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Encyclopedia > Warren G. Harding
"Warren Harding" redirects here. This article is about the American politician; for the American rock climber, see Warren Harding (climber).
Warren Gamaliel Harding


In office
March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923
Vice President Calvin Coolidge (1921-1923)
Preceded by Woodrow Wilson
Succeeded by Calvin Coolidge

In office
January 4, 1915 – March 4, 1921
Preceded by Theodore E. Burton
Succeeded by Frank B. Willis

In office
January 11, 1904 – January 8, 1906
Governor Myron T. Herrick
Preceded by Harry L. Gordon
Succeeded by Andrew L. Harris

In office
1899 – 1903

Born November 2, 1865(1865-11-02)
Near Blooming Groove, Ohio
Died August 2, 1923 (aged 57)
San Francisco, California
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse Florence Kling Harding
Alma mater Ohio Central College
Occupation Businessman (Newspapers)
Religion Baptist
Signature

Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865August 2, 1923) was an American politician, and the twenty-ninth President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, his term ending as he died from a heart attack at age 57. A Republican from Ohio, Harding was an influential newspaper publisher. He served in the Ohio Senate (1899–1903) and later as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio (1903–1905) and as a U.S. Senator (1915–1921). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (891x1184, 89 KB) Description Senator Warren G. Harding, June 21, 1920. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Frank Bartlett Willis (December 28, 1871 - March 30, 1928) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Myron Timothy Herrick (October 9, 1854 - March 31, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Andrew Lintner Harris (also known as The Farmer-Statesman) (November 17, 1835 – September 13, 1915) was one of the heroes of the Battle of Gettysburg and the last Civil War general to serve as a governor in the U.S., serving as the 44th governor of Ohio. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Blooming Grove, Ohio is an unincorporated village located in Morrow County, Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... GOP redirects here. ... White House portrait Florence Kling Harding (August 15, 1860–November 21, 1924), wife of Warren G. Harding, was First Lady of the United States from 1921 to 1923. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... Muskingum College is located in New Concord, Ohio, approximately sixty miles east of Columbus, Ohio. ... A businessperson is a generic term for someone who is employed at a profit-oriented enterprise, or more specifically, someone who is involved in the management (at any level) of a company. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Image File history File links Warren_G._Harding_signature. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


His political leanings were conservative, which enabled him to become the compromise choice at the 1920 Republican National Convention. During his presidential campaign, held in the aftermath of World War I, he promised a return to "normalcy"; and, in the 1920 election, he defeated his Democratic opponent, fellow Ohioan James M. Cox, by a landslide—60.36% to 34.19%. American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... The 1920 Republican National Convention nominated Ohio Senator Warren G. Harding for United States President and Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge for United States Vice President. ... Woodrow Wilson and the American peace commissioners during the negotiations on the Treaty of Versailles. ... Harding called for a return to normalcy. ... The United States presidential election of 1920 was dominated by the aftermath of World War I and the hostile reaction to Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic president. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ...


Harding headed a cabinet of notable men such as Charles Evans Hughes, Andrew Mellon, Herbert Hoover and Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, who was jailed for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. In foreign affairs, Harding signed peace treaties that built on the Treaty of Versailles (which formally ended World War I). He also led the way to world Naval disarmament at the Washington Naval Conference of 1921–22. The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... Mellon portrait Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855–August 27, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921 until February 12, 1932. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Albert Bacon Fall (November 26, 1861 – November 30, 1944) was a Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, notorious for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. ... The location of Teapot Dome in the US state of Wyoming. ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a peace treaty that officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Naval redirects here. ... The Washington Naval Conference was a diplomatic conference, called by the administration of President Warren G. Harding and held in Washington, D.C. from 12 November 1921 to 6 February 1922. ...


By many, Harding is ranked as one of the least successful U.S. Presidents, despite having been immensely popular while in office. Sculptor Gutzon Borglum and Presidents Calvin Coolidge selected Washington, Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Lincoln to appear on Mount Rushmore. ...

Contents

Early life

Warren Gamaliel Harding was born November 2, 1865, near Marion, Ohio (in a town now called Blooming Grove, Ohio).[1] Harding was the eldest of eight children born to Dr. George Tryon Harding, Sr. and Phoebe Elizabeth (Dickerson) Harding. His mother was a midwife and later obtained her medical license, and his father taught at a rural school north of Mount Gilead, Ohio. One of Harding's great grandparents may have been African American.[2] When Harding was a teenager, the family moved to Caledonia, Ohio in neighboring Marion County, when Harding's father acquired The Argus, a local weekly newspaper there. It was at The Argus that Harding learned the basics of the journalism business. He continued studying the printing and newspaper trade as a college student at Ohio Central College in Iberia, Ohio, during which time he also worked at the Union Register in Mount Gilead. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Blooming Grove, Ohio is an unincorporated village located in Morrow County, Ohio. ... Midwifery is a blanket term used to describe a number of different types of health practitioners, other than doctors, who provide prenatal care to expecting mothers, attend the birth of the infant and provide postnatal care to the mother and infant. ... In most countries, only persons licensed by specified government-approved professional associations are allowed to practice medicine. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... Mount Gilead State Park. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Caledonia is a village located in Marion County, Ohio. ... Marion County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Muskingum College is located in New Concord, Ohio, approximately sixty miles east of Columbus, Ohio. ... Iberia, Ohio is an unicorporated village in Washington Township, Morrow County, Ohio. ...


After graduating, Harding moved to Marion, Ohio, where he and two friends raised $300 with which to purchase the failing Marion Daily Star, the weakest of the growing city's three newspapers. Harding revamped the paper's editorial platform to support the Republican Party, and enjoyed a moderate degree of success. However, his political stance put him at odds with those who controlled Marion's local politics. Thus when Harding moved to unseat the Marion Independent as the official paper of daily record, he met with vocal resistance from local figures, such as Amos Hall Kling, one of Marion's wealthiest real estate speculators. Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ... The Marion Daily Star is a newspaper in Marion, Ohio, originally owned and published by Warren G. Harding and Florence Kling Harding. ...

Warren and Florence Harding pose in their garden.
Warren and Florence Harding pose in their garden.

While Harding won the war of words and made the Marion Daily Star one of the most popular newspapers in the county, the battle took a toll on his health. In 1889, when Harding was 24, he suffered from exhaustion and nervous fatigue. He spent several weeks at the Battle Creek Sanitarium to regain his strength, ultimately making five visits over fourteen years.[3] Harding later returned to Marion to continue operating the paper. He spent his days boosting the community on the editorial pages, and his evenings "bloviating" (Harding's term for "informally conversing") with his friends over games of poker. Image File history File links HardingFlorence. ... Image File history File links HardingFlorence. ... The Marion Daily Star is a newspaper in Marion, Ohio, originally owned and published by Warren G. Harding and Florence Kling Harding. ... Exhaustion redirects here. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the domestic fireplace tool, see fireplace poker. ...


On July 8, 1891, Harding married Florence Kling, the daughter of his nemesis, Amos Hall Kling. Florence Kling was a divorcée, five years Harding's senior, and the mother of a young son, Marshall Eugene DeWolfe. She had pursued Harding persistently, until he reluctantly proposed. Florence's father was furious with his daughter's decision to marry Harding, forbidding his wife from attending the wedding and not speaking to his daughter or son-in-law for eight years. is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... White House portrait Florence (Flossie) Mabel Kling deWolfe Harding (August 15, 1860 – November 21, 1924), wife of Warren G. Harding, was First Lady of the United States from 1921 to 1923. ... Divorcée, or Divorcee, refers to a woman whose marriage ended in divorce, a legal dissolution of marriage before death of either spouse. ...


The couple complemented one another, with Harding's affable personality balancing his wife's no-nonsense approach to life. Florence Harding, exhibiting her father's determination and business sense, turned the Marion Daily Star into a profitable business. She has been credited with helping Harding achieve more than he might have alone; some have speculated that she later pushed him all the way to the White House.[citation needed] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Harding was a Freemason, raised to the Sublime Degree of a Master Mason on August 27, 1920, in Marion Lodge #70, F.& A.M., in Marion, Ohio. American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... A Master Mason is the designation of a Freemason who has completed the Third Degree in Masonic Lodge (aka Blue Lodge or Craft Masonry). ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Political career

As an influential newspaper publisher with a flair for public speaking, Harding was elected to the Ohio State Senate in 1899. He served four years before being elected Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, a post he occupied from 1903 to 1905. His leanings were conservative, and his record in both offices was relatively undistinguished.[citation needed] He received the Republican nomination for Governor of Ohio in 1910, but lost to incumbent Judson Harmon. A modern day speaker addressing an audience through microphones Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... The Ohio Senate is the upper house in Ohios bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly; the lower house is the Ohio House of Representatives. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... GOP redirects here. ... Categories: | ... Judson Harmon (February 3, 1846 - February 22, 1927) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ...


U.S. Senator

In 1912, Harding gave the nominating speech for incumbent President William Howard Taft at the Republican National Convention [4] and in 1914 he was elected to the United States Senate. He served in the Senate from 1915 until his inauguration as President on March 4, 1921, becoming the first sitting Senator to be elected President of the United States. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... The 1912 National Convention of the Republican Party of the United States was held at the Chicago Coliseum, Chicago, Illinois, from June 18 to June 22, 1912. ... This article is about the political process. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


In his book, Blink, Malcolm Gladwell became the latest of a long string of political pundits and ordinary voters who felt that Warren Harding's electoral success was based on his appearance, essentially that he "looked like a president". Gladwell argues that people's first impression of Harding tended to be so highly favorable that it gave them a fixed and very high opinion of Harding, which could not be shaken unless his intellectual and other deficiencies became glaring. Gladwell even refers to the flawed process by which people make decisions as 'Warren Harding Error.' Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking is a 2005 book by Malcolm Gladwell, in which he explores the power of the trained mind to make split second decisions, the ability to think without thinking, or in other words using instinct. ... Malcolm Gladwell Malcolm Gladwell (born September 1, 1963) is a United Kingdom-born, Canadian-raised journalist now based in New York City who has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. ...


Election of 1920

Relatively unknown outside his own state, Harding was a true "dark horse" candidate, winning the Republican Party nomination due to the political machinations of his friends after the nominating convention had become deadlocked. Republican leaders met in a smoke-filled room at the Blackstone Hotel in Chicago to end the deadlock. Before receiving the nomination, he was asked whether there were any embarrassing episodes in his past that might be used against him. His formal education was limited, he had a longstanding affair with the wife of an old friend, and he was a social drinker in the time of Prohibition. However, Harding answered "No" and the Party moved to nominate him, only to discover later his relationship with Carrie Fulton Phillips. The United States presidential election of 1920 was dominated by the aftermath of World War I and the hostile reaction to Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic president. ... This article describes dark horse candidates. ... GOP redirects here. ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ... A smoke-filled room is a term used in the United States to describe a gathering of minds secluded from the general public, often insinuating that the majority of people in the room is comprised of old, white males smoking cigars. ... The Blackstone Hotel is located in Chicago at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Balbo Street. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Following the death of Warren G. Harding, Carrie Phillips became obsessed with German culture, including the breeding of pure bred German Shepherd dogs Carrie Phillips (born Caroline Fulton on September 22, 1873 near Bucyrus, Ohio in Crawford County, Ohio- died February 3, 1960) was a mistress of Warren G. Harding...


In the 1920 election, Harding ran against Democratic Ohio Governor James M. Cox, whose running-mate was Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt. The election was seen in part as a referendum on whether to continue with the "progressive" work of the Woodrow Wilson Administration or to revert to the "laissez-faire" approach of the William McKinley era. The United States presidential election of 1920 was dominated by the aftermath of World War I and the hostile reaction to Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic president. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... Assistant Secretary of the Navy (abbrev. ... FDR redirects here. ... In the United States, the Progressive Era was a period of reform which lasted from the 1890s to the 1920s. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Laissez-faire is short for laissez faire, laissez passer, a French phrase meaning to let things alone, let them pass. First used by the eighteenth century Physiocrats as an injunction against government interference with trade, it is now used as a synonym for strict free market economics. ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ...


Harding ran on a promise to "Return to Normalcy", a seldom-used term he popularized. The slogan called an end to the abnormal era of the Great War, along with a call to reflect three trends of his time: a renewed isolationism in reaction to the War, a resurgence of nativism, and a turning away from the government activism of the reform era.[citation needed] Harding called for a return to normalcy. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For the electronic album, see Isolationism (album). ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ...


Harding's "front porch campaign" during the late summer and fall of 1920 captured the imagination of the country. Not only was it the first campaign to be heavily covered by the press and to receive widespread newsreel coverage, but it was also the first modern campaign to use the power of Hollywood and Broadway stars, who traveled to Marion for photo opportunities with Harding and his wife. Al Jolson, Lillian Russell, Douglas Fairbanks, and Mary Pickford were among the conservative-minded luminaries to make the pilgrimage to central Ohio. Business icons Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, and Harvey Firestone also lent their cachet to the campaign. From the onset of the campaign until the November election, over 600,000 people traveled to Marion to participate. American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Al Jolson (May 26, 1886–October 23, 1950) was a highly acclaimed American singer, comedian and actor of Jewish heritage whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... Lillian Russell (Helen Louise Leonard) (December 4, 1860 - June 6, 1922) was an American actress and singer. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... For the Katie Melua song, see Mary Pickford (Used to Eat Roses). ... Edison redirects here. ... Henry Ford (1919) Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production. ... Harvey Samuel Firestone was the founder of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, one of the first global makers of automobile tires and an important contributor to North American economic growth in the 20th century. ...


The campaign owed a great deal to Florence Harding, who played perhaps a more active role than any previous candidate's wife in a presidential race. She cultivated the relationship between the campaign and the press. As the business manager of the Star, she understood reporters and their industry and played to their needs by making herself freely available to answer questions, pose for pictures, or deliver food prepared in her kitchen to the press office, which was a bungalow she had constructed at the rear of their property in Marion. Mrs. Harding even went so far as to coach her husband on the proper way to wave to newsreel cameras to make the most of coverage. White House portrait Florence (Flossie) Mabel Kling deWolfe Harding (August 15, 1860 – November 21, 1924), wife of Warren G. Harding, was First Lady of the United States from 1921 to 1923. ... [Image:Bungalows. ...


The campaign also drew upon Harding's popularity with women. Considered handsome, Harding photographed well compared to Cox. However, it was Harding's support for women's suffrage in the Senate that made him popular with women: the ratification of the 19th Amendment in August 1920 brought huge crowds of women to Marion, Ohio to hear Harding. Immigrant groups who had made up an important part of the Democratic coalition such as the Germans and Irish also voted for Harding in the election in reaction to their perceived persecution by the Wilson administration during the war. Amendment XIX in the National Archives The Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution provides that neither any individual state or the federal government may deny a citizen the right to vote because of that citizens sex. ... Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ...


During the campaign, rumors spread that Harding's great-great-grandfather was a West Indian black and that other blacks might be found in his family tree. In response, Harding's campaign manager said, "No family in the state (of Ohio) has a clearer, a more honorable record than the Hardings, a blue-eyed stock from New England and Pennsylvania, the finest pioneer blood."[5] The rumors, based perhaps on no more than local gossip, were circulated by William Estabrook Chancellor.[6] The rumors may have been sustained by a statement Harding allegedly made to a reporter on the subject, perhaps meaning to be dismissive: "How do I know, Jim? One of my ancestors may have jumped the fence."[7] The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... William Estabrook Chancellor (25 September 1867 - 4 February 1963) was an American academic and writer. ...


The election of 1920 was the first in which women could vote nationwide. It was also the first presidential election to be covered on the radio, thanks to the nation's first commercial radio station, KDKA in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Harding received 60% of the national vote and 404 electoral votes, an unprecedented margin of victory. Cox received 34% of the national vote and 127 electoral votes. Socialist Eugene V. Debs, campaigning from a federal prison, received 3% of the national vote. Debs was in prison for opposing Wilson's draft; despite the many political differences between the two candidates, when Harding became President, he pardoned Debs. [8] KDKA is the callsign of two broadcast stations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA: KDKA AM 1020, the first commercial station in the U.S. KDKA-TV, channel 2 (DTV 25) KDKA-FM 92. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... The Socialist Party of America (SPA) is a socialist political party in the United States. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... This is a list of U.S. federal prisons. ...


Presidency 1921–1923

Inauguration of Warren G. Harding, March 4, 1921.
Inauguration of Warren G. Harding, March 4, 1921.

The administration of Warren G. Harding followed the Republican platform approved at the 1920 Republican National Convention, which was held in Chicago. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3156x2126, 1677 KB) Summary Inauguration of President Warren G. Harding, 1921. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3156x2126, 1677 KB) Summary Inauguration of President Warren G. Harding, 1921. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... A party platform, also known as an manifesto is a list of the principles which a political party supports in order to appeal to the general public for the purpose of having said partys candidates voted into office. ... The 1920 Republican National Convention nominated Ohio Senator Warren G. Harding for United States President and Massachusetts Governor Calvin Coolidge for United States Vice President. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


Harding pushed for the establishment of the Bureau of Veterans Affairs (later organized as the Department of Veterans Affairs), the first permanent attempt at answering the needs of those who had served the nation in time of War.[citation needed] The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ...

President Harding (center) with Chief Justice William Howard Taft (left) and former Secretary of War Robert Todd Lincoln (right).
President Harding (center) with Chief Justice William Howard Taft (left) and former Secretary of War Robert Todd Lincoln (right).

In April 1921, speaking before a joint session of Congress he called for peacemaking with Germany and Austria, emergency tariffs, new immigration laws, regulation of radio] and trans cable communications retrenchment in government, tax reduction, repeal of wartime excess profits tax, reduction of railroad rates, promotion of agricultural interests, a national budget system, a great merchant marine and a department of public welfare.[citation needed] He also called for the abolition of lynching, but he did not want to make enemies in his own party and with the Democrats and did not fight for his program.[9] Image File history File links Taft-Harding-Lincoln. ... Image File history File links Taft-Harding-Lincoln. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        For other uses of this word, see tariff (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Merchant Navy. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ...

Harding addresses the House of Representatives, Coolidge and Gillett seated behind.
Harding addresses the House of Representatives, Coolidge and Gillett seated behind.

The Hardings visited their home community of Marion, Ohio once during the term when the city celebrated its Centennial during the first week of July. The President arrived on July 3, gave a speech to the community at the Marion County Fairgrounds on July 4, and left the following morning for other speaking commitments. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 796 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (819 × 617 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date Around 1920 Author N/A Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 796 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (819 × 617 pixel, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date Around 1920 Author N/A Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Frederick Huntington Gillett (October 16, 1851–July 31, 1935) was a prominent U.S. politician during the early 20th century. ... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Major events during presidency

A peace treaty is an agreement (a peace treaty) between two hostile parties, usually countries or governments, that formally ends a war or armed conflict. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... The Matewan massacre was the stand-off that resulted from the attempt of coal miners to unionize in Matewan, West Virginia on May 19, 1920. ... The Washington Naval Conference was a diplomatic conference, called by the administration of President Warren G. Harding and held in Washington, D.C. from 12 November 1921 to 6 February 1922. ... The Budget and Accounting Act of 1921 (Pub. ... The United States Revenue Act of 1921 was the first Republican stab at tax reduction following their landslide victory in the 1920 federal elections. ... The Fordney-McCumber tariff of 1922 was a law in the United States that created a Tariff Commission to raise or lower rates by 50%. This was a post-World War I Republican defense against expected Europeans exports. ... The location of Teapot Dome in the US state of Wyoming. ... The National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska (NPR-A) is an area of land in the North Slope of Alaska owned by the United States Federal Government. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the International Labor Union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... A political prisoner is someone held in prison or otherwise detained, perhaps under house arrest, because their ideas or image are deemed by a government to either challenge or threaten the authority of the state. ...

Administration and cabinet

The Harding Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President Warren G. Harding 1921–1923
Vice President Calvin Coolidge 1921–1923
Secretary of State Charles Evans Hughes 1921–1923
Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon 1921–1923
Secretary of War John W. Weeks 1921–1923
Attorney General Harry M. Daugherty 1921–1923
Postmaster General Will H. Hays 1921–1922
  Hubert Work 1922–1923
  Harry S. New 1923
Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby 1921–1923
Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall 1921–1923
  Hubert Work 1923
Secretary of Agriculture Henry C. Wallace 1921–1923
Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover 1921–1923
Secretary of Labor James J. Davis 1921–1923


Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Charles Evans Hughes, Sr. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Mellon portrait Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855–August 27, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921 until February 12, 1932. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John Wingate Weeks (April 11, 1860–July 12, 1926) was an American politician in the Republican Party. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Harry Micajah Daugherty (January 26, 1860–October 12, 1941) (daw-GER-tee) was an American politician. ... The Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Cover of Time Magazine (September 13, 1926) William Harrison Hays (November 5, 1879–March 7, 1954) was the namesake of the Hays Code, chairman of Republican National Committee and U.S. Postmaster General. ... Hubert Work (July 3, 1860 - December 14, 1942) was a U.S. administrator. ... Harry Stewart New (1858–1937) was a U.S. journalist and political figure. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Edwin Denby Edwin C. Denby (b. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Albert Bacon Fall (November 26, 1861 – November 30, 1944) was a Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, notorious for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. ... Hubert Work (July 3, 1860 - December 14, 1942) was a U.S. administrator. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... For other persons named Henry Wallace, see Henry Wallace (disambiguation). ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Seal of the United States Department of Labor Secretary of Labor redirects here. ... James J. Puddler Jim Davis (October 27, 1873-November 22, 1947), was a U.S. Republican Party politician, He was born in Tredegar, South Wales in the United Kingdom, and emigrated to the United States in 1881 at the age of eight and was apprenticed as a puddlers assistant...


Supreme Court appointments

The Taft Court, 1925
The Taft Court, 1925

Harding appointed the following justices to the Supreme Court of the United States: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... George Sutherland (March 25, 1862 – July 18, 1942) was an English-born U.S. jurist and political figure. ... Pierce Butler (March 17, 1866 – November 16, 1939) was an American jurist who served as an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1923 until his death in 1939. ... Edward Terry Sanford (July 23, 1865-March 8, 1930) was an American jurist who served on the United States Supreme Court. ...

Administrative scandals

Upon winning the election, Harding appointed many of his old allies to prominent political positions. Known as the "Ohio Gang" (a term used by Charles Mee, Jr., in his book of the same name), some of the appointees used their new powers to rob the government. It is unclear how much, if anything, Harding himself knew about his friends' illicit activities. This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The most infamous scandal of the time was the Teapot Dome affair, which shook the nation for years after Harding's death. The scandal involved Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall, who was convicted of accepting bribes and illegal no-interest personal loans in exchange for the leasing of public oil fields to business associates. (Absent the bribes and personal loans, the leases themselves were quite legal.) In 1931, Fall became the first member of a Presidential Cabinet to be sent to prison.[10] Teapot Dome is the commonly used name applied to the scandal that rocked the administration of United States President Warren G. Harding. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Albert Bacon Fall (November 26, 1861 – November 30, 1944) was a Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, notorious for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. ... Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ...


Thomas W. Miller, head of the Office of Alien Property, was convicted of accepting bribes. Jess Smith, personal aide to the Attorney General, destroyed papers and then committed suicide. Charles Forbes, Director of the Veterans Bureau, skimmed profits, earned large amounts of kickbacks, and directed underground alcohol and drug distribution. He was convicted of fraud and bribery and drew a two-year sentence. Charles Cramer, an aide to Charles Forbes, committed suicide. Thomas Woodnutt Miller (June 26, 1886 – May 5, 1973) was an American businessman, lawyer and politician, from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware, and Reno, in Washoe County, Nevada. ... An Alien Property Custodian is someone who has been employed to handle an enemy citizens property, which has landed in the United States. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... The Ohio Gang is a misnomer, applied to a group of officials within the administration of Warren G. Harding, 29th President of the United States of America. ... The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for administering programs of veterans benefits for veterans, their families, and survivors. ... World map of the Corruption Perceptions Index by Transparency International, which measures the degree to which corruption is perceived to exist among public officials and politicians. High numbers (green) indicate relatively less corruption, whereas lower numbers (red) indicate relatively more corruption. ... Bribery is a crime implying a sum or gift given alters the behaviour of the person in ways not consistent with the duties of that person. ... Dorchester Penitentiary in New Brunswick, Canada is an institution that is part of Corrections Canada. ...


No evidence to date suggests that Harding personally profited from these crimes, but he was apparently unable to stop them. "I have no trouble with my enemies," Harding told journalist William Allen White late in his presidency, "but my damn friends, they're the ones that keep me walking the floor nights!"[11] William Allen White Born in Emporia, Kansas, on February 10, 1868, William Allen White was a nationally known newspaper editor for much of his life. ...


Historian Wyn Craig Wade, in his 1987 book The Fiery Cross, suggests that Harding had ties with the Ku Klux Klan, perhaps even having been inducted into the organization in a private White House ceremony. Evidence includes the taped testimony of one of the members of the alleged induction team, however beyond that it is scant at best and the theory is generally discounted.[12] Members of the second Ku Klux Klan at a rally during the 1920s. ...


Death

President Harding's casket passes by the front of the White House.
President Harding's casket passes by the front of the White House.
The Harding Memorial in Marion, Ohio is considered by many historians to be the most beautiful of Presidential Tombs in the United States.
The Harding Memorial in Marion, Ohio is considered by many historians to be the most beautiful of Presidential Tombs in the United States.

In June 1923, Harding set out on a cross-country "Voyage of Understanding," planning to meet ordinary people and explain his policies. During this trip, he became the first president to visit Alaska.[13] Rumors of corruption in his administration were beginning to circulate in Washington by this time, and Harding was profoundly shocked by a long message he received while in Alaska, apparently detailing illegal activities previously unknown to him. At the end of July, while traveling south from Alaska through British Columbia, he developed what was thought to be a severe case of food poisoning. He gave the final speech of his life to a large crowd at the University of Washington Stadium (now Husky Stadium) at the University of Washington campus in Seattle, Washington. A scheduled speech in Portland, Oregon was canceled. The President's train proceeded south to San Francisco. Arriving at the Palace Hotel, he developed pneumonia. Harding died of either a heart attack or a stroke at 7:35 p.m. on August 2, 1923. The formal announcement, printed in the New York Times of that day, stated that "A stroke of apoplexy was the cause of death." He had been ill exactly one week.[14] Image File history File links HardingFuneral. ... Image File history File links HardingFuneral. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Harding Memorial, Marion Ohio File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Harding Memorial, Marion Ohio File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Harding Memorial, the final resting place of the 29th President of the United States of America Warren G. Harding and his wife, First Lady Florence Kling Harding The Harding Memorial is the burial location of President Warren G. Harding and First Lady Florence Kling Harding and is located in... Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Foodborne illness or food poisoning is caused by consuming food contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, toxins, viruses, prions or parasites. ... Husky Stadium is the University of Washingtons football and track and field venue in Seattle, USA, located between Montlake Boulevard N.E. and Union Bay just north of the Montlake Cut. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... Seattle redirects here. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Type Commission  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Palace Hotel is an historic hotel in San Francisco, California, dating from 1875. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Apoplexy is an old-fashioned medical term, generally used interchangeably with cerebrovascular accident (CVA or stroke) but having other meanings as well. ...


Naval physicians surmised that he had suffered a heart attack; however, this diagnosis was not made by Dr. Charles E. Sawyer, the Surgeon General, who was traveling with the presidential party. Mrs. Harding refused permission for an autopsy, which soon led to speculation that the President had been the victim of a plot, possibly carried out by his wife. Gaston B. Means, an amateur historian and gadfly, noted in his book The Strange Death of President Harding (1930) that the circumstances surrounding his death lent themselves to some suspecting he had been poisoned. Several individuals attached to him, personally, and politically, would have welcomed Harding's death, as they would have been disgraced in association by Means' assertion of Harding's "imminent impeachment". Although Means was later discredited for publicly accusing Mrs. Harding of the murder, enough doubts surround the President's death to keep reputable scholars open to the possibility of murder.[citation needed] USN redirects here. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Diagnosis (from the Greek words dia = by and gnosis = knowledge) is the process of identifying a disease by its signs, symptoms and results of various diagnostic procedures. ... Dr. Charles Elmer Sawyer, also known as Dr. C. E. Sawyer (January 24, 1860–September 1924), was a homeopathic physician who is blamed for giving a false diagnosis of US President Warren G. Harding that led to Hardings premature death. ... Surgeon General can have several different meanings. ... This article is about the medical procedure. ... Gaston Bullock Means, a. ... For other uses, see Gadfly. ...


Harding was succeeded by Vice President Calvin Coolidge, who was sworn in by his father, a Justice of the Peace, in Plymouth Notch, Vermont. The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... A justice of the peace (JP) is a puisne judicial officer appointed by means of a commission to keep the peace. ... Small town in Vermont, where Calvin Coolidges father was Justice of the Peace, and where Coolidge was sworn in as president almost immediately upon the death of his tarnished predecessor, Warren G. Harding, who died suddenly at the age of 57 in 1923. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Following his death, Harding's body was returned to Washington, where it was placed in the East Room of the White House pending a state funeral at the United States Capitol. White House employees at the time were quoted as saying that the night before the funeral, they heard Mrs. Harding speak for more than an hour to her dead husband. For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Harding was entombed in the receiving vault of the Marion Cemetery, Marion, Ohio, in August 1923. Following Mrs. Harding's death on November 21, 1924, she too was temporarily buried next to her husband. Both bodies were moved in December 1927 to the newly completed Harding Memorial in Marion, which was dedicated by President Herbert Hoover in 1931. The lapse between the final interment and the dedication was partly because of the aftermath of the Teapot Dome scandal. is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Harding Memorial, the final resting place of the 29th President of the United States of America Warren G. Harding and his wife, First Lady Florence Kling Harding The Harding Memorial is the burial location of President Warren G. Harding and First Lady Florence Kling Harding and is located in... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Teapot Dome is the commonly used name applied to the scandal that rocked the administration of United States President Warren G. Harding. ...


At the time of his death, Harding was also survived by his father. Harding and John F. Kennedy are the only two presidents to have predeceased their fathers.[citation needed] They are also the only two presidents to have been elected while serving as senators.[15] John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...


Personal scandals and allegations

The extent to which Harding engaged in extramarital affairs is somewhat controversial. It has been recorded in primary documents that Harding had an affair with Carrie Fulton Phillips; Nan Britton wrote The President's Daughter in 1927, documenting her affair and the alleged child (Elizabeth Ann) with Harding. Following the death of Warren G. Harding, Carrie Phillips became obsessed with German culture, including the breeding of pure bred German Shepherd dogs Carrie Phillips (born Caroline Fulton on September 22, 1873 near Bucyrus, Ohio in Crawford County, Ohio- died February 3, 1960) was a mistress of Warren G. Harding... Nan Britton, seen here in the 1920s developed her crush on Warren G. Harding when she was a teenage girl. ...


Rumors of the Harding love letters circulated through Marion, Ohio, for many years. However, their existence was not confirmed until 1968, when author Francis Russell gained access to them during his research for his book, The Shadow of Blooming Grove. The letters were in the possession of Phillips. Phillips kept the letters in a box in a closet and was reluctant to share them. Russell persuaded her to relent, and the letters showed conclusively that Harding had a 15-year relationship with Mrs. Phillips, who was then the wife of his friend James Phillips, owner of the local department store, the Uhler-Phillips Company. Mrs. Phillips was almost eight years younger than Harding. By 1915, she began pressing Harding to leave his wife. When he refused, she left her husband and moved to Berlin with her daughter Isabel. However, as the United States became increasingly likely to be drawn into World War I, Mrs. Phillips moved back to the U.S. and the affair reignited. Harding was now a U.S. Senator, and a vote was coming up on a declaration of war against Germany.[citation needed] Francis Russell - (b. ... The interior of a typical Macy*s department store. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Mrs. Phillips threatened to go public with their affair if the Senator supported the war, but Harding defied her and voted for war, and Phillips did not reveal the scandal to the world. When Harding won the Republican Presidential nomination in 1920, he did not disclose the relationship to party officials. Once they learned of the affair, it was too late to find another nominee. To reduce the likelihood of a scandal breaking, the Republican National Committee sent Phillips and her family on a trip to Japan and paid them over $50,000.[citation needed] She also received monthly payments thereafter, becoming the first and only person known to have successfully extorted money from a major political party. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Extortion is a criminal offense, which occurs when a person either obtains money, property or services from another through coercion or intimidation or threatens one with physical harm unless they are paid money or property. ... A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ...


The letters Harding wrote to Mrs. Phillips were confiscated at the request of the Harding heirs, who requested and received a court injunction prohibiting their inclusion in Russell's book. Russell in turn left quoted passages from the letters as blank passages in protest against the Harding heirs' actions. The Harding-Phillips love letters remain under an Ohio court protective order that expires in 2023, 100 years after Harding's death, after which the content of the letters may be published or reviewed. Look up Injunction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Warren Gamaliel Harding.
Warren Gamaliel Harding.

Besides Mrs. Phillips, Harding also reportedly had an affair with Nan Britton, the daughter of Harding's friend Dr. Britton of Marion. Britton's claim that he had fathered her child was widely circulated in the years just after Harding's death, and it is often cited as one of the best-known "facts" about Harding, but it has not been proven to the satisfaction of most historians. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (651 × 879 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date N/A Author N/A Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (651 × 879 pixel, file size: 98 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date N/A Author N/A Permission (Reusing this image) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


Nan Britton's obsession with Harding started at an early age when she began pasting pictures of Senator Harding on her bedroom walls.[citation needed] According to Britton's book The President's Daughter, she and Senator Harding conceived a daughter, Elizabeth Ann, in January of 1919, in his Senate office. Elizabeth Ann was born on October 22, 1919. Harding never met Elizabeth Ann but paid large amounts of child support.[citation needed] Harding and Britton, according to unsubstantiated reports, continued their affair while he was President, using a closet adjacent to the Oval Office for privacy. Following Harding's death, Britton unsuccessfully sued the estate of Warren G. Harding on behalf of Elizabeth Ann. Under cross-examination by Harding heirs' attorney, Grant Mouser (a former member of Congress himself), Britton's testimony was riddled with inconsistencies, and she lost her case. Britton married a Mr. Christian, who adopted Elizabeth Ann. In adulthood, Elizabeth Ann married Henry Blaesing and raised a family. During most of her life she shied from press coverage about her alleged birthright, and refused requests for interviews in her later years. She died on November 17, 2005, in Oregon. Elizabeth Ann Blaesing, nee Christian, born in Asbury Park, New Jersey in 1919 is the alleged daughter of Warren G. Harding, 29th President of the United States and Nan Britton, a native of Marion County Ohio. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... In many countries, child support or child maintenance is the ongoing obligation for a periodic payment made by a non-custodial parent to a custodial parent, caregiver or guardian, for the care and support of children of a relationship or marriage that has been terminated. ... The Oval Office from above in 2003, during the administration of George W. Bush. ... In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by ones opponent. ... See Adult. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Speaking style

Although a commanding and powerful speaker, Harding was notorious for his verbal gaffes, such as his comment "I would like the government to do all it can to mitigate, then, in understanding, in mutuality of interest, in concern for the common good, our tasks will be solved."[16] His errors were compounded by his insistence on writing his own speeches. Although it might not have been a mispronunciation as some thought, Harding's most famous "mistake" was his use of the word "normalcy" when the more correct word to use at the time would have been "normality." Harding decided he liked the sound of the word and made "Return to Normalcy" a recurring theme. Critic H.L. Mencken disagreed, saying of Harding, "He writes the worst English that I have ever encountered. It reminds me of a string of wet sponges; it reminds me of tattered washing on the line; it reminds me of stale bean soup, of college yells, of dogs barking idiotically through endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it. It drags itself out of the dark abysm of pish, and crawls insanely up the topmost pinnacle of posh. It is rumble and bumble. It is flap and doodle. It is balder and dash." Mencken also coined the term "Gamalielese" to refer to Harding's distinctive style of speech, a mocking reference to Harding's middle name rather than a reference to any of the Biblical characters named Gamaliel.[17] H. L. (Henry Louis) Mencken (September 12, 1880 - January 29, 1956) was a twentieth century journalist and social critic, a cynic and a freethinker, known as the Sage of Baltimore and the American Nietzsche. He is often regarded as one of the most influential American writers of the early 20th... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Gamaliel can mean: Gamaliel, a first century doctor of Jewish law Gamaliel is many Nasis(the Patriarch of Sanhedrin)name, which the pedigree goes back to Hillel the Elder: Gamaliel I Gamaliel II Gamaliel III Gamaliel IV Gamaliel V Gamaliel VI, the last Nasi See also Judah I(Judah haNasi...


Memorials

A statue honoring Harding on a speech he delivered on relations between the United States and Canada in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
A statue honoring Harding on a speech he delivered on relations between the United States and Canada in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 2. ... Location of Stanley Park within Vancouver. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Warren G. Harding High School is a public high school located in Warren, Ohio. ... Warren is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Trumbull County[4]. The municipality is located in northeastern Ohio, approximately 14 miles (22 km) northwest of Youngstown and 15 miles (24 km) west of the Pennsylvania state line. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The Harding Memorial, the final resting place of the 29th President of the United States of America Warren G. Harding and his wife, First Lady Florence Kling Harding The Harding Memorial is the burial location of President Warren G. Harding and First Lady Florence Kling Harding and is located in... Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ... Marion Harding High School is a public high school in Marion, Ohio. ... Marion is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Marion County[4]. The city is located in northern Ohio, approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of Columbus. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Harding County is a county located in the state of New Mexico. ... The Harding Park Golf Club (commonly known as Harding Park) is a municipal golf course owned by the city and county of San Francisco. ... 9/11 Memorial and Court House, Somerville The Old Dutch Parsonage, home of Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh and John Frelinghuysen Somerville is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Joseph Sherman Frelinghuysen (March 12, 1869–February 8, 1948) represented New Jersey as a Republican in the United States Senate from 1917 to 1923. ... It has been suggested that Retail park be merged into this article or section. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... New Jersey State Highway 28 is a state highway in New Jersey, United States. ... 9/11 Memorial and Court House, Somerville The Old Dutch Parsonage, home of Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh and John Frelinghuysen Somerville is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. ... Columbus Circle, New York City, NY; site of the first traffic circle in the United States completed in 1905 DeSoto Fountain sits in the center of a traffic circle in the city of Coral Gables, Florida. ... Harding Charter Preparatory High School is a charter school based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Nickname: Location in Oklahoma County and the state of Oklahoma. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Woodland Park can refer to: Woodland Park, Colorado Woodland Park (Seattle) Woodland Park Zoo This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... The Pledge of Allegiance to the United States flag is an oath of loyalty to the country. ... Woodland Park Zoo, which occupies the western half of Seattles (USA) Woodland Park, near Green Lake, began as a small menagerie on the Woodland Park estate of Guy C. Phinney, Canadian-born lumber mill owner and real estate developer. ...

Sources

  • Adams, Samuel Hopkins (1939). Incredible Era: The Life and Times of Warren Gamaliel Harding. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. 
  • Anthony, Carl S. Florence Harding: The First Lady, the Jazz Age, and the Death of America's Most Scandalous President. (1998)
  • Dean, John W. Warren G. Harding (The American Presidents Series). Times Books, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 2004
  • Downes Randolph C. The Rise of Warren Gamaliel Harding, 1865–1920. Ohio University Press, 1970
  • Fine, Gary Alan. "Reputational Entrepreneurs and the Memory of Incompetence: Melting Supporters, Partisan Warriors, and Images of President Harding." American Journal of Sociology 1996 101(5): 1159-1193. Issn: 0002-9602 Fulltext: in Jstor and Ebsco
  • Grant, Philip A., Jr. "President Warren G. Harding and the British War Debt Question, 1921-1923." Presidential Studies Quarterly 1995 25(3): 479-487. Issn: 0360-4918
  • Hakim, Joy (1995). War, Peace, and All That Jazz. New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 29-33. ISBN 0-19-509514-6. 
  • "An International Problem" Marion Daily Star, October 26, 1921.
  • Kenneth J. Grieb; The Latin American Policy of Warren G. Harding 1976 online
  • Malin, James C. The United States after the World War 1930. online detailed analysis of foreign and economic policies
  • Morello, John A. Selling the President, 1920: Albert D. Lasker, Advertising, and the Election of Warren G. Harding. Praeger, 2001.
  • Murray Robert K. The Harding Era 1921-1923: Warren G. Harding and his Administration. University of Minnesota Press, 1969, the standard academic study
  • Payne, Phillip. "Instant History and the Legacy of Scandal: the Tangled Memory of Warren G. Harding, Richard Nixon, and William Jefferson Clinton." Prospects 2003 28: 597-625. Issn: 0361-2333
  • Russell, Francis (1968). The Shadow of Blooming Grove: Warren G. Harding and His Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 39-40, 403-405. ISBN 0070543380. 
  • Sinclair, Andrew. The Available Man: The Life behind the Masks of Warren Gamaliel Harding 1965 online full-scale biography
  • "Social Equality Impossible for Negro, Says President, Pleading for Fair Treatment." Atlanta-Journal Constitution, October 27, 1921.

The Marion Daily Star is a newspaper in Marion, Ohio, originally owned and published by Warren G. Harding and Florence Kling Harding. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ...

See also

  • List of United States Presidents who died in office

This is a list of us presidents who died during their term as president, by date and by cause of death. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Warren G. Harding
Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Warren G. Harding
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Warren G. Harding
  • Warren G. Harding at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • Extensive essay on Warren G. Harding and shorter essays on each member of his cabinet and First Lady from the Miller Center of Public Affairs
  • American President: Warren Harding
  • Harding, Garfield, and Arthur
  • Audio clips of Harding's speeches
  • Inaugural Address
  • The Harding home (historic site, Ohio)
  • First State of the Union Address of Warren Harding
  • Second State of the Union Address of Warren Harding
  • C-Span The American Presidents
  • White House biography
  • Presidential Biography by Stanley L. Klos
  • Warren G. Harding Links
  • 1920 Presidential Election Links
  • Works by Warren G. Harding at Project Gutenberg
  • A political cartoon about Harding from Married to the Sea
  • Harding Park Golf Club in San Francisco
  • Missing Warren G Harding, an essay with a more positive take on the 29th president.

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Notes

  1. ^ The Biography of Warren. G. Harding
  2. ^ Our First Black President? from the New York Times
  3. ^ Knott, Bill (2006-01-26). The Nearly Adventist President. Adventist Review. Seventh-day Adventist Church. Retrieved on 2007-11-28.
  4. ^ Warren G. Harding bio from White House
  5. ^ Russell, Francis (1968). The Shadow of Blooming Grove: Warren G. Harding and His Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 39-40, 403-405. ISBN 0070543380. 
  6. ^ Russell, Francis (1968). The Shadow of Blooming Grove: Warren G. Harding and His Times. New York: McGraw-Hill, 39-40, 403-405. ISBN 0070543380. 
  7. ^ Adams, Samuel Hopkins (1939). Incredible Era: The Life and Times of Warren Gamaliel Harding. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 280. 
  8. ^ "Eugene V. Debs", Time (magazine), Monday, November 1, 1926. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. "He was Eugene Victor Debs, labor leader. He was in jail for the violation of an injunction. Back of this event was the story of an Indiana grocery clerk, a locomotive fireman, who became the organizer of the American Railway Union, who twice made the nation feel the fist of unionized labor. The second time was the great strike against the Pullman Co. in 1894 when President Cleveland had to dispatch troops to Chicago to quell the riotous bloodshed. Eugene Debs and three others, indicted for conspiracy against the Government, were successfully defended by Clarence S. Darrow." 
  9. ^ Murray (1969)
  10. ^ Hakim, Joy (1995). War, Peace, and All That Jazz. New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 37-40. ISBN 0-19-509514-6. 
  11. ^ (2001) American Decades 6. The Gale Group. Retrieved on 2008-05-27. 
  12. ^ Straight Dope Staff Report: Was Warren Harding inducted into the Ku Klux Klan while president?
  13. ^ President Harding's 1923 Visit to Utah by W. Paul Reeve History Blazer July 1995
  14. ^ "Harding a Farm Boy Who Rose by Work", New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-21. "Nominated for the Presidency as a compromise candidate and elected by a tremendous majority because of a reaction against the policies of his predecessor, Warren Gamaliel Harding, twenty-ninth President of the United States, owed his political elevation largely to his engaging personal traits, his ability to work in harmony with the leaders of his party and the fact that he typified in himself the average prosperous American citizen." 
  15. ^ Chan, Sewell; and Richard Pérez-Peña. "If Clinton Should Win, Who Would Take Her Place?", The New York Times, 2007-01-22. Retrieved on 2007-11-01. 
  16. ^ Stephen Pile, The Book of Heroic Failures (Futura, 1980) p.180.
  17. ^ Gamaliel and Gamalielese, October 18, 2006.</REF Upon Harding's death, poet E. E. Cummings said "The only man, woman or child who wrote a simple declarative sentence with seven grammatical errors is dead."<ref></ref> Some suggest Harding had a form of aphasia.<ref>[http://www.doctorzebra.com/prez/g29.htm#5 President Warren Harding: Health and Medical History]</li></ol></ref>
Political offices
Preceded by
Harry L. Gordon
Lieutenant Governor of Ohio
1904 – 1906
Succeeded by
Andrew L. Harris
Preceded by
Woodrow Wilson
President of the United States
March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923
Succeeded by
Calvin Coolidge
United States Senate
Preceded by
Theodore E. Burton
Senator from Ohio (Class 3)
1915 – 1921
Served alongside: Atlee Pomerene
Succeeded by
Frank B. Willis
Party political offices
Preceded by
Charles Evans Hughes
Republican Party presidential candidate
1920
Succeeded by
Calvin Coolidge
Persondata
NAME Harding, Warren Gamaliel
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician, businessman
DATE OF BIRTH November 2, 1865
PLACE OF BIRTH Near Blooming Groove, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH August 2, 1923
PLACE OF DEATH San Francisco, California, United States
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John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | United States Senators | Ohio State Senators | American lawyers | U.S. Army officers | 1824 births | 1889 deaths ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Henry B. Payne (November 30, 1810 - September 9, 1896) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Calvin Stewart Brice (September 17, 1845 - December 15, 1898) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Joseph Benson Foraker (July 5, 1846 – May 10, 1917) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Frank Bartlett Willis (December 28, 1871 - March 30, 1928) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Cyrus Locher (March 8, 1878 - August 17, 1929) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Roscoe Conkling McCulloch (November 27, 1880 - March 17, 1958) was a Republican politician from Ohio who served in the United States House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. ... Robert Johns Bulkley (October 8, 1880 - July 21, 1965) was a United States Democratic Party politician from Ohio. ... For the former Governor of Ohio and Robert Tafts grandson, see Bob Taft. ... Thomas A. Burke (October 30, 1898 - December 5, 1971) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... George Harrison Bender (September 29, 1896, Cleveland, Ohio - June 18, 1961, Chagrin Falls, Ohio) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Frank John Lausche (November 14, 1895 - April 21, 1990) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Blooming Grove, Ohio is an unincorporated village located in Morrow County, Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

 
 

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