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Encyclopedia > War of the Eight Princes
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The War of the Eight Princes or Rebellion of the Eight Kings or Rebellion of the Eight Princes (trad. ch. 八王之亂, sim. ch. 八王之乱, py. bā wáng zhī luàn., wg. pa wang chih luan) was a civil war for power among princes or kings (wang ch. ) of the Chinese Jin Dynasty from AD 291 to AD 306. It was fought mostly in northern China and devastated the country, later triggering the Wu Hu ravaging. The term stems from biographies of eight princes collected in chapter 59 of the "History of Jin Dynasty" (Jinshu). Jump to: navigation, search Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... Jump to: navigation, search Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: 简体字; Traditional Chinese: 簡體字; pinyin: jiÇŽntǐzì; also called 简化字/簡化字, jiÇŽnhuàzì) are one of two standard character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language. ... PY, Py or py may stand for: Pinyin, a system of romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration to roman script) for Mandarin Chinese used in the Peoples Republic of China. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... Wang (King) and Huangdi (Emperor) The King or Wang (王 wang2) was the title of the Chinese head of state from the Zhou dynasty until the Qin dynasty. ... The Jin Dynasty (晉 pinyin jìn, 265-420) followed the Three Kingdoms and preceded the Southern and Northern Dynasties in China. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events The War of the Eight Princes begins in China. ... Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Following the death of Emperor Wu in 290, a complex power struggle began amongst the Sima clan. The new emperor, Emperor Hui, was weak and young, and factions fought to control the imperial court. Initially, the emperor's mother, Empress Dowager Yang, exerted the most power at the courts, and empowered her family, the Yang consort clan, with the help of Yang Jun. Format of naming convention in English is under discussion at Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese) and Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese)/monarchical titles. ... Events Jin Hui Di succeeds Jin Wu Di as emperor of China Births Pachomius, Christian monk (approximate date) Deaths Categories: 290 ... Format of naming convention in English is under discussion at Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese) and Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese)/monarchical titles. ... The consort clan (外戚 Pinyin: waichi) is the family, clan or a group related to a spouse or a empress dowager of the Chinese dynastic ruler or a warlord. ...


The emperor's wife, Empress Jia, enlisted the help of Sima Wei and Sima Yun, whose troops then killed Yang Jun and his faction in the palace in 291; the empress dowager was removed from power and died in prison. Jump to: navigation, search Empress Jia, Jia Nan Fung, of the Jin Dynasty was the daughter of Jia Chong - Son of Jia Xu. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events The War of the Eight Princes begins in China. ...


Power then passed to Sima Liang, the emperor's uncle. However, Empress Jia plotted with Sima Wei and convinced the prince to kill Sima Liang. She then ordered Sima Wei's death for the murder of Sima Liang. The empress and the Jia clan remained in power until 300, when she ordered the assassination of the heir to the throne, Sima Yu. For other uses, see number 300. ...


Sima Lun, who commanded the imperial guards, took this opportunity to kill the Empress Jia and her faction. Sima Lun placed himself in power and tried to centralize control over the powerful princes; this resulted in Sima Yun's rebellion, who marched his troops to capital against Sima Lun; Sima Yun was killed by Sima Lun's troops in the ensuing battle in Luoyang. Sima Lun then imprisoned Emperor Hui and styled himself as the new emperor. Sima Lun (sim. ...


In response, Sima Jiong led a coalition of forces, including Sima Ying and Sima Yong, against Sima Lun. They defeated Sima Lun's troops, killed him, and then re-established Emperor Hui as the emperor, with Sima Jiong exerting the most influence at the imperial court. When Sima Jiong tried to centralize power in his hands, the princes rebelled against him, and he was defeated by Sima Yi, the Prince of Changsha (a great-grandson of the famous strategist Sima Yi) and killed. Changsha (Simplified Chinese: 长沙; Traditional Chinese: 長沙; pinyin: Ch ng shā; Wade-Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital of Hunan, a province of Southcentral China, located on the lower reaches of Xiangjiang river, a branch of Chang Jiang. ... Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a military strategist of the Kingdom of Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ...


Likewise, Sima Yi held power briefly, then was later defeated by Sima Yue and killed. Sima Yue's troops by this time had strongly incorporated Wuhuan and Xianbei troops as cavalry. The Wuhuan (乌桓) were a nomadic people who inhabited northern China, in what is now the provinces of Hebei, Liaoning, Shanxi, the municipality of Beijing and the autonomous region of Inner Mongolia. ... The Xianbei (鮮卑, written XiānbÄ“i in pinyin or Hsien-pei in Wade-Giles) is a significant nomadic people residing in modern Manchuria and eastern Mongolia before migrating into areas of the modern Chinese provinces of Shanxi, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Hebei, Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning. ...


Power then passed to Sima Ying, who was then defeated and fled Luoyang with the emperor. He was finally captured by Sima Yong, who was in turn defeated by Sima Yue's troops. Emperor Hui died in 306, and his brother, Emperor Huai, ascended the throne. Sima Ying and Sima Yong were eventually captured and killed; Sima Yong died on February 7, 307, which marked the official end of the struggle. Events July 25 - Constantine I proclaimed Roman Emperor by his troops. ... Format of naming convention in English is under discussion at Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese) and Wikipedia talk:Naming conventions (Chinese)/monarchical titles. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 31 - After divorcing his wife Minerva, Constantine marries Fausta, the daughter of the retired Roman Emperor Maximian. ...


The resultant winner was last surviving major prince, Sima Yue. The struggle depopulated northern China and greatly weakened the strength of the Jin Dynasty.


The eight princes included:

  • Sima Liang (sim. ch. 司马亮), son of Sima Yi (sim. ch. 司马懿), titled the Prince of Runan (ch. 汝南王)
  • Sima Wei (sim. ch. 司马玮), son of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Chu (ch. 楚王)
  • Sima Lun (sim. ch. 司马伦), son of Sima Yi, titled the Prince of Zhao (ch. 赵王)
  • Sima Jiong (sim. ch. 司马冏), nephew of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Qi (sim. ch. 齐王)
  • Sima Ying (sim. ch. 司马颖), son of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Chengdu (ch. 成都王)
  • Sima Yi (sim. ch. 司马乂), son of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Changsha (sim. ch. 长沙王)
  • Sima Yong (sim. ch. 司马颙), distant cousin of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Hejian. (sim. ch. 河间王)
  • Sima Yue (sim. ch. 司马越), distant cousin of Emperor Wu, titled the Prince of Donghai (sim. ch. 东海王)

Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a military strategist of the Kingdom of Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ... State of Chu (small seal script, 220 BC) Chu (楚) was a kingdom in what is now southern China during the Spring and Autumn period (722-481 BCE) and Warring States (481-212 BCE) period. ... Sima Lun (sim. ... State of Zhao (small seal script, 220 BC) Zhao (pinyin: zhao4, simplified Chinese: 赵, traditional Chinese: 趙) was a Chinese state during the Warring States Period. ... State of Qi (small seal script, 220 BC) See Qi (disambiguation) for other meanings of Qi. Qi (齊; pinyin: qi2) was a relatively powerful state during the Spring and Autumn Period and Period of the Warring States. ... Jump to: navigation, search Location within China Chengdu (Chinese: 成都; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Cheng-tu) is the capital of Sichuan province and a sub-provincial city, located in southwest China, and bordering Tibet. ... Changsha (Simplified Chinese: 长沙; Traditional Chinese: 長沙; pinyin: Ch ng shā; Wade-Giles: Chang-sha) is the capital of Hunan, a province of Southcentral China, located on the lower reaches of Xiangjiang river, a branch of Chang Jiang. ...

References

  • Graff, David A., Medieval Chinese Warfare, 300-900. ISBN 0415239540

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War of the Eight Princes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (644 words)
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