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Encyclopedia > Wartburg Castle
Wartburg in Eisenach
Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg Castle is situated on a 1230-foot (410 m) precipitous hill to the southwest of and overlooking the town of Eisenach in Thuringia. The castle was founded in 1067 by the landgrave Ludwig the Springer. According to a humorous myth, the castle (Burg) got its name when its founder first laid eyes on the hill upon which the Wartburg now sits; enamored with the site, he is supposed to have exclaimed, "Warte, Berg--du sollst mir eine Burg werden!" ("Wait, mountain--you should become a castle for me!"). The humor in the story hinges upon the fact that the German words for "castle" (Burg) and "mountain" (Berg) sound similar. Download high resolution version (900x675, 112 KB)Wartburg in Eisenach File links The following pages link to this file: Martin Luther Tannhäuser Wartburg Castle Images of castles Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (900x675, 112 KB)Wartburg in Eisenach File links The following pages link to this file: Martin Luther Tannhäuser Wartburg Castle Images of castles Categories: GFDL images ... Eisenach is a city in Thuringia, Germany. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German Freistaat Thüringen) lies in central Germany and is among the smaller of the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 sq. ... Events Constantine X emperor of the Byzantine Empire dies. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ...


In 1999, Wartburg Castle was selected to the World Heritage List as an "Outstanding Monument of the Feudal Period in Central Europe" and is linked to "Cultural Values of Universal Significance". 1999 is a common year starting on Friday Anno Domini (or the Current Era), and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... Historical lands and provinces in Central Europe Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ...


It was the seat of the Thuringian landgraves until 1440, and as a place of courtly culture it became the venue of the Sängerkrieg, the Minstrels' Contest, around 1207 with contestants such as Walther von der Vogelweide, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Albrecht von Halberstadt, and many others, taking part. It was later to be treated with poetic licence in Richard Wagner's Tannhäuser. Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count or an earl. ... For alternative meanings, see number 1440. ... Events Stephen Langton consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury June 17 by Pope Innocent III Births September 8 - King Sancho II of Portugal October 1 - King Henry III of England (d. ... Portrait of Walther von der Vogelweide. ... Portrait of Wolfram from the Codex Manesse. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 in Leipzig – February 13, 1883 in Venice) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his groundbreaking symphonic-operas (or music dramas). His compositions are notable for their continuous contrapuntal texture, rich harmonies and orchestration, and elaborate... In the Venusberg by John Collier, 1901: a gilded setting that is distinctly Italian quattrocento for soft-core High Culture. ...


The sainted Elisabeth of Hungary (later of Thuringia), also spent part of her life [from 1211 to 1228] on the Wartburg as consort of Ludwig IV). Elisabeth of Hungary St. ... The Free State of Thuringia (German Freistaat Thüringen) lies in central Germany and is among the smaller of the countrys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 sq. ... Events The oldest extant double entry bookkeeping record dates from 1211 Canons regular of the Order of the Holy Cross founded September 14 1211 Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents France - Philippe II, Auguste King of France (reigned from 1180 to 1223) Mongol Empire - Genghis Khan, Mongol Khan (from 1206 to 1227... Events The Sixth Crusade is launched by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, after delays due to sickness and an excommunication from Pope Gregory IX. Conrad IV of Germany becomes titular King of Jerusalem, with Frederick II as regent. ...


From May, 1521 until March, 1522, Martin Luther stayed at the castle, after he had been taken there for his safety, at the request of Frederick the Wise, after his excommunication by Pope Leo X and his refusal to recant at the Diet of Worms. It was during this period that he, under the name of Junker Jörg (the Knight George), translated the New Testament into German. Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther. ... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... The Luther seal Martin Luther (November 10, 1483–February 18, 1546) was a German theologian, an Augustinian monk, and an ecclesiastical reformer whose teachings inspired the Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ... Friedrich III (January 17, 1463 — May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death. ... Leo X, born Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (11 December 1475, Florence – 1 December 1521, Rome), pope between 1513 and his death, is known primarily for his failure to stem the Protestant Reformation, which began during his reign when Martin Luther first attacked the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Diet of Worms, unlike what its name suggests, was a general assembly (a Diet) of the estates of the Holy Roman Empire that took place in Worms, Germany, a small town on the Rhine river, from January 28 to May 25, 1521, with Emperor Charles V presiding. ... The Luther seal Martin Luther (November 10, 1483–February 18, 1546) was a German theologian, an Augustinian monk, and an ecclesiastical reformer whose teachings inspired the Reformation and deeply influenced the doctrines of Lutheran, Protestant and other Christian traditions (a broad movement composed of many congregations and church bodies). ... The New Testament, sometimes called the Greek Testament or Greek Scriptures is the name given to the part of the Christian Bible that was written after the birth of Jesus. ...


The Castle has been renovated throughout its existence with many earlier parts being overbuilt by later constructions and additions. From 1952 to 1966, for example, the East German Government restored it to what it looked like in the 16th century, which included Luther's Room with its original floor and panelled walls. 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... The German Democratic Republic (GDR) (German: Deutsche Demokratische Republik), also commonly known as East Germany, was a communist state that existed from 1949 to 1990 in the former Soviet occupation zone of Germany. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


The Romanesque Palace (the Palas, Landgrafenhaus, or Great Hall) is the oldest and architecturally most impressive of the buildings. Besides the chapel, it contains the Sängersaal (Hall of the Minstrels), which is in fact Wagner's setting for Tannhäuser and the Festsaal (the Feast or Festival Hall), both of which contain fine frescoes by Moritz von Schwind with the theme of the minstrels' contest in the Sängersaal and frescoes of the triumphs of Christianity in the Festsaal. Part of the Palace consists of the original castle as it was between 1157 and 1170, as an image of power and residence of the Thuringian landgraves. Romanesque St. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... A great hall was the main room of a royal palace, a noblemans castle or a large manor house in the Middle Ages, and in the country houses of the 16th and early 17th centuries. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... A XIV Century fresco featuring Saint Sebastian Note: Fresco is the NATO reporting name of the Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17. ... Moritz von Schwind (1804-1871), Austrian painter, was born in Vienna. ... A minstrel was a bard who played songs to tell stories about other places or about historical events of the Middle Ages. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Events Births 8 September - Richard I of England Deaths August 21 - Alfonso VII, king of Castile (b. ... Events December 29: Assassination of Thomas Beckett, Archbishop of Canterbury, in Canterbury cathedral Eleanor of Aquitaine leaves the court of Henry II because of a string of infidelities. ...


The castle gate behind the drawbridge is the only access to the Castle, and it has remained exactly as it was throughout the centuries. Drawbridge crossing fortification ditches at Fort Ticonderoga. ...


The Knights' House on the western side of the drawbridge is half-timbered, and dates back to the 15th century. It probably served as a hall of residence for the servants and guards. (The English word knight derives from the same stem-word as the German word "Knecht" for servant or squire). Timber framing is the modern term for the traditional half-timbered construction in which timber provides a visible skeletal frame that supports the whole building. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A silver statue of an armoured knight, created as a trophy in 1850 For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ...


There are two towers, the South Tower (the only tower preserved of the medieval castle, having been erected in 1318 and which has the dungeon; and the Castle keep (finished in 1859, partially incorporating the foundations of its medieval predecessor, and which has the landmark four-meter Latin cross at its top; the Vogtei (the Bailiff's Lodge) in which the Luther Room is situated and to which a 15th century oriel was attached in 1872; two covered walks, the Elisabeth and the Margaret Hallways form part of the 15th-century defence ring and its projecting beams are supported by wooden consoles; and finally the New Bower (the Kemenate or Women's Chamber) contain the Wartburg collection. A tower is a high structure, usually man-made. ... Events Pope John XXII declares the doctrines of the Franciscans advocating ecclesiastical poverty erroneous End of the reign of Emperor Hanazono of Japan Emperor Go-Daigo ascends to the throne of Japan Births Pope Urban VI Margarete Maultasch, Countess of Tyrol Deaths Categories: 1318 ... The dungeon of Bothwell Castle seen from the Great Hall A dungeon (derived from the Old French donjon, from the Latin dominus, lord), in its original medieval usage, was the keep, the main tower of a castle which formed the final defensive position the garrison could retreat to when outer... 1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... The traditional form of the Christian cross, known as the Latin cross The Christian cross is a familiar religious symbol of most Christianity. ... A Bailiff in a United States courtroom Bailiff (from Late Latin bajulivus, adjectival form of bajulus) is a governor or custodian; cf. ... Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England) is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Console may be: An organ term for the area of an organ including the keys, stops, and foot pedals manipulated by the organist. ...


Mention should be made, however, of the Rüstkammer (the armoury) of the Wartburg, which used to contain a magnificent collection of about 800 pieces, from the splendid armour of King Henry II of France, to the items of Frederick the Wise, Pope Julius II and Bernhard von Weimar. All these objects were confiscated by the Soviet Occupation Army in 1946 and have disappeared in the Soviet Union. Two helmets, two swords, a prince's and a boy's armour, however, were found in a temporary store at the time and a few pieces were given back by the USSR in the 1960s. The new Russian Government has been petitioned to help locate the missing treasures. An armory is a military depot used for the storage of weapons and ammunition. ... A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ... Marriage and Children On October 28, 1533, he married Catherine of Medici (April 13, 1519 - January 5, 1589) Issue: François II (January 19, 1544 - December 5, 1560) Elisabeth de France (April 2, 1545 - October 3, 1568) married Philip II of Spain Claude (November 12, 1547 - February 21, 1575) married... Friedrich III (January 17, 1463 — May 5, 1525), also known as Frederick the Wise, was Elector of Saxony (from the House of Wettin) from 1486 to his death. ... Pope Julius II Julius II, né Giuliano della Rovere (December 5, 1443 - February 21, 1513), was pope from 1503 to 1513. ... 1946 was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Pith helmet of Harry S. Truman For information about the band Helmet, see Helmet (band) Helmet of Swedish Royal Guard soldier A helmet is a form of protective clothing worn on the head and usually made of metal or some other hard substance, typically for protection of the head from... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century A sword (from Old English sweord; akin to Old High German swerd lit. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... Treasure is a concentration of riches, often that which is considered lost or forgotten until being rediscovered. ...


Over the many years of its existence, the Wartburg has become a place of pilgrimage to many people from home and abroad and its overall significance in the history of Germany cannot be estimated highly enough.

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External links

  • History, architecture and tour of the Wartburg
  • History and present

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Wartburg - LoveToKnow 1911 (547 words)
THE WARTBURG, a castle near Eisenach in the grand-duchy of Saxe-Weimar.
Under the landgrave Hermann I., the Wartburg was the home of a boisterous court to which minstrels and "wandering folk" of all descriptions streamed; 1 and it was here that in 1207 took place the minstrels' contest (Sdngerkrieg) immortalized in Wagner's Tannhduser.
2 It was to the Wartburg, too, that on the 4th of May 1521, Luther was brought for safety at the instance of Frederick the Wise, elector of Saxony, and it was during his ten months' residence here (under the incognito of Junker Jorg) that he completed his translation of the New Testament.
WCHS - Community - Wartburg Castle (484 words)
Wartburg is quietly nestled in the hills of East Tennessee and is surrounded by a variety of scenic wonders.
The driving force behind the project is not that Wartburg Castle is just the most beautiful castle in Germany, but because it is one of the oldest castles and is clearly the one with the most significant history and profound symbolism.
Just as the Wartburg Castle stands as a symbol for Martin Luther and the Protestant Reformation, the eagle you see on Wartburg Castle's logo symbolizes strength, determination, and victory while the dove represents the love and the desire to share the message of Christ's love with all people.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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