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Encyclopedia > War film

The war film is a film genre concerned with warfare, usually about naval, air or land battles, sometimes focusing instead on prisoners of war, covert operations, military training or other related subjects. Sometimes they focus on daily military or civilian life in wartime without depicting battles. Their stories may be fiction, based on history, docudrama or occasionally biographical. In film theory, genre refers to the primary method of film categorization. ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... For a particular Air Force, see List of air forces. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Military education and training is a process which intends to establish and improve the capabilities of military personnel in their respective roles. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... The historical drama is a film genre in which stories are based upon historical events and famous persons. ... It has been suggested that Drama Documentary be merged into this article or section. ...


The term anti-war film is sometimes used to describe films which bring to the viewer the pain and horror of war, often from a political or ideological perspective. An anti-war film is a movie that is perceived as having an anti-war theme. ...

Contents

History

1920s and 1930s

Films made in the years following World War I tended to emphasise the horror or futility of warfare, most notably The Big Parade (1925) and What Price Glory? (1926 film). With the sound era, films like All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), Howard Hawks' Road to Glory (1936) and Grand Illusion (1937), focused on the futility of war for non-American soldiers whilst Hollywood produced American soldiers featuring in World War I comedies such as Buster Keaton's Doughboys (1930) and Wheeler & Woolsey's Half Shot at Sunrise (1930), or exciting tales of the U.S. Marine Corps putting down rebellions in Central America, China, and the Pacific Islands in films like Frank Capra's Flight (1930), The Leathernecks Have Landed (1936) and Tell it to the Marines (1926 film). Other films focused on the drama inherent in the new technology and fading chivalry of aerial combat in films such as Wings (1927), Hell's Angels (1930) and The Dawn Patrol (1930 and 1938 versions). “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Big Parade is a 1925 silent film which tells the story of an idle rich boy who is shipped off to France to fight World War I, becomes friends with two working class men, experiences the horrors of trench warfare, and finds love with a French girl. ... What Price Glory is a film that has been made twice, based on a 1924 play by Maxwell Anderson. ... For the films, see All Quiet on the Western Front (1930 film) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1979 film). ... Howard Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... La Grande Illusion is a 1937 film by renowned director Jean Renoir (1894-1979)—son of artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir—and is regarded by critics and film historians as one of the masterpieces of French cinema. ... Buster Keaton (born Joseph Frank Keaton, October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an American silent film comic actor and filmmaker. ... Wheeler & Woolsey famous American film comedy team of the thirties who are almost totally unknown today though their movies have survived. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... For other uses, see Central America (disambiguation). ... →this is tuff i mean kyle carters tuff Tuamotu, French Polynesia The Pacific Ocean contains an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 islands; the exact number has not been precisely determined. ... This article is about the film director. ... Bors Dilemma - he chooses to save a maiden rather than his brother Lionel Chivalry[1] is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood. ... Combat has been fought in the air since 1911. ... Wings is a 1927 silent movie about World War I fighter pilots Charles Buddy Rogers and Richard Arlen who vie for the attentions of Jobyna Ralston. ... Hells Angels Theatrical Release poster Hells Angels was a 1930 film directed by Howard Hughes. ... For the BBC Radio 2 show often referred to as the Dawn Patrol, see Sarah Kennedy The Dawn Patrol is a 1930 World War I film starring Richard Barthelmess and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ...


1940s

The first popular war films during the Second World War came from Britain and Germany and were often documentary or semi-documentary in nature. Examples include The Lion Has Wings and Target for Tonight (British) and Sieg im Westen (German). Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... The Lion Has Wings (1939) is a documentary style British propaganda film. ... Target for Tonight is a 1941 documentary film billed as being filmed by and acted by the Royal Air Force, all while under fire. ... Sieg im Westen was a 1941 German propaganda film about the Blitzkrieg in Western Europe of May and June 1940. ...


By the early 1940s, the British film industry began to combine documentary techniques with fictional stories in films like Noel Coward's In Which We Serve (1942), Millions Like Us (1943) and The Way Ahead (1944). Others used the medium of the fiction film to carry a propaganda message; about the need for vigilance (Went the Day Well?) or to avoid "careless talk" (The Next of Kin). Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971). ... Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... In Which We Serve is a 1942 war film written by and starring Noel Coward, and directed by Coward and David Lean, both making their directorial debut. ... Millions Like Us is a 1943 British propaganda film, showing life in a wartime aircraft factory in documentary detail. ... The Way Ahead is a British Second World War drama released in 1944. ... Went the Day Well? is a British war film produced by Ealing Studios in 1942. ... The Next of Kin, also known as Next of Kin, is a 1942 World War II propaganda film produced by Ealing Studios. ...


The Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 was passed by the United States Congress on September 16, 1940, becoming the first peacetime conscription in United States history. Hollywood reflected the interest of the American public in Conscription in the United States by having nearly every film studio bring out a military film comedy in 1941 with their resident comedian(s). Universal Pictures' Abbott and Costello came out with the first feature film on the subject Buck Privates and followed it with the team In The Navy and in the United States Army Air Corps to Keep 'Em Flying. Paramount Pictures' Bob Hope was Caught In The Draft, Warner Brothers told Phil Silvers and Jimmy Durante You're In The Army Now, Columbia Pictures put Fred Astaire in the army declaring You'll Never Get Rich, Hal Roach gave his new comedy team of William Tracy and Joe Sawyer Tanks a Million and 20th Century Fox had the former Hal Roach team of Laurel & Hardy going Great Guns. The minor studios such as Republic Pictures made Bob Crosby and Eddie Foy Jr Rookies on Parade and Monogram Pictures enlisted Nat Pendleton as Top Sergeant Mulligan. However, the first comedians to hit the screen in an army comedy were The Three Stooges as Boobs in Arms. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Selective Service Training Act. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... The United States has employed conscription (mandatory military service, also called the draft) several times, usually during war but also during the nominal peace of the Cold War. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Buck Privates is the 1941 comedy/World War II film that turned Bud Abbott and Lou Costello into bonafide movie stars. ... See In the Navy (film) for the 1941 Abbott & Costello film. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Keep Em Flying is a 1941 film starring the comedy team of Abbott and Costello. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Warner Bros. ... Phil Silvers (May 11, 1911 – November 1, 1985) was an American entertainer and comedy actor. ... “Inka Dinka Doo” redirects here. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ... Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... William Tracy (b. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Harold Eugene Roach, Sr. ... Laurel and Hardy Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy were the members of the most famous comedy duo in film history. ... Great Guns is a 1941 film directed by Monty Banks, produced by Sol Wurtzel for 20th Century Fox and starring Laurel and Hardy. ... Republic Pictures Corporation (aka Republic Entertainment) is an independent film, television, and video distribution company that was originally a movie production-distribution corporation with studio facilities, best known for its specialization in quality B pictures, westerns and movie serials. ... Bob Crosby (August 23, 1913 - March 9, 1993) was an American bandleader and singer. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nathaniel Greene Pendleton (August 9, 1895 - October 12, 1967) was an American Olympic wrestler and film actor. ... The Three Stooges was an American comedy act in the 20th century. ... Boobs in Arms (1940) is the 52nd of Columbia Pictures 190 short subjects starring the comedy team of the Three Stooges. ...


Serious 1941 films involving training for war included U.S. Cavalry in MGM's The Bugle Sounds, RKO's Parachute Battalion, Paramount Pictures I Wanted Wings and Warner Brothers' Dive Bomber. 20th Century Fox made the last pre-war military film about the U.S. Marine Corps To The Shores of Tripoli. When the Pearl Harbor attack occurred the studio reshot the ending to have John Payne reenlist in the Corps and march off with the Marines whilst his father implores hime ot 'Get a Jap for me'. For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The United States Cavalry was a horse-mounted cavalry force that existed in various forms between 1775 to 1942. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Warner Bros. ... A dive bomber is a bomber aircraft that dives directly at its targets in order to provide greater accuracy. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... There have been several well-known people named John Payne, including: John Payne (actor) John Payne (poet). ...


Prior to Pearl Harbor, Warner Brothers warned of Confessions of a Nazi Spy whilst PRC told of Hitler, Beast of Berlin. A metaphor for America was Gary Cooper as the real life Sergeant York who went from hillbilly hell-raiser, to pacifist, to a draftee comparing the Bible to the History of the United States and deciding that his marksmanship against the Germans was righteous. This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... Warner Bros. ... Confessions of a Nazi Spy is a 1939 spy thriller and the first blatantly anti-Nazi film produced by a major Hollywood studio prior to World War II. [1] The film stars Edward G. Robinson, George Sanders, and a large cast of German actors, including some who had immigrated from... PRCs logo 1945 One of the larger Hollywood production conglomerates of Poverty Row of the late 30s-mid 40s (along with Republic Pictures and Monogram Pictures and smaller outfits) PRC, as it was commonly known, intentionally made mostly small-budget B-movies. ... Hitler, Beast of Berlin was one of the most popular hiss and boo films of the World War II era. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American film actor of English heritage. ... For the unsuccessful U.S. weapon system, see M247 Sergeant York. ... {{refimprove| // The term Hill-Billies is first encountered in documents from 17th century Ireland. ... Pacifist may mean: an advocate of pacifism. ... “Conscript” redirects here. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... “American history” redirects here. ... Shooting is the act of causing a gun to fire at a target. ...


After the United States entered the war in 1941 Hollywood began to mass-produce war films. Many of the American dramatic war films in the early 1940s were designed to celebrate American unity and demonize "the enemy." One of the conventions of the genre that developed during the period was of a cross-section of the American people who come together with a common purpose for the good of the country, i.e. the need for mobilization. ... This article describes military mobilization. ...


The American industry also produced films designed to extol the heroics of America's allies, such as Mrs. Miniver (about a British family on the home front), Edge of Darkness (Norwegian resistance fighters) and The North Star (the Soviet Union and its Communist Party). Towards the end of the war popular books became the source of films of higher quality and more serious tone, extoling more long-term values, including Guadalcanal Diary (film) (1943), Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) and They Were Expendable (1945). Mrs. ... Bob Peck as Yorkshire police officer Ronald Craven, investigating what appears to be the accidental killing of his daughter. ... The North Star is a 1943 film produced and distributed by RKO Pictures in 1943. ... In modern usage, the term communist party is generally used to identify any political party which has adopted communist ideology. ... The cover of the DVD release of the film Guadalcanal Diary. ... The Ruptured Duck, which was the bomber depicted in the movie Nose-art of the Ruptured Duck Thirty Seconds over Tokyo is a 1944 film based on a 1943 book by Ted W. Lawson. ... They Were Expendable is a war film released in 1945. ...


1950s

The years after World War II brought a large number of mostly patriotic war films, which used the war as a backdrop for dramas and adventure stories. Many films made in Britain drew on true stories, such as The Dam Busters (1954), Dunkirk (1958), Reach for the Sky (1956) telling the life of Douglas Bader and Sink the Bismarck! (1960). The immediate aftermath of the war in Hollywood avoided the action film and delved into problems experienced by the returning veterans, turning out a number of high quality movies that included The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Battleground (1949), Home of the Brave (1949), Command Decision (1948), and Twelve O'Clock High (1949). The latter two examined the psychological effects of combat and the stresses of command. The Dam Busters is a 1954 British war film, set during the Second World War, and documenting the true story of the RAFs 617 Squadron, the development of the bouncing bomb, and Operation Chastise - the attack on the Ruhr dams in Germany. ... Dunkirk is a 2nd World War film made in 1958, starring John Mills with Bernard Lee. ... Reach For The Sky is the name of the biography of Douglas Bader, by Paul Brickhill, and also of a film of Baders story released in 1956, starring Kenneth More and directed by Lewis Gilbert. ... Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader, CBE, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar, FRAeS, DL, RAF (21 February 1910–5 September 1982); surname pronounced ) was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ... Sink the Bismarck! is a 1960 black-and-white war film based on the book The Last Nine Days of the Bismarck by C. S. Forester, and recounts the true story of the Royal Navys attempts to find and sink the famous German battleship during World War II. It... The Best Years of Our Lives is a 1946 movie about three servicemen (an air force officer, an infantry sergeant, and an ordinary sailor) trying to piece their lives back together after coming back home from World War II. It is based on a novel by MacKinlay Kantor, Glory for... Battleground is a 1949 war film which tells the story of a squad of the 101st Airborne Division trying to cope during the Battle of the Bulge at Bastogne, Belgium. ... Home of the Brave is a phrase used in the refrain of The Star Spangled Banner, the national anthem of the United States. ... Twelve OClock High is a 1949 film about the United States Army Air Forces crews who flew daylight bombing missions against Germany and occupied France during World War II. The movie was adapted by Sy Bartlett, Henry King (uncredited) and Beirne Lay Jr. ...


Hollywood films in the 1950s and 1960s were often inclined towards spectacular heroics or self-sacrifice in films like Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), Halls of Montezuma (1950) or D-Day the Sixth of June (1956). They also tended to toward stereotyping: typically, a small group of ethnically diverse men would come together but would not be developed much beyond their ethnicity; the senior officer would often be unreasonable and unyielding; almost anyone sharing personal information - especially plans for returning home - would die shortly thereafter and anyone acting in a cowardly or unpatriotic manner would convert to heroism or die (or both, in quick succession). Twentieth-Century Fox made a succession of war movies realistically-filmed in black-and-white in the early 1950s that highlighted little-known aspects of World War II, among them The Frogmen, Go For Broke!, You're in the Navy Now, and Decision Before Dawn. ... Sands of Iwo Jima is a 1949 war film which follows a group of Marines from training to the Battle of Iwo Jima during World War II. It stars John Wayne, John Agar, Adele Mara and Forrest Tucker. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Related articles FOX Television Network Fox Searchlight Pictures Fox Entertainment Group List of Hollywood movie studios List of movies Variant of current 20th Century Fox logo External links 20th Century Fox Movies official site Twentieth Century Fox is also the punning title of a song by The Doors on their... The movie The Frogmen (made by Twentieth Century Fox, 1951), is based on some USA frogman operations against the Japanese in WWII. It contains obvious errors in the mens diving equipment. ... Go for Broke! is a war film released in 1951. ... Youre in the Navy Now is a Hollywood film released in 1951 by Twentieth Century Fox about the United States Navy in the first months of World War II. Its initial release was titled USS Teakettle. ... Decision Before Dawn is a 1950 war film which tells the story of an American Army, looking for intelligence in the closing days of World War II, which has to rely on potentially unreliable German prisoners to gather information. ...


Another large group of films emerged from the plethora of popular war novels penned after the war. Their quality was largely dependent on their faithfulness to the plot or theme of the original, casting, direction,and production values. Much of their appeal for the American public was that they covered virtually every branch of the service involved in the war. These include: The Young Lions (1958), The Naked and the Dead (1958), Battle Cry (1955), Run Silent, Run Deep (1958), Captain Newman, M.D. (1963), The Caine Mutiny (1954), Away All Boats (1956), From Here to Eternity (1953), Kings Go Forth (1958), Never So Few (1959), The Mountain Road (1960), and In Harm's Way (1965). The Young Lions was novel by Irwin Shaw and a 1958 film based upon the book starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, and Dean Martin. ... The Naked and the Dead is a 1948 novel, the first written by Norman Mailer. ... For other uses of Battle Cry, see Battle Cry (disambiguation). ... Run Silent, Run Deep is a war film released in 1958. ... Captain Newman, M.D. is a 1963 film with Bobby Darin. ... The Caine Mutiny, a 1954 movie directed by Edward Dmytryk, and based on Herman Wouks Pulitzer Prize-winning (1951), best-selling novel and subsequent stage hit (The Caine Mutiny Court Martial), provided Humphrey Bogart with the next-to-last great role of his acting career and a spectacular comeback... Away All Boats is a 1956 war film made by Universal Pictures. ... From Here to Eternity is a 1953 movie based on a James Jones novel in which characters work through ordinary bouts of intimidation and infidelity on a military base in the days preceding the attack on Pearl Harbor. ... Kings Go Forth is a 1958 World War II movie about racism starring Frank Sinatra, Tony Curtis, and Natalie Wood. ... The Movie Never So Fewis a 1959 film directed by John Sturges starring Frank Sinatra, Gina Lollobrigida, Peter Lawford, and Steve McQueen. ... The Mountain Road is a 1961 war film starring James Stewart and directed by Daniel Mann. ... In Harms Way is a 1965 film, produced and directed by Otto Preminger and distributed by Paramount Pictures. ...


POW films

A popular sub-genre of war films in the 1950s and '60s was the prisoner of war film. This was a form popularised in Britain and recounted stories of real escapes from (usually German) P.O.W. camps in World War II. Examples include The Wooden Horse (1950), Albert R.N. (1953) and The Colditz Story (1955). Hollywood also made its own contribution to the genre with The Great Escape (1963) and the fictional Stalag 17 (1953). Other fictional P.O.W. films include The Captive Heart (1947), Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), King Rat (1965), Danger Within (1958), The Secret War of Harry Frigg (1968) and Hart's War (2002). Unusually, the British industry also produced a film based on German escaper Franz von Werra, The One That Got Away in (1957). A genre [], (French: kind or sort from Greek: γένος (genos)) is a loose set of criteria for a category of literary composition; the term is also used for any other form of art or utterance. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... The Wooden Horse is a 1950 2nd World War film starring Leo Genn, Anthony Steel and David Tomlinson. ... Albert R.N. is a 1953 World War II film starring Anthony Steel and directed by Lewis Gilbert. ... The Colditz Story is a 1955 World War II film starring John Mills and Eric Portman. ... The Great Escape, written by James Clavell, W.R. Burnett, and Walter Newman (uncredited), and directed by John Sturges is a popular 1963 World War II film, based on a true story about Allied prisoners of war with a record for escaping from German prisoner-of-war camps. ... Stalag 17 is a 1953 war film which tells the story of a group of American G.I.s held in a German World War II prisoner of war camp who come to believe one of their number is a traitor. ... VHS cover for The Captive Heart The Captive Heart is a 1946 British war drama, directed by Basil Dearden. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bridge over the River Kwai taken in June 2004. ... King Rat is a 1965 film version of the James Clavell novel King Rat. ... Danger Within is a 1959 British war film set in a Prisoner of war camp in Northern Italy during the summer of 1943. ... The Secret War of Harry Frigg is a 1968 comedy film, directed by Jack Smight and starring Paul Newman. ... Based on the novel by John Katzenbach Harts War is a 2002 film about a fictional World War II prisoner of war camp starring Bruce Willis, Colin Farrell and Terrance Howard. ... Franz von Werra (1914-1941) was a German WWII fighter ace who escaped from a British POW camp in Canada. ... The One That Got Away is a 1957 World War II film starring Hardy Krüger. ...


1960s

By the early 1960s films based on commando missions like The Gift Horse (1952) based on the St. Nazaire raid, and Ill Met by Moonlight (1956) had begun to inspire fictional adventure films such as The Guns of Navarone (1961), The Dirty Dozen (1967) and Where Eagles Dare (1968), which used the war as the backdrop for spectacular action films. The latter films had American producers, stars and financing but were filmed in England or on location with British film crews, supporting actors, and expertise. For other uses, see Commando (disambiguation). ... For the Lost Dogs album, see Gift Horse. ... Saint-Nazaire is also a commune of the Gard département of France. ... Poster for Ill Met by Moonlight. ... This article is about the film, for the novel see The Guns of Navarone (novel) The Guns of Navarone is a 1961 film based on a well-known 1957 novel about World War II by Scottish thriller writer Alistair MacLean. ... For the rap group, see D12. ... Where Eagles Dare is a 1968 film directed by Brian G. Hutton and starring Richard Burton, Clint Eastwood, and Mary Ure. ...


The late 1950s and 1960s also brought some more thoughtful big war films like Andrei Tarkovsky's Ivan's Childhood (1962), David Lean's Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), and Lawrence of Arabia (1962) as well as a fashion for all-star epics based on battles which were often quasi-documentary in style and filmed in Europe where extras and production costs were cheaper. This trend was started by Darryl F. Zanuck's production The Longest Day in 1962, based on the first day of the 1944 D-Day landings. Other examples included Battle of the Bulge (1965), Anzio (1968), Battle of Britain (1969), Waterloo (1970), Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970) (based on the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor), Midway (1976) and A Bridge Too Far (1977). A more recent example is the American Civil War film Gettysburg which was based on events during the battle, including the defense of Little Round Top by Colonel Joshua Chamberlain. “Tarkovsky” redirects here. ... My Name is Ivan (in America) (aka Ivans Childhood, Ivanovo detstvo) is a Soviet film made in 1962 by Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky. ... Sir David Lean, KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, and Doctor Zhivago . ... The Bridge over the River Kwai taken in June 2004. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Darryl Francis Zanuck (September 5, 1902–December 22, 1979) was a producer, writer, actor and director who played a major part in the Hollywood studio system as one of its longest survivors (the length of his career being rivalled only by that of Adolph Zukor). ... The Longest Day is a 3-hour-long 1962 war film with a very large cast, based on the 1959 book The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan, about D-Day, the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944, during World War II. // The movie was adapted by Romain Gary, James... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... Battle of the Bulge is a war film released in 1965. ... Battle of Britain is a 1969 film directed by Guy Hamilton, and produced by Harry Saltzman and S Benjamin Fisz. ... Waterloo was a Soviet-Italian film of 1970, directed by Sergei Bondarchuk and produced by Dino De Laurentiis. ... For the Melvinss album, see Tora Tora Tora (album) Tora! Tora! Tora! is a 1970 American-Japanese film that dramatizes the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the series of American blunders that unintentionally improved its effectiveness. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... Midway is a 1976 war film made by the Mirisch Corporation and released by Universal Pictures . ... A Bridge Too Far is a 1977 film based on the 1974 book of the same name. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Gettysburg is a 1993 movie which depicts the decisive American Civil War battle in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. ... Little Round Top, western slope, photographed by Timothy H. OSullivan, 1863. ... Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (September 8, 1828 – February 24, 1914) was a college professor from Maine who volunteered to join the Union Army without the benefit of any formal military education, and became a highly respected and decorated Union officer during the American Civil War, reaching the rank of brigadier general...


Though trouble in Southeast Asia was shown in Jack L. Warner's Brushfire (1961), and Marshall Thompson's A Yank in Viet-Nam (1964) and To the Shores of Hell (1966), the major Hollywood studios refused to make any Vietnam War films with the exception of John Wayne's The Green Berets (film) based on the best selling book by Robin Moore and using the theme song Ballad of the Green Berets. No Vietnam war films followed until Jack Starrett's Nam Angels AKA The Losers (1970) filmed on Philippine sets left over from Robert Aldrich's Too Late the Hero (1970). Location of Southeast Asia Southeast Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... This article is about Jack Warner, the head of Warner Brothers. ... Actor Marshall Thompson in To Hell and Back (1955) Marshall Thompson (November 27, 1925 - May 18, 1992) was an American film and television actor. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... The Green Berets is the title of a 1968 film starring John Wayne and featuring George Takei, David Janssen, Jim Hutton, and Aldo Ray. ... Robin Moore (b. ... Ballad of the Green Berets is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special force in the U.S. Army. ... Jack Starrett (November 2, 1936 – March 27, 1989) was an American actor and director from Refugio, Texas. ... Robert Aldrich (August 9, 1918 – December 5, 1983) was a United States film director, writer and producer notable for a number of films including What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte, and The Dirty Dozen. ... Too Late the Hero is a war film released in 1970. ...


Post-Vietnam films

The effects of the Vietnam War tended to diminish the appetite for fictional war films by the turn of the 1970s. American war films produced during and just after the Vietnam War often reflected the disillusion of the American public towards the war. Most films made after the Vietnam War delved more deeply into the horrors of war than movies made before it. (This is not to say that there were no such films before the Vietnam War; Paths of Glory is a notable critique of war from 1957, the beginning of the Vietnam War era.) Later war films like Catch-22 (set in WWII) and the black comedy MASH (set in Korea), reflected some of these attitudes. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Paths of Glory (1957) is a debatedly anti-war black and white film by Stanley Kubrick based on the novel of the same name by Humphrey Cobb. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Catch-22 is a 1970 film, adapted from the book of the same name by Joseph Heller. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into articles entitled Black comedy and List of black comedies, accessible from a disambiguation page. ... MASH is a 1970 satirical American dark comedy film directed by Robert Altman and based on the novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker. ...


In the late 1970s and 1980s, the American industry produced war films critical of American involvement in Vietnam, including Apocalypse Now, Go Tell the Spartans, Platoon, Full Metal Jacket and Casualties of War, and others, such as Hamburger Hill that emphasized the soldiers' suffering. Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy and Golden Globe award winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... Go Tell the Spartans is a low-budget and critically acclaimed 1978 American film about U.S. advisors in the early days of the Vietnam War. ... Platoon is a 1986 Vietnam war film, written and directed by Oliver Stone and starring Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, Charlie Sheen and Forest Whitaker. ... For the type of ammunition, see Full metal jacket bullet. ... Casualties of War is a 1989 war drama about the Vietnam War, starring Michael J. Fox and Sean Penn. ... A hill situated in Duncans Dam, see Dam Hambuger Hill Hamburger Hill is a 1987 American movie starring Dylan McDermott and Michael Boatman, directed by John Irvin and written by James Carabatsos. ...


1990's to 2000's

The success of Steven Spielberg's visceral Saving Private Ryan in 1998, helped to usher in a revival of interest in World War II films. A number of these, such as Pearl Harbor and Enemy at the Gates were aimed fairly squarely at the blockbuster market, while others, like Enigma, Captain Corelli's Mandolin, and Charlotte Gray, were more nostalgic in tone. Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 Academy-Award-winning film set in World War II, directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Enemy at the Gates is a 2001 motion picture directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, starring Jude Law and Ed Harris. ... Enigma is a 2001 film set in World War II. It stars Dougray Scott and Kate Winslet and is based on a novel of the same title by Robert Harris (Enigma). ... Captain Corellis Mandolin, a 1993 novel written by Louis de Bernières, is a story about an Italian captain (Antonio Corelli) and the daughter (Pelagia) of the local physician (Dr. Iannis) on the island of Kefalonia set against the background of the Italian/German occupation of the island during... Charlotte Gray is a 1999 book by Sebastian Faulks. ...


The military and the film industry

Many war films have been produced with the cooperation of a nation's military forces. The United States Navy has been very cooperative since World War II in providing ships and technical guidance; Top Gun is the most famous example. The U.S. Air Force provided considerable verisimilitude for The Big Lift, Strategic Air Command and A Gathering of Eagles, filmed on Air Force bases and using Air Force personnel in many roles. USN redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Top Gun is a 1986 American film directed by Tony Scott and produced by Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer in association with Paramount Pictures. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... The Big Lift is a 1950 film that was shot on location in the city of Berlin, Germany, and tells the story of two Air Force sergeants (played by Montgomery Clift and Paul Douglas) who meet and fall in love with two women in Berlin during the 1948/1949 Berlin... For the film of the same name, see Strategic Air Command (film) The Strategic Air Command (SAC) was the operational establishment of the United States Air Force in charge of Americas bomber-based and ballistic missile-based strategic nuclear arsenal from 1946 to 1992. ... A Gathering of Eagles is a 1963 movie about the Cold War and the pressures of command. ...


Typically, the military will not assist filmmakers if the film is critical of them. Sometimes the military demands some editorial control in exchange for their cooperation, which can bias the result. The German Ministry of Propaganda, making the epic war film Kolberg in January 1945, used several divisions of soldiers as extras. Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels believed the impact of the film would offset the tactical disadvantages of the missing soldiers. Soviet Propaganda Poster during World War II. The text reads Red Army Fighter, SAVE US! Chinese propaganda poster from the time of the Cultural Revolution. ... Kolberg is a 1945 German propaganda film directed by Veit Harlan and Wolfgang Liebeneiner. ... Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ) (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ...


If the home nation's military will not cooperate, or if filming in the home nation is too expensive, another country's may assist. Many 1950s and 1960s war movies, including the Oscar-winning films Patton, Lawrence of Arabia, and Spartacus, were shot in Spain, which had large supplies of both Allied and Axis equipment. The Napoleonic epic Waterloo was shot in Ukraine (then part of the Soviet Union), using Soviet soldiers. The D-Day scenes in Saving Private Ryan were shot with the cooperation of the Irish army, and all of the major sequences in Dark Blue World were shot in the Czech Republic, at a disused air force base. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Patton is a 1970 epic biographical film which tells the story of General George S. Pattons commands during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. ... Lawrence of Arabia is an award-winning 1962 film based on the life of T. E. Lawrence. ... Spartacus is a 1960 film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Howard Fast about the historical life of Spartacus and the Third Servile War. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Waterloo was a film of 1970, directed by Sergei Bondarchuk. ... Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 Academy-Award-winning film set in World War II, directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. ... Dark Blue World (Czech: Tmavomodrý svět) is a 2001 film by Czech director Jan Svěrák about Czechoslovakian pilots who fought for the British Royal Air Force during World War II. The screenplay was written by Zdeněk Svěrák, the father of...


See also

Soviet Propaganda Poster during World War II. The text reads Red Army Fighter, SAVE US! Chinese propaganda poster from the time of the Cultural Revolution. ... In film theory, genre refers to the primary method of film categorization. ... This is a list of war film or films depicting aspects of historical wars. ... A list of war films that are based on books. ... Below is an incomplete list of full-length films to feature or partly feature events of World War II in the narrative. ... World War I was never quite so fertile a topic as World War II for American fiction, but there were nevertheless a large number of fictional works created about it in Europe, Canada, and Australia. ... Many types of fiction have involved events in the World War II time period. ... Many types of fiction have involved events in the Vietnam War time period. ... Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein is a well-known example of military science fiction. ... Staged fights in Cinema include performances of classical fencing, historical fencing, martial arts, close combat and duels in general, as well as choreography of full-scale battles. ... The United States Marine Corps on film began with The Star Spangled Banner (1918), the United States Marine Corps discovered the use of motion pictures. ...

External links

  • http://movies.groups.yahoo.com/group/Warflicks/
  • List of World War II Movies at WWII Movies
  • Top War Movies at the Internet Movie Database
  • War Movies & Literature Discussion Forum
  • War Movie Reviews and News at WarMovieBlog

  Results from FactBites:
 
Official War Photographers - Hurley and Parer photographs and film [Australian War Memorial] (271 words)
Some of their images have achieved icon status, but these men are only two of a large number of war photographers (taking both still and moving images) whose work is held in the Memorial's collection.
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There is little of the war experience which is not represented in the collection among the work of the official war photographers.
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