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Encyclopedia > War on terror
Global War on Terror

US Soldiers boarding a CH-47 Chinook helicopter in Afghanistan during Operation Anaconda in the Shahi-Kot Valley and Arma Mountains southeast of Zormat.
Date October 7, 2001
Location Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Horn of Africa, United States, more...
Result Conflict ongoing
Combatants
Participants in operations
Flag of the United States United States
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Flag of Israel Israel
Flag of Canada Canada
Flag of Australia Australia
Flag of Poland Poland
Flag of the Netherlands Netherlands
Flag of Iraq Iraq
Flag of Afghanistan Afghanistan
Flag of India India
Flag of Pakistan Pakistan
Flag of the Philippines Philippines
Flag of Somalia Somalia
Flag of Ethiopia Ethiopia
Flag of Lebanon Lebanon
Algeria
et al.
Targets of operations
al-Qaeda
Taliban
Islamic Courts Union
Waziristan
Hezbollah
Hamas
al-Qaeda in Iraq
Mahdi Army
Abu Sayyaf
Jemaah Islamiyah
et all.
Strength
In trans Sahara:
959
In Somalia:
14,600-15,600
In Iraq:
664,000-725,000
In 2006 Lebanon War:
20,000
In 2007 Lebanon conflict:
72,100
In Afghanistan:
153,000
In Waziristan:
90,000
In the Philippines:
20,000
Total:
1,028,926-1,106,649
In trans Sahara:
2,500
In Somalia:
13,000-18,000
In Iraq:
121,300-221,300
In 2006 Lebanon War:
3,600-11,000
In 2007 Lebanon conflict:
480-500
In Afghanistan:
20,000
In Waziristan:
Unknown
In the Philippines:
9,000
Total:
169,880-282,000
Casualties
Military casualties only
~25,500 dead
~51,600+ Injured
More...
Military casualties only
~35,300 - 52,000 dead
More...

The War on Terror (also known as the War on Terrorism) is a campaign initiated by the United States government under President George W. Bush which includes various military, political,legal and personal actions ostensibly taken to "curb the spread of terrorism," following the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States. The War on Terror was authorized by the United States Congress under the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Terrorists passed on September 18, 2001. Both the phrase “War on Terror” and the policies it denotes have been a source of ongoing controversy, as critics argue it has been used to justify unilateral preemptive war, perpetual war, human rights abuses, and other violations of international law.[1][2][3] It has been suggested that Waziristan War (2004–2006 phase) and Waziristan War (July 2007–present phase) be merged into this article or section. ... Combatants Hezbollah Lebanon Amal[2] LCP[3] PFLP-GC[4]  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[11] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Commanders Ismail Haniya Khaled Meshaal Mohammed Deif Mahmoud Abbas Mohammed Dahlan Strength Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades: 15,000 Executive Force: 6,000[1][2] National Security: 30,000 Police and Preventive Security: 30,000 General Intelligence: 5,000 Presidential Guard: 4,200 Al Aqsa Martyrs... Combatants Russian Federation Pro-Russian Chechens Republic of Ichkeria Caucasian insurgents and foreign fighters Commanders Vladimir Putin Akhmad Kadyrov† Ramzan Kadyrov Aslan Maskhadov† Abdul Halim Sadulayev† Doku Umarov Shamil Basayev† Strength At least 93,000 in Chechnya in 1999. ... For other uses, see al-Aqsa (disambiguation). ... Combatants JEM factions NRF alliance Janjaweed SLM (Minnawi)  Sudan African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) United Nations African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) Commanders Ibrahim Khalil Ahmed Diraige Omar al-Bashir Minni Minnawi Luke Aprezi Strength N/A N/A 7,000 The Darfur conflict is a crisis in the... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Terrorist redirects here. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Note: AUMF may refer to several authorizations granted by the United States Congress. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Preemptive war (or preemptive attack) is waged in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war. ... Perpetual war is a war with no clear ending conditions. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... International law deals with the relationships between states, or between persons or entities in different states. ...


The phrase "War on Terror" started being used to refer to the U.S. campaign in Iraq and elsewhere by members of the American Republican Party, who were advised to do so by Frank Luntz.[4] For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Frank I. Luntz (born February 23, 1962) is a corporate and political consultant and pollster who has worked most notably with the Republican Party in the United States. ...

Contents

Historical usage of phrase

The phrase "War on Terrorism" was first widely used by the Western press to refer to the attempts by Russian and European governments, and eventually the U.S. government, to stop attacks by anarchists against international political leaders[5]. Many of the anarchists described themselves as "Terrorists," and the term had a positive valence for them at the time. When Russian Marxist Vera Zasulich shot and wounded a Russian police commander who was known to torture suspects on 24 January 1878, for example, she threw down his weapon without killing him, announcing that she was a terrorist, not a killer.[6] For other uses, see News (disambiguation). ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... Valence, as used in psychology, especially in discussing emotions, means the intrinsic attractiveness (positive valence) or aversiveness (negative valence) of an event, object, or situation[1] However, the term is also used to characterize and categorize specific emotions. ... Vera Ivanovna Zasulich Vera Ivanovna Zasulich (July 27, 1849-May 8, 1919) (born August 8, New Style) was a Russian Marxist writer and revolutionary. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The next time the phrase gained currency was when it was used to describe the efforts by the British colonial government to end a spate of Jewish attacks in the British Mandate of Palestine in the late 1940s. The British proclaimed a "War on Terrorism" and attempted to crack down on Irgun, Lehi, and anyone perceived to be cooperating with them. The Jewish attacks, Arab attacks and revolts, and the subsequent British crackdown hastened the British evacuation from Palestine. The phrase was also used frequently by U.S. President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s.[7] In fact, many leaders from all over the world utilize this term when dealing with perceived terrorist activity. Flag The approximate borders of the British Mandate circa 1922. ... Irgun emblem. ... For other uses, see Lehi. ... Reagan redirects here. ...


Overview

See also: Terrorism, List of terrorist incidents, War on Terrorism (historical), Rationale for the War on Terror, and Timeline of the War on Terror
Countries in which Islamist terrorist attacks have occurred on or after September 11, 2001.
Countries in which Islamist terrorist attacks have occurred on or after September 11, 2001.

Terrorist organizations carried out attacks on the U.S. and its allies throughout the latter part of the 20th century, prompting occasional military responses. Following the 1998 embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania,[8] United States President Bill Clinton launched Operation Infinite Reach, a bombing campaign in Sudan and Afghanistan against targets associated with al-Qaeda.[9][10] In October of 2000 the USS Cole bombing occurred,[11] followed by the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.[12] The latter attacks created an immediate demand throughout the United States for a response. Terrorist redirects here. ... The following is a timeline of acts and failed attempts that can be considered non-state terrorism. ... The phrase War on Terrorism was first widely used by the Western press to refer to the attempts by Russian and European governments, and eventually the U.S. government, to stop attacks by anarchists against international political leaders. ... The United States has defined terrorism under the Federal Criminal Code. ... Timeline of the War on Terrorism: // September 11 - September 11, 2001 attacks take place and kill 2,993 people. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1427x628, 55 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1427x628, 55 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Terrorism is a controversial term with multiple definitions. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... In the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings (August 7, 1998), 257 people were killed and over 4,000 wounded in simultaneous car bomb explosions at the United States embassies in the East African capital cities of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Operation Infinite Reach was a US cruise missile strike on purported terrorist bases in Afghanistan and Sudan on August 20, 1998. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... The USS Cole bombing was a suicide bombing attack against the U.S. Navy guided missile destroyer USS Cole (DDG 67) on October 12, 2000 while it was harbored in the Yemeni port of Aden. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


The first aspects of the campaign came in the freezing of assets terrorist organizations and associated groups.[13] The United Nations Security Council also adopted United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373 which obliges all States to criminalize assistance for terrorist activities, deny financial support and safe haven to terrorists and share information about groups planning terrorist attacks.[14] NATO began Operation Active Endeavour on October 4th, which stepped up security checks in the Mediterranean.[15] After the Taliban rejected an ultimatum to turn over the al-Qaeda operatives in Afghanistan, the United States and NATO allies began airstrikes against Taliban and al-Qaeda targets on October 7, 2001. The Afghan Northern Alliance and allied militia, aided by elements of the United States Special forces, began a ground offensive that succeeded in capturing most of Afghanistan by early 2002. While operations continued in Afghanistan, the campaign was expanded into the Philippines, where United States Special Forces assisted the Philippine army against elements of al-Qaeda, Jemaah Islamiyah, and Abu Sayyaf. It was expanded further into the Horn of Africa, where NATO allies began training Ethiopian and Djiboutian armed forces in anti-terror and counter-insurgency methods. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373 is a counter-terrorism measure adopted September 28, 2001 following the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Combatants NATO, represented by Denmark Germany Greece Italy Norway Spain Turkey  Russia  Ukraine  Israel  Egypt Morocco Commanders Vice Admiral Roberto Cesaretti, Italian Navy Strength 480 ships and 84 planes Operation Active Endeavour is a naval operation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... The Northern Alliance is a term used by the western media, Taliban and Al Qaida to identify the military coalition of various Afghan groups fighting the Taliban. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Combatants Philippines United States al-Qaeda, Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, New Peoples Army (alleged collaboration) Commanders Hermogenes Esperon Jr. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Jemaah Islamiyah[1] (JI, Arabic phrase meaning Islamic Group or Islamic Community) is a Southeast Asian militant Islamic organization dedicated to the establishment of a Daulah Islamiyah[2] (Islamic State) in Southeast Asia incorporating Indonesia, Malaysia, the southern Philippines, Singapore and Brunei[3]. JI was added to the United Nations... The Abu Sayyaf Group (Arabic: جماعة أبو سياف; , ASG),also known as al-Harakat al-Islamiyya is one of several militant Islamist separatist groups based in and around the southern islands of the Philippines, in Bangsamoro (Jolo, Basilan, and Mindanao) where for almost 30 years various groups have been engaged in an insurgency... Combatants NATO and allies, represented by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Pakistan Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa is the official name used by the US government for a component of its response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on... This article is about the military alliance. ...

On March 20, 2003, the United States, United Kingdom, and a coalition expanded the campaign into Iraq, seeking to topple Saddam Hussein for his alleged possession of Weapons of Mass Destruction and state sponsorship of terror. By May 1, they had succeeded in doing so, though an insurgency developed supported by al-Qaeda and other militant elements. Likewise, the Taliban insurgency continued in Afghanistan, and their frequent border crossings into Pakistan prompted the nation to expand the campaign further into Waziristan in 2004, to remove Taliban and al-Qaeda elements. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Multinational Force Iraq. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Iraqi insurgency denotes groups using armed resistance against the US-led Coalition occupation of Iraq. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Combatants Pakistan, USA Waziristan tribesmen, al-Qaeda members Commanders Pervez Musharraf Ayman al-Zawahiri (probable) Strength 15,000? 8000-20,000? Casualties 500 Pakistanis, 50 Americans 2000 confirmed The Waziristan War (2004-present) is an ongoing armed conflict that began in 2004 when the Pakistani Army began its search for... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In 2005 the Security Council also adopted resolution 1624 concerning incitement to commit acts of terrorism and the obligations of countries to comply with international human rights laws[14]. Although both resolutions require mandatory annual reports on counter terrorism activities by adopting nations the United States and Israel have both declined to submit reports.[16]


Campaigns and theatres of operation

Main article: War on Terror - Theaters of operation

// The campaign War on Terror is taking place in the following theaters of operation. ...

Africa

Horn of Africa

Main article: Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa
Main article: War in Somalia (2006–present)

In October 2002, the Combined Joint Task Force, Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) was established in Djibouti at Camp Le Monier. It contains approximately 2,000 personnel including U.S. military and Special Operations Forces (SOF) and coalition force members, Coalition Task Force 150 (CTF-150). The primary goal of the coalition forces is to monitor, inspect, board and stop suspected shipments from entering the Horn of Africa. These are regions and areas of Operation Iraqi Freedom.[17] Included in the operation is the training of selected armed forces units of the countries of Djibouti, Kenya and Ethiopia in counterterrorism and counterinsurgency tactics. Humanitarian efforts conducted by CJTF-HOA include rebuilding of schools and medical clinics as well as providing medical services to those countries whose forces are being trained. Combatants NATO and allies, represented by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and Pakistan Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa is the official name used by the US government for a component of its response to the September 11, 2001 attacks on... Combatants Islamic Courts Union Pro-Islamist militias Alleged:  Eritrea Foreign Mujahideen al-Qaeda South:  Ethiopia Transitional Government of Somalia  United States North:  Ethiopia Galmudug Puntland After the invasion: AMISOM Commanders Hassan Aweys Sharif Ahmed Hasan Hersi Adan Ayrow Barre Adan Shire Hirale Abdi Qeybdid (Galmudug) Adde Musa (Puntland) Meles Zenawi... Camp Le Monier is a United States Marine Corps Base situated in Djibouti and is home to Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA). ... For other uses of the term, see Iraq war (disambiguation) The 2003 invasion of Iraq (also called the 2nd or 3rd Persian Gulf War) began on March 20, 2003, when forces belonging primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom invaded Iraq arguably without the explicit backing of the...


Somalia became the mother of all operations as the Islamic Courts Union (ICU), an Islamist faction campaigning on a restoration of "law and order" through Sharia Law, had rapidly taken control of much of southern Somalia, displacing other militia and the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) of Somalia. On July 1, 2006, a Web-posted message purportedly written by Osama bin Laden urged Somalis to build an Islamic state in the country and warned western states that his al-Qaeda network would fight against them if they intervened there.[18] On December 14, 2006, the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Jendayi Frazer claimed al-Qaeda cell operatives were controlling the Islamic Courts Union, a claim denied by the ICU.[19] Motto: none Anthem: none Capital formerly Mogadishu and Kismayu Largest city n/a Official languages Somali and Arabic Government Sharia Krytocracy  - Executive Chairman Sharif Sheikh Ahmed  - Shura Chairman Hassan Dahir Aweys Civil War Faction Has not declared autonomy or independence   - Established June 6th 2006 in Mogadishu  Area  - Total not finalized... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ... The Transitional Federal Parliament is an interim parliament of Somalia formed in neighbouring Kenya in 2004. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Jendayi Frazer Jendayi E. Frazer is the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs, heading the Bureau of African Affairs. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


After seeing their power limited to the city of Baidoa, the TFG was attacked in a final ICU offensive aimed at destroying it in December 2006. But Ethiopia intervened, defending the TFG and forcing the ICU to retreat. The ICU abandoned conventional warfare, instead opting for guerilla combat, turning the battle to an insurgency as Ethiopia began aiding the TFG restore order. The Prime Minister of Somalia claims that 3 terror suspects from the 1998 Embassy Bombings were in Kismayo.[20] On 30 December 2006, al-Qaeda deputy leader Ayman al-Zawahiri called upon Muslims worldwide to fight against Ethiopia and the TFG in Somalia.[21] The United States carried out several strikes against al-Qaeda targets within Somalia during 2007. Combatants Islamic Courts Union Pro-Islamist Militias Foreign fighters Alleged:  Eritrea Transitional Federal Government Ethiopia[1] Casualties 700 dead or wounded (TFG claim) SomaliNet 400 killed (ICU claim) [1] The Battle of Baidoa began on December 20, 2006 when the Somali Transitional Federal Governments forces (TFG) allied with Ethiopian... In the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings (August 7, 1998), 257 people were killed and over 4,000 wounded in simultaneous car bomb explosions at the United States embassies in the East African capital cities of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ayman Muhammad Rabaie al-Zawahiri (Arabic: ) or closer to the original Arabic pronunciation al-Zawahri (born June 19, 1951) is an extremist Muslim leader and prominent member of al-Qaeda, and was the second and last emir of Egyptian Islamic Jihad, having succeeded Abbud al-Zummar in the latter role...


Trans Sahara

Main article: Islamic insurgency in Algeria (2002-present)
Main article: Operation Enduring Freedom - Trans Sahara

Combatants Algeria  Chad  Niger  France  United States Al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb (previously GSPC) The Islamic insurgency in Algeria (2002-present) is an insurgency waged by the Salafist muslim terrorist Group for Preaching and Combat (which is known today as the Al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb... Combatants United States  Algeria  Chad  Morocco  Niger Mauritania  Mali  Senegal al-Qaeda Strength 480 Americans; 250 Algerians; 200 Chadians; 20 Moroccans; 5 Nigerien; 3 Mauritanians; 1 Malian; 25 Senegalese medical doctors Total:959 troops and 25 medical doctors 2,500 (al-Queda claim) Casualties 1 Nigerian (WIA) and 1 Moroccan...

Europe

Beginning in October 2001, Operation Active Endeavour is a naval operation of NATO started in response to the 9/11 attacks. It operates in the Mediterranean Sea and is designed to prevent the movement of terrorists or weapons of mass destruction as well as to enhance the security of shipping in general. The operation has also assisted Greece with the prevention of illegal immigration. Combatants NATO, represented by Denmark Germany Greece Italy Norway Spain Turkey  Russia  Ukraine  Israel  Egypt Morocco Commanders Vice Admiral Roberto Cesaretti, Italian Navy Strength 480 ships and 84 planes Operation Active Endeavour is a naval operation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... Illegal alien and illegal aliens redirect here. ...


Middle East

US Soldiers patrol the streets of Baghdad.
US Soldiers patrol the streets of Baghdad.

Image File history File links Army. ... Image File history File links Army. ... Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Governorate. ...

Iraq

Main articles: Iraq War and Iraqi insurgency

Iraq had been listed as a State Sponsor of Terror by the United States since 1990,[22] and maintained poor relations with the United States since the Gulf War. Tensions were high throughout the 1990s, with the United States launching Operation Desert Fox against Iraq in 1998 after it failed to meet demands of "unconditional cooperation" in weapons inspections.[23] After the September 11 attacks, the U.S. government claimed that Iraq was a threat to the United States because Iraq could begin to use its alleged Weapons of Mass Destruction to aid terrorist groups.[24] For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Iraqi insurgency denotes groups using armed resistance against the US-led Coalition occupation of Iraq. ... The U.S. list of state sponsors of international terrorism is a list, compiled by the U.S. State Department, of countries that the United States sees as sponsoring terrorism. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States, UK Iraq Commanders General Tony Zinni Saddam Hussien Strength 30,500 unknown Casualties none 600-2,000 dead Operation Desert Fox was the military codename for a major four-day bombing campaign on Iraqi targets from December 16-December 19, 1998 by the United States and United...


The George W. Bush administration called for the United Nations Security Council to send weapons inspectors to Iraq to find and destroy alleged weapons of mass destruction and for a UNSC resolution.[25][26] UNSC Resolution 1441 was passed unanimously, which offered Iraq "a final opportunity to comply with its disarmament obligations" or face "serious consequences." Resolution 1441 did not authorize the use of force by member states, thus Resolution 1441 had no effect on the UN Charter's prohibition on the use of force by member states against fellow member states. Saddam Hussein subsequently allowed UN inspectors to access Iraqi sites, while the U.S. government continued to assert that Iraq was being obstructionist.[27] In October 2002, the United States Congress authorized the president to use force if necessary to disarm Iraq in order to "prosecute the war on terrorism."[28] After failing to overcome opposition from France, Russia, and China against a UNSC resolution that would sanction the use of force against Iraq, and before the UN weapons inspectors had completed their inspections which were deemed to be fruitless by the U.S. because of Iraq's alleged deception, the United States assembled a "Coalition of the Willing" composed of nations who pledged support for a war against Iraq. On March 20th, 2003, the invasion of Iraq was launched in what the Bush Administration said were the "serious consequences" spoken of in UNSC Resolution 1441. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... United Nations Security Council Resolution 1441 is a resolution by the UN Security Council, passed unanimously on November 8, 2002, offering Iraq a final opportunity to comply with its disarmament obligations that had been set out in several previous resolutions (resolution 660, resolution 661, resolution 678, resolution 686, resolution 687... The United Nations Charter is the constitution of the United Nations. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with multinational force in Iraq. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Saddam Hussein's regime was quickly toppled and on May 1, 2003, George W. Bush stated major combat operations in Iraq had ended and claimed victory against it.[29] But the war continued on as an insurgency against the U.S.-led coalition forces and the Iraqi police units and governing structures they installed. Elements of the insurgency are led by Sunni loyalists, who are Iraqi nationalists and pan-Arabists. Some insurgency leaders are Islamists and see themselves as fighting a religious war to liberate Iraq of foreign non-Muslim occupiers and their Iraqi collaborators.[30] Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The Iraqi insurgency denotes groups using armed resistance against the US-led Coalition occupation of Iraq. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ...


Lebanon

Main article: 2006 Lebanon War

In July 2006, following the killing of three Israeli soldiers and the taking prisoner of two more by Hezbollah, Israel invaded southern Lebanon, intent on the destruction of Hezbollah. The conflict lasted over a month and caused the deaths of between 845[31] and 1300[32] Lebanese and 163 Israelis (119 military and 44 civilian) and wounding thousands more Israelis and Lebanese.[33] Both the Lebanese government (including Hezbollah) and the Israeli government have agreed to the terms of the ceasefire agreement created by the United Nations that began at 0500 on August 14, 2006. While the conflict is associated with the longer running Arab-Israeli conflict, prior to the declaration of the ceasefire, Israel stated it was fighting a war against terror,[34] the U.S. government stated the conflict was also a front in the "War on Terror"[35] and President Bush reiterated it in a speech the day the ceasefire came into effect.[36] Combatants Hezbollah Lebanon Amal[2] LCP[3] PFLP-GC[4]  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[11] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701 is a resolution intended to resolve the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel, Palestine and the...

Main article: 2007 Lebanon conflict

In 2007 a conflict began in northern Lebanon after fighting broke out between Fatah al-Islam, an Islamist militant organization, and the Lebanese Armed Forces on May 20, 2007 in Nahr al-Bared, a Palestinian refugee camp near Tripoli. The conflict evolved mostly around the Siege of Nahr el-Bared, but minor clashes had also occurred in the Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon and several terrorist bombings took place in and around Lebanon's capital Beirut. The terrorist group has been described as a militant jihadist[37] movement that draws inspiration from al-Qaeda.[37] The U.S. provided military aid to Lebanon during the conflict. Combatants Lebanese Armed Forces Fatah [1] Fatah al-Islam Jund al-Sham Commanders Michel Sulaiman Shaker al-Abssi Abu Youssef Sharqieh Abu Hureira † Strength 72,100 troops 450 Fatah militants, 50 Jund militants, unknown number of al-Qaeda bombers Casualties Northern casualties: 167 killed, 400-500 wounded Southern casualties: 2... Not to be confused with Fatah or Fatah Revolutionary Council. ... For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Many organizations that are accused of being a terrorist organization deny using terrorism as a military tactic to achieve their goals, and there is no international consensus on the bureaucratic definition of terrorism. ... The military of the Republic of Lebanon is officially known as the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) (Arabic: القوات المسلحة اللبنانية ) and consists of three branches: The Lebanese Army The Lebanese Navy The Lebanese Air Force // The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include; defending Lebanon and its citizens against all aggression, confronting threats against... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Nahr al-Bared, Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... List of Palestinian refugee camps with current population and year they were established: Gaza, 8 camps, 478,854 refugees 1948, Beach camp (Shati), 76,109 1949, Bureij, 30,059 1948, Deir el-Balah, 20,188 1948, Jabalia (Jabalyia, Abalyia), 103,646 1949, Khan Yunis, 60,662 1949, Maghazi, 22,536... This page refers to Tripoli, the city in Lebanon. ... Ain al-Hilweh (variously, Ayn al-Hilweh, Ein al-Hilweh, etc. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Jihad (ǧihād جهاد) is an Arabic word which comes from the Arabic root word jahada, which means exerting utmost effort or to strive. The word connotes a wide range of meanings, from an inward spiritual struggle to attain perfect faith, to holy war. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


Saudi Arabia

One of the Riyadh compounds bombing.

The resistance against Saudi government was started since the bombing in Riyadh on 12 May 2003 by al-Qaeda terrorists. The attacks are targeting the Saudi security forces, the foreign workers, and tourists (mostly Western). The Insurgency in Saudi Arabia is an armed conflict in Saudi Arabia between radical Sunni Muslim fighters, believed to be associated with al-Qaeda, against the Saudi monarchy. ... Image File history File links This picture is from this site, Rewardsforjustice, and is in the public domain. ... Image File history File links This picture is from this site, Rewardsforjustice, and is in the public domain. ... Riyadh (Arabic: ar-Riyāḍ) is the capital and largest city of Saudi Arabia. ... Riyadh (Arabic: ar-Riyāḍ) is the capital and largest city of Saudi Arabia. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ...


Gaza Strip/West Bank

Main article: Fatah-Hamas conflict

The Fatah-Hamas conflict began in 2006 and has continued, in one form or another, into the middle of 2007. The conflict is between the two main Palestinian factions, Fatah and Hamas, with each trying to assume political control of the Palestinian territories. The majority of the fighting is occurring in the Gaza Strip, which was taken over by Hamas in June 2007. Fatah is United States backed and, although Hamas won the first free and democratic elections held in the Palestinian territories, it is considered a terrorist organization by the United States, United Nations and the European Union. Combatants Hamas Fatah Commanders Ismail Haniya Khaled Meshaal Mohammed Deif Mahmoud Abbas Mohammed Dahlan Strength Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades: 15,000 Executive Force: 6,000[1][2] National Security: 30,000 Police and Preventive Security: 30,000 General Intelligence: 5,000 Presidential Guard: 4,200 Al Aqsa Martyrs... Fatah (Arabic: ); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major secular Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a generally secular multi-party confederation. ... Hamas (Arabic: ; acronym: Arabic: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement,[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Muslim militant organization. ... Combatants Hamas Fatah Commanders Ismail Haniya Khaled Meshaal Mohammed Deif Mahmoud Abbas Mohammed Dahlan Strength Izz ad-Din al-Qassam Brigades: 15,000 Executive Force: 6,000[1][2] National Security: 30,000 Police and Preventive Security: 30,000 General Intelligence: 5,000 Presidential Guard: 4,200 Al Aqsa Martyrs... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... This article is about the Palestinian territories as a geopolitical phenomenon. ... June 2007 is the sixth month of that year. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Hamas wins Palestinian election On January 25, 2006, elections were held for the Palestinian Legislative Council (PLC), the legislature of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). ... Many organizations that are accused of being a terrorist organization deny using terrorism as a military tactic to achieve their goals, and there is no international consensus on the bureaucratic definition of terrorism. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ...


Central Asia/South Asia

Republic of India

Naval ships from India, Japan, Australia, U.S. and Singapore during a naval exercise off the Malabar coast. The primary aim of the exercise was to enhance naval surveillance in the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Strait of Malacca.
Naval ships from India, Japan, Australia, U.S. and Singapore during a naval exercise off the Malabar coast. The primary aim of the exercise was to enhance naval surveillance in the Arabian Sea, Indian Ocean and Strait of Malacca.
Main articles: 2001 Indian Parliament attack, Terrorism in India, Terrorism in Kashmir, and 2001-2002 India-Pakistan standoff

India has had to deal with a slow but steady rise in Islamist terrorism over the course of the 1990s and the 21st century. The recent rise in prominence of several terror groups, such as Lashkar-e-Toiba, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Hizbul Mujahideen and others in Kashmir has created grave problems for the country. Major terrorist incidents in India include the 1993 Mumbai bombings, as well as Terrorism in Kashmir such as Wandhama massacre, Kaluchak massacre, Chittisinghpura massacre and others. Terrorist attacks in the rest of the country include the 2001 Indian Parliament attack, Akshardham Temple attack, 29 October 2005 Delhi bombings, 2005 Ram Janmabhoomi attack in Ayodhya, 2005 Jaunpur train bombing, 29 October 2005 Delhi bombings, 11 July 2006 Mumbai train bombings, 2006 Malegaon blasts, 2006 Varanasi bombings, and the 2007 Samjhauta Express bombings. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (3872 × 2592 pixel, file size: 890 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source:[1] Description: USS KITTY HAWK, At sea (Sept. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 536 pixelsFull resolution (3872 × 2592 pixel, file size: 890 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source:[1] Description: USS KITTY HAWK, At sea (Sept. ... [Land of uncivilised] Bekal Fort Beach, Kerala Malabar (Malayalam: മലബാര്‍ ) is a region of southern India, lying between the Western Ghats and the Arabian Sea, and derived from the Malayalam word Mala mean Hill and Persian word Bar means Kingdom, and is same as the word meaning of Malayalam. ... The Arabian Sea (Arabic: بحر العرب; transliterated: Bahr al-Arab) is a region of the Indian Ocean bounded on the east by India, on the north by Pakistan and Iran, on the west by Arabian Peninsula, on the south, approximately, by a line between Cape Guardafui, the north-east point of Somalia... A close-up map showing the Strait of Malacca separating peninsular Malaysia and the Indonesian island of Sumatra. ... The 2001 Indian Parliament attack was a high-profile attack by Pakistan based Kashmiri terrorists against the building housing the Parliament of India in New Delhi. ... Terrorism in India can be attributed to Indias many low intensity conflicts within its borders. ... Kashmir : Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... The 2001-2002 India-Pakistan standoff was a military standoff between India and Pakistan that resulted in the amassing of troops on either side of the International Border (IB) and along the Line of Control (LoC) in the region of Kashmir. ... For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Lashkar-e-Toiba (Urdu: لشكرِ طيبه laÅ¡kar-Ä• ṯaiyyiba, literally The Army of Pure, also transliterated as Lashkar-i-Tayyaba, Lashkar-e-Tayyaba, Lashkar-e-Tayyiba or Lashkar-i-Toiba) is one of the largest and most active Islamic terrorist organizations in South Asia. ... Jaish-e-Mohammed (Arabic:جيش محمد, literally The Army of Muhammad, transliterated as Jaish-e-Muhammed, Jaish-e-Mohammad or Jaish-e-Muhammad, often abbreviated as JEM) is a major Islamic militant organization in South Asia. ... The Hizbul Mujahideen (حزب المجاھدین) (created 1989) is a militant group active in Kashmir. ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... The 1993 Mumbai bombings were a series of 15 bomb explosions that took place in Mumbai (Bombay), India on March 12, 1993. ... Kashmir : Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... The Hindu temple in Wandhama after it was desecrated and destroyed by the terorists . ... The Kaluchak Massacre refers to an incident on May 14, 2002 near the town of Kaluchak in the Indian state of Jammu when three terrorists attacked a tourist bus from the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. ... The Chittisinghpura massacre refers to the murder of 35 adherents of the religion of Sikhism (called Sikhs) by the Islamic Fundamentalist militant group Lashkar-e-Toiba on March,2000. ... The 2001 Indian Parliament attack was a high-profile attack by Pakistan based Kashmiri terrorists against the building housing the Parliament of India in New Delhi. ... The Akshardham Temple attack (or Akshardham Temple siege) occurred on September 24, 2002 when two heavily armed Muslim terrorists arrived at the Akshardham in Gandhinagar, the capital of Western Gujarat state in India at around 1630 hrs local time. ... India map showing Delhi The 29 October 2005 Delhi bombings occurred on October 29, 2005 in the Indian city of Delhi, killing 59 people and injuring at least 200 others [1] in three explosions. ... On July 5, 2005, five suspected Islamist militants attacked the site of the destroyed Babri Mosque and the Ram Janmabhoomi, in Ayodhya, India. ... The Jaunpur train bombing occurred on July 28, 2005, when an explosion destroyed a carriage of an express train near the town of Jaunpur in Uttar Pradesh. ... India map showing Delhi The 29 October 2005 Delhi bombings occurred on October 29, 2005 in the Indian city of Delhi, killing 59 people and injuring at least 200 others [1] in three explosions. ... Map showing the Western line and blast locations. ... The 2006 Malegaon bombings were a series of bomb blasts that took place on 8 September in Malegaon, a town in the Nashik district of the Indian state of Maharashtra, located at some 290 km to the northeast of state capital Mumbai. ... Location of Varanasi in India Map of blast locations The 7 March 2006 Varanasi bombings were a series of bombings that occured across the Hindu holy city of Varanasi in India on 7 March 2006. ... The Samjhauta Express bombings were terrorist attacks that occurred just before midnight and into the early hours of February 19, 2007, on the Samjhauta Express, a twice-weekly train service connecting Delhi, India, and Lahore, Pakistan. ...


The international terrorist network al-Qaeda also lends ideological and financial support to terrorism in Kashmir, with Osama bin Laden and his co-ideologues in the militant Islamist press in Pakistan[38] constantly demanding that jihad be waged against India.[39] and Islamic fundamentalist propaganda groups disseminating propaganda in many countries against India with rhetoric like "idol worshippers and Hindus" who "occupy Kashmir".[40] Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ... Islamic fundamentalism is a term used to describe religious ideologies seen as advocating literalistic interpretations of the texts of Islam and of Sharia law. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


The Indian Government and Military of India have taken numerous counter-terrorist measures to combat rising terrorism in the country.[41][42] Some of these measures stand criticized by human rights groups as being too draconian, particularly in Kashmir. Similar allegations are levelled on the militants as well.[43] In the aftermath of the 2001 Indian Parliament attack, massive troop buildups occurred in the Kashmir region by both India and Pakistan and fire was exchanged. This incident is called the 2001-2002 India-Pakistan standoff. On January 12, 2002, Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf gave a speech intended to reduce tensions with India. He declared the Pakistan would combat extremism on its own soil, but said that Pakistan had a right to Kashmir.[44] Indian leaders reacted with skepticism. Minister of State for External Affairs Omar Abdullah said that the speech was nothing new, and others said that it would 'not make any change in the Indian stand'.[45] Still, tensions eased somewhat. The Indian President told his generals that there’d be no attack “for now.”[46] The military of India, officially known as the Indian armed forces, is the primary military organisation responsible for the territorial security and defense of India. ... The 2001 Indian Parliament attack was a high-profile attack by Pakistan based Kashmiri terrorists against the building housing the Parliament of India in New Delhi. ... The 2001-2002 India-Pakistan standoff was a military standoff between India and Pakistan that resulted in the amassing of troops on either side of the International Border (IB) and along the Line of Control (LoC) in the region of Kashmir. ... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ) (born August 11, 1943) is President of Pakistan and the Chief of Army Staff of the Pakistan Army who came to power in wake of a coup detat. ...


It should also be noted that India has been a target of Islamic terrorism for a much longer period of time than the western world and India's war against terrorism precedes the American war on terrorism. This article contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... The term Western world, the West or the Occident (Latin occidens -sunset, -west, as distinct from the Orient) [1] can have multiple meanings dependent on its context (e. ...


Afghanistan

Main article: War in Afghanistan (2001–present)
Soldiers in south-eastern Afghanistan check their coordinates during a combat patrol.

In October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, NATO invaded the country of Afghanistan to remove al-Qaeda forces and oust the Taliban regime which had control of the country. After the initial attack, the Taliban's conventional force dissolved and the war turned into an insurgency. Combatants Taliban al-Qaeda IMU Hezbi Islami United States ISAF Afghanistan Northern Alliance Commanders Mohammed Omar Obaidullah Akhund # Mullah Dadullah  Jalaluddin Haqqani Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Mohammad Atef  Juma Namangani  Tohir Yo‘ldosh Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Bismillah Khan Mohammed Fahim Abdul Rashid Dostum Dan McNeill Guy Laroche Ton van... Image File history File links Army. ... Image File history File links Army. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... This article is about the military alliance. ... The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1995 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the United States, United Kingdom and the Northern Alliance. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


Pakistan

Main articles: War on Terrorism in Pakistan and Waziristan War

Pakistan has been a site of many high profile arrests in the War on Terrorism, including Khalid Shaikh Mohammed in 2003. In 2004 they launched an offensive into the Federally Administered Tribal Areas region of Waziristan. The goal of the conflict was to remove the al-Qaeda and Taliban forces in the region. After the fall of the Taliban regime many members of the Taliban resistance fled to the Northern border region of Afghanistan and the tribal regions of northwest Pakistan where the Pakistani army previously had little control. With logistics and air support from the United States, the Pakistani Army captured or killed numerous al-Qaeda operatives. Pakistan has lost over 3000 of its soldiers since 2001 fighting, Taliban, al-Qaeda, and Waziri Terrorists. The Saudi born Zayn al-Abidn Muhammed Hasayn Abu Zubaydah was arrested by Pakistani officials during a series of joint U.S. and Pakistan raids during the week of March 23, 2002. ... Combatants Pakistan, USA Waziristan tribesmen, al-Qaeda members Commanders Pervez Musharraf Ayman al-Zawahiri (probable) Strength 15,000? 8000-20,000? Casualties 500 Pakistanis, 50 Americans 2000 confirmed The Waziristan War (2004-present) is an ongoing armed conflict that began in 2004 when the Pakistani Army began its search for... Khalid Sheikh Mohammed: Prosecution Exhibit from the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (Arabic: خالد شيخ محمد; also transliterated as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, , commonly referred to as KSM and also known by as many as twenty-seven aliases[1] (b. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) are areas of Pakistan outside the four provinces, comprising a region of some 27,220 km² (10,507 mi²). // The FATA are bordered by: Afghanistan to the west with the border marked by the Durand Line, the North-West Frontier Province and the Punjab... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Southeast Asia

Indonesia

In 2002 and again in 2005, the Indonesian island of Bali has been struck by suicide and car bombings that killed over 200 people and injured over 300. The 2002 attack consisted of a bomb hidden in a backpack exploding inside of "Paddy's Bar," a remote controlled car bomb exploding in front of the "Sari Club" and a third explosion in front of the American consulate in Bali. The 2005 attack consisted of 2 suicide bombings, the first near a food court in Jimbaran, the second in the main square of Kuta. The group Jemaah Islamiyah is suspected by Indonesian authorities of carrying out both attacks. The 2002 Bali bombing occurred on October 12, 2002 in the tourist district of Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali. ... The Jakarta embassy bombing took place on September 9, 2004 in Jakarta, Indonesia. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Explosions hit Bali Map showing Bali within Indonesia A series of explosions occurred on October 1, 2005 in Bali, Indonesia. ... This article is about the Indonesian island. ... Restaurants on the beach near Jimbaran Jimbaran is a fishing village and tourist resort in Bali, Indonesia. ... Kuta Beach Kuta Beach Kuta Beach Street Kuta is a town in southern Bali, Indonesia. ...


On September 9, 2004, a car bomb exploded outside of the Australian embassy in Jakarta, killing 10 Indonesians and injuring over 140 others; despite conflicting initial reports there were no Australian casualties.[47] Foreign Minister Alexander Downer reported that a mobile phone text message was sent to Indonesian authorities before the bombing warning of attacks if Abu Bakar Bashir was not released from prison.[48] Abu Bakar Ba'asyir was imprisoned on charged of treason for his support of the 2002 and 2005 Bali bombings.[49] Currently Jemaah Islamiyah is suspected of carrying out the attacks and Noordin Mohammed Top is a prime suspect. Top is a bomb maker and explosions expert for Jemaah Islamiyah.[50] is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jakarta (also DKI Jakarta), formerly known as Sunda Kalapa, Jayakarta, Batavia and Djakarta is the capital and largest city of Indonesia. ... Alexander John Gosse Downer, MP (born 9 September 1951), Australian politician, became Foreign Minister of Australia in March 1996 This makes him the longest serving Foreign Minister in Australian history. ... A received SMS being announced on a Nokia phone. ... Abu Bakar Bashir Abu Bakar Bashir (also Abubakar Baasyir, Abdus Somad, and Ustad Abu (Teacher Abu) (born August 17, 1938) is an Indonesian Muslim cleric and leader of the Indonesian Mujahedeen Council (MMI). ... For other uses, see Treason (disambiguation) or Traitor (disambiguation). ...


Philippines

Main article: Operation Enduring Freedom - Philippines

In January 2002 the United States Special Operations Command, Pacific deployed to the Philippines to advise and assist the Armed Forces of the Philippines in combating terrorism. The operations were mainly focused on removing the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) from their stronghold on the island of Basilan. The United States military has reported that they have removed over 80% of the Abu Sayyaf Group members from the region. The second portion of the operation was conducted as a humanitarian program called "Operation Smiles." The goal of the program was to provide medical care and services to the region of Basilan to prevent the ability for members of the terrorist groups to reestablish themselves. Combatants Philippines United States al-Qaeda, Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf, New Peoples Army (alleged collaboration) Commanders Hermogenes Esperon Jr. ... Emblem of the United States Special Operations Command. ... Seal of the Philippine Army Seal of the Philippine Navy Seal of the Philippine Air Force Seal of the Philippine Marine Corps The Armed Forces of the Philippines or AFP (Filipino: Sandatahang Lakas ng Pilipinas) originated in the establishment of the Philippine Scouts in 1901. ... The Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), or simply Abu Sayyaf, also known as Al Harakat Al Islamiyya, is a separatist group of islamist terrorists based in and around the southern islands of the Philippines, primarily Jolo, Basilan, and Mindanao. ... Jemaah Islamiyah[1] (JI, Arabic phrase meaning Islamic Group or Islamic Community) is a Southeast Asian militant Islamic organization dedicated to the establishment of a Daulah Islamiyah[2] (Islamic State) in Southeast Asia incorporating Indonesia, Malaysia, the southern Philippines, Singapore and Brunei[3]. JI was added to the United Nations... Basilan is an island province of the Philippines located in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). ...


North America

United States of America

Smoke billows from the Pentagon after a highjacked commercial jetliner crashed into the building September 11, 2001.
Smoke billows from the Pentagon after a highjacked commercial jetliner crashed into the building September 11, 2001.

On September 18, 2001, the 107th United States Congress passed the "Authorization for Use of Military Force" (Public law 107-40), which states "That the President is authorized to use all necessary and appropriate force against those nations, organizations, or persons he determines planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001 [...]" This is the authorization for the War in Afghanistan, and has also been used as justification for other operations, domestic and international. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Soon after the attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States Government began detaining people who fit the profile of the suspected hijackers: mostly male, Arabic or Muslim noncitizens. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1910 × 1276 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) WASHINGTON -- Smoke billows from the Pentagon after a highjacked commercial jetliner crashed into the building Sept 11, 2001. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1910 × 1276 pixel, file size: 244 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) WASHINGTON -- Smoke billows from the Pentagon after a highjacked commercial jetliner crashed into the building Sept 11, 2001. ... Look up pentagon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... 2001-2003 The first session of this Congress took place in Washington, DC from January 3, 2001 to December 20, 2001 The second session took place in Washington, DC from January 23, 2002 to November 22, 2002 President George W. Bush addressing a joint session of Congress, regarding the September... The Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public law 107-40) was a joint resolution passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 2001, authorizing the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the attacks on September 11, 2001. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Taliban al-Qaeda IMU Hezbi Islami United States ISAF Afghanistan Northern Alliance Commanders Mohammed Omar Obaidullah Akhund # Mullah Dadullah  Jalaluddin Haqqani Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Mohammad Atef  Juma Namangani  Tohir Yo‘ldosh Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Bismillah Khan Mohammed Fahim Abdul Rashid Dostum Dan McNeill Guy Laroche Ton van...


A $40 billion emergency spending bill, and an additional $20 billion bail-out of the airline industry were also passed. An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ...


Investigations were started through many branches of both federal and state governments, pursuing tens of thousands of tips. Thousands of people have been detained, arrested, or questioned.


The Justice Department launched a Special Registration procedure for certain male non-citizens in the U.S., requiring them to register in person at offices of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ... The National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS, INS Special Registration) is a system for registration of certain non-citizens within the United States, initiated in September 2002 as part of the War on Terrorism. ...


Several laws were passed to increase the investigative powers of law enforcement agencies in the United States, notably the USA PATRIOT Act. Many civil liberties groups have alleged that these laws remove important restrictions on governmental authority, and are a dangerous encroachment on civil liberties, possible unconstitutional violations of the Fourth Amendment. No official legal challenges have been started as of 2004, but governing bodies in a number of communities have passed symbolic resolutions against the act. The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law on October... Constitutionality is the status of a law, a procedure, or an acts accordance with the laws or guidelines set forth in the applicable constitution. ... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a speech on June 9, 2005, Bush said that the USA PATRIOT Act had been used to bring charges against more than 400 suspects, more than half of whom had been convicted. Meanwhile the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) quoted Justice Department figures showing that 7,000 people have complained of abuse of the Act. The ACLU also maintains that many others do not know they have been subjected to a search because the law requires that searches be kept secret. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.[1] It works through litigation, legislation, and community...


DARPA began an initiative in early 2002 with the creation of the Total Information Awareness program, designed to promote information technologies that could be used in counterterrorism. This program, facing criticism, has since been defunded by Congress. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. ... The Information Awareness Office (IAO) was established by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the research and development agency of the United States Department of Defense, in January 2002 to bring together several DARPA projects focused on applying information technology to counter transnational threats to national security. ...


Various government bureaucracies which handled security and military functions were reorganized. Most notably, the Department of Homeland Security was created to coordinate "homeland security" efforts in the largest reorganization of the U.S. federal government since the consolidation of the armed forces into the Department of Defense. The Office of Strategic Influence was secretly created after 9/11 for the purpose of coordinating propaganda efforts, but was closed soon after being discovered. The Bush administration implemented the Continuity of Operations Plan (or Continuity of Government) to ensure that U.S. government would be able to continue in catastrophic circumstances. The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... The Office of Strategic Influence, or OSI, was a department created by the United States Department of Defense on October 30, 2001, to support the War on Terrorism through psychological operations in targeted countries. ... The U.S. Government has for some time had Continuity of Operations Plans (or Continuity of Government) plans. ...


Recently the House of Representatives passed a bill enacting many of the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission, something the Democrats campaigned on as part of their "100-Hour Plan". The bill passed in the House 299-128 and is currently still being considered in the U.S. Senate. So far funding has not been appropriated for the enactments.[51] The 100-Hour Plan is a United States Democratic Party political strategy detailing the actions the party will pursue upon assuming leadership of the 110th Congress on January 4, 2007. ...


Role of U.S. media

Researchers in the area of communication studies and political science have found that American understanding of the War on Terror is directly shaped by how the mainstream news media reports events associated with the War on Terror. In Bush’s War: Media Bias and Justifications for War in a Terrorist Age[52] political communication researcher Jim A. Kuypers illustrated “how the press failed America in its coverage on the War on Terror”. In each comparison, Kuypers “detected massive bias on the part of the press.” This researcher called the mainstream news media an “anti-democratic institution” in his conclusion. “What has essentially happened since 9/11 has been that Bush has repeated the same themes, and framed those themes the same whenever discussing the War on Terror,” said Kuypers. “Immediately following 9/11, the mainstream news media (represented by CBS, ABC, NBC, USA Today, New York Times, and Washington Post) did echo Bush, but within eight weeks it began to intentionally ignore certain information the president was sharing, and instead reframed the president's themes or intentionally introduced new material to shift the focus.” To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... The media of the United States of amrica consist of several different types of communications media: television, radio, cinema, newspapers, magazines, and Internet-based Web sites. ... Jim A. Kuypers is an American Academic specializing in communication studies at Virginia Tech. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... This article is about the television network. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


This goes beyond reporting alternate points of view, which is an important function of the press. “In short,” Kuypers explained, “if someone were relying only on the mainstream media for information, they would have no idea what the president actually said. It was as if the press were reporting on a different speech.” The study is essentially a “comparative framing analysis”. Overall, Kuypers examined themes about 9/11 and the War on Terror that the President used, and compared them to the themes that the press used when reporting on what the president said. Journalism ethics and standards include principles of ethics and of good practice to address the specific challenges faced by professional journalists. ... In media studies, sociology and psychology, framing is a process of selective control over the individuals perception of the meanings attributed to words or phrases. ...


“Framing is a process whereby communicators, consciously or unconsciously, act to construct a point of view that encourages the facts of a given situation to be interpreted by others in a particular manner,” wrote Kuypers. These findings suggest that the public is misinformed about government justification and plans concerning the War on Terror. Perspective in theory of cognition is the choice of a context or a reference (or the result of this choice) from which to sense, categorize, measure or codify experience, cohesively forming a coherent belief, typically for comparing with another. ...


Others have also suggested that press coverage has contributed to a public confused and misinformed on both the nature and level of the threat to the U.S. posed by terrorism. In his book, Trapped in the War on Terror[53] political scientist Ian S. Lustick claimed, “The media have given constant attention to possible terrorist-initiated catastrophes and to the failures and weaknesses of the government's response.” Lustick alleged that the War on Terror is disconnected from the real but remote threat terrorism poses, and that the generalized War on Terror began as part of the justification for invading Iraq, but then took on a life of its own, fueled by media coverage. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...


Media researcher Stephen D. Cooper’s analysis of media criticism Watching the Watchdog: Bloggers As the Fifth Estate[54] contains many examples of controversies concerning mainstream reporting of the War on Terror. Cooper found that bloggers’ criticisms of factual inaccuracies in news stories or bloggers’ discovery of the mainstream press’s failure to adequately check facts before publication caused many news organizations to retrack or change news stories. Media Studies is the academic study of the constitution and effects of media. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A fact checker is a person whose job consists of checking factual assertions made in news copy to determine whether they are correct. ... A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ...


Cooper found that bloggers specializing in criticism of media coverage advanced four key points:

  • Mainstream reporting of the War on Terror has frequently contained factual inaccuracies. In some cases, the errors go uncorrected; moreover, when corrections are issued they usually are given far less prominence than the initial coverage containing the errors.
  • The mainstream press has sometimes failed to check the sources of information or visual images supplied by Iraqistringers” (local Iraqis hired to relay local news).
  • Story framing is often problematic; in particular, “man-in-the-street” interviews have often been used as a representation of public sentiment in Iraq, in place of methodologically sound survey data.
  • Mainstream reporting has tended to concentrate on the more violent areas of Iraq, with little or no reporting of the calm areas.
See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq media coverage

Stringer can have different meanings, including: In journalism, a stringer is a freelance journalist, who is paid for each piece of published or broadcast work, rather than receiving a regular salary. ... In journalism, local news refers to news coverage of events in a local context which would not normally be of interest to those of other localities, or otherwise be of national or international scope. ... Jericho, see Vox Populi (Jericho episode). ... Jericho, see Vox Populi (Jericho episode). ... There are several uses of the word survey, relating to two primary meanings: land surveying; and statistical surveys of people or other items, such as animals, organisations, or messages. ... The 2003 invasion of Iraq involved unprecedented media coverage. ...

International military support

The multinational Combined Task Force 150 was established to pursue the war on terrorism. Countries contributing to CTF-150 have included Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Pakistan, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States.
The multinational Combined Task Force 150 was established to pursue the war on terrorism. Countries contributing to CTF-150 have included Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Pakistan, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States.
Main article: Operation Enduring Freedom - Afghanistan: Allies

The first wave of attacks were carried out solely by American and British forces. Since the initial invasion period, these forces were augmented by troops and aircraft from Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand and Norway amongst others. In 2006, there were about 33,000 troops in Afghanistan. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3000x1387, 2991 KB) Ships assigned to Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) assemble in a formation for a photo exercise. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3000x1387, 2991 KB) Ships assigned to Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) assemble in a formation for a photo exercise. ... Ships assigned to Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) assemble in a formation in the Gulf of Oman, May 06, 2004 Combined Task Force 150 (CTF-150) is a multinational coalition naval task force with logistics facilities at Djibouti. ... Ships assigned to Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) assemble in a formation in the Gulf of Oman, May 06, 2004 Combined Task Force 150 (CTF-150) is a multinational coalition naval task force with logistics facilities at Djibouti. ... // In January 2006, NATO’s focus in southern Afghanistan was to form Provincial Reconstruction Teams with the British leading in Helmand Province and the Netherlands and Canada would lead similar deployments in Orūzgān Province and Kandahar Province respectively. ... Spc. ...


On September 12, 2001, less than 24 hours after the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, NATO invoked Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty and declared the attacks to be an attack against all 19 NATO member countries. Australian Prime Minister John Howard also declared that Australia would invoke the ANZUS Treaty along similar lines. is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the military alliance. ... The North Atlantic Treaty is the treaty that brought NATO into existence, signed in Washington, DC on April 4, 1949. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the 25th Prime Minister of Australia. ... The Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty (ANZUS or ANZUS Treaty) is the military alliance which binds Australia and New Zealand and, separately, Australia and the United States to cooperate on defence matters in the Pacific Ocean area, though today the treaty is understood to relate to attacks in...


In the following months, NATO took a wide range of measures to respond to the threat of terrorism. On November 22, 2002, the member states of the EAPC decided on a Partnership Action Plan against Terrorism which explicitly states that "EAPC States are committed to the protection and promotion of fundamental freedoms and human rights, as well as the rule of law, in combating terrorism."[55] NATO started naval operations in the Mediterranean Sea designed to prevent the movement of terrorists or weapons of mass destruction as well as to enhance the security of shipping in general called Operation Active Endeavour. is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC) is a NATO organization, a multilateral forum created to improve relations between NATO and non-NATO countries in Europe and those parts of Asia on the European periphery. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ... For the Xzibit album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ... Damaged package The Panama canal. ... Combatants NATO, represented by Denmark Germany Greece Italy Norway Spain Turkey  Russia  Ukraine  Israel  Egypt Morocco Commanders Vice Admiral Roberto Cesaretti, Italian Navy Strength 480 ships and 84 planes Operation Active Endeavour is a naval operation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ...


The invasion of Afghanistan is seen as the first action of this war, and initially involved forces from the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Afghan Northern Alliance. The Northern Alliance is a term used by the western media, Taliban and Al Qaida to identify the military coalition of various Afghan groups fighting the Taliban. ...


Support for the United States cooled when America made clear its determination to invade Iraq in late 2002. Even so, many of the "coalition of the willing" countries that unconditionally supported the U.S.-led military action have sent troops to Afghanistan, particular neighbouring Pakistan, which has disowned its earlier support for the Taliban and contributed tens of thousands of soldiers to the conflict. Pakistan was also engaged in the Waziristan War. Supported by U.S. intelligence, Pakistan was attempting to remove the Taliban insurgency and al-Qaeda element from the northern tribal areas.[56] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with multinational force in Iraq. ... Combatants Pakistan, USA Waziristan tribesmen, al-Qaeda members Commanders Pervez Musharraf Ayman al-Zawahiri (probable) Strength 15,000? 8000-20,000? Casualties 500 Pakistanis, 50 Americans 2000 confirmed The Waziristan War (2004-present) is an ongoing armed conflict that began in 2004 when the Pakistani Army began its search for...


The International Security Assistance Force

December 2001 saw the creation of the NATO led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to assist the Afghan Transitional Administration and the first post-Taliban elected government. With a renewed Taliban insurgency, it was announced in 2006 that ISAF would replace the U.S troops in the province as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. The British 16th Air Assault Brigade (latter reinforced by Royal Marines) formed the core of the force in Southern Afghanistan, along with troops and helicopters from Australia, Canada and the Netherlands. The initial force consisted of roughly 3,300 British, 2,000 Canadian, 1,400 from the Netherlands and 240 from Australia, along with special forces from Denmark and Estonia (and small contingents from other nations).[57][58][59][60] Logo of ISAF. Pashto writing: کمک و همکاری (Komak wa Hamkari) means Help and Cooperation. International Security Assistance Force (10) (ISAF) is the name of a NATO-led security and development mission in Afghanistan which was established by the United Nations Security Council on 20 December 2001[1] and consists of about 35... Logo of ISAF. Pashto writing: کمک و همکاری (Komak wa Hamkari) means Help and Cooperation. International Security Assistance Force (10) (ISAF) is the name of a NATO-led security and development mission in Afghanistan which was established by the United Nations Security Council on 20 December 2001[1] and consists of about 35... Elections were held on 9th October 2004, to decide upon a leader of the new government. ... The 16 Air Assault Brigade (16 AAB) is a unit of the British Army. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ...


Criticism of the War on Terror

Main article: Criticism of the War on Terror
Extrajudicial detention of captives in Guantanamo Bay.
Extrajudicial detention of captives in Guantanamo Bay.
U.S. Army Private Lynndie England holding a leash attached to a prisoner collapsed on the floor in the Abu Ghraib prison
U.S. Army Private Lynndie England holding a leash attached to a prisoner collapsed on the floor in the Abu Ghraib prison

Both the phrase “War on Terrorism” and the policies it denotes have been a source of ongoing controversy, as critics argue it has been used to justify unilateral preemptive war, perpetual war, human rights abuses, and other violations of international law[1][2][3]. Opponents have also heavily criticized the Iraq War, and USA PATRIOT Act. Criticism of the War on Terrorism addresses the issues, morals, ethics, efficiency, economics, and other questions surrounding the War on Terrorism. Arguments are also made against the phrase itself, calling it a misnomer. Criticism of the War on Terror (also named the War on Terrorism) addresses the issues, morals, ethics, efficiency, economics, and other questions surrounding the War on Terror. ... Download high resolution version (704x704, 88 KB)Detainees at Camp X-Ray Original caption: Detainees in orange jumpsuits sit in a holding area under the watchful eyes of Military Police at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. ... Download high resolution version (704x704, 88 KB)Detainees at Camp X-Ray Original caption: Detainees in orange jumpsuits sit in a holding area under the watchful eyes of Military Police at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during in-processing to the temporary detention facility on Jan. ... Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism Wikisource has original text related to this article: Statement of Alberto J Mora on interrogation abuse, July 7, 2004 Guantanamo... This image is in the public domain because it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image is in the public domain because it is ineligible for copyright. ... Lynndie Rana England (born November 8, 1982) is a former United States Army reservist who served in the 372nd Military Police Company. ... Abu Ghraib cell block The Abu Ghraib prison (Arabic: سجن أبو غريب; also Abu Ghurayb) is in Abu Ghraib, an Iraqi city 32 km (20 mi) west of Baghdad. ... Preemptive war (or preemptive attack) is waged in an attempt to repel or defeat a perceived imminent offensive or invasion, or to gain a strategic advantage in an impending (allegedly unavoidable) war. ... Perpetual war is a war with no clear ending conditions. ... A human rights abuse is abuse of people in a way that violates any fundamental human rights. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law on October...


The notion of a "war" against "terrorism" has proven highly contentious, with critics charging that it has been exploited by participating governments to pursue long-standing policy objectives, reduce civil liberties, and infringe upon human rights. Some argue that the term war is not appropriate in this context (as in War on Drugs), since they believe there is no tangible enemy, and that it is unlikely international terrorism can be brought to an end by means of war[61]. Others note that "terrorism" is not an enemy, but a tactic; calling it a "war on terror," obscures differences between conflicts. For example, anti-occupation insurgents and international jihadists. Some have also alleged that the tactics used are counterproductive to the goals. The U.S. media has also received criticism for its coverage of the War on Terrorism. The Bush administration's use of the War on Terrorism to justify the invasion of Iraq has been particularly controversial, as the link asserted between al-Qaeda and Saddam Hussein was disproved[62], even by Bin Laden himself[63]. In 2007, Presidential-hopeful, John Edwards, called the War on Terror a "bumper sticker, not a plan"[64]. For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Massive mark-ups for drugs, areas/drugs/index. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... The name bin Laden may refer to: the bin Laden family Osama bin Laden This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards[1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ...


Decreasing international support

In 2002, strong majorities supported the U.S.-led War on Terrorism in Britain, France, Germany, Japan, India, and Russia. By 2006, supporters of the effort were in the minority in Britain (49%), France (43%), Germany (47%), and Japan (26%). Although a majority of Russians still supported the War on Terrorism, that majority had decreased by 21%. Whereas 63% of the Spanish population supported the War on Terrorism in 2003, only 19% of the population indicated support in 2006. 19% of the Chinese population supports the War on Terrorism, and less than a fifth of the populations of Turkey, Egypt, and Jordan support the effort. However, a major exception is India, where the support for the War on Terrorism has been stable.[65] Andrew Kohut, speaking to the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, noted that, according to the Pew Center polls conducted in 2004, "majorities or pluralities in seven of the nine countries surveyed said the U.S.-led war on terrorism was not really a sincere effort to reduce international terrorism. This was true not only in Muslim countries such as Morocco and Turkey, but in France and Germany as well. The true purpose of the war on terrorism, according to these skeptics, is U.S. control of Middle East oil and U.S. domination of the world."[66] The U.S. House Committee on International Relations (also known as the House International Relations Committee, the House Foreign Relations Committee or the House Foreign Affairs Committee), is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives which is in charge of bills and investigations related to the foreign... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Military decorations

Since 2002, the United States military, has created several military awards and decorations related to the War on Terrorism including: The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ...

The U.S. Department of Transportation created two awards related to the War on Terrorism which are authorized to be worn on U.S. military uniforms: The Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (GWOTEM) is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ... Afghanistan Campaign Medal obverse (left) and reverse (right). ... The Iraq Campaign Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by Executive Order of President George W. Bush on May 28, 2004. ... The Global War on Terrorism Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States military which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ... The United States Department of Transportation (DOT) is a Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with transport. ...

  • 9-11 Medal
  • 9-11 Ribbon

NATO has also created military decorations related to the War on Terrorism: The 9-11 Medal is a special decoration of the Department of Transportation which was first created in 2002. ... The 9-11 Ribbon is a military decoration of the Department of Transportation that was issued to both civilians and military personnel who, through service with the United States Department of Transportation, contributed to the recovery of the September 11, 2001 attacks against the United States of America. ... This article is about the military alliance. ...

NATO Medals for Yugoslavia and Kosovo The NATO Medal is an international military decoration which is awarded to various militaries of the world under the authority of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ... ISAF can stand for: International Sailing Federation International Security Assistance Force This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... NATO Medals for Yugoslavia and Kosovo The NATO Medal is an international military decoration which is awarded to various militaries of the world under the authority of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. ...

Casualties

Main article: War on Terror casualties

The following is a summary of War on Terror casualties: // Military casualties only United States: 4,280 killed, 4 POW/MIA, 11 ex-POW/MIA[1][2] United Kingdom: 253 killed, 25 ex-POW/MIA[1][2] Canada: 71 killed[2] Other Coalition forces: 237 killed, 1 ex-POW/MIA...

Further reading

Brian Michael Jenkins is one of the world’s foremost authorities on terrorism and is considered by many to be the father of terrorism research in the United States. ... Unconquerable Nation: Knowing Our Enemy, Strengthening Ourselves (ISBN 0833038931) is a book written by Brian Michael Jenkins, one of the world’s foremost authorities on terrorism. ... Alternate meanings: See RAND (disambiguation) The RAND Corporation is an American think tank first formed to offer research and analysis to the U.S. military. ... Richard A. Clarke (born 1951) provided national security advice to four U.S. presidents: Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, consulting on issues of intelligence and terrorism, from 1973 to 2003. ... Michael F. Scheuer is a 22-year CIA veteran. ... Michelle Malkin (née Maglalang) (born October 20, 1970) is an American columnist, blogger, author and political commentator. ... Steven Emerson is an American investigative journalist specializing in national security, terrorism, and Islamic extremism. ... The Emerging System of International Criminal Law: Developments in Codification and Implementation by Lyal S Sunga Sponsored Links International Law Most comprehensive, authoritative resource of international law info www. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hans Köchler (born October 18, 1948 in Schwaz, Tyrol, Austria) is Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. ... Hans Köchler (born October 18, 1948 in Schwaz, Tyrol, Austria) is Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. ... Hans Köchler (born October 18, 1948 in Schwaz, Tyrol, Austria) is Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. ... Hans Köchler (born October 18, 1948 in Schwaz, Tyrol, Austria) is Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Innsbruck, Austria. ... For people named Robert Fiske, see Robert Fiske (disambiguation). ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Mohsin Hamid (born 1971) is a Pakistani author. ... The Reluctant Fundamentalist is a novel by Mohsin Hamid that was published in 2007 by Hamish Hamilton in the UK, Harcourt in the US, and worldwide in 16 languages. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "War on terror 'curbing human rights'", BBC News, 01-16-2002.
  2. ^ a b "Civil Rights and the "War on Terror"", Amnesty International USA.
  3. ^ a b "Preemptive War and International Law", Center for Defense Information, 12-05-2003.
  4. ^ John F. Harris and Brian Faler. Talking Iraq: Some Things Are Better Left Unsaid. The Washington Post, www.washingtonpost.com (June 20, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  5. ^ For example, New York Times, April 2, 1881.
  6. ^ The Four Waves of Rebel Terror and September 11. Department of Political Science University of California at Los Angeles (Summer 2004). Retrieved on 2006-08-09.
  7. ^ "War on Terrorism", Aljazeera.Com, 2003-01-01. 
  8. ^ "Report of the Accountability Review Boards", U.S. Department of State, 1998-08-07. 
  9. ^ "U.S. strikes terrorist targets in Afghanistan, Sudan", CNN, 1998-08-20. 
  10. ^ "U.S. retaliates for Africa bombings", CNN, 08.20.98. 
  11. ^ "U.S. sailors killed in attack on Navy vessel in Yemen", CNN, 2000-10-12. 
  12. ^ "What proof of bin Laden's involvement", CNN, 2001-09-13. 
  13. ^ "Fact Sheet on Terrorist Financing Executive Order", White House, 09-14-2001.
  14. ^ a b Counter-Terrorism Committee, United Nations Security Council, 09-29-31-2007.
  15. ^ "Operation Active Endeavour", Allied Joint Force Command Naples, NATO.
  16. ^ Corrado Maria Daclon, US elections and war on terrorism, Analisi Difesa, 2004, n. 50
  17. ^ CRS Report for CongressPDF
  18. ^ Bin Laden releases Web message on Iraq, Somalia USA Today
  19. ^ U.S. says al Qaeda behind Somali Islamists Reuters
  20. ^ "Militia under siege for shelter of terror suspects", Guardian Unlimited, 01-01-2007.
  21. ^ Somali, Ethiopian troops take Islamist stronghold CNN
  22. ^ "Iraq accuses U.S., Turkey of 'illegally' meeting with Kurds", CNN, 2000-03-09. 
  23. ^ "Clinton: Iraq has abused its final chance", CNN, 1998-12-16. 
  24. ^ Wright, Steven. The United States and Persian Gulf Security: The Foundations of the War on Terror, Ithaca Press, 2007 ISBN 978-0863723216
  25. ^ "Iraq weighs U.N. resolution", CNN, 2002-11-09. 
  26. ^ "Bush's remarks after U.N. passes Iraq resolution", CNN, 2002-11-08. 
  27. ^ "The Second U.N. Resolution", The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, 02-24-2003.
  28. ^ "Joint Resolution to Authorize the Use of United States Armed Forces Against Iraq", White House, 2002-10-02. 
  29. ^ "President Bush Announces Major Combat Operations in Iraq Have Ended", White House, 05-01-2003.
  30. ^ "Meet The New Jihad", Time, 07-27-2004.
  31. ^ Lauren Frayer. "Lebanese army greeted in south", Indianapolis Star, 2006-08-18. 
  32. ^ Robert Fisk. "Robert Fisk: Lebanon's pain grows by the hour as death toll hits 1,300", The Independent, 2006-08-17. 
  33. ^ Ben Wedeman, Brent Sadler. "Refugees stream back to southern Lebanon", CNN, 2006-08-14. 
  34. ^ "Israel needs int'l support for war against terror: DM", People's Daily Online, August 10, 2006.  "Israeli Defense Minister Amir Peretz said Wednesday morning that Israel is fighting a war of the free world against terror"
  35. ^ "Lebanon part of 'war on terror', says Bush", ABC News, July 30, 2006. 
  36. ^ "Bush: 'Hezbollah suffered a defeat'", CNN, 2006-08-14. 
  37. ^ a b Le Figaro (April 16, 2007). "Fatah Al-Islam: the new terrorist threat hanging over Lebanon". Retrieved May 20, 2007.
  38. ^ Pakistan’s Islamist press calls for jihad
  39. ^ "Osama bin Laden", South Asia Terrorism Portal.
  40. ^ "A question of Leadership" programme transcript, BBC News, 09-16-2005.
  41. ^ "India's counter-terrorism strategy", Rediff.com, 04-06-2003.
  42. ^ "Evolution Of India's Counter-Terrorism Capabilities", International Terrorism Monitor, South Asia Analysis Group, 05-10-2006.
  43. ^ "The surrogate war in Kashmir", Business Line, 03-08-2001.
  44. ^ "Musharraf declares war on extremism", BBC News, 01-12-2002.
  45. ^ Joseph, Josy/Sahay, Tara Shankar. "Musharraf's speech greeted with skepticism in India", Rediff.com.
  46. ^ Steve Coll, "The Stand-Off." The New Yorker, February 13 & 20
  47. ^ "JI 'claims Jakarta car bombing'", CNN, 2004-09-09. 
  48. ^ "Text 'warned of Jakarta bomb'", CNN, 09.10.04. 
  49. ^ "Jihad warning over Indonesian cleric arrest", CNN, 2002-10-10. 
  50. ^ "'Walking bombs' are desperate", CNN, 2003-11-01. 
  51. ^ "Anti-terror legislation sprints through House", MSNBC, 01-09-2007.
  52. ^ Kuypers, Jim A. [2006-10-28]. Bush’s War: Media Bias and Justifications for War in a Terrorist Age. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.. ISBN 0-7425-3653-X. 
  53. ^ Lustick, Ian S. [2006-09-01]. Trapped in the War on Terror. University of Pennsylvania Press. ISBN 0-8122-3983-0. 
  54. ^ Cooper, Stephen D. [2006-06-12]. Watching the Watchdog: Bloggers As the Fifth Estate. Marquette Books. ISBN 0-9229-9347-5. 
  55. ^ Partnership Action Plan against Terrorism. NATO (November 22, 2002). Retrieved on 2006-08-09.
  56. ^ "New frontline in the war on terror", The Guardian, 05.04.06. 
  57. ^ "UK troops take over Afghan duties", BBC, 2006-06-01. 
  58. ^ "Canada set for longer Afghan stay", BBC, 2006-06-16. 
  59. ^ "Australia outlines Afghan force", BBC, 2006-05-08. 
  60. ^ "More Dutch troops for Afghanistan", BBC, 2006-02-03. 
  61. ^ [1]
  62. ^ Pincus, Walter/Milbank, Dana. "Al Qaeda-Hussein Link Is Dismissed", The Washington Post, 07-17-2004.
  63. ^ Robert Fisk, The Great War for Civilisation - The Conquest of the Middle East; (October 2005) London.
  64. ^ "Remarks As Prepared For Delivery At The Council on Foreign Relations"
  65. ^ "America’s Image in the World", Pew Global Attitudes Project
  66. ^ Testimony of Andrew KohutPDF (152 KiB) transcript, United States House of Representatives, International Relations Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, 11-10-2005.

BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Amnesty International USA (AI USA) is a United States organisation that works to end human rights abuses and part is of the Amnesty International network. ... The Center for Defense Information, or CDI, is an organization composed partially of academics and a few retired high-ranking military officers formed for the purpose of critical analysis of United States defence policy. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university situated in the neighborhood of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Allied Joint Force Command Naples or JFC Naples was activated on 15 March 2004, when its predecessor command, Allied Forces Southern Europe (AFSOUTH), was deactivated after nearly 53 years of successful activity in support of peace and stability in and around its designated area of responsibility. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Corrado Maria Daclon was born in Milan, Italy, in 1963. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is an evening television news program broadcast weeknights on PBS in the United States. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... “TIME” redirects here. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rediff. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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For other uses, see New Yorker. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... For the news website, see MSNBC.com. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pew Global Attitudes Project, one of the projects carried out by the Pew Research Center, is a series of worldwide public-opinion surveys and reports aimed at understanding worldwide attitudes on various issues. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs (also known as the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives which is in charge of bills and investigations related to the foreign affairs of the United States. ... The U.S. House Subcommittee on International Organizations, Human Rights, and Oversight is a standing subcommittee within the House Foreign Affairs Committee. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Müller, Sebastian R. , Dec. ... Box-cutter knives were apparently used in the September 11, 2001 attacks, though such knives are not usually considered weapons. ... For the movie Behind Enemy Lines II: Axis of Evil, see Behind Enemy Lines II. For cosmic anisotropy, see Anisotropy#Physics. ... The United States of America has been accused of funding, training, and harboring individuals and groups who engage in terrorism by some legal scholars, other governments, and human rights organizations, among others. ... Since the 1979 Iranian Revolution when the American backed Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was overthrown and replaced by Shiite cleric Ayatollah Khomeini, the government of Iran is believed to have funded, provided equipment, weapons, training and given sanctuary to terrorists. ... The Barbary Wars (or Tripolitan Wars) were two wars between the United States of America and Barbary States in North Africa in the early 19th century. ... The Biodefense and Pandemic Vaccine and Drug Development Act of 2005 (S. 1873), nicknamed Bioshield Two and sponsored by Senator Richard Burr (R-North Carolina), aims to shortcut safety testing for new vaccines and drugs in case of a pandemic, and to protect vaccine makers and the pharmaceutical industry from... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens in the War Against Terrorism The Salt Pit in Afghanistan Black site is a military term that has been used by United States intelligence agencies to refer to any classified facility whose existence or... The Tenth Crusade is a rhetorical device that builds an analogy between the U.S.-led War on Terrorism and the historical Crusades. ... For the religion of Islam, see Islam. ... Anti-Arabism is a term that refers to prejudice or hostility against people from Arabic origin. ... Muslim percentage of population by country Distribution of Islam per country. ... Islam in the world. ... Criticism of the War on Terror (also named the War on Terrorism) addresses the issues, morals, ethics, efficiency, economics, and other questions surrounding the War on Terror. ... The Department of Anti-terrorism Strategic Studies (Italian: Dipartimento Studi Strategici Antiterrorismo, DSSA) is an Italian organization set up in 2004. ... Executive Order 12333 extends the powers and responsibilities of US intelligence agencies and directs the leaders of other US federal agencies to co-operate fully with CIA requests for information. ... Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another with the intent of legally torturing them outside of the jurisdiction of a state which prohibits it. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... For the NBC TV Movie starring Tom Skeritt, see Homeland Security (film). ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This box:      Islamophobia is a criticized[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ... The Long War is a name for the U.S. Global War on Terrorism. ... The McCain Detainee Amendment was an amendment to the United States Senate Department of Defense Authorization bill, commonly referred to as the Amendment on (1) the Army Field Manual and (2) Cruel, Inhumane, Degrading Treatment, amendment #1977 and also known as the McCain Amendment 1977. ... NATO AWACS Eagle Assist badge Operation Eagle Assist began on October 9, 2001 following the North Atlantic Councils October 4 decision to take measures to operationalize Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty. ... Teh NSA warrantless surveillance controversy concerns surveillance of persons within the United States incident to the collection of foreign intelligence by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the war on terror. ... The Proactive and Preemptive Operations Group (aka PPOG or P2OG), is reported to be a clandestine military intelligence agency established in 2002. ... Strategic reset is a policy framework designed to stop counterproductive U.S. engagement in a fragmenting Iraq and to strengthen the United States stance throughout the Middle East. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with NSA warrantless surveillance controversy. ... The term unlawful combatant (also unlawful enemy combatant or unprivileged combatant/belligerent) denotes a person denied the privileges of prisoner of war (POW) designation, in accordance with the Geneva Conventions; one to whom protection is recognised as due is a lawful or privileged combatant. ... Pakistan has long been seen as an ally of the United States. ... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which U.S. President George W. Bush signed into law on October... The Ohio Patriot Act (SB 9) is an act passed in the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Charles Clarke as former Home Secretary held primary responsibility for the Terrorism Bill The Terrorism Act is a UK Act made law on March 30, 2006, after being introduced on October 12, 2005. ... The Prevention of Terrorism Act 2005 is a British Act of Parliament intended to deal with the Law Lords ruling of 16 December 2004, that the detention without trial of nine foreigners at HM Prison Belmarsh under Part IV of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 was unlawful... There have been two Chechen Wars: First Chechen War, 1994–1996 Second Chechen War, 1999–continues Category: ... Combatants Russian Federation Daghestani militia Chechen rebels Shura of Dagestan Commanders Viktor Kazantsev Shamil Basayev Ibn al-Khattab Strength 17,000 unknown Casualties At least 279 dead and 987 wounded 2,500 dead The Dagestan War (in Russia called by the name Chechen invasion of Dagestan) began when Chechnya-based... Combatants Algerian government Islamic Armed Movement (MIA) Islamic Salvation Army (AIS) others. ... Wars during the History of Afghanistan include: The First Anglo-Afghan War The Second Anglo-Afghan War The Third Anglo-Afghan War The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... War against Islam (also War on Islam, or Attack on Islam) is a critical term used to describe a perceived campaign to annihilate Islam, using not only military but economic and cultural means. ... This is a list of wars and man-made disasters by death toll. ... War on Terror, The Boardgame is a satirical, strategic board game produced by TerrorBull Games. ...

External links

Official sites by governments and international organizations

  • FBI Most Wanted Terrorists
  • Rewards for Justice — Most Wanted Terrorists
  • White House FAQ about the "War on Terrorism"
  • U.S. Dept. of Defense News on the "War on Terrorism"
  • NATO and the scourge of terrorism
  • UN action against terrorism
  • TheBudgetGraph.com A large interactive graph of the 2008 federal discretionary budget including a full breakdown of the Global War on Terror appropriations.

Primary legal documents

  • Findlaw Special Coverage "War on Terrorism" (court documents in .pdf)
  • Authorization For Use of Military Force Against September 11 terrorists (AUMF) US Public Law 107-40, September 18, 2001, 115 Stat. 224
  • Report on Strategic CommunicationPDF (1.78 MiB) Defense Science Board Task Force, September 2004
  • counter-terrorism-law.org


  Results from FactBites:
 
War on Terror - Global Issues (4038 words)
Some of the definitions of ‘terrorism’ under discussion are so broad that they could be used to criminalize anyone out of favour with those in power and criminalize legitimate peaceful exercise of the right to freedom of expression and association.
The Iraq war was one such example, where among other things, the concern of terrorism was used to justify a war against Iraq, even though the terrorism links were not real.
The “war on terror” and the war in Iraq has encouraged a new wave of human rights abuse and diverted attention from old ones … while many governments are openly pursuing repressive agendas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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