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Encyclopedia > Walter Giffard

Walter Giffard (died April 1279), chancellor of England and archbishop of York, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire, and after serving as canon and archdeacon of Wells, was chosen bishop of Bath and Wells in May 1264. In August 1265 Henry III appointed him chancellor of England, and he was one of the arbitrators who drew up the dictum de Kenilwortk in 1266. Later in this year Pope Clement IV named him archbishop of York, and having resigned the chancellorship he was an able and diligent ruler of his see, although in spite of his great wealth he was frequently in pecuniary difficulties. When Henry III died in November 1272 the archbishopric of Canterbury was vacant, and consequently the great seal was delivered to the archbishop of York, who was the chief of the three regents who successfully governed the kingdom until the return of Edward I in August 1274. Having again acted in this capacity during the king's absence in 1275, Giffard died in April 1279, and was buried in his cathedral.


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopędia Britannica.

Preceded by:
Ralph Sandwich
Lord Chancellor
1265–1266
Followed by:
Godfrey Giffard
Preceded by:
William of Bitton I
Bishop of Bath and Wells
1266–1279
Followed by:
William of Bitton II
Preceded by:
Godfrey Ludham
Archbishop of York
1266–1279
Followed by:
William Wickwane

  Results from FactBites:
 
GODFREY GIFFARD - LoveToKnow Article on GODFREY GIFFARD (230 words)
1235-1302), chancellor of England and bishop of Worcester, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire.
In 1266 Godfrey became chancellor of the exchequer, succeeding Walter as chancellor of England when, in the same year, the latter was made archbishop of York.
Giffard, although inclined to nepotism, was a benefactor to his cathedral, and completed and fortified the episcopal castle at Hartlebury.
Walter Giffard - definition of Walter Giffard in Encyclopedia (224 words)
Walter Giffard (died April 1279), chancellor of England and archbishop of York, was a son of Hugh Giffard of Boyton, Wiltshire, and after serving as canon and archdeacon of Wells, was chosen bishop of Bath and Wells in May 1264.
In August 1265 Henry III appointed him chancellor of England, and he was one of the arbitrators who drew up the dictum de Kenilwortk in 1266.
Having again acted in this capacity during the king's absence in 1275, Giffard died in April 1279, and was buried in his cathedral.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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