FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Walsingham" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Walsingham
Map sources for Walsingham at grid reference TF934368
Seal of the Medieval Shrine
Seal of the Medieval Shrine
The Anglican National Procession to Walsingham proceeds through the ruined abbey, May 2003.
The Anglican National Procession to Walsingham proceeds through the ruined abbey, May 2003.
This refers to the village, for other uses see Walsingham (disambiguation)

Walsingham is a village (actually two conjoined villages: Little Walsingham and Great Walsingham—the "Great" referring to its age, rather than its size) and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. The village is famed for its religious shrines in honour of the Virgin Mary and is a major pilgrimage centre. It also contains the ruins of two medieval monastic houses.[1][2] Image File history File links Dot4gb. ... Image File history File links Gb4dot. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Self-created file. ... Self-created file. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (863x594, 426 KB) Procession with the statue of the Blessed Virgin, Anglican National Pilgrimage at Walsingham, 2003. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (863x594, 426 KB) Procession with the statue of the Blessed Virgin, Anglican National Pilgrimage at Walsingham, 2003. ... Walsingham or Little Walsingham is a town in England The name may also refer to the following people Thomas Walsingham, an English chronicler Francis Walsingham, the spymaster of Queen Elizabeth I of England Any of the Barons Walsingham The Countess of Walsingham, an illegitimate daughter of King George I of... A village is a human residential settlement commonly found in rural areas. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2005 est. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... A traditional Catholic image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, displaying her Immaculate Heart The Blessed Virgin Mary, sometimes shortened to The Blessed Virgin, is a traditional title specifically used by Roman and Eastern Catholics, Anglo-Catholics, Eastern Orthodox and others to describe Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The Order of Friars Minor is a major mendicant movement founded by Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


The civil parish, which includes the two Walsinghams together with the depopulated medieval village of Egmere, has an area of 18.98 km² and in the 2001 census had a population of 864 in 397 households. For the purposes of local government, the parish falls within the district of North Norfolk.[3] To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... Non-metropolitan districts (usually just called Districts) are local government sub-divisions of English Counties. ... North Norfolk is a local government district in Norfolk, England. ...


Walsingham became a major centre of pilgrimage in the 11th century, following a vision of the Virgin Mary to Saxon noblewoman Richeldis de Faverches in 1061. Richeldis was instructed to build a replica of the house of the Holy Family in Nazareth, in honour of the Annunciation. The Holy House was panelled with wood and held a wooden statue of an enthroned Virgin Mary with the child Jesus seated on her lap. For other uses of the word pilgrimage, see Pilgrimage (disambiguation). ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ... Events Normans conquer Messina in Sicily Pope Alexander II elected The building of the Speyer Cathedral in Speyer, Germany, had begun to be built. ... A key piece of the Paleologan Mannerism - the Annunciation icon from Ohrid. ...


Walsingham became one of Northern Europe's great places of pilgrimage, and remained so through most of the Middle Ages.

Contents

Priory

A priory of Augustinian canons was established on the site in 1153, a few miles from the sea in the northern part of Norfolk, England, and grew in importance over the following centuries. Founded in the time of Edward the Confessor, the chapel of Our Lady of Walsingham was confirmed to the Augustinian Canons a century later and enclosed within the priory. From the first this shrine of Our Lady was a famous place of pilgrimage. Hither came the faithful from all parts of England and from the continent until the destruction of the priory by King Henry VIII in 1538. To this day the main road of the pilgrims through Newmarket, Brandon and Fakenham is still called the Palmers' Way. A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... Events January 6 - Henry of Anjou arrives in England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the play, see Henry VIII (play). ...


Many were the gifts of lands, rents and churches to the canons of Walsingham, and many the miracles wrought at Our Lady's shrine. Several English kings visited the shrine including Henry III (1231 or 1241), Edward I (1289 and 1296), Edward II in 1315, Edward III in 1361, Henry VI in 1455, Henry VII in 1487 and finally Henry VIII, who was later responsible for its destruction when the shrine and abbey perished in the Dissolution of the Monasteries. Erasmus in fulfilment of a vow made a pilgrimage from Cambridge in 1511, and left as his offering a set of Greek verses expressive of his piety. Thirteen years later he wrote his colloquy on pilgrimages, wherein the wealth and magnificence of Walsingham are set forth, and some of the reputed miracles rationalized. Two of Henry VIII's wives—Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn—made pilgrimages to the shrine. Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1] and the Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who kept Scotland under English domination during his lifetime. ... Edward II, (25 April 1284 – 21 September? 1327), of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until deposed in January, 1327. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English kings of medieval times. ... Henry VI (December 6, 1421 – May 21, 1471) was King of England from 1422 to 1461 (though with a Regent until 1437) and then from 1470 to 1471, and King of France from 1422 to 1453. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... The Dissolution of the Monasteries, referred to by Roman Catholic writers as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the formal process during the English Reformation by which King Henry VIII confiscated the property of the monastic institutions in England between 1538 and 1541. ... Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... The recently-widowed young Catherine of Aragon, by Henry VIIs court painter, Michael Sittow, c. ... A portrait of Anne Boleyn painted some years after her death. ...

Walsingham Abbey Remains
Walsingham Abbey Remains

In 1537 while the last prior, Richard Vowell, was paying obsequious respect to Thomas Cromwell, the sub-prior Nicholas Milcham was charged with conspiring to rebel against the suppression of the lesser monasteries, and on flimsy evidence was convicted of high treason and hanged outside the priory walls. In July, 1538, Prior Vowell assented to the destruction of Walsingham Priory and assisted the king's commissioners in the removal of the figure of Our Lady, of many of the gold and silver ornaments and in the general spoliation of the shrine. For his ready compliance the prior received a pension of 100 pounds a year, a large sum in those days, while fifteen of the canons received pensions varying from 4 pounds to 6 pounds. The shrine dismantled, and the priory destroyed, its site was sold by order of Henry VIII to one Thomas Sidney for 90 pounds, and a private mansion was subsequently erected on the spot. Eleven people including the sub-prior of the abbey were hanged, drawn and quartered. Gold and silver from the shrine was taken to London along with the statue of Mary and Jesus, which was burnt. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1452x1592, 1654 KB) Walsingham Abbey Remains. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1452x1592, 1654 KB) Walsingham Abbey Remains. ... Thomas Cromwell: portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger, 1532–3 Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex ( 1485 – July 28, 1540) was an English statesman, King Henry VIII of Englands chief minister 1532–1540. ... Events Treaty of Nagyvarad. ...


The fall of the monastery gave rise to the anonymous Elizabethan ballad the Walsingham Lament on what the Norfolk people felt at the loss of their glorious shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham, which includes the lines: Map sources for Walsingham at grid reference TF934368 This refers to the town, for other uses see Walsingham (disambiguation) Walsingham (full name Little Walsingham) is a small market town (population 864) in Norfolk, England, famed for its religious shrines in honour of the Virgin Mary. ...

Weep Weep O Walsingam,
Whose dayes are nights,
Blessings turned to blasphemies,
Holy deeds to despites
Sinne is where our Ladye sate,
Heaven turned is to helle;
Satan sitthe where our Lord did swaye,
Walsingham O farewell!

In the 20th Century, as a result of the initiative of the Anglican priest Fr Alfred Hope Patten, Anglican, Catholic and Orthodox Marian shrines have been re-established in Walsingham, and pilgrimages are held through the summer months. The Anglican National Pilgrimage takes place on the Spring Bank Holiday (the Monday following the last Sunday in May) and is regularly met by Protestant picket lines, but the highlight of the year is arrival of the Student cross pilgrimage on Good Friday. The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ... For other uses of the word pilgrimage, see Pilgrimage (disambiguation). ... Good Friday is a holy day celebrated by most Christians on the Friday before Easter or Pascha. ...


See also

Map sources for Walsingham at grid reference TF934368 This refers to the town, for other uses see Walsingham (disambiguation) Walsingham (full name Little Walsingham) is a small market town (population 864) in Norfolk, England, famed for its religious shrines in honour of the Virgin Mary. ... St Pauls Cathedral The United Kingdom is traditionally a Christian state, though of the four constituent countries, only England still has a state faith in the form of an established church. ... Walsingham House School in Bombay, India is one of the elitest girls school in the city. ... // The Diocese covers the counties of Cambridge, Norfolk, Suffolk and also Peterborough. ... // The Catholic Association, abbreviated to the CA, has been around in one form or another since 1881 and ran its first pilgrimage to Lourdes in 1901. ...

References

  1. ^ Ordnance Survey (2002). OS Explorer Map 251 - Norfolk Coast Central. ISBN 0-319-21887-2.
  2. ^ Welcome to Walsingham. Walsingham Parish Council Clerk. Retrieved on June 7, 2006.
  3. ^ Office for National Statistics & Norfolk County Council (2001). Census population and household counts for unparished urban areas and all parishes. Retrieved December 2, 2005.

June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources and external links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Francis Walsingham - Education - Information - Educational Resources - Encyclopedia - Music (932 words)
In 1570 William Cecil, the queen's chief advisor, chose Walsingham to negotiate in support of the Huguenots in their negotiations with Charles IX for the Treaty of Blois.
Walsingham was so successful that he was entrusted with a more prestigious role, became a joint secretary of state with Sir Thomas Smith.
Walsingham and was behind the discovery of the Throckmorton plot and Babington plot.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Walsingham Priory (418 words)
Walsingham Priory stood a few miles from the sea in the northern part of Norfolk, England.
Henry III came on a pilgrimage to Walsingham in 1241, Edward I in 1280 and 1296, Edward II in 1315, Henry VI in 1455, Henry VII in 1487, and Henry VIII in 1513.
In July, 1538, Prior Vowell assented to the destruction of Walsingham Priory and assisted the king's commissioners in the removal of the figure of Our Lady, of many of the gold and silver ornaments and in the general spoliation of the shrine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m