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Encyclopedia > Warrant Officer
Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers.

A Warrant Officer (WO) is a member of a military organization holding one of a specific group of ranks. In most countries they are effectively senior non-commissioned officers, although technically in a class of their own between NCOs and commissioned officers. In the United States military, a Warrant Officer is ranked as an officer above the senior-most enlisted ranks but below the grade of O-1 (NATO: OF-1). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (450x649, 217 KB) Two Warrant Officers, Second Class (WO2) of the Bermuda Regiments Training Company. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (450x649, 217 KB) Two Warrant Officers, Second Class (WO2) of the Bermuda Regiments Training Company. ... The Bermuda Regiment Band A Command Centre during IS training. ... rank. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or noncom, is a non-commissioned member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ...

Contents

History

Common Military Ranks
Navies
(English-speaking
world)
Armies and
some Air Forces
Air Forces
(Commonwealth)
Admiral of the Fleet Field Marshal Marshal of the Air Force
Admiral General Air Chief Marshal
Commodore Brigadier Air Commodore
Captain Colonel Group Captain
Commander Lieutenant Colonel Wing Commander
Lieutenant Commander Major Squadron Leader
Lieutenant Captain Flight Lieutenant
Sub-Lieutenant Lieutenant Flying Officer
Warrant Officer Warrant Officer Warrant Officer
Petty Officer Sergeant Sergeant
Leading Rate Corporal Corporal
Seaman Private Aircraftman

The warrant officer corps began in the 13th century in the nascent English Royal Navy. At that time, noblemen with military experience took command of the new Navy, adopting the military ranks of lieutenant and captain. These officers often had no knowledge of life on board a ship — let alone how to navigate such a vessel — and relied on the expertise of the ship's Master and other seamen who tended to the technical aspects of running the ship. As cannon came into use, the officers also required gunnery experts. rank. ... Admiral of the Fleet is a supreme naval position that has existed in historical navies and still exists in several modern-day navies. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... Marshal of the Air Force is a generic term for the most senior rank in an air force, equivalent to Field Marshal or Fleet Admiral. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... General is a military rank, in most nations the highest rank, although some nations have the higher rank of Field Marshal. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom As well as the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and air forces of many Commonwealth... Commodore is a military rank used in some navies for officers whose position exceeds that of a Captain, but is less than that of a Flag Officer. ... Brigadier (IPA pronunciation: ) is a military rank, the meaning of which has a considerable variation. ... An Air Commodoress sleeve/shoulder insignia Air Commodore is the fourth most senior rank active in the Royal Air Force today, after the deactivation of Marshal of the Royal Air Force as a substantive rank in peacetime during defence cuts of the 1990s. ... . Captain, is the name most often given in naval circles to the NATO rank code of OF-5. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... A Captain in armies, air forces and marine forces, is a rank an army or air force rank with a NATO rank code of OF-2. ... A Flight Lieutenants sleeve/shoulder insignia Flight Lieutenant (abbreviated as Flt Lt and pronounced as flight lef-tenant, see Lieutenant) is a junior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many Commonwealth countries. ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Leading Rating (or Leading Rate) is the most senior of the junior rates in the British Royal Navy. ... This article is about the military rank. ... This article is about the military rank. ... This article is about a military rank. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Aircraftman (AC) (or Aircraftwoman (ACW)) is the lowest rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking below Leading Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-1. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Master Mariner is the official title of someone qualified to command a ship; the qualification is colloquially called a Masters Ticket. The term was introduced in the mid 19th century, and is usually held by the chief officer/first mate as well as the captain). ...


These sailors became indispensable to the running of the ship and were rewarded with a royal warrant. The warrant was a special designation, designed to set them apart from other sailors, yet not violate the class system that was prevalent during the time.


Nevertheless, while the class distinctions embodied by the distinction between commission and warrant were important at Court and in society both at home and abroad, on board ship a person's status has always depended more on the practical importance of the job that he did rather than the formalities of commission or warrant. Admiralty commissions were therefore never accorded the unique status that the Queen's commission holds in the Army, and in the hierarchy of a Royal Navy ship important warrant officers such as the Master would outrank commissioned officers such as the marine Lieutenants. See also Commissioned Officer The Queens Commisson is awarded to all officers of the British, Canadian, Austrailian and New Zealand armed forces. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ...


Three categories of WOs

Originally, warrant officers were as described at the top of this article: specialist professionals whose expertise and authority demanded formal recognition. They eventually developed into three categories:

  • Wardroom warrant officers
  • Standing warrant officers
  • Lower-grade warrant officers

Wardroom warrant officers

Wardroom warrant officers, formerly called "Warrant Officers of Wardroom Rank", were accorded the same privileges as commissioned officers.

  • The Master, like a master of a merchant ship, responsible for the navigation and general sea-handling of the ship.
  • The Surgeon
  • The Chaplain
  • The Purser, responsible for the provisioning of the ship.

It may be noted that the positions listed above are now equivalent to commissioned positions in the modern Royal Navy (i.e. navigating officer, chaplain, surgeon and supply officer). Master Mariner is the official title of someone qualified to command a ship; the qualification is colloquially called a Masters Ticket. The term was introduced in the mid 19th century, and is usually held by the chief officer/first mate as well as the captain). ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a religious service in an unknown location during World War II. US Navy Chaplain Kenneth Medve conducts Catholic Mass onboard the Ronald Reagan (2006) A chaplain is typically a priest, ordained deacon or other member of the clergy serving a group of... A ships purser, or just purser is the person on a ship responsible for the handling of money on board. ...


Standing warrant officers

The standing warrant officers generally remained with the ship even when she was out of commission, and often were involved in the initial fit-out.

  • The Boatswain, (pronounced bo'sun) responsible, under the master, for the rigging, sails and anchors of the ship.
  • The Carpenter
  • The Gunner, responsible for the maintenance of the guns, but not the actual firing of them.

The carpenter was rendered obsolete with the end of wooden sailing ships, but the roles of boatswain and the gunner in the Royal Navy are now carried out by commissioned officers. The boatswain on a modern merchant ship supervising cargo operations. ... Carpenter at work in Tennessee, June 1942. ... Gunner refers to a rank in the Royal Artillery, or can refer to anyone whose main job is to operate a gun. ...


Lower-grade warrant officers

Below the standing warrant officers were various warrant officers, such as the Master-at-Arms, the Sailmaker and the Armourer, although in the hierarchy of the ship these warrant officers might be junior to others who did not hold formal warrants, such as the master's mates or the midshipmen. A Master-at-Arms (MAA) is a rating responsible for discipline aboard a naval ship. ... The USS Monongahela (1862), an exemplar of the 19th century sailmakers craft A sailmaker is a person who makes and repairs sails for sailboats, typically working on shore in a sail loft. ... An armorer or armourer (US English/Commonwealth English) was in former times a smith who specialized in manufacturing and repairing arms and armor. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ...


The demise of the Royal Naval warrants

In 1843, the wardroom warrant officers were given commissioned status, while in 1853 the lower-grade warrant officers were absorbed into the new rate of Chief Petty Officer, both classes thereby ceasing to be warrant officers. By the time of the First World War the standing warrant officers had been divided into two grades: Warrant Officers and Chief Warrant Officers (or "Commissioned Warrant Officers", a phrase that was replaced in 1920 with "Commissioned Officers from Warrant Rank"). Their ranks had by then expanded with the adoption of modern technology in the Navy to include Telegraphists, Electricians, Shipwrights, Artificer Engineers, etc. Both WOs and CWOs messed in the Warrant Officers' mess rather than the wardroom. Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Telegraphist is an operator who uses the morse code in order to communicate by land or radio lines. ... TVA electricians, Tennessee, 1942. ... Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. ... An Artificer is one who is a skilled artist or craftsman. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Until 1949, WOs and CWOs carried swords, were saluted by ratings, had their own mess and ranked between Sub-Lieutenants and Midshipmen. In 1949, the ranks of WO and CWO were changed to "Commissioned Officer" and "Senior Commissioned Officer", the latter ranking with but after the rank of Lieutenant, and they were admitted to the wardroom, the WOs messes closing down. Collectively these officers were known as "Branch Officers", being retitled "Special Duties" officers in 1956. In 1998, the Special Duties list was merged with the General list of officers in the Royal Navy, all officers now having the same opportunity to reach the highest commissioned ranks. 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... A Lieutenant, Junior Grade, is a division officer in the United States Navy. ... A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Warrant officers in the Royal Marines

The development of the warrant officer ranks in the Royal Marines closely paralleled those in the Royal Navy. As in the RN, by the Second World War there were Warrant Officers and Commissioned Warrant Officers, e.g. Staff Sergeant Majors, Commissioned Staff Sergeant Majors, Royal Marines Gunners, Commissioned Royal Marines Gunners, etc. As officers they were saluted by junior ranks in the Royal Marines and the Army. These all became (commissioned) Branch officer ranks in 1949, and Special Duties officer ranks in 1956. The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... Staff Sergeant Major (SSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps who are not Conductors or Regimental Sergeant Majors. ...


Warrant officers in the Army

Warrant officers were generally introduced throughout the British Army under Army Order 70 of 1915, although Regimental Sergeant Majors and a few other appointments (beginning in 1879, when Conductors of Stores and Supplies were warranted), had been warranted before that time. These earlier warranted appointments, and some others, became WOIs. The appointments that were designated WOIIs had previously been senior sergeants. Unlike in the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines, warrant officers in the Army were not considered officers and were not saluted. Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... Conductor (Cdr) is an appointment held by a few selected Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps and is the most senior appointment that can be held by a warrant officer in the British Army. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ...


Australia

Warrant Officers in the Australian Defence Force are the senior non-commissioned ranks. The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. ...


Royal Australian Navy

The RAN has two Warrant Officer ranks. The first is Warrant Officer (WO), and is equivalent to an Army Warrant Officer Class One (WO1). The insignia for a WO in the RAN is the Australian coat of arms. Beneath the rank of WO, and equivalent to the Army's WO2 is Chief Petty Officer (CPO). CPOs are not however classified as Warrant Officers. The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...


The RAN also has the more senior rank of Warrant Officer of the Navy (WO-N). It is the most senior non-commissioned rank in the RAN and is also a singular rank. That is, it is only held by one person at any time. The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Warrant Officer of the Navy (WO-N) is the most senior non-commisioned rank in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and is also a singular rank. ...


Warrant Officers are not saluted because they are not a commissioned rank.


Australian Army

The Australian Army has three Warrant Officer ranks. The most senior Warrant Officer rank is that of Warrant Officer (WO), introduced in 1991. This rank is held by the Regimental Sergeant Major of the Army (RSM-A). It is the most senior non-commissioned rank in the Australian Army and is only held by one person at a time. The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ...


A Warrant Officer Class One (WO1) can hold the position of Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) or Battalion Sergeant Major (BSM) of a battalion or equivalent unit, RSM of a brigade or larger formation, or occasionally a training or administrative position, particularly Quartermaster of a smaller unit. Warrant Officer Class Two (WO2) can hold the position of Company Sergeant Major, Squadron Sergeant Major or Battery Sergeant Major, or a number of training or administrative positions. Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... Quartermaster is a term usually referring to a military unit which specializes in supplying and provisioning troops, or to an individual who does the same. ... Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers, Second Class. ... Company Sergeant Major (CSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Company Sergeant Major (CSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ...


Army WO1s can be promoted to Captain, given what is known as a Prescribed Service Commission. It is rare for an officer promoted from WO1 to rise past Major, or to be given a command position. Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ...


The insignia of a WO2 is a crown. The insignia of a WO1 is the Australian coat of arms (changed from the royal coat of arms in 1976). The insignia for the RSM-A is the Australian coat of arms surrounded by a wreath. All these are worn on the sleeve on the upper arm.[1] Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Warrant Officers in the Army are addressed by subordinates as "Sir" or "Ma'am". They can be addressed by commissioned officers above subaltern rank (ie. Officer Cadet, 2nd Lieutenant, Lieutenant) according to their appointment (e.g. "CSM" or "RSM").


Royal Australian Air Force

The RAAF has two Warrant Officer ranks. The first is Warrant Officer (WOFF) which is equivalent to an Army WO1. The insignia of a WOFF is the Australian coat of arms. Beneath the rank of WOFF, and equivalent to the Army's WO2 is Flight Sergeant (FSGT). Flight Sergeants are not however classified as Warrant Officers. The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


The senior WO rank is Warrant Officer of the Air Force (WOFF-AF). It is the most senior non-commissioned rank in the RAAF and like the WO-N in the RAN and the RSM-A in the Army, there is only one WOFF-AF in the RAAF. The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...


The insignia of the WOFF-AF is the Australian coat of arms surrounded by a wreath. The wreath denotes the singularity of the rank.


Canada

In the Canadian Forces, Warrant Officers are the senior non-commissioned member (NCM) ranks. There are three ranks in this group: in the Army and Air Force, they are (in descending order): The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... A non-commissioned member (NCM), in the Canadian Forces, is defined in the Queens Regulations and Orders as: … any person, other than an officer, who is enrolled in, or who pursuant to law is attached or seconded otherwise than as an officer to, the Canadian Forces… Thus, an NCM... Canadian Forces Land Force Command (LFC) is responsible for army operations within the Canadian Forces. ... CF-18 off the coast Hawaii CH-124 Sea King CH-149 Cormorant CC-115 Buffalo Canadian Forces Air Command (AIRCOM) is the air force element of the Canadian Forces. ...

Their Naval equivalents are, respectively: A warrant officer (WO) or a chief warrant officer (CWO) is a member of a military organization, with a rank subordinate to other commissioned officers and senior to noncommissioned officers. ... Master Warrant Officer or MWO is an Army and Air Force non-commissioned member rank of the Canadian Forces. ... Warrant Officer (WO) is an Army and Air Force non-commissioned member (NCM) rank of the Canadian Forces. ... HMCS Bastion, flagship of the Canadian Navy. ...

The rank insignia of the WO is a royal crown, worn on both forearms of the Service Dress tunic; in gold metal and green enamel miniature pins on the collar of the Service Dress shirt and outerwear coats (Army only); on CADPAT slipons worn in the middle of the chest, embroidered in tan (Army) or dark blue (Air Force) thread; and in "old gold" thread on blue slip-ons on both shoulders of other uniforms (Air Force only). Chief Petty Officer 1st Class or CPO1 is the most senior Naval non-commissioned member (NCM) rank of the Canadian Forces. ... Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class or CPO2 is a Naval non-commissioned member rank of the Canadian Forces. ... Petty Officer 1st Class or PO1 is a Naval non-commissioned member rank of the Canadian Forces. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... A sample of the temperate woodland CADPAT design. ...


A WO of the Canadian Grenadier Guards and the Governor General's Foot Guards is referred to and addressed as Colour Sergeant (CSgt). On ceremonial full dress and patrol dress uniforms, a Colour Sergeant wears a distinctive rank insignia, but on all other uniforms wears the WO's crown. Categories: Stub | Canadian regiments | Guards Regiments ... The Governor Generals Foot Guards is one of three Household regiments in the Primary Reserve of the Canadian Army, along with The Governor Generals Horse Guards and the Canadian Grenadier Guards. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ...


Forms of address

The etiquette of addressing Warrant Officers is as follows (assuming a member named Bloggins):

  • Warrant Officer – initially as "Warrant Officer Bloggins" or "Warrant Bloggins", thereafter as "Warrant"; except in foot guards regiments, initially as "Colour Sergeant Bloggins", thereafter as "Colour Sergeant".
  • Petty Officer 1st Class – initially as "Petty Officer Bloggins" or "PO Bloggins", thereafter as "PO".
  • Chief Petty Officer 1st/2nd Class – initially as "Chief Petty Officer Bloggins" or "Chief Bloggins", thereafter as "Chief". The distinction between 1st and 2nd class (for both Chiefs and POs) is usually only made during formal awards, promotions or other presentations.
  • Master Warrant Officer – initially as "Master Warrant Officer Bloggins", thereafter as "Sir" or "Ma'am" by subordinates, and as "Master Warrant Officer" by superiors. May also be addressed as "Sergeant-Major" if s/he holds that appointment.
  • Chief Warrant Officer – initially as "Chief Warrant Officer Bloggins" by subordinates, thereafter as "Sir" or "Ma'am"; "Mr./Ms. Bloggins" by superiors; and, if s/he holds the title of Regimental Sergeant-Major, "RSM" by his/her Commanding Officer.

Foot guards is a term used to describe elite infantry regiments. ...

Appointments

A WO is usually the most senior NCM in a platoon, troop, or flight, and holds the position of Platoon WO (Pl WO), Troop WO (Tp WO), or Flight WO (Flt WO). This applies to independent organizations – e.g., an Air Reserve Flight – as well as sub-units of a larger unit – e.g., a Pioneer Platoon in an infantry regiment. If necessary, they may also act in the capacity of second-in-command (2IC) of such a sub-unit under a lieutenant. Platoon of the German Bundeswehr. ... For the TV show, see F Troop. ... A flight is a military unit in an air force, naval air service, or army air corps. ...


WOs may also command detachments of larger organizations, for example Communication Detachment Great Village, near Debert, Nova Scotia, which falls under the command of 726 Communication Squadron at CFB Halifax, almost 100 km away. Debert is an unincorporated farming community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... Canadian Forces Base Halifax (CFB Halifax) is Canadas east coast navy base and home port to the Atlantic fleet. ...


Commands, Bases and Formations also have Chief Warrant Officers - sometimes referred to as, for example "Brigade RSM", "Base RSM", etc.; there are special insignia for these, as well as for the most senior CWO of the entire Canadian Forces, known as the Canadian Forces Chief Warrant Officer.


Due to the unified nature of the CF, it is not unheard-of for Air Force WOs or even Navy PO1s – especially those of the so-called "purple trades", such as logistics or military police – to find themselves filling WO appointments in what are otherwise considered "hard" army units (such as Service Battalions or Communication Squadrons). Conversely, it is not impossible for an Army WO or Navy PO1 to find themselves filling a WO billet in an Air Force squadron – an example would be an Army Line Technician as the Technical WO of an Air Force base's telecommunications and information services squadron. The Logistics (Log) Branch is a personnel branch of the Canadian Forces (CF). ... The Canadian Forces Military Police provide military police services to the Canadian Forces. ...


Messes and quarters

WOs generally mess and billet with other Warrant Officers and with Sergeants, and their Naval equivalents, Chief Petty Officers and Petty Officers. Their mess on military bases or installations are generally named the "Warrant Officers and Sergeants Mess". For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...


Usage note

The term "Warrant Officer" can be ambiguous; care must be taken to distinguish between Warrant Officers as a particular Army and Air Force rank, and Warrant Officers as a cadre, consisting of all ranks mentioned above (including Warrant Officer). Generally, whether one is referring to the rank or the cadre will be determined by context.


Singapore

In the Singapore Armed Forces, Warrant Officers are former Specialists who have attained the rank of Master Sergeant and have been selected for and graduated from the Joint Warrant Officer Course at SAF Warrant Officer School.[2] Warrant officers rank between Specialists and commissioned officers. They ordinarily serve as Battalion, Brigade, etc. Regimental Sergeant Majors. A great deal of them serve as instructors and subject-matter experts in various training establishments. Warrant officers are also seen on the various staffs headed by the respective manpower, intelligence, etc. officers. The Singapore Armed Forces (abbreviation: SAF, Malay: Angkatan Bersenjata Singapura, Simplified Chinese: ) comprises three branches: the Singapore Army, the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) and the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN). ... In the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF), Specialists are the group of ranks equivalent to non-commissioned officers in other armed forces. ... United States Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Marine Corps Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Army Master Sergeant insignia U.S. Air Force A Master Sergeant is: the eighth enlisted rank in the United States Marine Corps, just above Gunnery Sergeant, below Master Gunnery Sergeant, Sergeant Major, and Sergeant Major of... SAF Warrant Officer School (SAFWOS) is a training school within the Pasir Laba Camp complex. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ...


Interestingly, they may also be given appointments usually reserved for commissioned officers such as platoon commander and Officer Commanding (company commander) in certain training units. Having had extensive practical experience through their career, Warrant Officers are often given staff officer appointments such as Quartermaster and Motor Transport Officer in training and non-combat units. The Officer Commanding (OC) is the commander of a sub-unit or minor unit (smaller than battalion size) in British and Commonwealth military usage. ... Quartermaster is a term usually referring to a military unit which specializes in supplying and provisioning troops, or to an individual who does the same. ...


There are four grades of warrant officer:

These are the successor ranks to the previous warrant officer rank structure which consisted of Warrant Officer Class II and I only in the British style. Their rank insignia were the Singapore coat of arms, and the coat of arms in laurels respectively. Second Warrant Officer (2WO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ... First Warrant Officer (1WO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ... Master Warrant Officer or MWO is an Army and Air Force non-commissioned member rank of the Canadian Forces. ... Senior Warrant Officer (SWO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ...


Warrant Officers usually have their own mess. For smaller units, this mess may be combined with the Officers' Mess as the Officers'/Warrant Officers' Mess. Warrant Officers wear their insignia on their epaulettes, like officers, instead of on the sleeve like specialists and other soldiers. This signifies that Warrant Officers often have similar responsibilities to commissioned officers. Warrant Officers are addressed as "Sir" by those junior to them or by "Warrant (Surname)".[2] They are also commonly addressed "Encik" ("Uncle") as a form of respect by commissioned officers. They are not, however, saluted by enlisted ranks.

Singapore Armed Forces Warrant Officer rank insignia
NATO rank code OR-8 OR-9
Rank Second Warrant Officer First Warrant Officer Master Warrant Officer Senior Warrant Officer
Abbreviation 2WO 1WO MWO SWO
Insignia

The Singapore Armed Forces (abbreviation: SAF, Malay: Angkatan Bersenjata Singapura, Simplified Chinese: ) comprises three branches: the Singapore Army, the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) and the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN). ... Second Warrant Officer (2WO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ... First Warrant Officer (1WO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ... Master Warrant Officer or MWO is an Army and Air Force non-commissioned member rank of the Canadian Forces. ... Senior Warrant Officer (SWO) is a Warrant Officer rank in the Singapore Armed Forces. ... Image File history File links Air_Force_2WO.gif‎ Singapore Armed Forces Second Warrant Officer rank insignia From http://www. ... Image File history File links Air_Force_1WO.gif‎ Singapore Armed Forces First Warrant Officer rank insignia From http://www. ... Image File history File links Air_Force_MWO.gif‎ Singapore Armed Forces Master Warrant Officer rank insignia From http://www. ... Image File history File links Air_Force_SWO.gif‎ Singapore Armed Forces Senior Warrant Officer rank insignia From http://www. ...

Switzerland

In the Swiss Army, warrant officers are senior NCOs (höhere Unteroffiziere/sous-officiers supérieurs/sottuficiali superiori). The reforms in 2001 increased the number of WO ranks from three (Feldweibel, Fourier and Adjutant Unteroffizier) to seven; they now range from Sergeant Major to Chief Warrant Officer. Military of Switzerland On May 18, 2003, Swiss voters approved the military reform project Army XXI that will drastically reduce the size of the Swiss Army. ... Swiss army ranks have changed little over the centuries, except for the introduction, in 2001, of a new set of warrant officers. ...

Rank code WO-1 WO-2 WO-3 WO-4 WO-5 WO-6
Designation Feldweibel
Sergent-major
Sergente maggiore
Fourier
Fourrier
Furiere
Hauptfeldweibel
Sergent-major chef
Sergente maggiore capo
Adjutant Unteroffizier
Adjudant sous-officier
Aiutante sottuficiale
Stabsadjudant
Adjudant d'état-major
Aiutante di stato maggiore
Hauptadjudant
Adjudant-major
Aiutante maggiore
Chefadjudant
Adjudant-chef
Aiutante capo
English equivalent Sergeant Major Quartermaster Sergeant Chief Sergeant Major Warrant Officer Staff Warrant Officer Master Warrant Officer Chief Warrant Officer
Insignia

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United Kingdom

In the British armed forces, a warrant officer is the highest non-commissioned rank, holding the Queen's (or King's) warrant, which is signed by the Secretary of State for Defence. Warrant officers are not saluted, but are usually addressed by their juniors as "Sir" or "Ma'am". Commissioned officers refer to Warrant officers as "Mister" and then their last name, e.g. "Mr. Smith". Warrant officers have all been promoted from NCO rank. This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ...


Royal Navy

In 1973, warrant officers reappeared in the Royal Navy, but these appointments followed the Army model, with the new warrant officers being ratings rather than officers. They were initially known as Fleet Chief Petty Officers (FCPOs), but were renamed Warrant Officers in the 1980s. They always ranked with Warrant Officers Class I in the British Army and Royal Marines and with Warrant Officers in the Royal Air Force.


In April of 2004, the RN renamed the top rate Warrant Officer Class 1 (WO1) and created the new rate of Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2) immediately below it, to replace the appointment of Charge Chief Petty Officer. The latter was a senior Chief Petty Officer, but not a substantive rank in its own right. Only those who held the specific appointment of Charge Chief Artificer (a CCPO in a skilled technical trade) gained partial recognition as NATO OR-8 equivalent, as with other WO2s. In the Fleet Air Arm the Charge Chief Artificer was commonly referred to as the Senior Maintenance Rating (SMR) but continued to wear the traditional badges of the CPO which made it difficult to distinguish his seniority from the others on a Squadron or ship. With the Advent of the WO2 the SMR is now referred to as the Warrant Officer Engineering on most Naval Squadrons. Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ...


Royal Navy warrant rates are thus now the same as those in the Army and Royal Marines, and wear the same rank insignia. Like RM WO2s (but unlike Army WO2s), all RN WO2s wear the crown-in-wreath variation of the rank insignia.


In 2005 the Royal Navy introduced the appointment of Executive Warrant Officer (EWO) equivalent to that of the US Navy's Command Master Chief Petty Officer (CMCPO) and the Canadian Navy's Command Chief Petty Officer (CCPO). The position of EWO is filled by a senior WO1 and unlike its US Navy and Canadian Forces counterparts, the Royal Navy EWO does not wear a different or modified rate badge to that of a standard WO1. Every Royal Navy establishment and ship has an EWO.


Royal Marines

The Royal Marines now has the same warrant ranks as the Army, Warrant Officer Class 1 and Warrant Officer Class 2. The insignia are the same, but all RM WO2s wear the crown-in-wreath variation. As in the Army, all warrant officers have appointments by which they are known, referred to and addressed.


WO2 appointments are:

WO1 appointments are: Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers, Second Class. ... Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (RQMS) is an appointment held by a senior Warrant Officer Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... A bandmaster is the leader and conductor of a band, usually a military band or marching band. ...

The rank below WO2 is Colour Sergeant, the RM equivalent of Staff Sergeant. Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... A bandmaster is the leader and conductor of a band, usually a military band or marching band. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ...


British Army

In the British Army, there are two warrant ranks, Warrant Officer Class 2 (WO2) and Warrant Officer Class 1 (WO1), which is the senior of the two. It used to be more common to refer to these ranks as WOII and WOI (using Roman instead of Arabic numerals). Warrant Officer 1st Class or 2nd Class is incorrect. The rank immediately below WO2 is Staff Sergeant (or Colour Sergeant). The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ...


Every warrant officer has an appointment, and is usually referred to by his appointment rather than by his rank.

WO1s wear a royal coat of arms on the lower sleeve, which may be surrounded by a wreath depending on appointment. Appointments held by WO1s include: Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

WO1 variant arm badge (British Army)
WO2 arm badge (British Army)

WO2s wear a crown on the lower sleeve, surrounded by a wreath for Quartermaster Sergeants (for all WOIIs from 1938 to 1947). Appointments held by WO2s include: Image File history File links UK-Army-OR9. ... The Academy Sergeant Major (AcSM) is the senior non_commissioned officer instructor at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. ... A bandmaster is the leader and conductor of a band, usually a military band or marching band. ... Clerks of Works are the most highly qualified non_commissioned tradesmen in the Royal Engineers. ... Conductor (Cdr) is an appointment held by a few selected Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps and is the most senior appointment that can be held by a warrant officer in the British Army. ... A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ... Foremen of Signals are the most highly qualified non-commissioned signal equipment managers and Incorporated Engineers in the Royal Corps of Signals. ... A Garrison Sergeant Major (GSM) in the British Army is the senior non-commissioned officer of a garrison and holds the rank of Warrant Officer Class 1. ... Master Gunner is an appointment of Warrant Officer in the British Armys Royal Artillery. ... Master Gunner is an appointment of Warrant Officer in the British Armys Royal Artillery. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 (WO1) in the British Army, Royal Marines and many Commonwealth armies including the Australian Army and New Zealand Army, and by Chief Warrant Officers (CWO) in the Canadian Forces. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Sergeant Major Instructor This is the rank/title held by the Adult Instructor whos responsibility it is to look after and train a cadet company (or equiv. ... Staff Sergeant Major (SSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps who are not Conductors or Regimental Sergeant Majors. ... Staff Sergeant Major (SSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps who are not Conductors or Regimental Sergeant Majors. ... Conductor (Cdr) is an appointment held by a few selected Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps and is the most senior appointment that can be held by a warrant officer in the British Army. ... Trumpet Major is an appointment in British Army cavalry regiments or the Royal Horse Artillery, held by a Sergeant (or Corporal of Horse in the Household Cavalry) or a more senior non-commissioned officer or Warrant Officer. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

From 1938, there was also a rank of Warrant Officer Class III (WOIII). The only appointments held by this rank were Platoon Sergeant Major, Troop Sergeant Major and Section Sergeant Major. The WOIII wore a crown on his lower sleeve (which is why all WOIIs switched to a crown in a wreath during this period). The rank was placed in suspension in 1940 and no new appointments were made, but it was never officially abolished. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Band Sergeant Major (BSM) is the senior playing musician in a British Army band and holds the rank of Warrant Officer Class 2. ... The Band Sergeant Major (BSM) is the senior playing musician in a British Army band and holds the rank of Warrant Officer Class 2. ... Company Sergeant Major (CSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Clerks of Works are the most highly qualified non_commissioned tradesmen in the Royal Engineers. ... Two Bermuda Regiment Warrant Officers, Second Class. ... A drill sergeant drills recruits in the U.S. Army. ... A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ... Foremen of Signals are the most highly qualified non-commissioned signal equipment managers and Incorporated Engineers in the Royal Corps of Signals. ... Master Gunner is an appointment of Warrant Officer in the British Armys Royal Artillery. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Quartermaster Sergeant Instructor (QMSI) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Armys Army Physical Training Corps and by some in the Royal Engineers. ... Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (RQMS) is an appointment held by a senior Warrant Officer Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant (RQMS) is an appointment held by a senior Warrant Officer Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Company Sergeant Major (CSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... Company Sergeant Major (CSM) is an appointment held by Warrant Officers Class 2 in the British Army and Royal Marines. ... In the British Army, the Troop Sergeant Major (TSM) is the senior NCO in a Royal Artillery troop, usually a Warrant Officer Class 2. ... Trumpet Major is an appointment in British Army cavalry regiments or the Royal Horse Artillery, held by a Sergeant (or Corporal of Horse in the Household Cavalry) or a more senior non-commissioned officer or Warrant Officer. ... Platoon Sergeant Major was an appointment in the British Army in the short-lived rank of Warrant Officer Class III (WOIII), created in 1938. ... In the British Army, the Troop Sergeant Major (TSM) is the senior NCO in a Royal Artillery troop, usually a Warrant Officer Class 2. ...


WOs are officially designated using their rank and appointment. For instance, WO2 (CSM) Smith or WO1 (BM) Jones. However, they would usually be referred to as "CSM Smith" and "Bandmaster Jones". WO2s holding Sergeant Major or Corporal Major appointments are often referred to as the "Sergeant Major" or the "Corporal Major", but WO1s are only ever referred to using their full appointment or its abbreviation (the "RSM" or the "Garrison Sergeant Major", for instance).


How warrant officers are addressed depends, as does much else in the British Army, on the traditions of their regiments or corps. However, there are some general rules of thumb:

  • WO1s are usually addressed as "Mr surname" by officers and by their peers, and as "sir" or "Mr surname, sir" by their subordinates (for female WO1s, "Mrs or Miss surname", "ma'am", and "Mrs or Miss surname, ma'am", respectively);
  • an RSM's Commanding Officer, and he alone, has the privilege of addressing him as "RSM"; all others use the normal form of address for WO1s;
  • WO2s are commonly addressed as "Sergeant Major", "Corporal Major" or "Q" (for Quartermaster Sergeants) as appropriate (or as "sir" or "ma'am").

The four most senior warrant officer appointments in the British Army are generally considered to be, in descending order of seniority: A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ... A family name, or surname, is that part of a persons name that indicates to what family he or she belongs. ...

Conductor (Cdr) is an appointment held by a few selected Warrant Officers Class 1 in the Royal Logistic Corps and is the most senior appointment that can be held by a warrant officer in the British Army. ... The Royal Logistic Corps is the British Army corps that provides the logistic support for the Army. ... Tactical Recognition Flash of the Royal Artillery The Royal Regiment of Artillery, generally known as the Royal Artillery (RA), is, despite its name, a corps of the British Army. ... The Academy Sergeant Major (AcSM) is the senior non_commissioned officer instructor at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. ... New College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst New Colours are presented to RMAS, June 2005. ... A Garrison Sergeant Major (GSM) in the British Army is the senior non-commissioned officer of a garrison and holds the rank of Warrant Officer Class 1. ...

Royal Air Force

The Royal Air Force inherited the ranks of Warrant Officer Class I and II from the Royal Flying Corps, part of the Army, in 1918. It also inherited the rank badges of the Royal Arms and a crown respectively. Until the 1930s, these ranks were often known as Sergeant Major 1st and 2nd Class. In 1939 the RAF abolished the rank of WOII and retained WOI as simple Warrant Officer, which it remains to this day. The RAF has no equivalent to WO2 (NATO OR-8), WO being equivalent to WO1 (NATO OR-9) and wearing the Royal Arms. Warrant officers are addressed and referred to as "Mr", "Mrs" or "Miss" ("Mr Smith" etc), or as "sir" or "ma'am" by their juniors. They do not have appointments as in the Army or Royal Marines. They rank above Flight Sergeants and below Pilot Officers, the lowest commissioned rank. Image File history File links RAF Warrent Officers Arm Patch File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. // Formed by Royal Warrant on 13 May 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting...

In 1946, the RAF renamed its aircrew warrant officers Master Aircrew, a designation which still survives. In 1950, it renamed warrant officers in technical trades Master Technicians, a designation which only survived until 1964. Image File history File links Master Aircrews Arm Patch (Royal Air Force) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In the Royal Air Force and United Kingdom the word Aircrew is used to describe the flying crew of the aeroplane. ... Master Aircrew (MAcr) is the highest non-commissioned rank held by aircrew in the Royal Air Force. ...

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Military service. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom are known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, officially the Armed Forces of the Crown. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... In the Royal Navy in the middle of the 18th century, the term Ordinary Seaman was used to refer to a seaman with between one and two years experience at sea. ... // In the Royal Navy in the middle of the 18th century, the term Able Seaman referred to a seaman with at least two years experience at sea. ... Leading Seaman (or Leading Rate) is the most senior of the junior rates in the British Royal Navy. ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Chief Petty Officer is a non-commissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys elite fighting forces. ... British Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft Marines (from the English adjective marine, meaning of the sea, from Latin language mare, meaning sea, via French adjective marin(e), of the sea) are, in principle, seaborne land soldiers that are part of a navy. ... Lance Corporal (LCpl or L/Cpl) is a military rank used by some elements of the British, Commonwealth, and U.S. armed forces. ... This article is about the military rank. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Lance Corporal (LCpl or L/Cpl) is a military rank used by some elements of the British, Commonwealth, and U.S. armed forces. ... This article is about the military rank. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... United States Military Staff Sergeant insignia (U.S. Air Force) Staff Sergeant is the fifth enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Airman and below Technical Sergeant. ... Colour Sergeant (CSgt or C/Sgt) is an non-commissioned rank in the Royal Marines, ranking above Sergeant and below Warrant Officer Class 2. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Aircraftman (AC) (or Aircraftwoman (ACW)) is the lowest rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking below Leading Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-1. ... Leading Aircraftman (LAC) (or Leading Aircraftwoman (LACW)) is a rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking between Aircraftman and Senior Aircraftman and having a NATO rank code of OR-2. ... Senior Aircraftman (SAC), or Senior Aircraftwoman (SACW), is a rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking between Leading Aircraftman and Junior Technician (although SACs in non-technical trades progress directly to Corporal) and having a NATO rank code of OR-2. ... Junior Technician (JT) is a rank in the Royal Air Force, ranking between Senior Aircraftman and Corporal, with a NATO rank code of OR-2. ... This article is about the military rank. ... For other uses, see Sergeant (disambiguation). ... Chief Technician (CT or Ch Tech) is a non_commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force which is only held by airmen in technical trades and by musicians. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Master Aircrew (MAcr) is the highest non-commissioned rank held by aircrew in the Royal Air Force. ...

Cadet organizations

The rank of warrent officer is also used in the British youth cadet corps. The Sea Cadet Corps has only one warrent officer per area and in total the corps has 6 warrants officers.


See also

Comparative military ranks are a means of comparing military rank systems of different nations as a means of categorizing the hierarchy of an armed force compared to another. ... Enlisted ranks is not a term used in the British Army, and is only used in this articles title for the sake of consistency with rank listings in other countries; not least those of the United States. ... The term used in the Royal Air Force to refer to all ranks below commissioned officer level is Other Ranks (ORs). ... A warrant officer (WO) or a chief warrant officer (CWO) is a member of a military organization, with a rank subordinate to other commissioned officers and senior to noncommissioned officers. ...

References

  1. ^ Australian Government, Department of Defence, Australian Defence Force Badges of Rank and Special Insignia, accessed 19 March 2007.
  2. ^ a b MINDEF, History Snippets, 1992 - The SAF Warrant Officer School, 7 January 2007. Accessed 19 March 2007.

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