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Encyclopedia > Warren Hastings

Warren Hastings (December 6, 1732 - August 22, 1818) was the first governor-general of British India, from 1773 to 1786. He was famously impeached in the 1780s for corruption. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 23 - First performance of Handels Orlando, in London June 9 - James Oglethorpe is granted a royal charter for the colony of Georgia. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ... 1818 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The British Raj is an informal term for the period of British rule of most of the Indian subcontinent, or present-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka (previously known as Ceylon). ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... Events and Trends 1787 United States Constitution 1788 Great Britain established the prison colony of New South Wales in Australia. ...


Warren Hastings was born 6th December 1732 at Churchill, Oxfordshire. He attended Westminster School before joining the British East India Company in 1750 as a clerk. In 1757 he was made the British Resident (administrative in charge) of Murshidabad. He was appointed to the Calcutta council in 1761 then went back to England in 1764. He returned to India in 1769 as a member of the Madras council and was made governor of Bengal in 1772. In 1773, he was appointed the first Governor-General of India. All Saints Church, Churchill Churchill is a small and picturesque Cotswold village in north-west Oxfordshire, about three miles south-west of Chipping Norton. ... Motto: Dat Deus Incrementum Westminster School (in full, The Royal College of St. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was a joint-stock company of investors, which was granted a Royal Charter by Elizabeth I on December 31, 1600, with the intent to favour trade privileges in India. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex to... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Murshidabad is a town located in the northern part of present day state of West Bengal, India. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... A database query syntax error has occurred. ... 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ...


During his time in this post, a great deal of precedent was established pertaining to the methods which the British Raj would use in its rule over India. Hastings had a great respect for the ancient scripture of Hinduism and fatefully set the British position on governance as one of looking back to the earliest precedents possible. This allowed Brahmin advisors to mold the law, as no Englishman understood Sanskrit until the great Sir William Jones; it also accentuated the caste system and other religious frameworks which had, at least in recent centuries, been somewhat incompletely applied. Thus, British influence on the everchanging social structure of India can in large part be characterized as, for better or for worse, a solidification of the privileges of the caste system through the influence of the exclusively high-caste scholars by whom the British were advised in the formation of their laws. These laws also accepted the binary division of the people of Bengal and, by extension, India in general as either Muslim or Hindu (to be governed by their own laws). Though they cannot be accused of causing the Partition, they were both cause and effect of the forces which would eventually polarize Hindu and Muslim nationalists into the creation of India and Pakistan. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A Brahmin (less often Brahman) is a member of the Hindu priestly caste. ... The Sanskrit language ( संस्कृता वाक्) is one of the earliest attested members of the Indo-European language family and is not only a classical language, but also an official language of India. ... William Jones is a common name, especially in Wales, and there have been several well-known individuals of this name, including: William Jones (judge) (1566-1640) William Jones (Great Britain statesman), Attorney General for England and Wales during the 17th century Sir William Jones (mathematician) (~1675-1749), father of Sir... The word Caste is derived from the Portuguese word casta, meaning lineage, breed or race. ...


As Hastings had few Englishmen to carry out administrative work, and still fewer with the ability to converse in local tongues, he was forced to farm out revenue collection to locals with no ideological friendship for Company rule. Due to lax administration these revenue collectors became tyrants and the population of Bengal suffered horribly, even more so when famine struck. Englishmen continued to be seduced by the massive wealth of India into corruption and bribery, and Hastings could do little or nothing to stop it. Indeed, he participated in the widespread exploitation of these newly conquered lands.


Hastings resigned in 1784 and returned to England. He was charged with high crimes and misdemeanors by Edmund Burke and Sir Philip Francis, whom he had wounded in a duel in India. He was impeached in 1787 but the trial, which began in 1788, ended with his acquittal in 1795. Hastings spent most of his fortune on his defense, although the East India Company did contribute towards the end of the trial. 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Edmund Burke Edmund Burke (January 12, 1729 – July 9, 1797) was an Anglo-Irish statesman, author, orator and political philosopher, who served for many years in the British House of Commons as a member of the Whig Party. ... Sir Philip Francis (October 22, 1740 - December 23, 1818), English politician and pamphleteer, the supposed author of the Letters of Junius, and the chief antagonist of Warren Hastings, was born in Dublin. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Hastings was made a Privy Councillor in 1814. This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The city of Hastings, New Zealand is named after him. Hastings is a large urban area in Hawkes Bay, close to the east coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ...


Quotations

"The writers of the Indian philosophies will survive, when the British dominion in India shall long have ceased to exist, and when the sources which it yielded of wealth and power are lost to remembrances."


"I hesitate not to pronounce the Gita a performance of great originality, of sublimity of conception, reasoning and diction almost unequalled; and a single exception, amongst all the known religions of mankind.."


See also: History of India // Paleolithic The prehistory of India goes back to the old Stone age Palaeolithic. ...



Preceded by:
Governor-General of India
1773–1786
Succeeded by:
John Macpherson


The Governor-General of India (or Governor-General and Viceroy of India) was the head of the British administration in India. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Warren Hastings - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (629 words)
Warren Hastings (December 6, 1732 - August 22, 1818) was the first governor-general of British India, from 1773 to 1786.
Warren Hastings was born 6th December 1732 at Churchill, Oxfordshire.
Hastings had a great respect for the ancient scripture of Hinduism and fatefully set the British position on governance as one of looking back to the earliest precedents possible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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