FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Wandering Jew
The Wandering Jew by Gustave Doré.
The Wandering Jew by Gustave Doré.

The Wandering Jew is a figure from medieval Christian folklore that began to spread in Europe in the thirteenth century and became a fixture of Christian mythology. It concerns a Jew who, according to legend, taunted Jesus on the way to the Crucifixion and was then cursed to walk the earth until the Second Coming. The exact nature of the wanderer's indiscretion varies in different versions of the tale, as do aspects of his character; sometimes he is said to be a shoemaker or other tradesman, sometimes he is the doorman at Pontius Pilate's estate, and sometimes the myth is transferred to a Roman rather than a Jew. The Jew himself, when interviewed is presented as able to give first-hand accounts, sometimes corrective, of historical events. Image File history File links The Wandering Jew, by Gustave Doré Found at [1]. From Public domain image resources, we have: Visual arts File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Wandering Jew, by Gustave Doré Found at [1]. From Public domain image resources, we have: Visual arts File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... The Wandering Jew is a character from Christian folklore. ... Christian mythology is the body of traditional narratives, that would be viewed as sacred stories by Christians, which would often serve to explain or symbolize Christianity and Christian cultures. ... Christian mythology is the body of traditional narratives, that would be viewed as sacred stories by Christians, which would often serve to explain or symbolize Christianity and Christian cultures. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... The Second Coming refers to the Christian belief in the return of Jesus Christ, an event that will fulfill aspects of Messianic prophecy such as the resurrection of the dead, last judgment and full establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth (also called the Reign of God), including the... Shoemaking is a traditional handicraft profession, which has now been largely superseded by industrial manufacture of footwear. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire. ...


When some interpreters see the "Wandering Jew" as a personification of the Jewish diaspora, the subtext that links the two is the Christian perception that the destruction of Jerusalem was divine retribution for Jewish responsibility for the Crucifixion. The "Wandering Jew" theme has been made the vehicle for anti-Semitism. A modern allegorical view claims instead that the "Wandering Jew" personifies any individual who has been made to see the error of his or her wickedness, if the mocking of the Passion epitomizes the callousness of mankind toward the suffering of individual human beings. Personification- A kind of metaphore in which a non-human thing is talked about as if it were human. ... The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: Tefutzah, scattered, or Galut גלות, exile, Yiddish: tfutses) is the expulsion of the Jewish people out of the Roman province of Judea. ... Combatants Roman Empire Jews of Judea Commanders Titus Flavius Vespasianus Simon Bar-Giora Yohanan mi-Gush Halav (John of Gischala) Eleazar ben Simon Strength 70,000 men 13,000 men, split among three factions Casualties Unknown 60,000–1,100,000 (mass civilian casualties) The Siege of Jerusalem in the... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... Wickedness refers to human sin, describing not just the wicked aspect of the wicked act, but to describe the state of being wicked; mans own deliberate choice of doing evil over doing good. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ...


A variety of names have been given to the Wandering Jew, including Melmoth, Ahasuerus, Matathias, Buttadeus, Cartophilus, Isaac Laquedem (a name for him in France and the Low Countries, in popular legend as well as in a novel by Dumas, see below), and Juan Espera a Dios (Spanish: "John [who] waits for God") and also Jerusalemin suutari ("Shoemaker of Jerusalem" in Finnish). Melmoth the Wanderer is a gothic novel written by Charles Robert Maturin Melmoth, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa is a small town in zululand. ... Ahasuerus or Ahasverus (Hebrew אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ, Standard Hebrew Aḥašveroš, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḫašwērôš) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible and related legends and apocrypha. ... Alexandre Dumas, père, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. ...


At least from the seventeenth century the name Ahasver has been given to the Wandering Jew, an unlikely one, on the face of it, adapted from Ahasuerus, the Persian king in Esther, who is not a Jew, and whose very name among medieval Jews was an exemplum of a fool.[1] Ahasuerus or Ahasverus (Hebrew אֲחַשְׁוֵרוֹשׁ, Standard Hebrew Aḥašveroš, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḫašwērôš) is a name used several times in the Hebrew Bible and related legends and apocrypha. ... An Exemplum (latin for example, pl. ...

Contents

Origin of the legend

According to L. Neubaur, the legend is founded on Jesus' words given in Matthew 16:28: The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ...

Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom. (King James Version)[2]

A belief that the disciple whom Jesus loved would not die before the Second Coming was apparently popular enough in the early Christian world to be called into question in the Gospel of John: The phrase son of man is a primarily Semitic idiom that originated in Ancient Mesopotamia, used to denote humanity or self. ... The King James or Authorised Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... Jesus and the Beloved Disciple, polychromed and gilded wood, c 1320 The phrase the disciple whom Jesus loved or Beloved Disciple is used several times in the Gospel of John, but in none of the other accounts of Jesus. ... The Gospel of John is the fourth gospel in the canon of the New Testament, traditionally ascribed to John the Evangelist. ...

20. And Peter, turning about, seeth the disciple following whom Jesus loved, who had also leaned on His breast at the supper, and had said, Lord, which is he who betrayeth Thee? 21. When, therefore, Peter saw him, he said to Jesus, Lord, and what shall he do? 22. Jesus saith to him, If I will that he remain till I come, what is that to thee? follow thou Me. 23. Then this saying went forth among the brethren, that that disciple would not die; yet Jesus had not said to him that he would not die; but, If I will that he tarry till I come, what is that to thee? (John 21:20-23, KJV)

A variant of the Wandering Jew is recorded in the Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover under the year 1228. An Armenian archbishop, then visiting England, was asked by the monks of St Albans Abbey about the celebrated Joseph of Arimathea, who had spoken to Jesus, and was reported to be still alive. The archbishop answered that he had himself seen him in Armenia, and that his name was Cartaphilus, a Jewish shoemaker, who, when Jesus stopped for a second to rest while carrying His cross, hit Him, and told Him "Go on quicker, Jesus! Go on quicker! Why dost Thou loiter?", to which Jesus, "with a stern countenance", is said to have replied: "I shall stand and rest, but thou shalt go on till the last day." The Armenian bishop also reported that Cartaphilus had since converted to Christianity and spent his wandering days proselytizing and leading a hermitic life. The Flores Historiarum (Flowers of History) is a Latin chronicle dealing with English history from the creation to 1326 (although some of the earlier manuscripts end at 1306). ... Roger of Wendover (d. ... Abbey gateway St Albans Abbey was an abbey at St Albans, Hertfordshire, England, dissolved in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. ... Joseph of Arimathea, according to the Gospels, was the man who donated his own prepared tomb for the burial of Jesus after his crucifixion. ... The English language word proselytism is derived ultimately from the Greek language prefix pros (towards) and the verb erchomai (to come). ... Onuphrius lived as a hermit in the desert of Upper Egypt in the late 4th century A hermit (from the Greek erēmos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion and/or isolation from society. ...


Matthew Paris included this passage from Roger of Wendover in his own history; and other Armenians appeared in 1252 at the Abbey of St Albans, repeating the same story, which was regarded there as a great proof of the truth of the Christian religion.[3] The same archbishop appeared at Tournai in 1243, telling the same story, according to the Chronicles of Phillip Mouskes, (chapter ii. 491, Brussels, 1839). Self portrait of Matthew Paris from the original manuscript of his Historia Anglorum (London, British Library, MS Royal 14. ...


The figure of the doomed sinner, forced to wander without the hope of rest in death till the second coming of Christ, impressed itself upon the popular medieval imagination, mainly with reference to the seeming immortality of the wandering Jewish people. These two aspects of the legend are represented in the different names given to the central figure. In German-speaking countries he is referred to as "Der Ewige Jude" (the immortal, or eternal, Jew), while in Romance-speaking countries he is known as "Le Juif Errant" (the Erring Jew) and "L'Ebreo Errante"; the English form, probably because derived from the French, has followed the Romance. The Spanish name is Juan [el que] Espera a Dios, "John [who] waits for God", or, more commonly, "El Judío Errante".


In literature

The legend became more popular after it appeared in a pamphlet of four leaves, Kurtze Beschreibung und Erzählung von einem Juden mit Namen Ahasverus (short description and tale of a Jew with the name Ahasuerus).[4] "Here we are told that some fifty years before, a bishop met him in a church at Hamburg, repentant, ill-clothed and distracted at the thought of having to move on in a few weeks"[5] As with urban legends, particularities lend verisimilitude: the bishop is specifically the Bishop of Schleswig, Paulus von Eizen. The legend spread quickly throughout Germany, no less than eight different editions appearing in 1602; altogether forty appeared in Germany before the end of the eighteenth century. Eight editions in Dutch and Flemish are known; and the story soon passed to France, the first French edition appearing in Bordeaux, 1609, and to England, where it appeared in the form of a parody in 1625.[6] The pamphlet was translated also into Danish and Swedish; and the expression "eternal Jew" is current in Czech and German, der Ewige Jude. An urban legend or urban myth is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Wandering Jew makes an appearance in one of the secondary plots in Matthew Lewis's Gothic novel The Monk, first published in 1796. The wandering Jew is also mentioned, and then mirrored in "Melmoth the Wanderer" by Charles Maturin c. 1820. The legend also has been the subject of poems by Schubart, Aloys Schreiber, Wilhelm Müller, Lenau, Chamisso, Schlegel, Julius Mosen (an epic, 1838), and Köhler; of novels by Franz Horn (1818), Oeklers, and Schücking; and of tragedies by Klingemann ("Ahasuerus", 1827) and Zedlitz (1844). It is almost certainly the Ahasuerus of Klingemann to whom Richard Wagner refers in the final passage of his notorious Das Judentum in der Musik. There are clear echoes of the Wandering Jew in Wagner's The Flying Dutchman. The Monk is a Gothic novel by Matthew Gregory Lewis that first appeared in 1796. ... Melmoth the Wanderer is a gothic novel published in 1820, written by Charles Robert Maturin. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Christian Friedrich Daniel Schubart (March 24, 1739 - October 10, 1791), German poet, was born at Obersontheim in Swabia. ... Wilhelm Müller (October 7, 1794 - September 30, 1827), German lyric poet, was born at Dessau, the son of a shoemaker. ... Lenau in 1839 Nikolaus Lenau was the nom de plume of Nikolaus Franz Niembsch von Strehlenau (August 25, 1802 - August 22, 1850), an Austrian poet. ... Adelbert von Chamisso (January 30, 1781 – August 21, 1838), was a German poet and botanist. ... August Wilhelm von Schlegel (September 8, 1767 - May 12, 1845), German poet, translator and critic, was born at Hanover, where his father, Johann Adolf Schlegel (1721-1793), was a Lutheran pastor. ... Julius Mosen (1803-1867), German poet and author, was born at Marieney in the Saxon Vogtland on July 8, 1803. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Levin Schucking (September 6, 1814 - August 31, 1883), German novelist, was born on the estate of Klemenswerth, near Meppen, in Westphalia. ... In general usage a tragedy is a play, movie or sometimes a real world event with a sad outcome. ... Ernst August Friedrich Klingemann (born 31 August 1777 in Braunschweig; died 25 January 1831 in Braunschweig) was a German writer. ... Joseph Christian Freiherr von Zedlitz, (Baron Joseph Christian von Zedlitz). ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Das Judenthum in der Musik (Judaism in Music or Jewishness in Music) is an anti-Semitic article which was published in the Neue Zeitschrift. ... The Flying Dutchman by Albert Pinkham Ryder For other uses, see The Flying Dutchman (disambiguation). ...


Hans Christian Andersen made his "Ahasuerus" the Angel of Doubt, and was imitated by Heller in a poem on "The Wandering of Ahasuerus", which he afterward developed into three cantos. Robert Hamerling, in his "Ahasver in Rom" (Vienna, 1866), identifies Nero with the Wandering Jew. Goethe had designed a poem on the subject, the plot of which he sketched in his "Dichtung und Wahrheit". This does not cite any references or sources. ... Seligmann Heller was an Austrian poet and journalist; born at Raudnitz, Bohemia, July 8, 1831; died in Vienna January 8, 1890. ... Robert Hamerling (March 24, 1830 - July 13, 1889), Austrian poet, was born at Kirchenberg-am-Walde in Lower Austria, of humble parentage. ... Nero[1] Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (December 15, AD 37 – June 9, AD 68)[2], born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman Emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. ...  , IPA: , (28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832) was a German poet, dramatist, novelist, theorist, humanist, scientist, and painter. ...


In France, the Wandering Jew appeared in Simon Tyssot de Patot's La Vie, les Aventures et le Voyage de Groenland du Révérend Père Cordelier Pierre de Mésange (1720). Edgar Quinet published his prose epic on the legend in 1833, making the subject the judgment of the world; and Eugene Sue wrote his Juif Errant in 1844. From the latter work, in which the author connects the story of Ahasuerus with that of Herodias, most people derive their knowledge of the legend. Grenier's poem on the subject (1857) may have been inspired by Gustave Doré's designs published in the preceding year, perhaps the most striking of Doré's imaginative works. One should also note Paul Féval, père's La Fille du Juif Errant (1864), which combines several fictional Wandering Jews, both heroic and evil, and Alexandre Dumas' incomplete Isaac Laquedem (1853), a sprawling historical saga. Simon Tyssot de Patot (Born 1655-Died 1727) was a French writer who penned two very important, seminal works in fantastic literature. ... Edgar Quinet (February 17, 1803 - March 27, 1875) was a French historian and man of letters. ... -1... This article is an introduction to and summary of Eugène Sues Le Juif Errant (The Wandering Jew). ... Herodias (c. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... Paul Henri Corentin Féval, père (17 September 1817 - 8 March 1887) was a French novelist and dramatist. ... Alexandre Dumas, père, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. ...


In England — besides the ballad given in Thomas Percy's Reliques and reprinted in Francis James Child's English and Scotch Ballads (1st ed., viii. 77) — there is a drama entitled The Wandering Jew, or Love's Masquerade, written by Andrew Franklin (1797). William Godwin's novel St. Leon (1799) has the motive of the immortal man, and Shelley introduced Ahasuerus into his "Queen Mab". George Croly's "Salathiel", which appeared anonymously in 1828, treated the subject in an imaginative form; it was reprinted under the title "Tarry Thou Till I Come" (New York, 1901). Thomas Percy (April 13, 1729 - September 30, 1811), was Bishop of Dromore, and is remembered as editor of Tatler, Guardian, and Spectator. ... The Reliques of Ancient English Poetry (sometimes known as Reliques of Ancient Poetry or simply Percys Reliques) is a collection of ballads and popular songs collected by Thomas Percy and published in 1765. ... Francis James Child (February 1, 1825 - September 11, 1896), was an American scholar and educationist, and collector of what came to be known as the Child Ballads. ... The Child Ballads are a collection of 305 ballads from England and Scotland, and their American variants, collected by Francis James Child. ... William Godwin William Godwin (3 March 1756 – 7 April 1836) was an English political and miscellaneous writer, considered one of the important precursors of both utilitarian and liberal anarchist thought. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... George Croly (1780 - 1860), poet, novelist, historian, and divine, born at Dublin, and educated at Trinity College there, took orders and became Rector of St. ...


'The Pardoner's Tale', a piece of literature from The Canterbury Tales by Geoffery Chaucer may also contain a reference to the Wandering Jew. Many have attributed the Wandering Jew to the enigmatic character of the old man. An ancient man who is unable to die and wishes to trade his age for someone elses youth. He also disciplines the 3 rioters when they are rude to him and insult his circumstances, perhaps indicating he has learnt his lesson from tormenting Jesus. The Pardoners Tale is one of The Canterbury Tales. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902. ...


In Russia, the legend of the Wandering Jew appears in an incomplete epic poem by Vasily Zhukovsky (Василий Андреевич Жуковский), "Ahasuerus" (Агасфер, 1857) and in another epic poem by Wilhelm Küchelbecker (Вильгельм Карлович Кюхельбекер), "Ahasuerus, a Poem in Fragments" (Агасвер, поэма в отрывках), written from 1832-1846 but not published until 1878, long after the poet's death. Aleksandr Pushkin (Александр Сергеевич Пушкин) also began a long poem on Ahasuerus (Агафер, 1826) but abandoned the project quickly, completing under thirty lines. The name itself, with a clever plot that does not, however, focus on Ahasuerus per se, appears in the novel "Overburdened with Evil" (Отягощенные злом, 1988) by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky. On the publication of Pushkins first major work in 1820, Zhukovsky presented the younger poet with this famous portrait of himself, over the inscription: To the victorious disciple from his vanquished tutor. Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky (29 Jan/9 Feb 1783, Mishenskoe near Tula - 12/24 Apr 1852, Baden-Baden... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... ...


The Wandering Jew makes a notable appearance in the gothic masterpiece of the Polish writer Jan Potocki, 'The Manuscript Found in Saragossa', written about 1797. Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the Gothic revival style, built by seminal Gothic writer Horace Walpole The gothic novel was a literary genre that belonged to Romanticism and began in the United Kingdom with The Castle of Otranto (1764) by Horace Walpole. ... Noble Family Potocki Coat of Arms PiÅ‚awa Parents StanisÅ‚aw Potocki Anna Teresa OssoliÅ„ska Consorts Julia Lubomirska Konstancja Potocka Children with Julia Lubomirska Alfred Wojciech Potocki Artur Potocki with Konstancja Potocka Bernard Potocki Irena Potocka Teresa Potocka Date of Birth March 3, 1761 Place of Birth Leżajsk... The Manuscript Found in Saragossa (original French title Manuscrit trouvé à Saragosse, also known in English as Saragossa Manuscript), by the Polish author Jan Potocki (1761-1815), is a frame tale novel from the period of the Napoleonic Wars. ...


In Argentina, the topic of the Wandering Jew has appeared several times in the work of writer and professor Enrique Anderson Imbert, particularly in his short-story El Grimorio (The Grimoire), included in the eponymous book. Anderson Imbert refers to the Wandering Jew as El Judío Errante or Ahasvero (Ahasuerus) indistinctly. Chapter XXXVII, El Vagamundo, in the collection of short stories, Misteriosa Buenos Aires, by the Argentine writer Manuel Mujica Lainez also centres round the wandering of the Jew. The great Argentinian writer Jorge Luis Borges named the main character and narrator of his short story "The Inmortal" Joseph Cartaphilus (in the story he was a Roman military tribune who gained immortality after drinking from a magical river and dies in the 1920s). Enrique Anderson Imbert (born 1910), is a novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. ... Misteriosa Buenos Aires (Spanish for Mysterious Buenos Aires) is a 1950 book of literary fiction by Manuel Mujica Laínez, containing no fewer that 42 short stories (average length: 6. ... Manuel Mujica Laínez, Argentine fiction writer and art critic, was born in Buenos Aires on 11 September 1910 and died at Cruz Chica, Córdoba Province on 21 April 1984. ...

 In Joyce's master piece Ulysses Bloom's nemesis the citizen says of Bloom in his absence 

-"A wolf in sheep's clothing, says the citizen. That's what he is. Virag from Hungary! Ahasuerus I call him. Cursed by God." (p439 Bodley Head Ed) Brazilian writer and poet Machado de Assis often used Jewish themes in his writings. One of his poems, Viver! ("To Live!") is a dialog between the Wandering Jew (named as Ahasuerus) and Prometheus at the end of time. It was published in 1896 as part of the book Várias histórias ("Several stories"). Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, pron. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Greek: forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from Zeus in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ...


By the dawn of the 20th century Jewish writers and artists had appropriated the powerful symbol to express the suffering of exile and hope of the rebirth of the Jewish state. The great Soviet satyrists Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov had their hero Ostap Bender tell the story of the Wandering Jew's death at the hands of Ukrainian nationalists in The Little Golden Calf. Ilf (left) and Petrov Ilya Ilf (Ilya Arnoldovich Faynzilberg, Илья Ильф, October 15 (October 3 O.S.), 1897 – April 13, 1937) is an extremely popular Soviet author of the 1920s and 1930s, who worked in collaboration with Evgeny Petrov. ... Petrov (right) and Ilf Evgeny Petrov (Yevgeniy Petrovich Kataev or Katayev, Евгений Петров, December 13 (November 30 O.S.), 1903 – July 2, 1942) is an extremely popular Soviet author of the 1920s and 1930s, who worked in collaboration with Ilya Ilf. ... Ostap Bender as portrayed by Andrei Mironov, 1976 Ostap Bender (Russian: Остап Бендер; also Ostap-Suleyman-Berta-Maria-Bender-Bei, Bender-Zadunaysky, Ostap Ibragimovich) is a misanthropic[] con man and antihero who first appeared in the novel The Twelve Chairs (January 1928 - Russian: Двенадцать стульев), written by Russian writers Ilya Ilf and Evgeny Petrov. ... The Little Golden Calf The Little Golden Calf (Russian: ) (1931) is a famous satirical novel by Soviet authors Ilf and Petrov q. ...


In the post-apocalyptic science fiction book A Canticle For Leibowitz, written by Walter M. Miller, Jr. and published in 1959, a character that can be interpreted as being the Wandering Jew is the only to appear in all three novellas. He observes the progress of the world and the abbey of the Albertian Order of Leibowitz in the two thousand years or so after a nuclear holocaust. He is connected to Lazarus, who was raised from the dead by Jesus. In 1967, he appears as an unexplained magical realist townfolk legend in Gabriel García Márquez's 100 Years of Solitude. Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by Walter M. Miller, Jr. ... Walter Michael Miller, Jr. ... For the 1989 computer game, see Nuclear War (computer game). ... One Hundred Years of Solitude One Hundred Years of Solitude (original title: Cien a os de soledad) is a novel by Gabriel Garc rquez. ...


The character of Trofimov refers to himself as The Wandering Jew in Act One of The Cherry Orchard, by Anton Chekhov. Trofimov is an intellectual character, who symbolizes Bolshevik ideals throughout the play. Bust of Anton Chekhov at Badenweiler, Germany The Cherry Orchard (Вишнëвый сад or Vishniovy sad in Russian) is Russian playwright Anton Chekhovs last play. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov Was an incredibly annoying horrible Russian who noboby liked and everyone ditched all the time. ...


J.G. Ballard's short story "The Lost Leonardo" (collected in The Terminal Beach) features Ahasuerus, an aristocrat who has been retouching paintings such as the fictional "The Crucifixion" by Leonardo Da Vinci as to include himself.


DC Comics character the Phantom Stranger was given a series of possible origins by writers Mike W. Barr, Paul Levitz, Dan Mishkin, and Alan Moore. One story stated that a man named Isaac had bribed a Roman for an opportunity to flog Christ, was after Christ died found hmself compelled to wander the earth doing good deeds for others under the guise of The Phantom Stranger. He is eventually released by God, but chooses to keep his guise and to continue doing good works. The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ...


Randall Flagg, a character featured in several Stephen King novels, is occasionally referred to as Ahasuerus, the possible birth name of the Wandering Jew. Flagg is also occasionally called "Old Creeping Judas" in The Stand, possibly a reference to the Wandering Jew. Randall Flagg. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... The Stand is a post-apocalyptic science fiction / horror / adventure novel by Stephen King originally published in 1978. ...


In Raymond E. Feist's novel A Darkness at Sethanon, it is implied that Macros the Black is the son of the Wandering Jew. Raymond Elias Feist (born 1945, Los Angeles, California) is an American author, mostly specialising in fantasy fiction. ... A Darkness at Sethanon is the third book of The Riftwar Saga. ...


The single-act, single character theatrical play "Underneath the Lintel" deals primarily with the legend of the wandering Jew.


A variant of the Wandering Jew theme is to be seen in the Graphic Novel The Barn Owl's Wondrous Capers (2007) by Indian cartoonist Sarnath Banerjee, where the Wandering Jew settles in Calcutta in the mid 1800s and maintains a journal recording the scandals of the city's English Overlords and its obscenely rich and eccentric elite. The graphic novel gives an insight into Kolkatas Babu culture, both historic and modern-day The Barn Owls Wondrous Capers is a 2007 graphic novel by Indian graphic artist Sarnath Banerjee. ... Sarnath Banerjee is a graphic novelist, artist and filmmaker. ... This article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. ...


Diana Wynne Jones' book The Homeward Bounders also features The Wandering Jew. Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ... The Homeward Bounders is a fantasy novel by Diana Wynne Jones with the chilling premise that there is a vast series of parallel universes, all of which serve as the game-boards for a race of demons that delight in war-games and fantasy-games. ...


Staff Sgt. Barry Sadler, famous for writing and recording the Ballad of the Green Berets wrote a series of books featuring a character called Casca Rufio Longinius who is combination of two characters from Christian folklore, Longinus and the Wandering Jew. SSgt. ... Album cover Ballad of the Green Berets is a patriotic song in the ballad style about the Green Berets, an elite special operations force in the U.S. Army. ... Casca Rufio Longinius, also known as Casca Longinus, or simply Casca: The Eternal Mercenary, is a character in a series of military historical novels, written by Barry Sadler. ... Longinus, a Greek literary critic who may have lived in the 1st century, wrote a treatise On the Sublime. ...


In film

In the 1988 film The Seventh Sign this legendary character appears as a Father Lucci, who identifies himself as the centuries' old Cartaphilus, Pilate's porter, who was one who took part in the scourging of Jesus before his crucifixion. He is a combination of the Wandering Jew and the Longinus legend. He wishes to assist in bringing about the end of the world in order that his interminable wandering might come to an end as well. The Seventh Sign is a 1988 film written by Clifford and Ellen Green and directed by Carl Schultz. ... Ecce Homo (Behold the Man!), Antonio Ciseris depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting a scourged Jesus to the people of Jerusalem. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Longinus pierces the side of Christ. ...


There have also been several films entitled The Wandering Jew. A 1933 British version, starring Conrad Veidt in the title role, is based on the stage play by E. Temple Thurston, and attempts to tell quite literally the original legend, taking the Jew from Biblical times all the way to the Spanish Inquisition. This version was also made as a silent film in 1923, starring Matheson Lang in his original stage role. The play had been produced both in London and on Broadway. Co-produced in the U.S. by David Belasco, it had played on Broadway in 1921. 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Conrad Veidt in The Spy in Black (1939). ... Ernest Temple Thurston (September 23, 1879 - March 19, 1933) was an Irish poet, playwright and author. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Saint Dominic (1170 – August 6, 1221) Presiding over an Auto-da-fe, by Pedro Berruguete, (1450 - 1504). ... A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Matheson Alexander Lang (born May 15, 1879, Montreal; died April 11, 1948, Bridgetown, Barbados) was a Canadian who achieved fame in Great Britain as a stage and film actor in the early 20th century. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... David Belasco, between 1898 and 1916. ...


Another film version, intended for anti-Semitic propaganda in Germany, 1940 Der Ewige Jude, reflected the Nazi outlook. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Eternal Jew is an antisemitic Nazi propaganda film of 1940. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


Still another film version of the story, made in Italy in 1948, starred Vittorio Gassman. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Vittorio Gassman Vittorio Gassman (Il Mattatore) (September 1, 1922 – June 29, 2000) was an Italian theatre and film actor and director. ...


Related legends

Heinrich Heine noted a strong correspondence between the legend of the Wandering Jew and that of The Flying Dutchman. Similar legends involve the origins of the Gypsies. In one version, the Gypsies descended from the blacksmith who created the nails used in the Crucifixion. The Gypsies' constant wandering and exclusion were therefore explained by their betrayal of Jesus much in the same way the exclusion and pogroms against Jews were explained. There is an alternate version told by Gypsies in which a clever gypsy stole some of the nails before Jesus was put upon the cross, thus easing his suffering a little bit and being blessed for all time. In Genesis, Cain is issued with a similar punishment — to go to the Land of Nod (which means 'wandering'), and wander over the earth, never reaping a harvest again, but scavenging. The Book of Mormon includes the Three Nephites who also became immortal after interacting with Jesus. They were given immortality as a reward, however, rather than a punishment. Another doomed wanderer is found in the Irish tale of Jack-o'-lantern. The Mahabharata tells the tale of Ashwathama, who survived the great war and was cursed to live as a leper for his crime of killing warriors whilst they slept. He is one of the favorite unresolved characters in Hindu mythology. Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (born Chaim Harry Heine, December 13, 1797 – February 17, 1856) was a journalist, an essayist, and one of the most significant German romantic poets. ... The Flying Dutchman by Albert Pinkham Ryder For other uses, see The Flying Dutchman (disambiguation). ... Languages Romani, languages of native region Religions Christianity, Islam Related ethnic groups South Asians (Desi) The Roma (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom) or Romanies are an ethnic group living in many communities all over the world. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centers. ... Genesis (Hebrew: , Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... // Origin The Land of Nod is a place in the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible, located to the east of Eden, to which Cain was banished after murdering his brother Abel. ... The Book of Mormon[1] is one of the sacred texts of the Latter Day Saint movement, regarded by Latter Day Saints as divinely revealed, and named after the prophet-historian Mormon who, according to the text, compiled most of the book. ... The Three Nephites are three Nephite disciples of Jesus described in the Book of Mormon who were blessed by Jesus to never taste of death; but ye shall live to behold all the doings of the Father unto the children of men, even until all things shall be fulfilled according... Jack-o-lanterns may be carved with a friendly face, above, a menacing sawtooth scowl, or any look in between. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Ashwatthama was the son of guru, Dronacharya. ...


A variation on the story was later applied to Longinus, the soldier who pierced Jesus' side while he hung on the cross. Yet another version declares that the wanderer is the attendant Malchus, whose ear Saint Peter cut off in the garden of Gethsemane (John 18:10), who was condemned to wander until the second coming. His action is associated in some way with the scoffing of Jesus, and is so represented in a broadsheet which appeared in 1584. Longinus pierces the side of Christ. ... In the New Testament of the Bible, Malchus was the name of a servant of the high priest who helped try to arrest Jesus. ... Saint Peter, also known as Shimon Keipha Ben-Yonah/Bar-Yonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Keipha — original name Shimon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... The Garden of Gethsemane. ...


Notes

  1. ^ David Daube, "Ahasver" The Jewish Quarterly Review New Series 45.3 (January 1955), pp 243-244.
  2. ^ This is quoted in the German pamphlet Kurtze Beschreibung und Erzählung von einem Juden mit Namen Ahasverus, 1602.
  3. ^ Matthew Paris, Chron. Majora, ed. H. R. Luard, London, 1880, v. 340-341
  4. ^ This professes to have been printed at Leiden in 1602 by an otherwise unrecorded printer "Christoff Crutzer"; the real place and printer can not be ascertained.
  5. ^ Daube 1955:244.
  6. ^ Jacobs and Wolf, Bibliotheca Anglo-Judaica, p. 44, No. 221.

Henry Richards Luard (1825-1891) was a British medieval historian and antiquary[1]. He was a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge and university administrator, was Registrary of. ... Leyden redirects here. ...

References

  • Anderson, George K. The Legend of the Wandering Jew. Providence: Brown University Press, 1965. xi, 489 p.; reprint edition ISBN 0-87451-547-5 Collects both literary versions and folk versions.
  • Hasan-Rokem, Galit and Alan DundesThe Wandering Jew: Essays in the Interpretation of a Christian Legend (Bloomington:Indiana University Press) 1986. Twentieth-century folkloristic renderings.
  • This article incorporates text from the 1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Moore, Alan. et al... "Secret Origins" issue #10 (Third Series). New York: DC Comics, Jan. 1987. 52 p. 1st printing, from personal collection.

The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... DC Comics is an American comic book company (with related media publishing businesses). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wandering Jew (plant) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (870 words)
The Wandering Jew has escaped from cultivation in many areas from the southern United States to South America and in the warmer parts of the Old World including Australia; in many areas it is considered an invasive weed.
Wandering Jew is widely used as an ornamental plant in gardens and borders, as a ground cover, hanging plant, or (particularly in colder areas) houseplant.
Wandering Jew has applications as a livestock and poultry feed as it is fast-growing, resilient to disease, and tolerates shade.
Wandering Jew - definition of Wandering Jew in Encyclopedia (1585 words)
When Christian interpreters see the "wandering Jew" as a metaphorical personification of the Jewish diaspora, the subtext that links the two is that the destruction of Jerusalem was in retribution for Jewish responsibility for the Crucifixion.
An actual predecessor of the Wandering Jew is recorded in the "Flores Historiarum" by Roger of Wendover in the year 1228.
Charles Maturin retold the story and renamed the Wandering Jew as the eponymous protagonist of the Gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer (1820).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m