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Encyclopedia > War correspondent

A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see War (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Methods

Their jobs require war correspondents to deliberately go to the most conflict-ridden parts of the world. Once there they attempt to get close enough to the action to provide written accounts, photos, or film footage. Thus, being a war correspondent is often considered the most dangerous form of journalism. On the other hand, war coverage is also one of the most successful branches of journalism. Newspaper sales increase greatly in wartime and television news ratings go up. News organizations have sometimes been accused of warmongering because of the advantages they gather from conflict. William Randolph Hearst is often said to have encouraged the Spanish-American War for this reason. (See Yellow journalism) Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ...


Only some conflicts receive extensive worldwide coverage, however. Among recent wars, the Kosovo War received a great deal of coverage, as did the Gulf War. Many third-world wars, however, tend to received less substantial coverage because global audiences are often less interested and the conflicts are also far more dangerous for war correspondents. The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Third World (disambiguation). ...


History

Written war correspondents have existed as long as journalism. Before modern journalism it was more common for longer histories to be written at the end of a conflict. The first known of these is Herodotus's account of the Persian Wars, however he did not himself participate in the events. Thucydides, who some years later wrote a history of the Peloponnesian Wars was an observer to the events he described. Herodotus of Halicarnassus (Greek: Hērodotos Halikarnāsseus) was a Greek historian from Ionia who lived in the 5th century BC (ca. ... Persian Wars redirects here. ... Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ...


The first modern war correspondent is said to be Dutch painter Willem van de Velde, who in 1653 took to sea in a small boat to observe a naval battle between the Dutch and the English, of which he made many sketches on the spot, which he later developed into one big drawing that he added to a report he wrote to the States General. A further modernization came with the development of newspapers and magazines . One of the earliest war correspondents was Henry Crabb Robinson, who covered Napoleon's campaigns in Spain and Germany for The Times of London. William Howard Russell who covered the Crimean War, also for The Times, is often described as the first modern war correspondent. The stories from this era, which were almost as lengthy and analytical as early books on war, took many weeks from being written to being published. The Battle of Schooneveld, 7 June 1673 by Willem van de Velde, painted 1674. ... The States-General (Staten-Generaal) is the parliament of the Netherlands. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Henry Crabb Robinson (1775 - 1867), diarist, born at Bury St. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Categories: People stubs | 1821 births | 1907 deaths ... Combatants Allies: Second French Empire British Empire Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,194 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease ~134,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1853–1856) was fought...


It was not until the telegraph was developed that reports could be sent on a daily basis and events could be reported as they occurred that the short mainly descriptive stories of today became common. The continued progress of technology has allowed live coverage of events via satellite up-links. The rise of twenty-four hour news channels has led to a heightened demand for coverage. Telegraph and Telegram redirect here. ... For other uses, see Satellite (disambiguation). ...


Early film and television news rarely had war correspondents. Rather they would simply collect footage provided by other sources, often the government, and the news anchor would then add narration. This footage was often staged as cameras were large and bulky. This changed dramatically with the Vietnam War when networks from around the world sent cameramen with portable cameras and correspondents. This proved damaging to the United States as the full brutality of war became a daily feature on the nightly news. “Anchorman” redirects here. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Notable war correspondents

Some of them became authors of fiction drawing on their war experiences, including Davis, Crane and Hemingway.

Kate Adie (born September 19, 1945) is a British journalist. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Rwandan Genocide was the 1994 mass killing of hundreds of thousands of ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutu sympathizers in Rwanda and was the largest atrocity during the Rwandan Civil War. ... Combatants Government of Sierra Leone Sierra Leone Army Kamajors / South African mercenaries Nigerian-led ECOMOG forces United Kingdom Revolutionary United Front Armed Forces Revolutionary Council West Side Boys Liberia Commanders Ahmad Tejan Kabbah Samuel Hinga Norman Valentine Strasser Solomon Musa David J. Richards Tony Blair Foday Sankoh Johnny Paul Koroma... Christiane Amanpour, CBE (born January 12, 1958) (in Persian: ) is the chief international correspondent for CNN. // Shortly after her birth in London, her British mother Patricia, and her father Mohammed, an Iranian airline executive, moved the family to Tehran. ... Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim... Peter Arnett (born November 13, 1934 in Riverton, New Zealand) is a New Zealand-American journalist. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants Taliban al-Qaeda IMU Hezbi Islami United States ISAF Afghanistan Northern Alliance Commanders Mohammed Omar Obaidullah Akhund # Mullah Dadullah  Jalaluddin Haqqani Osama bin Laden Ayman al-Zawahiri Mohammad Atef  Juma Namangani  Tohir Yo‘ldosh Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Bismillah Khan Mohammed Fahim Abdul Rashid Dostum Dan McNeill Guy Laroche Ton van... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett (1881–1931) was a British war correspondent during the First World War. ... Combatants Russian Empire Principality of Montenegro [1] Empire of Japan Commanders Emperor Nicholas II Aleksey Kuropatkin Stepan Makarov â€  Emperor Meiji Oyama Iwao Heihachiro Togo The Russo–Japanese War (Japanese: Nichi-Ro Sensō, Russian: Russko-Yaponskaya Voyna, Chinese: RìézhànzhÄ“ng, February 10, 1904–September 5, 1905) was a conflict... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino casualties... For the British skier of the same name, please see Martin Bell (skier). ... The Nigerian Civil War, July 6, 1967 – January 13, 1970, was a political conflict caused by the attempted secession of the southeastern provinces of Nigeria as the self-proclaimed republic of Biafra. ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Combatants MPLA Republic of Cuba AAF Mozambique[1] UNITA FNLA South Africa Republic of Zaire Commanders José Eduardo dos Santos Jonas Savimbi Casualties Over 500,000 militants[2] and hundreds of thousands of civilians The Angolan Civil War began when Angola won its war for independence in 1975 with the... Mary Marvin Breckinridge Patterson (1905-2002) , usually known as Marvin Breckinridge Patterson, or Marvin Breckinridge, was an American photojournalist, cinematographer, and philanthropist. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Wilfred Graham Burchett (September 16, 1911, Melbourne, Australia — September 27, 1983, Sofia, Bulgaria) was a war correspondent and alleged KGB agent. ... For other uses, see Pacific War (disambiguation). ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Combatants China United States1 Soviet Union2 Japan Manchukuo3 Mengjiang3 Wang Jingwei Government 3 Commanders Chiang Kai-shek, Chen Cheng, Yan Xishan, Feng Yuxiang, Li Zongren, Xue Yue, Bai Chongxi, Peng Dehuai, Joseph Stilwell, Albert Wedemeyer, Claire Chennault, Aleksandr Vasilevsky Hirohito, Fumimaro Konoe, Hideki Tojo, Kotohito Kanin, Matsui Iwane, Hajime... Animation of the WWII European Theatre. ... Combatants French Union France State of Vietnam Cambodia Laos Viet Minh Commanders French Expeditionary Corps Philippe Leclerc de Hauteclocque (1945-46) Jean-Étienne Valluy (1946-8) Roger Blaizot (1948-9) Marcel-Maurice Carpentier (1949-50) Jean de Lattre de Tassigny (1950-51) Raoul Salan (1952-3) Henri Navarre (1953-4... U.S. Army soldier removes fuse from a Russian-made mine to clear a minefield outside of Fallujah, Iraq. ... Chapelle at the Don Phuc command post on the Vietnam-Cambodia border, 1964. ... Combatants Soviet Union ÁVH Hungarian government, various nationalist militias Commanders Yuri Andropov Pál Maléter, Béla Király, Gergely Pongrátz, József Dudás Strength 150,000 troops, 6,000 tanks 100,000+ demonstrators (some later armed), unknown number of soldiers Casualties 720 killed according to official... Churchill redirects here. ... Combatants British Empire پشتون Pashtun tribes Commanders William Hope Meiklejohn, Sir Bindon Blood Fakir Saidullah[1] Strength 10,630 on July 26, 1897[2] 10,000[3] Casualties 173 killed and wounded in the Malakand camps,[4][5] 33 killed and wounded at Chakdara,[6] 206 killed and wounded in total... Combatants British Empire:  United Kingdom British India Australia[1]  Egypt Italy[2] Belgium[3] Mahdist Sudan Commanders Charles George Gordon â€  Herbert Kitchener Muhammad Ahmad Abdullah  The Mahdist War was a colonial war of the late 19th century. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State South African Republic Commanders Sir Redvers Buller Lord Kitchener Lord Roberts Paul Kruger Louis Botha Koos de la Rey Martinus Steyn Christiaan de Wet Casualties 6,000 - 7,000 (A further ~14,000 from disease) 6,000 - 8,000 (Unknown number from disease) Civilians... Sir Basil Clarke (1879-12 Dec 1947) was an early pioneer of public relations (PR). ... Combatants Belgium British Empire Australia[1] Canada[2] India[3] Newfoundland[4] New Zealand[5] South Africa[6] United Kingdom France and French Overseas Empire Portugal[7] United States Germany Commanders No unified command until 1918, then Ferdinand Foch Moltke → Falkenhayn → Hindenburg and Ludendorff → Hindenburg and Groener Casualties ~4,800... For the U.S. Continental Congress delegate, see Stephen Crane (delegate). ... (Redirected from 1897 Greco-Turkish War) The Greco-Turkish War of 1897, also called the Thirty Days War, was a war between Greece and the Ottoman Empire. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... For other persons named Richard Davis, see Richard Davis (disambiguation). ... Combatants Central Powers:  Austria-Hungary  German Empire Bulgaria Allied Powers: Serbia  France (1915-1918) United Kingdom (1915-1918) Greece (1916-1918) Italy (1916-1918) Commanders August von Mackensen Oskar Potiorek Nikola Zhekov Petar Bojović Živojin MiÅ¡ić Maurice Sarrail Adolphe Guillaumat Franchet dEsperey George Milne Panagiotis Danglis Conquest of... Richard Dimbleby CBE (May 25, 1913–December 22, 1965) was an English journalist and broadcaster. ... Gloria Emerson (b. ... Richard Engel is NBC News Middle East correspondent and Beirut Bureau chief. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... Combatants Hezbollah Lebanon Amal[2] LCP[3] PFLP-GC[4]  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah Dan Halutz Moshe Kaplinsky[11] Udi Adam Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[5] Up to 10,000 ground troops. ... Bernard B. Fall (November 19, 1926-February 21, 1967) was a prominent war correspondent, historian, political scientist, and expert on Indochina during the 1950s and 1960s. ... U.S. Army soldier removes fuse from a Russian-made mine to clear a minefield outside of Fallujah, Iraq. ... For people named Robert Fiske, see Robert Fiske (disambiguation). ... Combatants Lebanese Front Syria LNM PLO Commanders Bachir Gemayel Dany Chamoun Kamal Jumblatt Yasser Arafat The Lebanese Civil War (1975–1990) was a multifaceted civil war whose antecedents trace back to the conflicts and political compromises reached after the end of Lebanons administration by the Ottoman Empire. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Iranian Revolution (also known as the Islamic Revolution,[1][2][3][4][5][6] Persian: انقلاب اسلامی, Enghelābe Eslāmi) was the revolution that transformed Iran from a monarchy under Shah Mohammad Reza... Combatants  Iran Kurdish Peshmerga Iraq Peoples Mujahedin of Iran Commanders Ruhollah Khomeini Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani Ali Shamkhani Mostafa Chamran â€  Saddam Hussein Ali Hassan al-Majid Strength 305,000 soldiers 500,000 Pasdaran and Basij militia 900 tanks 1,000 armored vehicles 3,000 artillery pieces 470 aircraft 750 helicopters... Combatants Algerian government Islamic Armed Movement (MIA) Islamic Salvation Army (AIS) others. ... The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... Martha Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn (8 November 1908 - 15 February 1998) was an American novelist and journalist considered one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century. ... Combatants Israel Egypt Syria Jordan Iraq Commanders Yitzhak Rabin, Moshe Dayan, Uzi Narkiss, Israel Tal, Mordechai Hod, Ariel Sharon Abdel Hakim Amer, Abdul Munim Riad, Zaid ibn Shaker, Hafez al-Assad Strength 264,000 (incl. ... U.S. Army Rangers prepare to take La Comandancia in Panama during Operation Just Cause, December 1989. ... Georgie Anne Geyer is an American journalist and columnist for the Universal Press Syndicate. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Lodewijk Hermen Grondijs was born in 1878 in the Dutch East-Indies, now known as Indonesia, where he spent most of his youth and graduated in 1896 from grammar school. ... Combatants Local Soviet powers led by Russian SFSR and Red Army Far Eastern Republic Chinese Volunteers White Movement Allied Intervention: Japan Czechoslovakia Greece  United States  Canada Serbia Romania  Turkey UK  France Foreign volunteers: Polish Italian Local nationalist movements, national states, and decentralist movements  German Empire  Mongolia Warlords Commanders Vladimir Lenin... Combatants National Revolutionary Army, Republic of China Imperial Japanese Army, Empire of Japan Commanders Zhang Xueliang, Ma Zhanshan, Feng Zhanhai, Ting Chao Shigeru Honjo, Jiro Tamon, Senjuro Hayashi Strength 160,000 men 30,000 - 60,450 men Casualties  ?  ? The Japanese invasion of Manchuria began on September 19, 1931, one day... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the author and journalist. ... Macdonald Hastings (1909–October 4, 1982), journalist and war correspondent. ... Sir Max Hastings (born December 28, 1945) is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Michael Herr (born in 1940, Syracuse, New York) is a writer and former war correspondent, best known as the author of Dispatches (1977), a memoir of his time as a correspondent for Esquire magazine (1967-1969) during the Vietnam War. ... Marguerite Higgins (September 3, 1920 - January 3, 1966), American reporter and war correspondent. ... Ryszard KapuÅ›ciÅ„ski   (March 4, 1932 - January 23, 2007) was a popular Polish journalist, author, publicist and poet both at home and abroad. ... Terence Ellis Lloyd (November 21, 1952 – March 22, 2003) was a British television journalist well-known for his reporting from the Middle East. ... Lara Logan (born March 29, 1971) is a television journalist for CBS News in the United States. ... Anthony Loyd is a noted British war correspondent. ... Anne OHare McCormick (1882-1954) was a foreign news correspondent for the New York Times, in an era where the field was almost exclusively a mans world. In 1937, she won the Pulitzer Prize for foreign correspondence, becoming the first woman to receive a major category Pulitzer award. ... Alan Moorehead (1910-1983), born in Melbourne, Australia, went to England in 1937 and became a foreign correspondent for the London Daily Express. ... Edward R. Ed Murrow (April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965) was an American journalist and media figure. ... Jean-Paul Ney is a French-Spanish photojournalist, author and TV director. ... Spanish stamp (2002) tribute to Captain Alatriste, Pérez-Revertes most famous character. ... TVE may stand for: Televisión Española Township and Village Enterprise This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Combatants Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Predominantly Bosniak) Army of Republika Srpska, Yugoslav Peoples Army, various paramilitary units from Serbia and Montenegro (Serbian) Croatian Defence Council, Croatian Army (Croatian) Commanders Alija Izetbegović (President of Bosnia and Herzegovina) Sefer Halilović (Army chief of staff 1992-1993) Rasim... John Pilger John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, UK. // Life and career Pilgers career in journalism began in 1958, and he has developed his reputation through both his reporting and the various books and documentary films... Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya (Russian: ; 30 August 1958 – 7 October 2006) was a Russian journalist and human rights activist well known for her opposition to the Chechen conflict and the Putin administration. ... Ernie Pyle on board the U.S.S. Cabot. ... Daniel Irvin Rather, Jr. ... With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... Categories: People stubs | 1821 births | 1907 deaths ... This article needs cleanup. ... Morley Safer (born November 8, 1931 in Toronto, Canada) is a reporter and correspondent for CBS News. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ... The Killing Fields (1984) is an award-winning dramatic British film based on the experiences of the journalists Dith Pran, who survived the Khmer Rouge regime, Sydney Schanberg, and Jon Swain. ... Kurt Schork Kurt Schork (1947 – May 24, 2000) – was an American reporter and war correspondent. ... Sigrid Schultz (January 5, 1893 – May 14, 1980) was a notable American reporter and war correspondent in an era when women were a rarity in both print and radio journalism. ... Giuliana Sgrena Giuliana Sgrena (born December 20, 1948) is a well-known Italian journalist and author who works for the Italian communist newspaper Il Manifesto and the German weekly Die Zeit. ... John Simpson has been World Affairs Editor for BBC News since 1998. ... Kevin Sites is a war correspondent who has spent more than 5 years covering wars around the world. ... Benjamin Cummings Truman (October 25, 1835 - July 18, 1916), was a American journalist and author; in particular, he was a distinguished war correspondent during the American Civil War, and an authority on duels. ... Kate Webb (1943 - May 13, 2007) was a New Zealand born Australian foreign correspondent for UPI and Agence France Presse. ... Eric Lloyd Williams (1915-1988) was a South African-born journalist and war correspondent who covered World War II for the South African Press Association and Reuters. ... The first woman war correspondent was Lady Sarah Wilson who covered the Siege of Mafeking for the Daily Mail during the Boer War. ... Mafikeng is the capital of the North West Province, South Africa, 870 miles NE of Cape Town and 492 miles SSW of Bulawayo by rail, and 162 miles in a direct line W by N of Johannesburg. ... Reginald William Winchester Wilmot (21 June 1911 – 10 January 1954) was an Australian war correspondent who reported for the BBC and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation during the Second World War. ...

See also

Journalism Portal

Mike Boettcher - From 1980 to 1984, worked at CNN as national security correspondent, covering riots in Miami, the Cuban refugee boat lift, the Israel invasion of Lebanon, the Falklands War, and the kidnapping of General Dozier in Rome. Boettcher then went to work for NBC News as a correspondent and a contributor to "NBC Nightly News," "Today," "Dateline," and MSNBC. He covered the wars in Central & Latin America, Africa, Kosovo, the "First Gulf War," Operation Desert Storm and Afghanistan. Image File history File links Portal. ... An embedded civilian journalist taking photographs of US soldiers in Panama. ... Press pool refers to a group of news gathering organizations pooling their resources in the collection of news. ...


Boettcher has received numerous awards, including four National Emmys, a Peabody, five National Headliner awards and the top award from the National Society of Professional Journalists. He has received the Associated Press Award for Best Spot News Reporting and an award from United Press International for Best Documentary.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
War correspondent - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (753 words)
A war in Europe, such as the conflict in the former Yugoslavia receives a great deal of coverage, as does the Israeli-Palestinian conflict or anything involving the troops of the audience's country.
One of the earliest war correspondents was Henry Crabb Robinson, who covered Napoleon's campaigns in Spain and Germany for The Times of London.
Later in the Gulf War the military found that if exciting, but sanitized, footage could be provided to the media they would use it instead of more expensive and difficult to obtain pictures from the ground.
Newseum War Stories: An Essay by Harry Evans (2297 words)
He faced none of the frustrations and dilemmas of the modern war correspondent because he was taking part in the battle himself, as the commanding general of the invasion of Britain in the year 55 B.C. Julius Caesar is one of a very long line of soldiers who reported their own campaigns firsthand.
Thucydides was a military officer and his "History of the Peloponnesian War" was informed by his experience in command of the Greek fleet at Thasos in 424 B.C. and his defeat by the Spartan general Brasidas.
For the modern war correspondent, the imponderables are more numerous and the canvas broader than it was for battle participants like Caesar, who practiced war journalism before it was invented.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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