FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > War of the Worlds (2005 movie)
For other uses, see The War of the Worlds.
War of the Worlds
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Written by Josh Friedman,
David Koepp
Starring Tom Cruise,
Dakota Fanning,
Justin Chatwin
Produced by Kathleen Kennedy
Distributed by Paramount
Release date June 29, 2005
Runtime
Language English
Budget $128 million
IMDb page

War of the Worlds is a 2005 modern retelling of H.G. Wells' original novel. It was directed by Steven Spielberg from a script by Josh Friedman and David Koepp and starring Tom Cruise, Dakota Fanning, and Justin Chatwin. The budget for the film was $132 million (US). The War of the Worlds is a novel written by H.G. Wells in 1898 depicting an alien invasion of the earth. ... Download high resolution version (444x655, 29 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: War of the Worlds (2005 movie) Categories: Fair use posters ... Steven Spielberg Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio but raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona), is an American film director and producer whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. ... David Koepp (pronounced kep) is an American screenwriter and director. ... Tom Cruise as seen on a poster for the 2001 film Vanilla Sky Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV July 3, 1962 in Syracuse, New York, USA) is an American film actor and producer who has starred in a number of top-grossing movies. ... Dakota Fanning at MTV awards Dakota and Elle Fanning at the premire of Uptown Girls Hannah Dakota Fanning (born February 23, 1994 in Conyers, Georgia), better known simply as Dakota Fanning, is a break-through American actress. ... Justin Chatwin (born on October 31, 1982 in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada) is an actor currently appearing in the Steven Spielberg/Tom Cruise movie War of the Worlds. ... Kathleen Kennedy is an American movie industry executive. ... The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1987 to 1995. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... English may refer to: The nation of England. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... Herbert George Wells Spoiler warning: An early science fiction novel, The War of the Worlds (1898), by H.G. Wells, describes the fictional of the late ninetenth century invasion of Earth by aliens, from Mars, who use laser/maser/phaser-like Heat-Rays, chemical weapons (the Black smoke), and mechanical... Steven Spielberg Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born on December 18, 1946 in Cincinnati, Ohio but raised in the suburbs of Haddonfield, New Jersey and Scottsdale, Arizona), is an American film director and producer whose films range from science fiction to historical drama to horror. ... David Koepp (pronounced kep) is an American screenwriter and director. ... Tom Cruise as seen on a poster for the 2001 film Vanilla Sky Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV July 3, 1962 in Syracuse, New York, USA) is an American film actor and producer who has starred in a number of top-grossing movies. ... Dakota Fanning at MTV awards Dakota and Elle Fanning at the premire of Uptown Girls Hannah Dakota Fanning (born February 23, 1994 in Conyers, Georgia), better known simply as Dakota Fanning, is a break-through American actress. ... Justin Chatwin (born on October 31, 1982 in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada) is an actor currently appearing in the Steven Spielberg/Tom Cruise movie War of the Worlds. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


The film supposedly tells H.G. Wells' story "through the eyes of one American family fighting to survive it." Locations were in Bayonne, New Jersey, Athens, New York City (Staten Island), Boston, Massachusetts, Naugatuck, Connecticut, Rockbridge County, Virginia, Brooklyn and parts of Los Angeles. Bayonne is a city located in Hudson County, New Jersey. ... Athens is a town located in Greene County, New York. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... Staten Island, shown in an enhanced satellite image Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City, located on an island of the same name on the west side of the Narrows at the entrance of New York Harbor. ... City nickname: Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe), Athens of America Location of Boston within Suffolk County, Massachusetts. ... Naugatuck is a borough located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Rockbridge County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... The Brooklyn Bridge in 1890, seven years after its opening Kings County in New York State Brooklyn is the most populous of the five boroughs of New York City. ... The Downtown Los Angeles skyline. ...

Contents


Plot

Ray Ferrier (Cruise) is a crane operator living in New Jersey (the setting has been said to be Newark, New Jersey, but the house shown in the movie was actually filmed in Bayonne). He has agreed with his ex-wife, Mary-Anne (Otto), to watch their kids, teenager Robbie (Chatwin) and preadolescent Rachel (Fanning), for the weekend while she and her new husband (Tim) go to visit her parents in Boston. While Rachel seems almost too mature for her age, Ray's son repeatedly acts out against him, eventually taking Ray's prized Ford Mustang out for a joyride. Newark (), nicknamed The Brick City, is the largest city in New Jersey and the county seat of urban Essex County. ... Bayonne is a city located in Hudson County, New Jersey. ... The Ford Mustang is a popular sports car. ...


Meanwhile, in background shots, news networks have been reporting EMPs and freak lightning storms around the world which leave all electronic equipment in the affected areas incapacitated. As Ray leaves Rachel in his house to go search for Robbie, one such storm comes up just near Ray's home. He returns to watch with Rachel, as 26 bolts of lightning — not accompanied by thunder — hit the same spot just a few blocks away. Ray leaves Rachel alone again, and goes to investigate. When he arrives, the ground breaks apart and a massive tripod battle machine rises from the ground. It begins firing a heat-ray on civilians, vaporizing them on contact (it appears as if upon contact they turn to ash and 'vaporize'). Ray hurries home, shaken and covered with the ashy remains of his neighborhood and neighbors. He gets his kids together, finds and steals a newly-repaired minivan, which appears to be the only working motor vehicle in the vicinity, and escapes the city just as the tripod reaches their block (and apparently blows up the bridge behind the family's house, portrayed by the Bayonne Bridge). In telecommunications and warfare, the term electromagnetic pulse (EMP) has the following meanings: The electromagnetic radiation from an explosion (especially nuclear explosions) or an intensely fluctuating magnetic field caused by Compton-recoil electrons and photoelectrons from photons scattered in the materials of the electronic or explosive device or in a... Martian tripods drawn by Warwick Goble. ... In H.G. Wellss classic science fiction novel The War of the Worlds, heat rays are the primary offensive weapon used by the Martians. ...


The family hits the highway, trying to get to Boston, where Mary-Anne and Tim are staying with her parents. Along the way, they spend a night in the basement of Mary-Anne and Tim's empty house (somewhere in suburban New Jersey or New York), where they survive a plane crashing nearby. Ray goes upstairs to survey the damage, and learns from the crew of a TV news mobile unit that countless tripods have appeared near every major city of the world, wreaking havoc everywhere. The news team also shows Ray a video of a lightning strike from one of the mysterious lightning storms. The video shows one alien "riding" the lightning in a capsule to a tripod below, thus explaining how the aliens arrived. The news team also tells Ray that they watched a battle between the tripods and a National Guard unit. All weapons were ineffective as each tripod is equipped with an invisible deflector shield that protects it from damage. A deflector shield is a fictional technology commonly found in science fiction. ...


Pushing on in the minivan, they drive across country where they witness further signs of the destruction — hundreds of bodies floating down a river, a train rushing by after having been set alight. Infuriated by the sight, Robbie runs after a passing National Guard convoy, hoping to "get back at" the tripods, but Rachel pleads with him to stay. The group continues heading along the Hudson, only to encounter a mob of people converging on a ferry-boat landing. The minivan is taken from them at gunpoint and they take refuge in a deserted diner. Trekking from there to the ferry, they arrive at the docks just as more tripods appear on the horizon behind them. They break past National Guard troops who have ordered the ferry to cast off, although it could take more passengers, even as the tripods begin attacking the frenzied, stranded mob. Another tripod appears in the water, and capsizes it. Tentacles from the alien machine whip into the water, abducting the survivors of the sinking vessel. The United States National Guard is a significant component of the United States armed forces military reserve. ...


Ray and his kids swim safely to the opposite shore after the ferry is sunk, and set out on foot, only to find another array of tripods engaging US Army/US Marine Corps units (the latter in new style MARPAT battledress uniform) on open farmland. Robbie impulsively runs after the troops, intending to join them in fighting the alien onslaught, and appears to be killed along with the others. Ray and Rachel take refuge in the cellar of a farmhouse at the invitation of its owner, an ambulance-driver named Ogilvy (Robbins), whom Ray discovers to be madly plotting a one-man assault on the aliens. United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Woodland MARPAT uniform. ...

Three tripods from the film.
Three tripods from the film.

Not long after Ray and Rachel have entered the basement, an alien probe appears, searching the basement for signs of life. After the humans successfully elude it, several live aliens subsequently appear and examine the basement, fascinated with the human artifacts. Ogilvy finds his shotgun and hopes to kill one of the creatures, but Ray wrestles the gun away from him before the aliens are called back to their ship. Image File history File links Screenshot from the 2005 movie War of the Worlds. ... Image File history File links Screenshot from the 2005 movie War of the Worlds. ...


Later the humans are awakened by a mechanical sound outside. They look out to discover that the tripods have been harvesting humans as part of a terraforming project by the aliens, where human blood is used to fertilize a red weed that spreads across the ground. Oglivy is thrown into madness by the sight, and begins raving loudly ("NOT MY BLOOD! NOT MY BLOOD!") after assaulting Ray. Ray has no choice but to kill Ogilvy in a tunnel he had been digging to silence him to avoid alarming the aliens, in order to protect his daughter. A horrified Ray then falls asleep with his daughter. Artists conception of a terraformed Mars in three stages of development. ... The red weed (also referred to as the red creeper) is a plant native to Mars in The War of the Worlds. ...


Moments later, however, Rachel awakens to one of the aliens' scanner mechanisms staring right at her. Rachel runs away screaming, and, after Ray had hacked apart the alien probe with a hatchet, he goes outside searching for her. Despite Ray's efforts, he and his daughter are captured by a tripod, but not before Ray has been able to secure a belt of hand grenades from an abandoned military vehicle. A WWII-era pineapple fragmentation hand grenade A hand grenade is a hand-held bomb designed to be thrown by hand. ...


They are placed in one of the two metal 'nets' or baskets underneath the 'belly' of one of the tripods along with many other humans. Every once in a while, a 'tentacle' reaches into the basket and draw a person out to be the next victim to be drained of their blood. As he is being sucked into the machine through an orifice-like opening, Ray manages to pull the pins on the grenades, then is pulled out by others in the basket just before the grenades explode and bring down the tripod.


Ray and Rachel, and the other civilians and soldiers in the baskets, survive the explosion, fall off the tripod, and make their way to Boston, where they find that the red weed has begun dying and the alien machines have begun collapsing. As Ray and Rachel are being guided with a group of civilians away from a functioning tripod by soldiers from the 10th Mountain Division (who can be indentified by the divisional insignia on their sleeves), Ray sees that the machine's shields are defunct (by noticing that birds were landing on the still walking tripod), leaving it open to attack, and takedown, from Javelin anti-tank missile attacks by the soldiers. After the tripod falls to the ground, a hatch opens up. As the troops surround the hatch, an alien staggers out of the war machine and dies. A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... (Redirected from 10th Mountain Division) Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry). ...


Ray arrives with Rachel at Mary-Anne's parents' house in Boston, where Mary-Anne, her parents, and Tim are all together and safe. They discover that Robbie, too, has survived and made his way to the house, and happily reunites with his real "Dad".


As in the original novel, over the final shot of the collapsed and immobile tripods, a narrator reveals that the aliens were defeated by exposure to Earthian bacteria and other microorganisms "God's littlest creatures" — to which they were not immune. Phyla/Divisions Actinobacteria Aquificae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chlamydiae/Verrucomicrobia Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Nitrospirae Omnibacteria Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Bacteria (singular, bacterium) are a major group of living organisms. ... A microorganism or microbe is an organism that is so small that it is microscopic (invisible to the naked eye). ...


Spielberg on the adaptation

Spielberg told the web site Dark Horizons:

"I'm more interested in concept shots and money shots than I am in tons of MTV coverage, which certainly takes a lot of time. But if I can put something on the screen that is sustained where you get to study it and you get to say, 'How did they do that?' That's happening before my eyes and the shot's not over yet, it's still going and it's still going and my God, it's an effects shot and it's lasting seemingly forever. I enjoy that more than creating illusion with sixteen different camera angles, where no shot lasts longer than six seconds on the screen. To pull a rabbit out of a hat, because you are really a smart audience and you're in the fastest media, the fastest growing new media today and you know the difference between sleight of hand visually and the real thing. I think what makes War of the Worlds, at least the version that we're making, really exciting, is you get to really see what's happening. There's not a lot of visual tricks. We tell it like it is, we show it to you, and we put you inside the experience. "

And this about the story: MTV (abbreviation for Music Television) is a cable television network which was originally devoted to music videos, especially popular rock music. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ...

"It's nothing you can really describe. The whole thing is very experiential. The point of view is very personal - everybody, I think, in the world will be able to relate to the point of view, because it's about a family trying to survive and stay together, and they're surrounded by the most epically horrendous events you could possibly imagine."

Tom Cruise, Scientology and the film

Though there is no apparent Scientological ideology represented in the film — which was not written, produced or directed by anyone associated with the Scientology movement — press coverage in May and June 2005 leading up to the film's release focused on Tom Cruise's proselytizings for Scientology. Around this time, Cruise had changed publicists, from Pat Kingsley to his sister, Lee Anne De Vette, and spoke to interviewers more frequently about Scientology — and his sudden engagement to actress Katie Holmes — than about the film itself. Some press coverage noted[1] the similarity between the film's promotional poster and the front cover of The Invaders Plan (volume one of Mission Earth) by L. Ron Hubbard, founder of Scientology. This similarity is not singular to the film, however, as the image of a hand grasping the Earth is a recurring one in science-fiction: it was used, for example, for the 1975 movie Rollerball. A Scientology Center on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California Scientology is a system of beliefs, teachings and rituals, originally established as an alternative psychotherapy in 1952 by science-fiction author L. Ron Hubbard, then recharacterized by him in 1953 as an applied religious philosophy. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Katie Holmes on the cover of the August 2005 edition of W. Katherine Noelle Katie Holmes (born December 18, 1978) is an American actress from Ohio best known for her role as Joey Potter, the tomboy down the titular waterway on The WB television drama Dawsons Creek. ... Cover of Mission Earth volume 1: The Invaders Plan Mission Earth is a ten-volume science fiction novel by L. Ron Hubbard, more famous as the founder of the Church of Scientology. ... L. Ron Hubbard, circa 1970 Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was a prolific and controversial American author and the founder of Dianetics and Scientology. ... See also: 1974 in film 1975 1976 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events January 28 - George Lucas creates the second draft of what would eventually become Star Wars. ... Rollerball is a 1975 science fiction film directed by Norman Jewison from the short story Roller Ball Murders by William Harrison. ...


Box Office

Despite of all these controversies, the movie received rather positive reviews and made an impressive box-office performance. As of 24 July 2005, It has earned $208.4 million domestically and over $255 million overseas, making it the second most succesful movie of summer 2005 (next to Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith). Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ...


This is considered to be good news for both Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise. First of all, Spielberg has not seen such a massive success since Saving Private Ryan (1998), and the $100-million Minority Report (2002) — his first collaboration with Cruise — earned a reasonable $132 million. In case of Tom Cruise (whose's film release coincided on the weekend of his 43rd birthday), this movie is bound to become the biggest blockbuster of his career, since the movie opened its first weekend with $65 million (which is a record-high for Paramount), beating Mission: Impossible II's nearly $58 million (also from Paramount Pictures). Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 film directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat, dealing with the World War II Battle of Normandy. ... Minority Report is a 2002 film by Steven Spielberg starring Tom Cruise, Max von Sydow, Samantha Morton,Kathryn Morris, and Colin Farrell. ... Mission: Impossible II, or M:I-2 as it is also known, is the 2000 John Woo-directed sequel to Brian De Palmas 1996 Mission: Impossible motion picture, based on the TV series of the same name. ... The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1987 to 1995. ...


Budget

In August of 2004, the Internet Movie Database reported that the film was "poised to make history in Hollywood as the most expensive film ever made — surpassing Titanic's $198 million budget." The report quoted an unnamed source that said, "No expense will be spared. Spielberg wants to make it the film of the decade." The New York Times, the original source for this number, ran a correction a few days later that the budget is actually $128 million. The final budget, however, has been confirmed to be $132 million. 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 Czesław Miłosz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert Bootzin • 8 Fay... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb), owned by Amazon. ... Titanic is a 1997 dramatic movie released by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Critical reaction

Though the film has garnered a positive box office response, reviews have been mixed. A Sun Times review said: "...a big, clunky movie containing some sensational sights but lacking the zest and joyous energy we expect from Steven Spielberg.". Most reviews have praised the movie for spectacular sound and special effects, as well as Spielberg's direction. But many reviews have found inconsistencies in the film's logic and unlikely coincidences in the storyline. Other critics felt the characters of the movie, such as Tom Cruise's Ray Ferrier and Dakota Fanning's Rachel Ferrier, were simply not likable characters.


Many reviews praised the portrayal of human reaction to disaster, especially during the first hour, but say the pace of the film bogs down when Ray, Rachel, and Ogilvy are trapped in the basement playing a cat-and-mouse game with the aliens.


Press coverage and anti-piracy controversy

The press preview of the movie raised severe criticism, as every journalist who wanted to take a look at the movie before it premiered had to sign a non-disclosure agreement. This NDA stated that the undersigned could not publish a review of the movie before its world-wide release on 29 June 2005. Many people have argued that the movie might not be able to catch up with the great expectations that might have been postulated by such reviewers. A non-disclosure agreement (NDA) or confidential disclosure agreement (CDA) is a legal contract between two parties which outlines confidential materials the parties wish to share with one another for certain purposes, but wish to restrict from generalized use. ... June 29 is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 185 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


Furthermore, at the New York premiere of the film at the Ziegfeld Theatre, all members of the press were required to check all electronic equipment — including cell phones — at the door, as part of a larger sweeping anti-piracy campaign by the film's producers hoping to keep the film from leaking on the Internet. As usual, however, these methods have failed, as evidenced by the availability of the movie online a day before the movie was released. Ziegfeld Theatre - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Motorola T2288 mobile phone A mobile phone is a portable electronic device which behaves as a normal telephone whilst being able to move over a wide area (compare cordless phone which acts as a telephone only within a limited range). ...


Among other efforts to curb piracy, the producers also prevented theatres from screening the movie at midnight the night before 29 June, despite the recent success of midnight screenings of such films as Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. The producers also chose not to screen the film in any DLP-equipped theatres, despite the technical superiority of digital projectors. Some viewers saw these efforts as overreactions, especially the more hardcore movie fans who enjoy seeing blockbusters such as War of the Worlds early and at the highest quality possible. For the film originally released under the name Star Wars, see Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... Digital Light Processing (DLP) is a technology used in projectors and projection televisions. ...


Trivia

There are a few references to the original 1953 film. There is a scene with an alien camera searching the house and at the end, one of the aliens staggers out of his war machine and dies, just like at the end of the 1953 film. Also, several lines of dialogue — especially those spoken by Tim Robbins' character — are taken directly from Orson Welles' infamous radio adaptation of the novel. Additionally, the plot device that the aliens had been to Earth before and left behind their tripods is similiar to a revelation in the TV series in which a tripod (an "older model" of the war machines in the 1953 film) is unearthed having been left behind for hundreds to thousands of years. The War of the Worlds DVD The War of the Worlds (1953), was directed by Byron Haskin and produced by George Pál (the second of three H.G. Wells science fiction stories to be filmed by Pál), and starred Gene Barry, Les Tremayne and Ann Robinson. ... Orson Welles, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) is generally considered one of Hollywoods greatest directors, as well as a fine actor, broadcaster and screenwriter. ... On October 30, 1938, as a Halloween special, Orson Welles performed a live radio adaptation of H. G. Wells classic novel The War of the Worlds, which famously frightened many in the audience into believing that an actual Martian invasion was in progress. ... The War of the Worlds television series ran for two seasons, from October of 1988 to May of 1990. ...


Actors Gene Barry and Ann Robinson, stars of the original film version, make a cameo together at the film's end, playing Mary-Anne's parents. Gene Barry (born June 14, 1921) is an American actor. ... Ann Robinson (b. ...


There are also references to Spielberg's earlier films about alien contact with Earth, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and Close Encounters of the Third Kind (the synthesizer "note" sounded by the alien tripods), as well as The Day the Earth Stood Still (the mass stoppage of electrical power) and Quatermass and the Pit (martian machines buried underground since prehistoric times). Some find also that shots in the diner, where Ferrier and the kids take refuge after the mob captures the minivan, evoke memories of the diner in the original The Blob. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is a Academy Award-winning 1982 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg that tells the story of a young boy, Elliott, who befriends an alien being called E.T. stranded on Earth and trying to find his way home. ... Released on November 16, 1977, Close Encounters of the Third Kind is a science-fiction movie about UFOs, written and directed by Steven Spielberg. ... Film poster for The Day the Earth Stood Still The Day the Earth Stood Still is a 1951 science fiction film which tells the story of a humanoid spaceman who comes to Earth to convince its leaders to learn how to live in peace. ... The opening titles of Quatermass and the Pit. ... A film poster for The Blob The Blob is an independently-made American science-fiction film from 1958, filmed in color and widescreen, that achieved instant success and is still recognized today partly because it starred Steve McQueen and Aneta Corsaut in their first film roles, and partly because it...


The plane in the crash scene is a Cathay Pacific Boeing 747. Cathay Pacific Airways Limited (國泰航空有限公司 Pinyin (in Mandarin Chinese):Guótài Hángkōng Yŏuxiàn Gōngsī, abbreviated 國泰) (HKSE: 0293) is an Asian commercial airline based in Hong Kong. ... 747 of Pan American World Airways. ...


The plane-crash set was built on the Universal Studios backlot, right next to the famous Bates house from Psycho. Despite great demand for the location, the studio has decided to keep the plane crash set intact as a permanent installation on the backlot tour. Universal Studios logo This article is about the Universal Studios movie studio and Universal Hollywood theme park. ... A backlot is an area behind or adjoining a movie studio with permanent exterior sets for outdoor scenes in motion picture and/or television productions. ... This article is about the novel and the movies based on it. ...


At the hill scene in the middle of the movie, when Ray Ferrier and his two kids are walking on a deserted farm with other refugees, U.S Air Force jets streak overhead firing at a nearby tripod. If you watch closely, the first jet that flys over is an A-10 Thunderbolt jet, followed by F-16 Falcons. The tanks that mount a ground offensive in that scene are M1A1 Abrams tanks utilising depleted uranium armor that was introduced in 1980, but was not equipped until after 2001. The helicopters that bombard the tripod are AH-64 Longbow Apache attack helicopters and AH-1 Cobra Light Attack helicopters. They are both missing landing equipment: landing wheels on the Apache and landing struts on the Cobras. The AH-64 was introduced in the 1970s but has remained a faithful part of the U.S Army and several other select armies around the world. The shoulder-portable anti-tank missile launchers seen in both the hill scene and at the end of the movie are FGM-148 Javelin missiles, first used by the U.S. military in 2003. The A-10/OA-10 Thunderbolt II, often known as the Warthog, is the first US Air Force aircraft specifically designed for close air support of ground forces. ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army. ... The Boeing IDS AH-64 Apache is the US Armys principal attack helicopter, the successor to the AH-1 Cobra. ... AH-1W SuperCobra of the U.S. Marines The AH-1 Cobra, usually called the Huey Cobra, is an attack helicopter, designed by Bell Helicopter Textron. ... A soldier practices with the Javelin on a firing range. ...


In the movie, Ray Ferrier's house is located in the Bayonne, New Jersey, edge of the Bayonne Bridge. The shot of the first tripod coming out of the ground was filmed in the Five corners intersection in the Ironbound neigbourhood of Newark, NJ. The two places are about 25 miles (50 km) apart from each other. View of Grand Bayonne across the Adour Bayonne (Basque: Baiona; Spanish: Bayona) is a city and commune of southwest France at the confluence of the Nive and Adour rivers, in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... The Bayonne Bridge, as seen from Port Richmond, Staten Island The Bayonne Bridge is the second longest steel arch bridge in the world. ... House in the Ironbound St. ... Skyline of downtown Newark as seen from the Newark Bay Bridge. ...


The name of Tim Robbins' character, Ogilvy, is the name of one of the narrator's friends in the book.


There is a subtle reference to the book when a couple of aliens, descended from their tripods, explore the basement that Ferrier and Ogilvy are hiding in. One of them pauses to spin the wheel of a bicycle hanging on the wall. In the Wells novel, the narrator explains the Martians did not use wheels in any of their technology.


The famous 1938 radio broadcast and the 1953 film also shifted the story's focus to the United States, as opposed to the book, which set the location in Southern England.


There is a widespread agreement in Japan that Spielberg has made a kaiju movie, in which, unlike American monster movies, indestructible giant monsters beyond understanding kill people mercilessly. At the world premiere in Tokyo, Spielberg said "Well, certainly the first tripod was taken down in Osaka, because Osaka has so much experience with Gamera and Godzilla." This explains why tripods appear from under earth after a million years of hibernation, why they are as tall as Godzilla, and why they roar. KaijÅ« (怪獣), literally meaning strange beast or mysterious beast, is a popular Japanese term referring to monsters, especially giant monsters as portrayed in Japanese fantasy films (tokusatsu and anime), more precisely termed daikaijÅ«. The similar term kaijin refers to human-like monsters in related genre. ... Osaka Castle, Ōsaka-jō Umeda district of Osaka Location in Japan Osaka City  listen? (大阪市; Ōsaka-shi) is the third-largest city in Japan, with a population of 2. ... Gamera (ガメラ) is a giant, tusked, flying turtle from a popular series of tokusatsu kaiju films produced by Daiei Motion Picture Company in Japan. ... Godzilla in one of his 1990s movies, Godzilla (Gojira) (ゴジラ) is a giant, amphibious, dinosaur first seen in the Japanese-produced 1954 tokusatsu kaiju film Gojira produced by Toho Film Company Ltd. ...


Differences from the book

  • The film's most obvious difference is that it takes place in early 21st century Northeastern United States rather than late 19th century Southern England.
  • One plot change is that the aliens this time do not land on Earth in giant meteorites before unleashing their war machines, since this kind of scenario has been already used recently. The tripods had already been buried underground, and the aliens themselves arrived by capsules transported via lightning bolts from their ships.
  • A prominent element from the novel that is not featured in the film is the Black Smoke, which was a part of the Martians' deadly arsenal. (Writer David Koepp has explained that this was dropped due more or less to time and didn't make it past his first draft, so any sightings of a similiar substance is purely coincidence and can be attributed to other sources.) The film also does not include the Thunder Child, whose symbol of power but ultimate failure to stop the invaders was represented in the 1953 film by the atomic bomb; however, there is a vaguely similiar scene taking place on land in which military forces fight valiantly in an effort to hold back tripods until refugess make it to safety.
  • The aliens are drastically different in design, in the movie featuring humanoid mouths and are tripedal where Wells' Martians have lipless v-shaped mouths and have tentacles. Also, the Martians of Wells' book feast on the blood of humans (Wells described the clean skeletons of humans and other animals) rather than the use of human blood as fertilizer for their terraforming project as seen in the movie.
  • In the movie, Tim Robbins' character, Harlan Ogilvy, plays the dual role of curate and soldier from the novel, while sharing the family name of the novel narrator's friend. The movie's Harlan Ogilvy has the qualities of the novel's increasingly-mad curate who drives the narrator to fight with him frequently. In the book, the character named Ogilvy is one of the first people killed by the alien's Heat-Ray. The movie's Ogilvy has the qualities of the novel's soldier in that he is digging a tunnel for an underground city with the goal of resistance. The novel's curate is "eaten" by the aliens after being struck in the head and left for dead by the narrator. In both versions, the story does not state outright that the main character killed the man, but the novel narrator does say "the killing of the curate" was "a thing done, a memory infinitely disagreeable but quite without the quality of remorse."
  • It is never said where the aliens of the movie are from, unlike the book where they are from Mars (in 1898, when the book was written, the possibility of life on Mars was considered realistic). This difference in origin shrouds the motivation for the attacks on the Earth. In the book, the Martians are escaping from their dilapidated planet, searching for a place to continue their civilization, rather than the "extermination" explanation claimed by a character in the film.
  • H.G. Wells never had the narrator play the hero. In fact, the story is told as a recount of the war, thus eliminating any doubts about the welfare of the narrator. In the film, the main character, Ray, succeeds in blowing up an alien tripod, creating the idea that heroes can be made in the face of an unbeatable foe, an idea that Wells clearly passed by.

Multiple cloud-to-ground and cloud-to-cloud lightning strokes are observed during a night-time thunderstorm. ... Black Smoke was the secondary offensive weapon of the Martians in H.G. Wells classic science fiction novel The War of the Worlds. ... HMS Thunder Child was the fictitious ironclad torpedo ram of the Royal Navy destroyed by Martian fighting-machines in H. G. Wellss The War of the Worlds. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Tentacles can refer to the elongated flexible organs that are present in many invertebrates, and sometimes to the hairs of the leaves of insectivorous plants. ... In H.G. Wellss classic science fiction novel The War of the Worlds, heat rays are the primary offensive weapon used by the Martians. ...

Errors and inconsistencies in the film

EMP related

Several errors in the movie are related to the EMP-related outages caused by the "lightning" bolts in which the aliens beam down.



These are the known errors:

  • After the electromagnetic pulse stops most electronic equipment from working, we see a man using his video camera. Later in the film they also show video clips taken of the aliens landing. Also, throughout the film, lights such as at the grade crossing and outside the diner work, as does the train and ferry, while cars in the same area do not. However, the effects of an EMP can be prevented if the object happens to be inside a Faraday cage (a sufficiently constructed container made of conductive material).
  • The minivan Ray takes is seemingly the only car able to work, in spite of being affected by the electromagnetic storm. Many, however, consider this not to be an error. All vehicles affected by the EMP had parts of their electrical system "fried", in the words of characters in the film. The minivan is able to work later, because the parts used to replace the damaged solenoid were, at the time of the EMP, not part of an electrical system (i.e. not in another car) and were therefore not affected by it. This ignores that this mid-1980s' minivan more than likely had a engine computer that would have been damaged as well.

In telecommunications and warfare, the term electromagnetic pulse (EMP) has the following meanings: The electromagnetic radiation from an explosion (especially nuclear explosions) or an intensely fluctuating magnetic field caused by Compton-recoil electrons and photoelectrons from photons scattered in the materials of the electronic or explosive device or in a... This article needs cleanup. ... The Faraday cage is an electrical apparatus designed to prevent the passage of electromagnetic waves, either containing them in or excluding them from its interior space. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field, encompassing all of space, composed of the electric field and the magnetic field. ... In engineering, a solenoid is a mechanical device that converts energy into linear motion. ...

Continuity

  • There are repetitive and glaring continuity glitches in the scene where the first tripod appears. Scenes of Ray on his own are spliced into scenes where he is accompanied by his two friends.

Other apparent inconsistencies

  • Ferrier's mechanic-friend seems oblivious to the tripods and their massive destruction and carnage, even though his service station is within walking distance of the disaster scene. However, the original novel's narrator also notes "the blank incongruity of this serenity" of the oblivious townspeople, despite "the swift death flying yonder, not two miles away" after the initial two attacks. The novel's narrator also appropriates a cart under the pretense of "borrowing" it from a shop owner "quite unaware of what was going on behind his house."
  • The type of train which interrupts Ferrier and his family during the "ferry sequence" is used for services on the eastern shore of the Hudson River, but is instead seen engulfed in flames on the western shore of the Hudson River.

View of the Hudson in the 1880s showing Jersey City The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river running mainly through New York State but partly forming the boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. ...

Main cast

Starring

Featuring Tom Cruise as seen on a poster for the 2001 film Vanilla Sky Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV July 3, 1962 in Syracuse, New York, USA) is an American film actor and producer who has starred in a number of top-grossing movies. ... Dakota Fanning at MTV awards Dakota and Elle Fanning at the premire of Uptown Girls Hannah Dakota Fanning (born February 23, 1994 in Conyers, Georgia), better known simply as Dakota Fanning, is a break-through American actress. ... Justin Chatwin (born on October 31, 1982 in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada) is an actor currently appearing in the Steven Spielberg/Tom Cruise movie War of the Worlds. ...

Also with Tim Robbins winning the 2003 Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in Mystic River Tim Robbins (born October 16, 1958, also Timothy Robbins) is an American actor, screenwriter, director, producer, and small time musician. ... Miranda Otto Miranda Otto (born December 16, 1967 in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia) is an Australian actress who has worked mainly in film. ... David Alan Basche appears in the 2005 movie War of the Worlds. He plays the role of Tim, Tom Cruises son. ...

Rick Gonzalez (born June 30, 1979 in New York City) is an actor of Puerto Rican-Dominican descent. ... Lenny Venito is an actor, and has made appearances in movies such as Gigli, Men in Black II, and the 2005 remake of War of the Worlds. ... Morgan Freeman Morgan Freeman (born June 1, 1937 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American actor and film director who first became known in the American media through roles on the kids show The Electric Company and on the soap opera Another World. ...

See also

This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ... Martian tripods drawn by Warwick Goble. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
War Of The Worlds (2005) Movie Review (702 words)
And so it is that in the terrorism-edgy mid-'00s, Steven Spielberg has resurrecteds War of the Worlds – again – and created the greatest alien invasion movie ever.
To that end, War of the Worlds is essentially an extended chase scene, and the massive-scale destruction – toppling cathedrals, smashed airliners, capsizing ferries – is some of the most awesome and convincing in memory.
For all the off-screen attention attracted by Cruise’s bizarre outbursts, the superstar of this movie is Spielberg, who crafts high-pressure suspense and frantic escape sequences that may leave you short of breath.
Eve Of The War - The War Of The Worlds Website (326 words)
Artwork from War Of The Worlds related comics
Various images, video and audio relating to War Of The Worlds.
The Babes Of The War Of The Worlds
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m