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Encyclopedia > Walpurgis Night
Walpurgis Night in Sweden.
Walpurgis Night in Sweden.

Walpurgis Night (or Walpurgisnacht in Germany) is a holiday celebrated on April 30 or May 1, in large parts of Central and Northern Europe.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x688, 213 KB) Summary en: bonfire, Walpurgis Night, near lake Ringsjö, Sweden sv: Valborgsbål vid Ringsjöns strand, Sverige de: Feuer zur Walpurgisnacht beim See Ringsjö, Schweden Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Walpurgis Night Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x688, 213 KB) Summary en: bonfire, Walpurgis Night, near lake Ringsjö, Sweden sv: Valborgsbål vid Ringsjöns strand, Sverige de: Feuer zur Walpurgisnacht beim See Ringsjö, Schweden Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Walpurgis Night Metadata... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... Northern Europe is marked in dark blue Northern Europe is a name of the northern part of the European continent. ...

Contents

Origins

The festival is named after Saint Walburga (known in Scandinavia as "Valborg"; alternative forms are "Walpurgis", "Wealdburg", or "Valderburger"), born in Wessex in 710. She was a niece of Saint Boniface and, according to legend, a daughter to the Saxon prince St. Richard. Together with her brothers she travelled to Franconia, Germany, where she became a nun and lived in the convent of Heidenheim, which was founded by her brother Wunibald. Walburga died on 25 February 779 and that day still carries her name in the Traditional Catholic Calendar. However she was not made a saint until 1 May in the same year, and that day carries her name in the Swedish calendar. Saint Walpurga, born in Devonshire, ca. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe and includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... Map of the British Isles circa 802 Wessex was one of the seven major Anglo-Saxon kingdoms (the Heptarchy) that preceded the Kingdom of England. ... // Events End of the Asuka period, the second and last part of the Yamato period and beginning of the Nara period in Japan. ... For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... Richard of Levick, (Richard Wych or Richard of Wych or Richard de Wich - born Droitwich 1197, died Dover 1253) is a saint (canonized 1262) who was Bishop of Chichester. ... Franconia (German: Franken) is a historic region in modern Germany, which today forms three administrative regions of the German federal state of Bavaria: Lower Franconia (Unterfranken), Middle Franconia (Mittelfranken), and Upper Franconia (Oberfranken). ... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events Offa of Mercia beats Cynewulf of Wessex and takes Bensington. ... This article lists the feast days of the Roman Calendar prior to the reforms which followed the Second Vatican Council, and prior to the reforms of 1955-1960, which suppressed certain feast days and reduced them from six classes to three. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... Namesdays or name days are a Swedish tradition of attaching personal names to each day of the year, and celebrating the association of particular days with those having this name. ...


Historically the Walpurgisnacht is derived from Pagan spring customs, where the arrival of spring was celebrated with bonfires at night. Viking fertility celebrations took place around February 25 and due to Walburga being declared a saint at that time of year, her name became associated with the celebrations. Walburga was honored in the same way that Vikings had celebrated spring and as they spread throughout Europe, the two dates became mixed together and created the Walpurgis Night celebration. The main mascot of Walpurgis Day is the witch. Heathen redirects here. ... The term Viking commonly denotes the ship-borne explorers, traders, and warriors of the Norsemen (literally, men from the north) who originated in Scandinavia and raided the coasts of the British Isles, France and other parts of Europe as far east as the Volga River in Russia from the late... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ...


Germany

In Germany, Walpurgisnacht (or Hexennacht, meaning witches' night), the night from April 30 to May 1, is the night when allegedly the witches hold a large celebration on the Blocksberg and await the arrival of Spring. The Brocken, or Blocksberg, is the highest peak (1142 meters) in the Germany, between the rivers Weser and Elbe. ...

Walpurgis Night (in German folklore) the night of April 30 (May Day's eve), when witches meet on the Brocken mountain and hold revels with their Gods..."
Brocken the highest of the Harz Mountains of north central Germany. It is noted for the phenomenon of the Brocken spectre and for witches' revels which reputably took place there on Walpurgis night.
The Brocken Spectre is a magnified shadow of an observer, typically surrounded by rainbow-like bands, thrown onto a bank of cloud in high mountain areas when the sun is low. The phenomenon was first reported on the Brocken.
—Taken from Oxford Phrase & Fable.

A scene in Goethe's Faust Part One is called "Walpurgisnacht", and one in Faust Part Two is called "Classical Walpurgisnacht". The Brocken, or Blocksberg, is the highest peak (1142 meters) in the Harz Mountains in Germany, between the rivers Weser and Elbe. ... NASA photo A glory is an optical phenomenon produced by light reflected toward its source by a cloud of uniformly_sized water droplets. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749–March 22, 1832) was a German writer, politician, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In some parts of northern coastal regions of Germany, the custom of lighting huge Beltane fires is still kept alive, to celebrate the coming of May, while most parts of Germany have a derived christianized custom around Easter called "Easter fires". This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ...


In rural parts of southern Germany it is part of popular youth culture to go out on Walburgisnacht to play pranks on other people, like messing up someone's garden, hiding stuff or spraying messages on other people's property. Sometimes these pranks go too far and may result in serious wilful damage to property or bodily injury.


Curiously Adolf Hitler, with several members of his staff (including Joseph Goebbels), committed suicide on Walpurgisnacht, April 30/May 1, 1945. In one History Channel documentary, Hitler and the Occult, one researcher suggested that Hitler was deliberately offering himself to the forces of evil. Hitler redirects here. ... Paul Joseph Goebbels (29 October 1897 – 1 May 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ... It has been suggested that The Pros of suicide be merged into this article or section. ... The History Channel is a cable television channel, dedicated to the presentation of historical events and persons, often with frequent observations and explanations by noted historians as well as reenactors and witnesses to events, if possible. ... For the book (nothing to do with the documentary) by the same name by Ken Anderson please see Hitler and the Occult (book) Hitler and the Occult, directed by unknown , narrated by unknown, is an English language unknown, 50 minute, History Channel documentary regarding the occult influences and history of...


Sweden

A large crowd, mostly students in typical Swedish white student caps, participating in the traditional Walpurgis Night celebration with song outside the Castle in Uppsala. The silhouette of the cathedral towers may be seen in the background. To the right are banners and standards of the student nations. Image from c. 1920.

Walpurgis (sw: Valborg) is one of the main holidays during the year in both Sweden and Finland, alongside Christmas and Midsummer. The forms of celebration in Sweden vary in different parts of the country and between different cities. One of the main traditions in Sweden is to light large bonfires, a custom which is most firmly established in Svealand, and which began in Uppland during the 18th century. An older tradition from Southern Sweden was for the younger people to collect greenery and branches from the woods at twilight, which were used to adorn the houses of the village. The expected reward for this task is to be paid in eggs. Image File history File links Uppsala_plate_1_from_NF_30_(1920)_-_Student_song_at_Slottsbacken_on_Walpurgis_night. ... Image File history File links Uppsala_plate_1_from_NF_30_(1920)_-_Student_song_at_Slottsbacken_on_Walpurgis_night. ... In various European countries, student caps of different types are or have been worn, either as a marker of a common identity, as is the case in the Nordic countries, or to identify the bearer as member of a smaller corporation within the larger group of students, as is the... Uppsala (older spelling Upsala) is a Swedish City in central Sweden, located about 70 km north of Stockholm. ... The Cathedral of Uppsala. ... The student nations at the two ancient universities in Uppsala and Lund, of which there are now thirteen at each university, are the oldest student societies in Sweden. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that marks the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. ... Midsummer celebration, Åmmeberg, Sweden Midsummer, also referred to as Litha by some Wiccans and other Neopagans, refers to the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the religious celebrations that accompany it. ... Svealand Swedens historical four lands. ... Uppland ( ) is a historical province or landskap on the eastern coast of Sweden. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Götaland Unofficial Nordic cross flag of Götaland. ... An egg is an ovum produced by a female animal for reproduction, often prepared as food. ...


The tradition which is most widespread throughout the country is probably singing songs of spring. Most of the songs are from the 19th century and were spread by students' spring festivities. The strongest and most traditional spring festivities are also found in the old university cities, like Uppsala and Lund where both current and graduated students gather at events that take up most of the day from early morning to late night on April 30, or "sista April" ("The last day of April") as it is called in Lund and elsewhere throughout the country. There are also newer student traditions like the carnival parade, The Cortège, which has been held since 1909 by the students at Chalmers in Gothenburg. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Uppsala (older spelling Upsala) is a Swedish City in central Sweden, located about 70 km north of Stockholm. ...   IPA: is a city in SkÃ¥ne in southern Sweden. ...   IPA: is a city in SkÃ¥ne in southern Sweden. ... The Cortège (Swedish: Cortègen), or The Chalmers Cortège (Swedish: Chalmerscortègen) is an annual carnival parade held on Walpurgis Night (April 30) by students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Chalmers University of Technology or Chalmers tekniska högskola (CTH), often Chalmers, is a university in Gothenburg, Sweden that focuses on research and edication in technology, natural science and architecture. ... Location of Gothenburg in northern Europe Coordinates: Country Sweden County Västra Götaland County Province Västergötland Charter 1621  - Mayor Göran Johansson Area    - City 450 km²  (174 sq mi)  - Water 14. ...


Finland

A team of students performing the traditional "capping of Havis Amanda" during Helsinki's Vappu.
A team of students performing the traditional "capping of Havis Amanda" during Helsinki's Vappu.

Today in Finland, Walpurgis Night (Vapunaatto) is, along with New Year's Eve, the biggest carnival-style festivity that takes place in the streets of Finland's towns and cities. The celebration is typically centered on plentiful use of sparkling wine and other alcoholic beverages. The student traditions are also one of the main characteristics of "Vappu". From the end of the 19th century, "Fin de Siècle", and onwards, this traditional upper class feast has been co-opted by students attending university, already having received their student cap. Many people who have graduated from lukio wear the cap. One tradition is drinking sima, whose alcohol content varies. Fixtures include the capping of the Havis Amanda, a nude female statue in Helsinki, and the biannually alternating publications of ribald matter called Äpy and Julkku. Both are sophomoric; but while Julkku is a standard magazine, Äpy is always a gimmick. Classic forms have included an Äpy printed on toilet paper and a bedsheet. Often the magazine has been stuffed inside standard industrial packages such as sardine-cans and milk cartons. The festivities also include a picnic on May 1st, which is sometimes prepared in a lavish manner. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 66 KB) Description: Havis Amanda statue in Helsinki gets her student cap on vappu (1st of May) Source: self-made Photographer: Revontuli File links The following pages link to this file: Walpurgis Night ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (480x640, 66 KB) Description: Havis Amanda statue in Helsinki gets her student cap on vappu (1st of May) Source: self-made Photographer: Revontuli File links The following pages link to this file: Walpurgis Night ... Havis Amanda is a nude female statue in Helsinki, Finland. ... Founded 1550 Country Finland Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Area[1] - Of which land - Rank 185. ... The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ... Carnival or Carnivale is an annual Christian festival season. ... A glass of sparkling wine A Sparkling wine cork It has been suggested that Spumante, Frizzante, Sekt and Cremant be merged into this article or section. ... Bottles of cachaça, a Brazilian alcoholic beverage. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... In various European countries, student caps of different types are or have been worn, either as a marker of a common identity, as is the case in the Nordic countries, or to identify the bearer as member of a smaller corporation within the larger group of students, as is the... A gymnasium (pronounced with or, in Swedish, as opposed to ) is a type of school providing secondary education in some parts of Europe, comparable to English Grammar Schools and U.S. High Schools. ... Sima (cognate with zymurgy) is a sweat mead, still an essential seasonal brew connected with the Finnish Vappu festival. ... Havis Amanda is a nude female statue in Helsinki, Finland. ... Founded 1550 Country Finland Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Area[1] - Of which land - Rank 185. ... Äpy is a traditional and the oldest Finnish humour magazine published related to the Walpurgis_Night festivities. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about magazine format. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Finnish tradition is also a shadowing of the Soviet Era May Day parade. Starting with the parties of the left, the whole of the Finnish political scene has nominated Vappu as the day to go out on stumps and agitate. This does not only include right-wing parties, but also others like the church have followed suit, marching and making speeches. In Sweden it is only the labour and socialist parties which use May 1 for political activities, while others observe the traditional festivities. The labourers who were active in the 1970s still party on the first of May. They arrange carnivals and the radio plays their old songs that workers liked to listen to. The labour spirit lies most in the capital of Finland, Helsinki. May Day is May 1, and refers to any of several holidays celebrated on this day. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...


The First of May is also a day for everything fun and crazy: children and families gather in market places to celebrate the first day of the spring and the coming summer. There are balloons and joy, people drink their first beers outside, there are clowns and masks and a lot of fun. The first of May includes colourful streamers, funny and silly things and sun. The first of May means the beginning of the spring for many people in Finland.


Traditionally May 1st is celebrated by a picnic in a park (Kaivopuisto in the case of Helsinki). For most, the picnic is enjoyed with friends on a blanket with good food and sparkling wine. Some people, however, arrange extremely lavish picnics with pavilions, white table cloths, silver candelabras, classical music and lavish food. The picnic usually starts early in the morning, and some hard-core party goers continue the celebrations of the previous evening without sleeping in between. Some Student organisations have traditional areas where they camp every year and they usually send someone to reserve the spot early on. As with other Vappu traditions, the picnic includes student caps, sima, streamers and balloons. Kaivopuisto (Swedish Brunnparken) is a district in Helsinki, Finland. ... Founded 1550 Country Finland Province Southern Finland Region Uusimaa Sub-region Helsinki Area[1] - Of which land - Rank 185. ... A glass of sparkling wine A Sparkling wine cork It has been suggested that Spumante, Frizzante, Sekt and Cremant be merged into this article or section. ... Candelabra is a nickname in the USA for radio masts and radio towers with multiple tops. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Sima (cognate with zymurgy) is a sweat mead, still an essential seasonal brew connected with the Finnish Vappu festival. ...


References in modern culture

  • The closing sequence of Fantasia (1940) is intended to portray Walpurgisnacht and not Halloween, as is popularly supposed.
  • The Bram Stoker short story Dracula's Guest takes place on Walpurgisnacht: "Walpurgis Night was when, according to the belief of millions of people, the devil was abroad – when the graves were opened and the dead came forth and walked. When all evil things of earth and air and water held revel."
  • In the 1931 film Dracula, a Romanian peasant describes the night on which the film begins as Walpurgis Night.
  • The hentai anime series Bible Black contains references to Walpurgis Night important to the plot.
  • The English novelist and journalist Angela Carter makes reference to Walpurgisnacht in a short story entitled The Werewolf from the compilation of short stories The Bloody Chamber.
  • The Campus Loop, a nationally syndicated TV show from the University of Texas at Austin's student television channel, KVR-TV, had a set of episodes entitled "The Maltese Pumpkin" that were set on Walpurgis Night.
  • In the popular children's books Mr Majeika by English author Humphrey Carpenter, the Mr Majeika, a wizard, originally comes from the land of Walpergis, where all witches and wizards reside. Those who fail their exams, like Mr Majeika, are sent to Britland (England) to be teachers.
  • Songs whose titles include or make reference to Walpurgis Night include:
  • Walpurgis Night falls halfway between last year's Halloween and the current year's Halloween.
  • In JK Rowling's famous Harry Potter series, the group of Dark Wizards called Death Eaters were originally named the Knights of Walpurgis, an obvious pun on Walpurgis Night or Walpurgisnacht. Incidentally, Walpurgisnacht also falls on the exact opposite day of the year as Hallowe'en, which is a pivotal date in the series, being the day when Lily and James Potter were murdered, and Voldemort was supposedly 'killed' by their baby son.
  • In Sight Unseen by Donald Margulies, Walpugisnacht is the controversial painting by Jonathan Waxman of an interracial couple fornicating in a cemetary.

Fantasia is a 1940 motion picture produced by Walt Disney. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Halloween or Halloween is a tradition celebrated on the night of October 31, most notably by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting sweets, fruit, and other gifts. ... Edward Albee, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1961 Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, and The Sandbox. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Draculas Guest is a short story by Bram Stoker, first published in 1914. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Dracula is a 1931 horror film produced by Universal Pictures Co. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ... The Magic Mountain book cover The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg) is a novel by Thomas Mann, first published in November 1924. ... Anton Szandor LaVey (11 April 1930 - 29 October 1997), born Howard Stanton Levey, was the founder and High Priest of the Church of Satan, author of The Satanic Bible, and creator of the religion known as as LaVeyan Satanism. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gustav Meyrink (January 19, 1868 – December 4, 1932) was an Austrian author, storyteller, dramatist, translator, banker and Buddhist. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Carnival or Carnivale is an annual Christian festival season. ... Nickname: City of a Hundred Spires Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson is the first volume of his series The Baroque Cycle. ... Neal Town Stephenson (born October 31, 1959) is an American writer, known primarily for his science fiction works in the postcyberpunk genre with a penchant for explorations of society, mathematics, currency, and the history of science. ... The Illuminatus! Trilogy is a series of three novels written by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson primarily between 1969 and 1971. ... Robert Joseph Shea (1933 - March 10, 1994) was the co-author (with Robert Anton Wilson) of The Illuminatus! Trilogy. ... It has been suggested that Timothy F.X. Finnegan be merged into this article or section. ... Hentai tankōbon on display in Japan Hentai )   is a Japanese word that can mean change of shape, abnormality or metamorphosis. However, in slang situations it often means perverted and is subsequently used in many other countries to refer to anime, manga and computer games with explicit sexual or pornographic... The main cast of the anime Cowboy Bebop (1998) (L to R: Spike Spiegel, Jet Black, Ed Tivrusky, Faye Valentine, and Ein the dog) For the oleo-resin, see Animé (oleo-resin). ... Bible Black ) is a Hentai anime OVA series. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... The Bloody Chamber is an anthology of short fiction by Angela Carter. ... Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight, commonly referred to as simply Legends of the Dark Knight is a DC comic book featuring Batman. ... Roger Joseph Zelazny (May 13, 1937 – June 14, 1995) was an American writer of fantasy and science fiction short stories and novels. ... Nine Princes in Amber The Chronicles of Amber is a popular fantasy series by Roger Zelazny. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The English language fantasy series The Chronicles of Amber feature a great variety of characters from both our universe and other possible parallel universes. ... The University of Texas at Austin, often called UT or Texas, is a doctoral/research university located in Austin, Texas. ... KVR-TV is the only student-managed and Federal Communications Commission-licensed television station in the United States. ... Mr Majeika was the title of a British childrens television series starring Stanley Baxter. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (Russian: Михаил Афанасьевич Булгаков; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1891, Kiev – March 10, 1940, Moscow) was a Russian novelist and playwright of the first half of the 20th century. ... The Master and Margarita (Russian: ) is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven about the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. ... Procol Harum are an English progressive rock band, formed in the 1960s. ... War Pigs is an anti-war song by British heavy metal rockers Black Sabbath from their 1970 album, Paranoid. ... It has been suggested that Polka Tulk be merged into this article or section. ... The Legendary Pink Dots are a UK rock band formed in London at the end of the late 1970s and who although distinctly underground, have been musically influential over the years. ... Schandmaul Schandmaul is a German rock/folk. ... Running Wild is one of several German power metal bands to emerge in the mid/late 1980s (along with Iced Earth, Helloween, Rage, Blind Guardian, Grave Digger, etc). ... Matt Cameron (born Matthew D. Cameron, November 28, 1962, in San Diego, California) is an American musician renowned for playing drums in the grunge rock bands Soundgarden (1986-1997) and Pearl Jam (1998-present). ... Soundgarden was an influential Seattle rock band who helped to define the sound that came to be called grunge. ... Mercyful Fate is an influential Danish heavy metal group that helped inspire the black metal, thrash metal and prog metal genres. ... They Were Wrong, So We Drowned (May 2004) is the second album released by indie rock band Liars. ... Liars is currently a three-piece band consisting of Australian-born Angus Andrew (vocals/guitar), Aaron Hemphill (percussion, guitar, synth), and Julian Gross (drums). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cradle of Filth is a heavy metal band formed in Suffolk, England in 1991. ... Donald Margulies is an American playwright who authored plays including Pulitzer Prize winning Dinner with Friends and Collected Stories. ...

See also

All official holidays in Sweden are established by acts of Parliament. ... By Swedish law a number of days of the calendar year are designated as official flag days. ... Faust depicted in an etching by Rembrandt van Rijn (circa 1650) Faust or Faustus is the protagonist of a popular German legend in which a mediæval scholar makes a pact with the Devil. ... Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carrés play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Goethes Faust, Part I. It debuted at the Théatre-Lyrique in Paris on March 19, 1859. ... Mefistofele is the only completed opera by the Italian composer Arrigo Boito. ... This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ... Halloween or Halloween is a tradition celebrated on the night of October 31, most notably by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting sweets, fruit, and other gifts. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The name of the holiday is Walpurgisnacht in German and Dutch, Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurgijos naktis in Lithuanian,Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, čarodějnice or Valpuržina noc in Czech, chódotypalenje Lower Sorbian, chodojtypalenje in Upper Sorbian.

Lower Sorbian (dolnoserbski) is a minority language spoken in eastern Germany in the historical province of Lower Lusatia, today part of Brandenburg. ... Upper Sorbian (hornjoserbsce) is a minority language of Germany spoken in the historical province of Upper Lusatia, today part of Saxony. ...

References

External links

  • Walpurgisnacht Events Guide
  • Day of the Witches - Czech Republic

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boat trip Rhine River Lights Firework Displays Round Opening Display Oberwesel Parade big Concluding Lorelei rock Live ... (1496 words)
All witches who come to the Walpurgis Night festival with a witch's hat and all sorcerers, who come to the Walpurgis night festival with a sorcerer's hat, receive a coupon for a glass of May Day wine.
Enjoy the colorful illumination of the sky above the Middle Rhine River during the Walpurgis Night firework from the open air deck of the boat you're on.
There will only be about 5 boats during this event, which means the guests can watch the Walpurgis Night firework literally from the front row.
Walpurgis Night - definition of Walpurgis Night in Encyclopedia (748 words)
Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton in Swedish, Vappu in Finnish, Volbriöö in Estonian, Valpurģu nakts or Valpurģi in Latvian, Walpurgisnacht in German) is a holiday celebrated on April 30, in Finland, Sweden, Estonia, Latvia and Germany.
The festival is named after Saint Walburga (known in Scandinavia as "Valborg"; alternative forms are "Walpurgis", "Wealdburg", or "Valderburger"), born in Wessex in 710 a niece of Saint Boniface and, according to legend, she was a daughter to the saxon prince St. Richard.
In Germany, Walpurgisnacht, the night from April 30 to May 1, is the night when allegedly the witches on the Blocksberg hold a large celebration and wait on the arrival of the devil.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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