter to the Editor. The Elm 76, (17), pg. 6
  2. ^ Last, K. (2005). Phi Delta Theta Leadership Consult Speaks Out. The Elm 76 (18), pg. 1-2
  3. ^ Last, K. (2006). Fraternities to Return to Quad Next Year. The Elm 77 (18)
  4. ^ Kappa Sigma Fraternity at WC, Omicron-Phi Chapter
  5. ^ Washington College | News and Events
  6. ^ Washington College | Student Life
  7. ^ Washington College | Student Life
  8. ^ Washington College Men's Lacrosse | WashingtonCollegeSports.com
  9. ^ The Collegian Online

External links

  • Official website

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