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Encyclopedia > Walter Scott
Raeburn's portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822.
Raeburn's portrait of Sir Walter Scott in 1822.
Portrait of Sir Walter Scott, by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer
Portrait of Sir Walter Scott, by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (15 August 177121 September 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... sir walter scott This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... sir walter scott This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Roman-Egyptian funeral portrait of a young boy A portrait is a painting (portrait painting), photograph (portrait photography), or other artistic representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. ... Monarch of the Glen by Sir Edwin Landseer, 1851: the image was widely distributed in steel engravings Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, RA (b. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Cha togar mfhearg gun dioladh (Scottish Gaelic) Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English (de facto)1; Gaelic[1]2 and Scots3 (recognised minority... A historical novel is a novel in which the story is set among historical events, or more generally, in which the time of the action predates the lifetime of the author. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ...


In some ways Scott was the first author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers all over Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and specifically, of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley and The Heart of Midlothian. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Scottish literature is literature written in Scotland or by Scottish writers. ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ... Rob Roy (1817) is a novel by Walter Scott about Frank Osbaldistone, the son of an English merchant who goes to the Scottish Highlands to collect a debt stolen from his father. ... In an Arthurian legend, the Lady of the Lake gave King Arthur the sword known as Excalibur. ... Waverley is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... The Old Tolbooth, Edinburgh For the Scottish football (soccer) club Heart of Midlothian, see Heart of Midlothian F.C. The Heart of Midlothian is the seventh of Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, and by many considered the finest. ...

Contents

Early days

Scott's childhood at Sandyknowe farm, seen across the lochan from Smailholm Tower, introduced him to the Borders.
Scott's childhood at Sandyknowe farm, seen across the lochan from Smailholm Tower, introduced him to the Borders.

Born in College Wynd in the Old Town of Edinburgh in 1771, the son of a solicitor, the young Walter Scott survived a childhood bout of polio in 1773 that would leave him lame in his right leg for the rest of his life. To restore his health he was sent in that year to live in the rural Borders region at his grandparents' farm at Sandyknowe, adjacent to the ruin of Smailholm Tower, the earlier family home. Here he was taught to read by his aunt Jenny, and learned from her the speech patterns and many of the tales and legends which characterized much of his work. In January 1775 he returned to Edinburgh, and that summer went with his aunt Jenny to take spa treatment at Bath in England. In the winter of 1776 he went back to Sandyknowe, with another attempt at a water cure being made at Prestonpans during the following summer,[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (2253 × 1525 pixel, file size: 208 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (2253 × 1525 pixel, file size: 208 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Smailholm Tower from the north-west. ... The Old Town of Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. ... , Edinburgh (() pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second largest city. ... A solicitor is a type of lawyer in many common law jurisdictions, such as the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Republic of Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, but not the United States (in the United States the word has a quite different meaning—see below). ... Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Smailholm Tower from the north-west. ... Look up spa, Spa, SpA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bath is a city in Somerset, England most famous for its baths fed by three hot springs. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Prestonpans is a small town found to the East of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the unitary council area of East Lothian . ...


In 1778 Scott returned to Edinburgh for private education to prepare him for school, and in October 1779 he began at the High School of Edinburgh. He was now well able to walk and explore the city as well as the surrounding countryside. His reading included chivalric romances, poems, history and travel books. He was given private tuition by James Mitchell in arithmetic and writing, and learned from him the history of the Kirk with emphasis on the Covenanters. After finishing school he was sent to stay for six months with his aunt Jenny in Kelso, attending the local Grammar School where he met James Ballantyne who later became his business partner and printed his books.[2] The Royal High School (RHS) in Edinburgh can trace its roots back to 1128, and is generally considered as the oldest school in Scotland and one of the oldest in Europe; it may even be one of the oldest surviving in the world. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... The Covenanters, named after the Solemn League and Covenant, were a party that, originating in the Reformation movement, played an important part in the history of Scotland, and to a lesser extent in that of England, during the 17th century. ... // Kelso has several meanings: Kelso, Scotland, a burgh in the Scottish Borders Kelso Abbey Kelso Racecourse Kelso, a small village in Halton Regional Municipality, Ontario, located beside Lake Kelso Kelso, New South Wales, a suburb of Bathurst Kelso, Tasmania a small village in the north of Tasmania Kelso, Queensland a... James Ballantyne (1772-1833) was an editor and publisher who worked for his friend Sir Walter Scott. ...


Scott began studying classics at the University of Edinburgh in November 1783, at the age of only twelve so that he was a year or so younger than most of his fellow students. In March 1786 he began an apprenticeship in his father's office, to become a Writer to the Signet. While at the university Scott had become a friend of Adam Ferguson, the son of Professor Adam Ferguson who hosted literary salons. Scott met the blind poet Thomas Blacklock who lent him books as well as introducing him to James Macpherson's Ossian cyle of poems. During the winter of 1786-87 the fifteen year old Scott saw Robert Burns at one of these salons, for what was to be their only meeting. When Burns noticed a print illustrating the poem "The Justice of the Peace" and asked who had written the poem, only Scott could tell him it was by John Langhorne, and was thanked by Burns.[3] When it was decided that he would become a lawyer he returned to the university to study law, first taking classes in Moral Philosophy and Universal History in 1789-90.[2] The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Society of Writers to Her Majesty’s Signet has a very long history and is the oldest legal society in the world. ... Adam Ferguson, also known as Ferguson of Raith (June 20, 1723 (O.S.) - February 22, 1816) was a philosopher and historian of the Scottish Enlightenment. ... Thomas Blacklock (1721 - 1791) was a Scottish poet. ... James Macpherson (October 27, 1736–February 17, 1796), was a Scottish poet, known as the translator of the Ossian cycle of poems (also known as the Oisín cycle). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oisín. ... Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ... John Langhorne (March 1735–April 1, 1779), poet, son of a clergyman, was born at Kirkby Stephen; having taken orders, he was for two years a curate in London, and from 1776 Rector of Blagdon, Somerset, and Prebendary of Wells. ...


After completing his studies in law, he became a lawyer in Edinburgh. As a lawyer's clerk he made his first visit to the Scottish Highlands directing an eviction. He was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in 1792. He had an unsuccessful love suit with Williamina Belsches of Fettercairn, who married Sir William Forbes, 6th Baronet. The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The Faculty of Advocates is the collective term by which what in England are called barristers are known in Scotland. ... Sir William Forbes, 6th Baronet (1739–1806) was a Scottish banker, son of a Scotch advocate and baronet, born in Edinburgh; became partner in the banking firm of Messrs. ...


Literary career launched

Scott's childhood at Sandyknowes, close to Smailholm Tower, introduced him to tales of the Scottish Borders.
Scott's childhood at Sandyknowes, close to Smailholm Tower, introduced him to tales of the Scottish Borders.

At the age of 25 he began dabbling in writing, translating works from German, his first publication being rhymed versions of ballads by Bürger in 1796. He then published a three-volume set of collected Scottish ballads, The Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border. This was the first sign of his interest in Scottish history from a literary standpoint. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (2161 × 1490 pixel, file size: 263 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 552 pixelsFull resolution (2161 × 1490 pixel, file size: 263 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Smailholm Tower from the north-west. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Burgher can refer to: A title. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ...


Scott then became an ardent volunteer in the yeomanry and on one of his "raids" he met at Gilsland Spa Margaret Charlotte Charpentier (or Charpenter), daughter of Jean Charpentier of Lyon in France whom he married in 1797. They had five children. In 1799 he was appointed Sheriff-Deputy of the County of Selkirk, based in the Royal Burgh of Selkirk. In the 1790s, the threat of invasion of England was high, with the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. ... Gilsland Spa is the present-day name of a Co-operative hotel at Gilsland, Cumbria, England. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: (Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon the best) Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country Region Rhône-Alpes Department Rhône (69) Subdivisions 9 arrondissements Intercommunality Urban Community of Lyon Mayor Gérard Collomb  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Sheriff Courts are the local Court system in Scotland. ... Selkirkshire or the County of Selkirk is a registration county of Scotland. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In his earlier married days, Scott had a decent living from his earnings at the law, his salary as Sheriff-Deputy, his wife's income, some revenue from his writing, and his share of his father's rather meagre estate.


After Scott had founded a printing press, his poetry, beginning with The Lay of the Last Minstrel in 1805, brought him fame. He published a number of other poems over the next ten years, including the popular The Lady of the Lake, printed in 1810 and set in the Trossachs. Portions of the German translation of this work were later set to music by Franz Schubert. One of these songs, Ellens dritter Gesang, is popularly labeled as "Schubert's Ave Maria". 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... In an Arthurian legend, the Lady of the Lake gave King Arthur the sword known as Excalibur. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Trossachs (Scottish Gaelic, Na Trosaichean) itself is a small woodland glen between Ben An to the north and Ben Venue to the south, with Loch Katrine to the west and Loch Achray to the east, but the name is used generally to refer to the wider area of wooded... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Ellens dritter Gesang (Ellens Gesang III, D839, Op 52 no 6, 1825), Ellens third song in English, composed by Franz Schubert in 1825, is one of Schuberts most popular works over a century after the composers death, although some misconceptions exist around it. ... Ave Maria (Latin: Hail, Maria or Hail, Mary) may refer to: Hail Mary, a traditional Catholic and Eastern Orthodox prayer calling for the intercession of Mary, the mother of Jesus A musical rendition of the Ave Maria prayer by Gounod (set to Prelude #1 from Well-Tempered Clavier). ...


Another work from this period, Marmion, produced some of his most quoted (and most often mis-attributed) lines. Canto VI. Stanza 17 reads: Marmion is an epic poem by Walter Scott about the Battle of Flodden published in 1808. ...

Yet Clare's sharp questions must I shun,
Must separate Constance from the nun
Oh! what a tangled web we weave
When first we practice to deceive!
A Palmer too! No wonder why
I felt rebuked beneath his eye;

In 1809 his Tory sympathies led him to become a co-founder of the Quarterly Review, a review journal to which he made several anonymous contributions. For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... Quarterly Review was a review journal started by John Murray, the celebrated London publisher, in March 1809 (though it bore a title page date of February), in rivalry with the Edinburgh Review, which had been seven years in possession of the field, and was exerting, as he judged, an evil...


The novels

Walter Scott
Walter Scott

When the press became embroiled in pecuniary difficulties, Scott set out, in 1814, to write a cash-cow. The result was Waverley, a novel which did not name its author. It was a tale of the "Forty-Five" Jacobite rising in the Kingdom of Great Britain with its English protagonist Edward Waverley, by his Tory upbringing sympathetic to Jacobitism, becoming enmeshed in events but eventually choosing Hanoverian respectability. The novel met with considerable success. There followed a succession of novels over the next five years, each with a Scottish historical setting. Mindful of his reputation as a poet, he maintained the anonymous habit he had begun with Waverley, always publishing the novels under the name Author of Waverley or attributed as "Tales of..." with no author. Even when it was clear that there would be no harm in coming out into the open he maintained the façade, apparently out of a sense of fun. During this time the nickname The Wizard of the North was popularly applied to the mysterious best-selling writer. His identity as the author of the novels was widely rumoured, and in 1815 Scott was given the honour of dining with George, Prince Regent, who wanted to meet "the author of Waverley". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x760, 28 KB) Walter Scott - Project Gutenberg eText 18396 From Project Gutenbergs The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I., by Various http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (600x760, 28 KB) Walter Scott - Project Gutenberg eText 18396 From Project Gutenbergs The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I., by Various http://www. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Waverley is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... The Jacobite Risings were a series of uprisings, rebellions, and wars in the British Isles occurring between 1688 and 1746. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... George IV King of the United Kingdom George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762–26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ...


In 1819 he broke away from writing about Scotland with Ivanhoe, a historical romance set in 12th-century England. It too was a runaway success and, as he did with his first novel, he wrote several books along the same lines. Among other things, the book is noteworthy for having a very sympathetic Jewish major character, Rebecca, considered by many critics to be the book's real heroine - relevant to the fact that the book was published at a time when the struggle for the Emancipation of the Jews in England was gathering momentum. 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Rebekah (Rebecca or Rivkah) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ) is the wife of Isaac. ... Emancipation of the Jews in England (This page is part of the History of the Jews in England) // Freedom for Catholics bodes well for Jews When in 1829 the Roman Catholics of England were freed from all their civil disabilities, the hopes of the Jews rose high; and the first...


As his fame grew during this phase of his career, he was granted the title of baronet, becoming Sir Walter Scott. At this time he organized the visit of King George IV to Scotland, and when the King visited Edinburgh in 1822 the spectacular pageantry Scott had concocted to portray George as a rather tubby reincarnation of Bonnie Prince Charlie made tartans and kilts fashionable and turned them into symbols of Scottish national identity. A baronet (traditional abbreviation Bart, modern abbreviation Bt) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown known as a baronetcy. ... Sir David Wilkies flattering portrait of the kilted King George IV, with lighting chosen to tone down the brightness of his kilt and his knees shown bare, without the pink tights he wore at the event. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Mrs. ... Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Silvester Maria Stuart (December 31, 1720 – January 31, 1788), was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and was commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... A tartan is type of pattern, originating in woven cloth, but now used in many materials. ... Formal Highland regalia, kilt and Prince Charlie jacket for Black tie. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


Scott included little in the way of punctuation in his drafts which he left to the printers to supply.[4]


Financial woes

Beginning in 1825 he went into dire financial straits again, as his company nearly collapsed. That he was the author of his novels became general knowledge at this time as well. Rather than declare bankruptcy he placed his home, Abbotsford House, and income into a trust belonging to his creditors, and proceeded to write his way out of debt. He kept up his prodigious output of fiction (as well as producing a biography of Napoléon Bonaparte) until 1831. By then his health was failing, and he died at Abbotsford in 1832. Though not in the clear by then, his novels continued to sell, and he made good his debts from beyond the grave. He was buried in Dryburgh Abbey where nearby, fittingly, a large statue can be found of William Wallace—one of Scotland's most romantic historical figures. Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... An artists rendition of the house Abbotsford is a historic house in the region of Scottish Borders in the south of Scotland, near Melrose, on south bank of the River Tweed. ... Bonaparte as general Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Dryburgh Abbey was founded in 1152 by Premonstratensian monks, on a site perhaps made sacred by Saint Modan around 600. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ...


His home, Abbotsford House

Displays of armour at Abbotsford House
Displays of armour at Abbotsford House

When Sir Walter Scott was a boy he sometimes travelled with his father from Selkirk to Melrose, in the Border Country where some of his novels are set. At a certain spot the old gentleman would stop the carriage and take his son to a stone on the site of the battle of Melrose (1526). Not far away was a little farm called Cartleyhole, and this he eventually purchased. In due course the farmhouse developed into a wonderful home that has been likened to a fairy palace. Through windows enriched with the insignia of heraldry the sun shone on suits of armour, trophies of the chase, fine furniture, and still finer pictures. Panelling of oak and cedar and carved ceilings relieved by coats of arms in their correct colour added to the beauty of the house. More land was purchased, until Scott owned nearly 1,000 acres (4 km²), and it is estimated that the building cost him over £25,000. A neighbouring Roman road with a ford used in olden days by the abbots of Melrose suggested the name of Abbotsford. An artists rendition of the house Abbotsford is a historic house in the region of Scottish Borders in the south of Scotland, near Melrose, on south bank of the River Tweed. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2362x1772, 1767 KB) Abbotsford, interior Christian Bickel 05. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2362x1772, 1767 KB) Abbotsford, interior Christian Bickel 05. ... An artists rendition of the house Abbotsford is a historic house in the region of Scottish Borders in the south of Scotland, near Melrose, on south bank of the River Tweed. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Melrose(Am Maol Ros in Gaelic) is a small, historic town in the Scottish Borders. ... Scottish Borders (often referred to locally as The Borders or The Borderland) is one of 35 local government unitary council areas of Scotland. ... Melrose(Am Maol Ros in Gaelic) is a small, historic town in the Scottish Borders. ...


Assessment

The Scott Monument, Edinburgh
Alternate View

Among the early critics of Scott was Mark Twain, who blamed Scott's "romantacization of battle" for what he saw as the South's decision to fight the Civil War. Twain's ridiculing of chivalry in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is considered as specifically targeting Scott's books. Download high resolution version (550x894, 60 KB)The Scott Monument in Edinburgh. ... Download high resolution version (550x894, 60 KB)The Scott Monument in Edinburgh. ... Scott Monument (alternate view) The Scott Monument is a victorian gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott. ... Download high resolution version (500x747, 49 KB)The Scott Monument in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Bors Dilemma - he chooses to save a maiden rather than his brother Lionel Chivalry[1] is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood. ... A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court is an 1889 novel by American humorist and writer Mark Twain. ...


From being one of the most popular novelists of the 19th century, Scott suffered from a disastrous decline in popularity after the First World War. The tone was set early on in E.M. Forster's classic "Aspects of the Novel" (1927), where Scott was savaged as being a clumsy writer who wrote slapdash, badly plotted novels. Scott also suffered from the rising star of Jane Austen. Considered merely an entertaining "woman's novelist" in the 19th century, in the 20th Austen began to be seen as perhaps the major English novelist of the first few decades of the 19th century. As Austen's star rose, Scott's sank, although, ironically, he had been one of the few male writers of his time to recognize Austen's genius. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970) was an English novelist. ... 1873 engraving of Jane Austen, based on a portrait drawn by her sister Cassandra. ...


Scott's many flaws (ponderousness, prolixity, lack of humor) were fundamentally out of step with Modernist sensibilities. Nevertheless, Scott was responsible for two major trends that carry on to this day. First, he essentially invented the modern historical novel; an enormous number of imitators (and imitators of imitators) would appear in the 19th century. It is a measure of Scott's influence that Edinburgh's central railway station, opened in 1854 for the North British Railway, is called Waverley Station. Second, his Scottish novels followed on from James Macpherson's Ossian cycle in rehabilitating the public perception of Highland culture after years in the shadows following southern distrust of hill bandits and the Jacobite rebellions. As enthusiastic chairman of the Celtic Society of Edinburgh he contributed to the reinvention of Scottish culture. It is worth noting, however, that Scott was a Lowland Scot, and that his re-creations of the Highlands were more than a little fanciful. His organisation of the visit of King George IV to Scotland in 1822 was a pivotal event, leading Edinburgh tailors to invent many "clan tartans" out of whole cloth, so to speak. After being essentially unstudied for many decades, a small revival of interest in Scott's work began in the 1970s and 1980s. Ironically, postmodern tastes (which favoured discontinuous narratives, and the introduction of the 'first person' into works of fiction) were more favourable to Scott's work than Modernist tastes. Despite all the flaws, Scott is now seen as an important innovator, and a key figure in the development of Scottish and world literature. 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The North British Railway was a Scottish railway company that was absorbed into the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923. ... Waverley railway station- the principal mainline station in Edinburgh viewed from Edinburgh Castle. ... James Macpherson (October 27, 1736–February 17, 1796), was a Scottish poet, known as the translator of the Ossian cycle of poems (also known as the Oisín cycle). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Oisín. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due south and east... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Sir David Wilkies flattering portrait of the kilted King George IV, with lighting chosen to tone down the brightness of his kilt and his knees shown bare, without the pink tights he wore at the event. ... A tartan is a specific woven pattern that often signifies a particular Scottish clan in the modern era. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used by philosophers, social scientists, art critics and social critics to refer to aspects of contemporary art, culture, economics and social conditions that are the result of the unique features of late 20th century and early 21st century...


Scott was also responsible, through a series of pseudonymous letters published in the Edinburgh Weekly News in 1826, for retaining the right of Scottish banks to issue their own banknotes, which is reflected to this day by his continued appearance on the front of all notes issued by the Bank of Scotland. The Governor and Company of the Bank of Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a Scottish commercial and clearing bank, operating throughout the world. ...


Many of his works were illustrated by his friend, William Allan. For other persons named William Allan, see William Allan (disambiguation). ...


In addition to Landseer, fine portraits of him were painted by fellow-Scots Sir Henry Raeburn and James Eckford Lauder. Sir Henry Raeburn (March 4, 1756 - July 8, 1823) was a Scottish portrait-painter. ... James Eckford Lauder (August 15, 1811 - March 27, 1869), was a notable mid-Victorian Scottish artist, famous for both portraits and historical pictures. ...


Sir Walter Scott is commemorated in Makars' Court, outside The Writers' Museum, Lawnmarket, Edinburgh.


Selections for Makars' Court are made by The Writers' Museum; The Saltire Society; The Scottish Poetry Library. The Saltire Society, established in 1936, is an organisation dedicated to promoting the culture and environment of Scotland. ...


Works

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Walter Scott
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Walter Scott

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

The Waverley Novels

The Waverley Novels are a long series of books by Sir Walter Scott. ... Waverley is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guy Mannering is a novel by Sir Walter Scott published anonymously in 1815. ... In his novel Italic textThe AntiquaryItalic text Walter Scott romanticises the life of a collector of old things. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Rob Roy (1817) is a novel by Walter Scott about Frank Osbaldistone, the son of an English merchant who goes to the Scottish Highlands to collect a debt stolen from his father. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Ivanhoe (disambiguation). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Kenilworth is a romance novel written by Walter Scott. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Disambiguation: The Pirate is also the title of novels by Harold Robbins and Frederick Marryat The Pirate is an 1822 novel by Walter Scott. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Fortunes of Nigel (1822) is a novel written by Sir Walter Scott. ... Peveril of the Peak (1822) is the longest of Walter Scotts novels. ... Quentin Durward is a historical novel written by Walter Scott in 1823. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Disambiguation: Ronans Well is also a cave at Kalk Bay, South Africa St. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Redgauntlet is an historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, set in Scotland in the 1760s in Dumfries. ... Tales of the Crusaders (1825) is a series of two historical novels by Sir Walter Scott: The Betrothed The Talisman As the title implies, they are novels of the Crusades. ... Disambiguation: the title of I Promessi Sposi in English, is sometimes given as The Betrothed The Betrothed is an 1825 novel, by Sir Walter Scott. ... The Talisman is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Woodstock; or The Cavalier (1826) is a historical novel by Walter Scott. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Chronicles of the Canongate was a series of books by Sir Walter Scott, published in the late 1820s. ... The Fair Maid of Perth (1828) is one of Walter Scotts novels. ... Anne of Geierstein, or The Maiden of the Mist (1829) is one of Walter Scotts novels. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Tales of My Landlord

Tales of my Landlord was a series of novels by Sir Walter Scott. ... Walter Scotts novel The Black Dwarf was part of his Tales of my Landlord, 1st series, published along with Old Mortality on 2 December 1816 by William Blackwood, Edinburgh, and John Murray, London. ... Old Mortality is a novel by Sir Walter Scott set in the period 1679 - 89 in south west Scotland. ... The Old Tolbooth, Edinburgh For the Scottish football (soccer) club Heart of Midlothian, see Heart of Midlothian F.C. The Heart of Midlothian is the seventh of Sir Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, and by many considered the finest. ... The Bride of Lammermoor is an historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, set in Scotland in the reign of Queen Anne. ... A Legend of Montrose is an historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, set in Scotland in the 1640s during the Civil War. ... Count Robert of Paris (1832) is a novel by Walter Scott It is part of Tales of My Landlord, 4th series. ... Castle Dangerous (1832) is a novel by Walter Scott. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Tales from Benedictine Sources

Tales from Benedictine Sources (1820) is a pair of novels by Walter Scott consisting of The Abbot and The Monastery. ... RZA (pronounced rizza, born Robert Diggs, July 5, 1969 in Brownsville, Brooklyn, New York, USA) is an African American producer, rapper and the leader of the hip hop crew Wu-Tang Clan. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Disambiguation, perhaps you are looking for Alt. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Short stories

  • Chronicles of the Canongate, 1st series (1827). Collection of three short stories:

The Highland Widow, The Two Drovers and The Surgeon's Daughter. Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

  • The Keepsake Stories (1828). Collection of three short stories:

My Aunt Margaret's Mirror, The Tapestried Chamber and Death Of The Laird's Jock. Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Poems

Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... --69. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805) is a long narrative poem by Walter Scott. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Marmion is an epic poem by Walter Scott about the Battle of Flodden published in 1808. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In an Arthurian legend, the Lady of the Lake gave King Arthur the sword known as Excalibur. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1811 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Bonnie Dundee, better known as John Graham, Viscount Dundee, who died fighting for the Jacobite cause at the Battle of Killiecrankie is immortalised in this song by Sir Walter Scott. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Other

Sir Walter Scott's study at Abbotsford
Sir Walter Scott's study at Abbotsford
  • Introductory Essay to The Border Antiquities of England and Scotland (1814-1817)
  • The Chase (translator) (1796)
  • Goetz of Berlichingen (translator) (1799)
  • Paul's Letters to his Kinsfolk (1816)
  • Provincial Antiquities of Scotland (1819-1826)
  • Lives of the Novelists (1821-1824)
  • Halidon Hill (1822)
  • The Letters of Malachi Malagrowther (1826)
  • The Life of Napoleon Buonaparte (1827)
  • Religious Discourses (1828)
  • Tales of a Grandfather, 1st series (1828)
  • History of Scotland, 2 vols. (1829-1830)
  • Tales of a Grandfather, 2nd series (1829)
  • The Doom of Devorgoil (1830)
  • Essays on Ballad Poetry (1830)
  • Tales of a Grandfather, 3rd series (1830)
  • Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft (1831)
  • The Bishop of Tyre

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1828 (MDCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Tales of a Grandfather is a series of books on the history of Scotland, written by Sir Walter Scott beginning around 1827, and published by A & C Black. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Tales of a Grandfather is a series of books on the history of Scotland, written by Sir Walter Scott beginning around 1827, and published by A & C Black. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Quote

Breathes there the man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land! from The Lay of the Last Minstrel by Walter Scott The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805) is a long narrative poem by Walter Scott. ...


Further reading

  • Bautz, Annika. Reception of Jane Austen and Walter Scott: A Comparative Longitudinal Study. Continuum, 2007. ISBN-10 082649546X, ISBN-13 978-0826495464

References

  1. ^ Sandyknowe and Early Childhood
  2. ^ a b School and University
  3. ^ Literary Beginnings
  4. ^ Stuart Kelly quoted by Arnold Zwicky in The Book of Lost Books at Language Log
  • Sir Walter Scott, John Buchan, Coward-McCann Inc., New York, 1932

John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ...

See also

Jedediah Cleishbotham is an imaginary editor in Scotts Tales of My Landlord. ... Tales of my Landlord was a series of novels by Sir Walter Scott. ... Alexandre Dumas, père, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie (July 24, 1802 – December 5, 1870) was a French writer, best known for his numerous historical novels of high adventure which have made him one of the most widely read French authors in the world. ... Karl May. ... Baroness Emma (Emmuska) Orczy (September 23, 1865 – November 12, 1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian origin. ... Rafael Sabatini (April 29, 1875 - February 13, 1950) was an Italian/British writer of novels of romance and adventure. ... Emilio Salgari. ... Samuel Shellabarger (1888 - 1954) was an American educator and author of both scholarly works and best-selling historical novels. ... Lawrence Schoonover Born in Anamosa, Iowa, Lawrence Schoonover attended the U of Wisconsin, then worked in advertising before becoming a novelist. ... Jules Gabriel Verne (February 8, 1828–March 24, 1905) was a French author who pioneered the science-fiction genre. ... Frank Garvin Yerby (September 5, 1916 - November 29, 1991) was an African American historical novelist. ... The Great Western Railway Waverley Class 4-4-0 broad gauge steam locomotives for passenger train work. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Walter Scott
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Walter Scott
Persondata
NAME Scott, Walter
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Novelist
DATE OF BIRTH August 15, 1771
PLACE OF BIRTH Old Town, Edinburgh
DATE OF DEATH September 21, 1832
PLACE OF DEATH Abbotsford House, Scotland

  Results from FactBites:
 
Thomas Walter Scott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (358 words)
Thomas Walter Scott (known less formally as Walter Scott) (October 27, 1867-March 23, 1938) was the first Premier of the province of Saskatchewan in Canada.
In his early adult life, Scott was a newspaper editor and publisher, becoming a partner in the Regina Standard from 1892 to 1893.
Politics lured Scott into joining the Liberal Party of Canada, and in 1900, he was elected in the riding of Assiniboia West to the Canadian House of Commons.
Walter Scott - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1702 words)
Scott then became an ardent volunteer in the yeomanry and on one of his "raids" he met at Gilsland Spa Margaret Charlotte Charpentier (or Charpenter), daughter of Jean Charpentier of Lyon in France whom he married in 1797.
His identity as the author of the novels was widely rumoured, and in 1815 Scott was given the honour of dining with George, Prince Regent, who wanted to meet "the author of Waverley".
Scott was also responsible, through a series of pseudonymous letters published in the Edinburgh Weekly News in 1826, for retaining the right of Scottish banks to issue their own banknotes, which is reflected to this day by his continued appearance on the front of all notes issued by the Bank of Scotland.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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