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Encyclopedia > Warsaw radio mast
The Warsaw radio mast in Konstantynów
The Warsaw radio mast in Konstantynów
The Warsaw radio mast a few months after collapse
The Warsaw radio mast a few months after collapse
Warsaw Radio Mast from far away
Warsaw Radio Mast from far away

The Warsaw radio mast was the tallest structure ever built; however, it existed only from 1973 to 1991. Designed by Jan Polak, it was 646.38 meters (2,120 feet) tall and weighed 380 tonnes (420 short tons). Construction was finished on May 18, 1973 and broadcasts were officially launched on July 30, 1974. The mast was located in Konstantynów, Poland (52°22′14″N, 19°48′23″E), and was used by Warsaw Radio-Television (Centrum Radiowo-Telewizyjne) for long wave radio broadcast on the frequency 227 kHz (before February 1, 1988) and 225 kHz (after February 1, 1988). The mast was insulated against ground for a voltage of 120 kV and stood therefore on a 2 metre high insulator. It served as an aerial of half wavelength for the used frequency 225 kHz. The signals from its 2 megawatt transmitters could be received across all of Europe, North Africa and even in North America. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x800, 116 KB)With http://pl. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x800, 116 KB)With http://pl. ... Image File history File links Foto_307_web. ... Image File history File links Foto_307_web. ... Image File history File links Konstantynow1. ... Image File history File links Konstantynow1. ... The CN Tower in Toronto, Ontario, Canada is the tallest free-standing structure on land in the world. ... The metre, or meter, is a measure of length, approximately equal to 3. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... Konstantynów is a city in Poland, corporated in 1924, but originally founded in the 1820s by a landowner who had planned to build a textile industry there. ... Longwave radio frequencies are those below 500 kHz, which correspond to wavelengths longer than 600 meters. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The megawatt (symbol: MW) is a unit for measuring power corresponding to one million (106) watts. ...

Contents


Construction

The Warsaw radio mast was a frame steelwork construction of steel tubing. It had a cross section in form of a triangle. All three sides of this triangle had a length of 4.8 metres. The steel tubes forming the edges of the construction had a diameter of 245 millimetres; the thickness of the walls of these tubes varied depending from the height between 8 and 34 millimetres. The mast construction consisted of 86 elements. Each element had a length of 7.5 metres. The mast was guyed in 5 levels with guys of 50 millimetres diameter, which were divided into multiple sections by special insulators. The weight of guys and insulators used for anchoring the mast was 80 metric tons. For better access to the flight safety lamps and other components of the mast, there was an elevator installed in the interior of the mast. The elevator had a maximum speed of 0.35 m/s and required 30 minutes for a trip from the bottom to the top of the construction.


The transmission building, which had a volume of 17,000 cubic metres, was approximately 600 metres away from the Warsaw radio mast. It contained the transmitter consisting of two 1,000 kilowatt units built by Brown Boveri and Cie. For the generation of the transmission frequency, which was a standard frequency, an atomic clock was used. To the radio station, which had an area of 65 hectares, also belonged a mast for directional radio service for the radio-link to the studio. ABB Corporate Logo Asea Brown Boveri, or ABB, is a multinational corporation headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, operating mainly in the power and automation business areas. ...


The official name of the facility was Radiofoniczny Ośrodek Nadawczy w Konstantynowie, Radiowe Centrum Nadawcze w Konstantynowie or Warszawska Radiostacja Centralna (WRC) w Gąbinie


History

On August 8, 1991, the mast collapsed at 16:00 UTC because of a mistake in exchanging the guys on the highest stock of the mast. No one was killed or injured, though some sources incorrectly claim otherwise. The workers had left the area well before the mast collapsed. It is sometimes claimed that this work was sabotaged by special Soviet forces. However there is no evidence for this theory. The version of mistake in the exchange of guys was confirmed by Jan Polak - the main constructor of the mast. [1] August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... KVLY-TV mast, which is guy-wire supported. ... Soviet redirects here. ...


After the collapse of the radio mast at Konstantynow, the Polish broadcasting company used the old transmitter of Raszyn with its 335 metre high mast near Warsaw, which had been used since 1978 during the daytime for the transmission of a second programme of the Polish broadcasting service in the longwave range on the frequency 198 kHz, for transmissions on 225 kHz with a power of 500 kilowatts. It is not possible to transmit from Raszyn on 198 kHz and 225 kHz simultaneously, so the transmissions on the second longwave frequency 198 kHz had to be discontinued until either a second longwave broadcasting transmitting facility was built in Poland or a special frequency switch, which would allow transmissions on both frequencies was installed at the transmitter Raszyn. The latter, simpler solution would have decreased the effectiveness and reliability of both transmitters and was therefore unacceptable. The longwave transmitter Raszyn is a longwave broadcasting transmitter near Raszyn, Poland. ... Warsaw (Polish: , (?), in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ...


Because the Polish longwave transmitters are of special importance to Polish people abroad, as early as April 1992 the Polish government planned to rebuild the mast at Konstantynow. Local residents opposed this, so a new transmitter site had to be found. An old military area near Solec Kujawski was eventually decided on as the new site and a new longwave transmitter facility with a transmitter of 1000 kW HF-power for the frequency 225 kHz was built there from 1998 to 1999 (Longwave-transmitter Solec Kujawski). The new transmitter uses as aerials two grounded masts 330 metres apart from each other with heights of 330 and 289 metres and entered service on September 4, 1999. The Longwave transmitter Solec Kujawski is the new longwave broadcasting facility of the Polish broadcasting company for the 225 kHz frequency. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...


After the inaugauration of the transmitter at Solec Kujawski, the transmitter at Raszyn was again used for transmitting on the frequency 198 kHz for the programme Radio Parlament.


The current use of the former transmission building is unknown.


Since the collapse of the Warsaw radio mast, the tallest construction in Poland is the transmission mast for FM-radio and TV at Olsztyn-Pieczewo with a height of 360 metres (coordinates: 53°45′13″N, 20°30′57″E). The FM- and TV-mast Olsztyn-Pieczewo is a 360 metre tall guyed mast for FM and TV situated at Olsztyn-Pieczewo in Poland (Geographical Coordinates: , ). The FM- and TV-mast Olsztyn-Pieczewo is since the collapse of the Warsaw radio mast the tallest structure in Poland. ...


After the collapse, the KVLY-TV mast outside of Fargo, North Dakota, USA, regained the title of the world's tallest structure, standing at 628.8 meters (2,063 feet) tall. This may be superseded during the next decade as plans are afoot to build a solar chimney in Australia that will stand 1000 m (3280 ft) tall, or by the Burj Dubai, slated for completion in 2008. KVLY-TV mast seen close-up The KVLY-TV mast (formerly the KTHI-TV mast) is a television transmitting tower in North Dakota, USA, used by Fargo station KVLY channel 11. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1871 County Cass County Mayor Bruce Furness Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 98. ... A solar chimney is an apparatus for harnessing solar energy by convection of heated air. ... The Burj Dubai (Arabic: برج دبي for Tower of Dubai) is a skyscraper currently under construction, since April 15, 2005, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, at , . Its final height is officially being kept a secret; however figures released by a contractor on the project have suggested a height of around 810m. ...


Scale Replica

According to [2], there is a scale replica of Warsaw Radio Mast 17 metres tall. (Please translate the text on http://dumnizpolski.pl/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=0&Itemid=38)


See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Table of masts. ...

External links

  • Anti-mast page
  • [3]
  • Diagram
  • [4]
  • [5]
  • [6]

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