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Encyclopedia > Warrior
Drawing of a Thracian peltast of 400 BC
Drawing of a Thracian peltast of 400 BC
The warrior goddess Athena - Musée du Louvre
The warrior goddess Athena - Musée du Louvre

According to the Random House Dictionary, the term warrior has two meanings. The first literal use refers to "a person engaged or experienced in warfare." The second figurative use refers to "a person who shows or has shown great vigor, courage, or aggressiveness, as in politics or athletics." [1] // A warrior is a person habitually engaged in combat. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (943x1200, 223 KB) Summary Thracian peltast 5-4th century BC. Drawing - ballpen on the white paper by Dariusz t. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (943x1200, 223 KB) Summary Thracian peltast 5-4th century BC. Drawing - ballpen on the white paper by Dariusz t. ... Thracian peltast, fifth to fourth century BC. Thracian Roman era heros (Sabazius) stele. ... This is the Greek name of the capital of the Hellenic Republic (Greece). ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... Warrior code is an ethical code followed by warriors, often those that were privileged by birth, belonging to nobility or another privileged caste to preserve their honour. ... The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged was the original name of a large American dictionary, first published in 1966, and recently renamed the Random House Websters Unabridged Dictionary. ... More traditional systems for analyzing language divide linguistic expressions into two classes: literal and figurative. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... More traditional systems for analyzing language divide linguistic expressions into two classes: literal and figurative. ...

Contents

Overview

In tribal societies engaging in endemic warfare, warriors often form a caste or class of their own. In feudalism, the vassals essentially form a military or warrior class, even if in actual warfare, peasants may be called to fight as well. In some societies, warfare may be so central that the entire people (or, more often large parts of the male population) may be considered warriors, for example in the Iron Age Germanic tribes or the Medieval Rajputs. http://www. ... Endemic warfare is the state of continual, low-threshold warfare in a tribal warrior society. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the late modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... A vassal, in European medieval feudalism terminology, is one who through a commendation ceremony (composed of homage and fealty) enters into mutual obligations with a lord, usually military conscription and mutual protection, in exchange for a fief. ... The term Germanic tribes applies to the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. ... Rajput constitute one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India. ...


Professional warriors are people who are paid money for engaging in military campaigns and fall into one of two categories: Soldiers, when fighting on behalf of their own state; or mercenaries, when offering their services commercially and unrelated to their own nationality. The classification of somebody who is involved in acts of violence may be a matter of perspective, and there may be disagreement whether a given person is a hooligan, gangster, terrorist, rebel, freedom fighter, mercenary or a soldier. A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... Ultras at FC Twente - SC Heerenveen in 2002 Hooliganism is unruly and destructive behaviour, usually by gangs of young people. ... For other uses, see Gangster (disambiguation). ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Rebel may mean: A participant in a rebellion, see Rebellion. ... Freedom fighter is a relativistic local term for those engaged in rebellion against an established organization that is thought to be oppressive. ... For other uses, see Mercenary (disambiguation). ... This article is about a military rank. ...


Warrior classes

Some societies have had a privileged social class or caste with special responsibility for warfare. This class could be hereditary or qualified. See also nobility. Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Caste systems are traditional, hereditary systems of social classification, that evolved due to the enormous diversity in India (where all three primary races met, not by forced slavery but by immigration). ... For the scientific journal Heredity see Heredity (journal) Heredity (the adjective is hereditary) is the transfer of characters from parent to offspring, either through their genes or through the social institution called inheritance (for example, a title of nobility is passed from individual to individual according to relevant customs and... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ...


In 1937 Georges Dumézil famously speculated that Proto-Indo-European society was composed of a priestly class, a warrior class, and an agrarian class. The Indian society was based on these lines, composing of the Brahmins (priests), the Kshatriya (warriors), the Vaishya (business class) and the Shudras (servants). In contemporary Jungian psychology, the warrior is often seen as a key archetype of masculinity. Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Georges Dumézil (March 4, 1898 - October 11, 1986) was a French comparative philologist best known for his analysis of sovereignty and power in Indo-European religion and society. ... The Proto-Indo-Europeans are the hypothetical speakers of the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European language, a prehistoric people of the Chalcolithic and early Bronze Age. ... Young Indian brahmachari Brahmin A Brahmin (less often Brahman) is a member of the Hindu priestly caste. ... For the Bollywood film of the same name see Kshatriya Kshatriya (Hindi: , from Sanskrit: , ) is one of the four varnas, or castes, in Hinduism. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Jung redirects here. ... For other uses, see Archetype (disambiguation). ... Manliness redirects here. ...


Warrior code

Main article: Warrior code

In many societies in which a specialized warrior class exists, specific codes of conduct (ethical codes) are instituted in order to ensure that the warrior class is not dangerous to the rest of society. Warrior codes often have common features and usually value honour in the forms of faith, loyalty and courage. Examples include the medieval knights' code of chivalry, the Kshatriya code of Dharma in India and Japanese samurai Bushido. See also noblesse oblige. Warrior code is an ethical code followed by warriors, often those that were privileged by birth, belonging to nobility or another privileged caste to preserve their honour. ... In the context of a code adopted by a profession or by a governmental or quasi-governmental organ to regulate that profession, an ethical code may be styled as a code of professional responsibility, which may dispense with difficult issues of what behavior is ethical. Some codes of ethics are... For other uses, see Honour (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Faith (disambiguation). ... (UTC):This page is about loyalty as faithfulness to a cause. ... For other uses, see Courage (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chivalry (disambiguation). ... For the Bollywood film of the same name see Kshatriya Kshatriya (Hindi: , from Sanskrit: , ) is one of the four varnas, or castes, in Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Japanese samurai in armor, 1860s. ... In French, noblesse oblige means, literally, nobility obliges. // Noblesse oblige is generally used to imply that with wealth, power, and prestige come social responsibilities. ...


Warrior cultures

A warrior culture is a culture that heavily emphasizes battle and war and greatly prizes feats of arms. Warrior cultures often incorporate a cult of personality around military leaders, are ruled by an elite warrior class, and have a warfare based economy. For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For the surname Battle, see Battle (surname). ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... This article is about the political institution. ...


Examples of societies in history that could be designated as warrior cultures include:

Feudal societies are not always warrior cultures, since although feats of arms are prized, there is not necessarily an emphasis on battle and war. In some feudal societies, the soldiery was provided through conscription of the peasant class. For other uses, see Apache (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people of ancient Greece; for the unrelated modern Slavic ethnic group see Macedonians (ethnic group). ... The Pashtuns (also Pushtun, Pakhtun, or ethnic Afghan; in referring to the period of the British Raj or earlier, sometimes Pathan) are an ethnic/religious group of people, living primarily in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India who follow Pashtunwali, their indigenous religion. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Pier Gerlofs Donia of Kimswerd (c. ... Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Barbados is an independent island nation situated on the boundary of the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article is about the Island Carib, who lived on the islands of the Caribbean. ... Celts, normally pronounced //, is a modern term used to describe any of the European peoples who spoke, or speak, a Celtic language. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... Chekava, Chekavar, Chekavan, etc. ... , Kerala ( ; Malayalam: കേരളം; ) is a state on the Malabar Coast of southwestern India. ... For other uses, see Cheyenne (disambiguation). ... This article is about Cheyenne warrior society. ... For other uses, see Cossack (disambiguation). ... Flag Crimean Khanate in 1600 Capital Bakhchisaray Government Monarchy History  - Established 1441  - Annexed to Russia 1783 The Crimean Khanate or the Khanate of Crimea (Crimean Tatar: ; Russian: - Krymskoye khanstvo; Ukrainian: - Krymske khanstvo; Turkish: ) was a Crimean Tatar state from 1441 to 1783. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Thor/Donar, Germanic thunder god. ... This article is about the people. ... For other uses, see Hun (disambiguation). ... Attila redirects here. ... The Jurchens (Chinese: 女真, pinyin: nǚzhēn) were a Tungusic people who inhabited parts of Manchuria and northern Korea until the seventeenth century, when they became the Manchus. ... A Kshatriya is a member of the military or reigning order, according to the law-code of Manu the second ranking caste of the Indian varna system of four castes, the first being the Brahmin or priestly caste, the third the Vaishya or mercantile caste and the lowest the Shudra. ... Te Puni, Māori Chief Māori is the name of the indigenous people of New Zealand, and their language. ... Flag of the Maratha Empire Maratha king Shivaji Bhonsale The Marāthās is a collective term referring to a group of Hindu, Marathi language speaking castes of warriors and peasants, hailing mostly from the Indian state of Maharashtra. ... Masai can refer to Maasai, also known as Masai, the name of an African ethnic group from Kenya and Tanzania Masai, Johor, a suburb of Johor Bahru city This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Matabele are a branch of the Zulus who split from King Shaka in the early 1820s under the leadership of Mzilikazi, a former general in Shakas army. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... This article is about the person. ... Rajput constitute one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Scythians (, also ) or Scyths ([1]; from Greek ), a nation of horse-riding nomadic pastoralists who spoke an Iranian language[2], dominated the Pontic steppe throughout Classical Antiquity. ... The Sambal people, also spelled Zambal form one of the most important Filipino ethnicities. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... For other senses of this name, see Tuareg (disambiguation). ... // Turks and Turkish may refer to: Ethnic Turks Citizens or residents of Turkey in historical contexts, all Turkic peoples collectively Turk one of any of the peoples speaking any of the Turkic languages Turkic peoples A native or inhabitant of Turkey, or a member of Turkic speaking minorities in neighboring... Velama (Telugu: ) is one of the older feudal castes or social groups in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... Fierce People redirects here. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Shaka Shaka (sometimes spelled Chaka) (ca. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... For the surname Battle, see Battle (surname). ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ...


Women as warriors

Further information: List of women warriors in folklore, literature, and popular culture

In many societies women have been considered innocent bystanders in war, alongside children. In such cases, fighting women is considered dishonorable. Most warriors have been men, however, there are many notable female warriors. A woman with a sword, from a Medieval manuscript. ... This article is about examples of woman warriors in a number of contexts. ...


In Ancient Egypt, the earliest of recorded histories of human culture, Ahhotep I and Hatshepsut are documented as warrior queens. Others in various early cultures are documented as well. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Maatkare[1] Truth is the Ka of Re Nomen Khnumt-Amun Hatshepsut[1] Joined with Amun, Foremost of Noble Ladies Horus name Wesretkau [1] Mighty of Kas Nebty name Wadjrenput[1] Flourishing of years Golden Horus Netjeretkhau[1] Divine of appearance Consort(s) Thutmose II Issue Neferure Father Thutmose I...


A warrior queen of Nubia led her forces against an attempted invasion by Augustus of Rome and her archers defeated them.[citation needed] Nubia (not to be confused with Nuba, a collective term used for the peoples who inhabit the Nuba Mountains, in Kordofan province, Sudan, Africa) is the region in the south of Egypt, along the Nile and in northern Sudan. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


Since Eurypyle, Deborah, and Vishpala there have been references to women warriors throughout history. Boudica lead an enormous army that is well documented. See the list provided above for many more. Yet until modern times, however, warrior women mostly have been noted by historians as an exception or a curiosity. One example of a group of fighting women is the legend of the Amazons, that is recorded in myths. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... For information on the name Deborah, see Debbie For information on the nurse of Rebeccah, mentioned in Genesis, see Deborah (Genesis) Deborah or Dvora (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Bee) was a prophetess and the fourth Judge and only female Judge of pre-monarchic Israel in the Old Testament (Tanakh). ... Vishpala () is a woman mentioned in the Rigveda (RV 1. ... A sculpture depicting Boudica, the warrior queen of the Iceni who led the revolt against the Romans in AD 61, and her daughters, commissioned by Prince Albert and executed by Thomas Thornycroft, stands near Westminster Pier, London Boudica (also spelt Boudicca, formerly better known as Boadicea) (d. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ...



Today, women are recruited to serve in the military in most countries, while only a few countries permit women to fill active combat roles, including Sweden, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Norway, and Switzerland. However, in other countries women do end up in combat situations.


Notes

  1. ^ Warrior, Random House Dictionary, <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/warrior> 

References

  • Shannon E. French, Code of the Warrior - Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present (2003).

See also

William Stanley

The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... The Japanese ashigaru (足軽) were conscripted foot-soldiers of medieval Japan. ... Berserkers in the kings hall, illustration by Louis Moe, 1898 Berserkers (or Berserks) were Norse warriors who were commonly understood to have fought in an uncontrollable rage or trance of fury; the berserkergang. ... Saka (Scythian) horseman from Pazyryk in Central Asia, c. ... The Dog-Soldiers were a warrior society of the Cheyenne Tribe. ... An Eagle warrior (left) depicted holding a macuahuitl in the Florentine Codex Eagle warriors or eagle knights (Classical Nahuatl: cuāuhtli) were a special class of infantry soldier of the Aztec army. ... This article is about the history and concept of ghazw and ghāzÄ«. For other meanings of gazi, see Gazi (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... A Hersir was a middle ranking warrior in Dark Age Scandanavia. ... The hoplite was a heavy infantryman that was the central focus of warfare in Ancient Greece. ... The Hwarang were an elite group of male youth in Silla, an ancient Korean kingdom that lasted until the 10th century. ... An Impi is an isiZulu word for any armed body of men. ... Jatt refers to group of people who mainly lived in Punjab. ... Aztec jaguar warrior Jaguar warriors (Classical Nahuatl: ocÄ“lōtl) were certain members of the Aztec army that were professional soldiers. ... The Janissaries (derived from Ottoman Turkish: ينيچرى (yeniçeri) meaning new soldier) comprised infantry units that formed the Ottoman sultans household troops and bodyguard. ... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ... For the Bollywood film of the same name see Kshatriya Kshatriya (Hindi: , from Sanskrit: , ) is one of the four varnas, or castes, in Hinduism. ... The Marāthās (Marathi: , also Mahrattas) form an Indo Aryan group of Hindu warriors and peasants hailing mostly from the present-day state of Maharashtra, who created a the expansive Maratha Empire, covering a major part of India, in the late 17th and 18th centuries. ... Ansar (Arabic: الأنصار, meaning aiders, or patrons) refer to a class of warriors who are renouned for there arsenal of weapons and the speed and mobility of there arabian horse. ... A Mandalorian is a member of a group of masked warrior clans in the Star Wars universe. ... Montenegrins (Serbian/Montenegrin: Црногорци/Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... Phalangite is the name for a phalanx of sarrissa-armed infantry in ancient Macedon. ... A Persian Immortal wielding a spear, wicker shield, dagger, and bow. ... Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... Pronoia (plural pronoiai, Greek for provisions) refers to a system of land grants in the Byzantine Empire. ... Rajput constitute one of the major Hindu Kshatriya groups from India. ... Look up ranger in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Graves of the forty-seven Ronin at Sengaku-ji Ronin robbing a merchants house in Japan around 1860 (1) For other uses, see Ronin (disambiguation). ... The Sacred Band of Carthage was the elite military force guarding the city of Carthage itself. ... Saiyan, or Saiya-jin (サイヤ人) in the original Japanese anime and manga, refers to a fictional race from the Planet Vegeta in the manga Dragon Ball/Dragon Ball Z and the anime Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The name is an anagram of yasai, which is Japanese for... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... Hervor dying after the battle with the Huns. ... Spahis (also spelled as Sipahis, Sepahis or Spakh, in Turkish sipahi) were an elite mounted force within the Six Divisions of Cavalry of the Ottoman Empire. ... The sōhei Benkei with Minamoto no Yoshitsune Sohei (僧兵), lit. ... A timariot (or timar holder; timarlu in Turkish) was an irregular cavalryman that served the Ottoman sultan and in return was granted a fief called a timar. ... Polish uhlans from Duchy of Warsaw army Uhlans (in Polish: UÅ‚an also spelled Ulan, German, from Turkish oÄŸlan [1]) were originally Polish light cavalry soldiers armed with lances, sabres, pistols, rifles; later they also served in the Prussian and Austrian armies. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... The xia (俠) is a righteous person who excels in personal combat and may use their armed expertise to serve social unfairness or injustice (鋤強扶弱). ... Modern-day yamabushi blowing a horagai Yamabushi ) (Literally: Those who hide in the mountains) were Japanese mountain ascetics and warriors, mostly of the Shingon sect of Buddhism. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Warrior - WoWWiki - Your guide to the World of Warcraft (1307 words)
The warrior is no mere sword-swinger; he is a skilled combatant, combining strength of arm, knowledge of weaponry and practiced maneuvers to slice or bludgeon his foes into little red bits.
Warriors need to be in combat or use a rage-generating ability to generate rage.
Fury warriors usually prefer two one handed weapons, with somewhat similar priorities as a rogue in terms of stats and weapon damage, but focusing more on strength and critical strike rating as opposed to the rogue's focus on attack power and hit rating.
Warrior - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (395 words)
Professional warriors are people who are paid money for engaging in military campaigns and fall into one of two categories: Soldiers, when fighting on behalf of their own state; or mercenaries, when offering their services commercially and unrelated to their own nationality.
In 1937 Georges Dumézil famously speculated that Proto-Indo-European society was composed of a priestly class, a warrior class, and a class of commoners or peasants.
A warrior culture is a civilization that heavily emphasizes battle and war and greatly prizes feats of arms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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