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Encyclopedia > Wally West
Flash


Cover art for The Flash vol. 2, # 207
Art by Michael Turner Wallace West (1900-1980) was an American science fiction writer. ... Download high resolution version (565x797, 99 KB)The current Flash, from The Flash (2nd series) #207, April 2004. ... Michael Turner (born April 21, 1971) is an American comic book artist born in Crossville, Tennessee and primarily known for his work on Witchblade, Black Panther, and Fathom. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance as Kid Flash:
The Flash vol. 1, #110
(Dec. 1959 – January 1960)
as Flash:
Crisis on Infinite Earths #12 (March 1986)
Created by John Broome
Carmine Infantino
Characteristics
Alter ego Wallace Rudolph "Wally" West
Team
affiliations
Justice League
Teen Titans
Justice League Elite
Notable aliases Kid Flash, Kid Lantern
Abilities Super speed,
molecular control,
time and dimensional travel

Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... The Teen Titans, also known as “The New Teen Titans”, “New Titans”, or “The Titans”, a DC Comics superhero team. ... Justice League Elite was a 12-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ...

Contents

Fictional character biography

When Wally is eight years old, he dreams of being like the Flash, though his parents do not approve. One day, he is visited by a friendly stranger, whose kindness gives young Wally the hope he needs for the future. The stranger then mysteriously disappears. It is later revealed in The Flash vol. 2 #0 that the stranger is an older version of Wally himself, who makes a detour in his travels through time to meet his younger self.


Kid Flash

Wally as Kid Flash.
Wally as Kid Flash.

Wally West is the nephew of Iris West (and consequently, Barry Allen's nephew by marriage), and is introduced in The Flash vol. 1, #110 (1959). When West is about ten years old, he visits the Central City police laboratory where Barry Allen (Iris' boyfriend at the time) worked, and the freak accident that gave Allen his powers repeats itself, bathing West in electrically-charged chemicals. Now possessing the same powers as The Flash, West dons a smaller sized copy of Barry Allen's Flash outfit and becomes the young crimefighter Kid Flash. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kid Flash is the name of three fictional characters, all superheroes, in the DC Comics universe. ... Iris West Allen is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ...


He soon adopts a slightly different, yellow-and-red outfit with his hair exposed, and becomes a founding member of the Teen Titans, along with fellow sidekicks Robin and Aqualad. Always something of a straight-shooter from rural America, Kid Flash sometimes feels out of place alongside more flamboyant heroes such as Speedy and Wonder Girl. Teen Titans redirects here. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Tempest is a fictional character, a superhero from DC Comics. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Roy Harper is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ...


Flash

As a young adult, West finds his powers to be failing and even damaging his body. He retires from crimefighting until a cure can be found. However, he is called to action again by the Crisis on Infinite Earths, in which his uncle Barry is killed. As a side effect of the energies he was exposed to during that adventure, West's powers stabilize. However, he can no longer run at the extraordinary speeds of his uncle. West is limited to the speed of sound and has to eat vast quantities of food to maintain his metabolism. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... This page is about the physical speed of sound waves in a medium. ...


Despite these handicaps, West resumes his career, though he retires his Kid Flash costume and adopts the costume and name of the Flash to honor his uncle. He does, however, make his identity public knowledge to keep from replacing Barry Allen in the minds of the public. This makes him the first sidekick to actually take on the name of his mentor. A short time later, West wins a lottery, buys a large mansion, and becomes something of a playboy. He joins Justice League Europe early in his career as Flash and later joins the reformed Justice League. West's finances and luck continue to ebb and wane until Flash vol. 2, #62, when his playboy ways end and his fortunes stabilize. A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ... Justice League Europe was a DC Comics book run that was a spin-off of Justice League International (which was renamed Justice League America at the time). ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


The Speed Force

Over the next few years, West learns several things about his powers. First, it is suggested that Allen had not actually been human after gaining his own powers, but was in fact a powerful energy force. As Allen's career ends after his death, West has access to only a fraction of this energy. Later, West discovers that Allen was in fact a conduit to the Speed Force, an extradimensional energy force that West and other speedsters could also tap. West had been holding back from fully embracing the Speed Force for fear of replacing his uncle in the minds of the public. Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ...

Flash vol. 2, #1 (June 1987). Wally West holds his first title as the Modern Age Flash. Art by Jackson Guice.
Flash vol. 2, #1 (June 1987). Wally West holds his first title as the Modern Age Flash. Art by Jackson Guice.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jackson Guice (sometimes credited as Butch Guice) is a comic book artist who has contributed to the Micronauts, New Mutants, X-Factor, The Flash, Doctor Strange and Birds of Prey. ...

Realization of his full potential

A difficult encounter with a particularly vicious foe, the first Reverse-Flash (Eobard Thawne, originating from a time before he even had his first encounter with Barry), who was bent on destroying Allen's legacy finally motivated West to use his abilities to their fullest potential. Upon arriving, Thawne believed he was Barry Allen due to the shock of time travel and the trauma of learning of his future death at Barry's hands, causing him to 'hide' behind the identity of Barry Allen, whose life he had learned all about thanks to an as-yet-unpublished autobiography of Barry he possessed in his time. Although he initially worked as a hero, Thawne's true personality began to emerge, and "Barry" went rogue, attacking Central City for 'forgetting him', even breaking Jay Garrick's leg in a battle. However, as Thawne (now his true self, uniform and all) bragged to Wally about how, when he was finished with Central City, no one would even remember Barry, a subconscious mental block Wally had imposed on his speed finally snapped; Wally had always limited his speed because, when he could move as fast as Barry, he really would have replaced him, but he feared Thawne replacing Barry more than he feared himself doing so. After this encounter, he was Barry Allen's equal in speed, though he still had not been able to recover Barry's vibrational abilities. Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ...


After discovering and being absorbed by the Speed Force, returning to Earth found Wally to be even faster than Barry Allen. This also saw the return of his vibration powers, though they had a destructive side effect of destroying any walls or objects he passed through. Battling the student/priest of speed, Savitar, West gained some additional powers from the Speed Force, and even more powers after meeting an alternate version of himself, Walter West (the Dark Flash), via Hypertime travel, including the ability to 'steal' speed from other speedsters to temporarily increase his own. Savitar is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy to The Flash (Wally West). ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ...


Until West's accumulation of new powers circa issues #90 and up, some of his uncle's abilities continued to elude West; most notably, the power to precisely travel through time, especially with the ease which Allen accomplished these feats. More recently, West has on several occasions used his speed to break time and even dimensional barriers, though unlike Barry Allen, he did not require the use of the Cosmic Treadmill to do so. By this time, Wally had also learned to temper the destructive nature of his vibration powers. While Walter seemed able to traverse dimensions easily (in The Flash vol. 2, #159, Walter West landed on our Earth and recognized himself on the cover of what was then the current month's issue of the comic), Wally has not, to date, been able to do so easily. The abilities that West has not been able to duplicate seem to coincide with Barry Allen's unique and complete control of his molecular structure.


Like his uncle, West had a friendship with Hal Jordan, a.k.a. Green Lantern. When Jordan became Parallax, he was replaced by Kyle Rayner. Having grown up with Jordan as Green Lantern and having always seen him as 'Uncle Hal', West did not warmly embrace Rayner when Rayner first took over the mantle and was very critical and sometimes harsh with Rayner during his early days. In time, West eventually accepted Rayner as Green Lantern and they became best friends and supporters. After John Stewart return his role as a Green Lantern once again and took Kyle's place within the Justice League, they also have good relationship as well. He also have a solid friendships with another one of his uncle's best friend, Oliver Queen, the Green Arrow, and his son, Connor Hawke, the second Green Arrow. Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... Parallax is a fictional character, a supervillain from DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... John Stewart may be: John Walking Stewart (1747–1822), English traveller and philosopher John D. Stewart (1833–1894), United States Representative from Georgia John Knox Stewart (1853–1919), United States Representative from New York John K. Stewart (1870–1916), American entrepreneur and inventor John Smith Stewart (1878–1970), Canadian Member... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Green Arrow (Connor Hawke) is a DC Comics superhero. ...


Marriage

West married journalist and longtime girlfriend, Linda Park. After an attack on Linda by a new Reverse-Flash, Zoom, caused a miscarriage of their unborn twins by triggering a sonic boom that caused Linda severe internal damage, West regretted the public knowledge of his identity. With the aid of the The Spectre (Hal Jordan), the knowledge of the Flash's secret identity was wiped from the minds of everybody in the world, but the Spectre's attempts to 'reassert' its mission of vengeance over Jordan's attempts to make it a mission of redemption resulted in even Wally forgetting his identity. He began working as a mechanic for the Keystone City Police, a job that reminded him of Barry Allen (whom he only remembered as a police scientist). For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Zoom (real name Hunter Zolomon) is a comic book supervillain in the DC Universe. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Keystone City is a fictional city featured in stories of the Flash published by DC Comics. ...

Flash with the rest of the Justice League Elite- Green Arrow, Manitou Raven, Menagerie II, Sister Superior, Major Disaster, Kasumi, and Coldcast.

Eventually, Batman deduced the truth and restored West's memory by revealing his own identity. The truth has also been revealed to Wally's friends in the heroic community, and to Linda Park, who initially found it difficult to deal with (As in her false memories, their twins had been innocent victims caught in the crossfire between the Flash and Zoom) and took some time away from her husband before reuniting. Disillusioned with typical heroics for a time after this, the Flash took up joint membership with the Justice League and the newly-formed Justice League Elite, working under Sister Superior- sister of the deceased Manchester Black- and assorted anti-heroes as a superhuman 'black ops' team, working to track down and eliminate metahuman threats to the populace before they went public, although the team eventually fell apart after Black's spirit was discovered to be influencing his sister and trying to drive her to destroy London. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... Manitou Raven was a superhero from the fictional DC Universe. ... Menagerie is a name shared by two anti-heroes in the DC Universe. ... Vera Black, alias Sister Superior, is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Major Disaster is a former DC Comics supervillain and reluctant amoral superhero. ... Cassandra Cain is a fictional character in the DC Universe, and the most recent Batgirl. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Justice League Elite was a 12-issue comic book limited series published monthly by DC Comics in 2004 and 2005. ... Vera Black, alias Sister Superior, is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Manchester Black is a fictional character, an anti-hero in the DC Comics universe. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Due to another fight with Zoom, which featured the temporary return of Barry Allen and Professor Zoom, the events leading to Linda's miscarriage were altered, as Zoom's future self took the brunt of the sonic boom that would have hit Linda when he attempted to ram her at superspeed, and the miscarriage was erased. Linda delivered twins shortly after Wally returned to the present, leading Wally to reconsider his position as the Flash, aiming to give more time to his newfound family than to the heroic business. Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ...


Infinite Crisis

Main article: Infinite Crisis
Wally and his family disappear into the Speed Force. Art by George Perez.
Wally and his family disappear into the Speed Force. Art by George Perez.

In Infinite Crisis #4, Wally, Jay, and Bart joined together to stop the rampage of Superboy-Prime in Smallville, using their top speeds to hinder him and trap him in another dimension. During the battle, Wally seemed to turn into energy and started to disappear. He was able to appear to Linda (his "lightning rod"). Refusing to be separated from her husband, Linda grabbed onto Wally in the middle of her good-bye with their infant children in her arms and all four vanished. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Image File history File links Westcrisis. ... Image File history File links Westcrisis. ... George Pérez (born June 9, 1954 in The Bronx, New York) is a Puerto Rican-American illustrator and writer of comic books. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe and the first Flash. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... This article is about Supermans adoptive home town. ...


Apparently, Linda, Wally and their twins were still alive in an alternate reality, living in its version of Keystone City, from which only Bart Allen managed to return. Bart told the other heroes that Wally was "just taking some time away" with Linda to watch his twins grow without dealing with the pressures of being a hero.


Return

During the events of the JLA/JSA "The Lightning Saga" crossover, several members of the Legion of Super-Heroes travel to the present to resurrect an ally via lightning rods. The locations the Legion travels to include the spots where Barry Allen and Wally West gained their powers as well as the last spots on Earth where Allen appeared before his death. Both Batman and Hal Jordan realize this fact and believe Allen's return is imminent. However, they instead retrieve Wally, Linda and his twin children, Iris and Jai, who appear to have aged several years. Wally is immediately offered membership in the Justice League, which he accepts. Brainiac 5 implies West's return was a freak accident and that they still retrieved the correct person they wanted and he is encased in one of the lightning rods used in the resurrection ceremony. The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... The Lightning Saga is a five-part 2007 crossover event between the new Justice League of America and Justice Society of America series. ... LSH redirects here. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ... Brainiac 5 (Querl Dox) is a fictional character who exists in the future of the DC Comics universe. ...


In All Flash #1, after learning of Bart's death, Wally seeks those responsible: Inertia and the Rogues. He steals Inertia's speed, immobilizes him in stasis in the Flash Museum, and leaves him conscious to stare at Bart's statues as Impulse and Kid Flash for eternity. Inertia is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ...


Trade Paperback Collection

Collected editions reprinting The Flash (vol. 2) series featuring Wally West. NOTE: a new edition of Blood Will Run will be released in 2008, with stories from The Flash Secret Files and Flash: Iron Heights, where as the earlier edition published in 2002 did not contain Iron Heights.

Title Material collected
Original
The Flash: Born to Run The Flash (vol. 2) #62-65
Flash Annual #8
Speed Force #1
Flash 80-Page Giant #1
Flash: The Return of Barry Allen The Flash (vol.2) #74-79
Impulse: Reckless Youth The Flash (vol.2) #92-94
Impulse #1-6
The Flash: Terminal Velocity The Flash (vol.2) #0, 95-100
The Flash: Dead Heat The Flash (vol.2) #108-111
Impulse #9-11
The Flash: Race Against Time The Flash (vol.2) #112-118
The Flash: Wonderland The Flash (vol.2) #164-169
The Flash: Blood Will Run (2002 edition) The Flash (vol.2) #170-176
The Flash: Blood Will Run (new edition, 2008) The Flash (vol.2) #170-176
The Flash Secret Files
The Flash: Iron Heights
The Flash: Rogues The Flash (vol.2) #177–181
The Flash: Crossfire The Flash (vol.2) #183-191
The Flash: Blitz The Flash (vol.2) #192-200
The Flash: Ignition The Flash (vol.2) #201-206
The Flash: The Secret of Barry Allen The Flash (vol.2) #207-211 and 213-217
The Flash: Rogue War The Flash (vol.2) #½, 212, 218-225

Collected editions featuring other Flashes, Jay Garrick and Barry Allen, as well as Wally West: Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ...

Title Material collected
Original
The Greatest Flash Stories Ever Told HC (1990) and TPB (1991) Flash Comics #1, 66, 86
Comic Cavalcade #24
Showcase #4
The Flash (vol. 1) #107, 113, 119, 124, 125, 137, 143, 148, 179
Five-Star Super-Hero Spectacular
The Flash (vol. 2) #2
The Flash: The Greatest Stories Ever Told TPB (2007) Flash Comics #86, 104
The Flash (vol. 1) #123, 155, 165, 179
The Flash (vol. 2) #91
DC Special Series #11

Powers

Wally's primary super power is his speed. Over the years, this has fluctuated from his career as Kid Flash, where he could approach the speed of light, to the beginning of his career as The Flash, in which he was limited to a top speed of approximately 700 mph (1127 km/h), leading to near retirement and returning to college before the death of Barry Allen. In recent years, with the knowledge and mastery of the Speed Force at his disposal, Wally has managed to reach the seemingly impossible speeds beyond light that lead into the Speed Force. Since his return after the events of the Lightning Saga and as a consequence of the events that lead to Bart Allen's death, Wally may now possess the Speed Force in its entirety. Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometres per hour (American spelling: kilometers per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


As Kid Flash, Wally had the ability to control the vibration of his molecules to the degree that he could vibrate through solid objects and traverse other dimensions and times. He lost this ability when he became The Flash, and regained this power in later years with the added twist that vibrating through objects could cause them to explode; apparently, this later version of the power passed kinetic energy into the molecular structure of the object he vibrated through, and the object would explode from the charge.


Other applications of super-speed:

  • Does not leave a scent trail that a bloodhound can track, even at the "low" speed of 700 mph (1127 km/h)
  • Being able to run across the surface of large bodies of water--moving so fast that he does not break the surface tension of the water as he runs.
  • Overcoming gravity by running up and down vertical surfaces.
  • Creating wind vortices by running in circles or rotating his arms and legs.
  • "Lending" velocity to objects or people already in motion
  • "Stealing" the speed of others and utilizing it himself.
  • Vibrating his molecules so fast he can travel through objects such as walls.
  • Use of his incredibly fast reflexes in order to withstand powerful blows.
  • Gaining infinite mass as he approaches light speed, resulting in extremely heavy blows.
  • Creating after-images of himself.
  • Vibrate so that light does not reflect off him sufficiently, rendering him invisible[1]
  • "Accelerated Healing" the ability to speed up his natural healing process.

As with most super-speedsters, Wally possesses an "aura" which protects him (and whatever he carries) from heat and air friction when he travels at high velocities. He also has a slight deal of invulnerability with this "aura". Miles per hour is a unit of speed, expressing the number of international miles covered per hour. ... Kilometres per hour (American spelling: kilometers per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ... Surface tension is an effect within the surface layer of a liquid that causes that layer to behave as an elastic sheet. ...


Costumes

As Kid Flash, Wally wore a costumes that was primarily yellow with red leggings, gloves and mask. The costume, like that of the Flash, would compress into a ring's compartment for quick changes.


At the beginning of his career as the Flash, initially wearing the costume of his late mentor Barry Allen, Wally would soon modify the belt of his costume to resemble two connecting lightning bolts, remove the wings from the top of his boots, alter the material of his costume, and add opaque lenses to the eyes of his cowl. This modified design utilized elements of the costume designed by artist Dave Stevens for the live action television series, The Flash. Later, after an accident left him with two broken legs, Wally discovered he had gained enough control over the Speed Force to create a costume of solidified energy which would support him and enable him to run despite his injury. With enough control, his Speed Force Energy costume could be shaped identically to his costume. This energy-based costume could appear at Wally's will, and could be mentally modified to show his eyes (which he resumed as the normal appearance) and mouth, or to shield both from a hostile environment. Dave Stevens (1955- ) is an American illustrator and comics artist. ... The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... In science fiction and fantasy literature, a force field is a physical barrier made up of energy to protect a person or object from attacks or intrusions. ...


As of All Flash #1, Wally's costume has been modified slightly with the addition of wings to his boots similar to those featured on Barry Allen's costume.


Villains

Main article: Rogues (comics)

Like his predecessor before him, Wally has accumulated a Rogues' Gallery as well. Many of his uncle's old rogues are still around, except for Captain Boomerang (George "Digger" Harkness, who was killed during Identity Crisis by Jack Drake, the father of the current Robin, in self-defense, although Jack died as well) and the first Mirror Master (Samuel Scudder, who was killed during the Crisis on Infinite Earths by Krona). Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ... The Flashs Rogues Gallery. ... This article is about the DC Comics series. ... Jack Drake is a fictional character from DC Comics books, specifically the Batman titles. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Krona is a fictional extraterrestrial villain in the DC Comics universe. ...


Some of these newer rogues include:

  • Blacksmith - head of the Network with the ability to fuse metal with flesh.
  • Cicada - cult leader with immortality
  • Double Down - has a cursed deck of mystical playing cards embedded in himself. They can be thrown telekinetically and are razor sharp.
  • Girder - superstrong and superdurable, made of steel.
  • Magenta - uses magnetism-based powers.
  • Mirror Master (Evan McCulloch) - uses the original Mirror Master's equipment.
  • Murmur - a serial killer who developed the "frenzy virus", an anthrax-like virus based on his own blood.
  • Peek-a-Boo: A teleporting metahuman and reluctant rogue.
  • Plunder - a bounty hunter from a mirror universe. His analogue in this world is the Keystone City PD cop Jared Morillo.
  • Tar Pit - mind trapped in invulnerable asphalt.
  • Thinker - A sentient computer program in hologram form based on the brain patterns of the original Thinker.
  • Trickster (Axel Walker) - based on the original Trickster.
  • Zoom - exists on a separate timeline from the world. This gives the illusion of superspeed.
  • Captain Boomerang II - The son of the original Captain Boomerang killed by Tim Drake's father Jack Drake in the Identity Crisis story line. Now reformed and a member of the Outsiders and the Suicide Squad.

Blacksmith is a DC Comics supervillain and a rogue to the Flash III (Wally West). ... Cicada is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Double Down is DC Comics supervillain and one of the new rogues of the Flash. ... Girder is DC Comics supervillain and a new rogue to the Flash (Wally West). ... Magenta is a fictional character in appeared in the DC Comics series Teen Titans. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Peek-a-Boo is a DC Comics supervillain and a member of Wally Wests Rogues Gallery. ... Teleport redirects here. ... Metahuman is a term to describe superhumans in the DC Universe. ... Tar Pit is a fictional supervillain in the DC comics and one of the new rogues of the current Flash (Wally West). ... The term asphalt is often used as an abbreviation for asphalt concrete. ... The Thinker is the name of four supervillains in the DC Comics universe. ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Zoom (real name Hunter Zolomon) is a comic book supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Owen Mercer is a fictional character existing in the DC Comics Universe. ...

Allies and friends

Wally's father, Rudolph West (a Manhunter agent), was presumed deceased following an explosion in Cuba during the Invasion series. He reappeared years later at, among other places, his ex-wife Mary West's (Wally's mother) second wedding. They both later attended Wally and Linda's wedding. Manhunter is the name given to several different DC Comics superheroes/antiheroes, as well as the Manhunters an entire race of androids created by the Guardians of the Universe, as a forerunner to the Green Lantern Corps. ... For other uses, see Invasion (comics). ...


While they disagree regularly, Wally has a developed an odd friendship/respect with Batman, whom has more than once made it clear that those feelings are mutual.


Like his predecessors, West is good friends with the Green Lantern of his time (Kyle Rayner). Wally also retained a close friendship with Kyle's predecessor Hal Jordan, who often looked out for Wally even while he was the Spectre. His best friend is perhaps Dick Grayson, who served with Wally on the Teen Titans as the first Robin. For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Cover to The Spectre #31, November 1989. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ...


Supporting cast

Wally also has developed a very extensive supporting cast over the duration of his ongoing comic book series which began in 1987. It should be noted that a few of them are former villains and adversaries, such as Pied Piper, Speed Demon and Chunk. Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ...

  • Mary West - Wally's mother
  • Dr. Tina McGee - a scientist/nutritionist with whom he had a brief romantic involvement
  • Dr. Jerry McGee a.k.a. Speed Demon a.k.a. Speed McGee - Tina's (formerly ex-) husband and former super-speed villain
  • Connie Noleski - a model and girlfriend of Wally's in his early career as the Flash. She is currently married to Chunk.
  • Chester P. Runk a.k.a. Chunk - a brilliant physicist who became a walking black hole after a matter-transmitting machine he invented imploded during its first test
  • Mason Trollbridge - the former kid sidekick of a hard-edged depression-era crimefighter known as the Clipper.
  • Pied Piper - one of Barry Allen's former Rogues.
  • Linda Park-West - originally introduced as a television news reporter, Wally began dating and eventually married her.
  • Jay Garrick - the original Flash. Currently out of semi-retirement and a member of the Justice Society of America.
  • Jesse Quick - the daughter of Liberty Belle and Johnny Quick, Jesse is a second generation superhero and speedster like her father.
  • Max Mercury - the Zen Master of Speed.
  • Iris Allen - Wally's aunt, returned from the future.
  • Kid Flash - Bart Allen, Barry and Iris Allen's grandson from the future. Originally code-named Impulse. Was a member of the Teen Titans when he took on his cousin's old identity.
  • Ashley Zolomon - current Rogue Profiler with the Keystone City PD, and former wife of Hunter Zolomon

Chunk is an fictional supporting character in the DC Comics universe, and a supporting character from the Flash family of books. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Jesse Chambers, formerly known as Jesse Quick is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... DC Comics Liberty Belle Liberty Belle is the name of two fictional superheroes. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Barry Allen was a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe and the second Flash. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Teen Titans redirects here. ... Zoom (real name Hunter Zolomon) is a comic book supervillain in the DC Universe. ...

Children

At the end of Rogue War, Linda retroactively gave birth to twins, eventually named Iris and Jai [2] The twins were quickly aged due to their time inside the speed force. It has yet to be revealed if the twins have inherited any of their father's speed powers. In Mark Waid's Kingdom Come and The Kingdom an alternate version of the twins are named Barry and Iris West and inherit their father's speed, but only Iris decides to become a superhero, a new Kid Flash. In Waid's The Life Story of the Flash, "written" by Iris Allen, she describes her namesake in a positive light and Barry West as "a tragedy". However, the timeline has since been altered.


Jai West


He is very likely named after Jay Garrick, the original Flash. He has inherited the ability to accelerate muscle growth, giving himself temporary super-strength. He is roughly 8 years old and is about 2 years "younger" than his sister, Iris.


Iris West II


She is named after her great-aunt Iris West I. She has inherited the ability to vibrate her own molecules (and anything she touches) at super-speed, enabling her to phase through matter. She is close to 10 years old, about 2 years "older" than her twin brother, Jai.


Though they are twins, one born just after the other, Iris appears about two years older than Jai, likely due to different aging speeds of their respective accelerated metabolisms.


Other versions

Walter West.
  • Flash has appeared in the Justice League Unlimited spin-off comic book.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Walter West

During the 1990s, an alternate version of Wally, called Walter "Wally" West, arrived to the regular DC Universe from an alternate timeline in Hypertime. In his timeline, Walter wasn't able to save Linda Park from her death at the hands of Kobra. He became known as the Dark Flash. Besides his name and reality, Walter is also different because he has blue eyes, while the normal Wally has green. Among his abilities, he can vibrate through objects without making them explode and he can also steal the speed from others. He is currently travelling through Hypertime to find his own timeline. Walter has not appeared since, but he was an alternate costume for Wally in the video game Justice League Heroes. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Alternate timeline, or AT, is a phrase used when discussing alternate history, a literary offshoot of the science-fiction genre. ... Hypertime is a fictional concept presented in the 1998 comic book series The Kingdom, both a catch-all explanation for any continuity discrepancies in DC Universe stories and a variation or superset of the Multiverse that existed before Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Linda Park (born July 9, 1978, South Korea) is an Asian American actress who is best known for her portrayal of communications officer character Hoshi Sato in the television series Star Trek: Enterprise. ... Kobra is a DC Comics supervillain. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Justice League Heroes is a console game released in the fourth quarter of 2006 across 3 different platforms. ...


Superman & Batman: Generations

Wally as he appears in Superman & Batman: Generations. Art by John Byrne.

In Superman & Batman: Generations 2, Wally started as Kid Flash around the same time as he did in his first appearance. There was a few notable differences, as his suit was primarily red rather than yellow. Also he, Robin II, Wonder Girl, and Supergirl formed the Justice League rather than the Teen Titans. He became the Flash roughly around 1974 up until 1986, when his cousin Carrie took over. Also, Wally married a woman named Magda, rather than Linda Park, who gave birth to their son Jay. In 2008, Jay would become the fifth Flash. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... Robin is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the superhero Wonder Girl. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Barry Allen Story

In Flash Annual #7, an alternate universe is shown where after Wally became Kid Flash, he became a superstar celebrity. However, after Barry was killed in a battle with Captain Cold, Wally's speed began to give out on him. He eventually lost use of his legs. Ten years later, Captain Cold wrote the "true" story of Barry Allen. Wally eventually decides to direct a movie about Barry's life to show the world what a great man he was. The resulting film is a success and Wally becomes "the fastest director alive." Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ...


Facets

In an alternate reality shown in The New Titans Annual #10, where Queen Raven was the ruler of N'Yarque. The queen needed help, so she kidnapped people and transformed them, one of whom became the Flash. For the animated television series based on this comic book, see Teen Titans (TV series). ... Raven is a fictional character and superhero in the DC Comics. ... This article is about the state. ...


Other media

The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure

In 1967, The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was produced by Filmation and featured seven minute shorts which starred various DC Universe heroes. Wally West was featured in two of them as Kid Flash. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... The first Filmation logo. ...


Wally West is in a segment starring the Flash (Barry Allen), "To Catch A Blue Bolt" shows Barry and Wally changing into their Flash and Kid Flash uniforms using their rings. It should be noted that Wally's appearance differs from his comic book counterpart. He has black hair and his red and yellow color scheme is reversed from his second uniform.


Wally was also featured on the Teen Titans segment which featured Aqualad, Wonder Girl, Speedy and the Wally West version of Kid Flash as seen in the Flash segment. Garth is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... Donna Troy is a fictional character, a superheroine in the DC Universe. ... Speedy is the name of two DC Comics superheroes, both of whom have served as teenaged sidekicks for the Green Arrow (a. ...


The Flash TV series (1990-1991)

Main article: The Flash (TV series)

The Flash was a live action CBS television series that starred John Wesley Shipp and Amanda Pays. The Flash featured in the series was an amalgamation of the silver-age Flash, Barry Allen, and the modern-age Wally West. The only resemblances between the TV Barry Allen Flash and the comic book Barry Allen Flash were his name, his profession as a forensic scientist, and his love interest Iris (who is very short lived as a love interest in the television series). Most of the elements in the television show were taken directly from the main story line in the first Wally West Flash comic books: The STAR labs researcher Tina McGee, her and her husband's research into speed, her husband's allegedly fatal accident with their speed research, the Flash's ravenous appetite, heat problems (which were mitigated by the TV show Flash suit), and speed limit on the order of the speed of sound were all elements from the main Wally West comic book storyline. The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Amanda Pays (born on 6 June 1959 in London, England) is an English actress. ...


Justice League of America pilot

The Flash (Barry Allen) was in a CBS live-action pilot called Justice League of America, portrayed by Kenny Johnston. The pilot did not air in the United States. Similar to The Flash (TV series), this Flash appeared to be Barry Allen in name only, as he reflected Wally's age, ravenous appetite, and personality. In addition, this version of Justice League was inspired by the Keith Giffen-era Justice League, of which Wally was a member. This article is about the broadcast network. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ...


DC Animated Universe

Superman: The Animated Series

An episode of Superman: The Animated Series called "Speed Demons" featured the first animated appearance of Wally West as Flash. He was voiced by Charlie Schlatter. Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Charles Schlatter (born May 1, 1966 in Englewood, New Jersey) is an American actor. ...


Justice League/Justice League Unlimited

Flash as featured in Justice League episode Eclipsed.
Flash as featured in Justice League episode Eclipsed.

Wally West is the Flash featured as one of the seven founding members of the Justice League, in both the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series. His personality is more or less the same as it was from his appearance on Superman: The Animated Series, and his flippant attitude is often used to provide comic relief from the often intense nature of his fellow Leaguers, though he is the featured hero in several episodes. However, in one episode of Justice League Unlimited, he complains to Elongated Man that he dislikes being viewed as the "teenage sidekick" even though he was part of the original seven. His super fast metabolism, which results in him eating absurdly and inhumanly large portions of food, was something of a running gag on the series. Flash's endorsement of the "Lightspeed" candy bar (which created controversy fueled by a talk-show host who constantly dissed the League in one episode) was also a sort of running gag, as the bars make numerous other appearances, with Flash's picture on the wrapper in some cases. He was prominently featured in "Divided We Fall," where he successfully defeated a fused Lex Luthor and Brainiac when the others could not (in addition, this also allowed him to contact the Speed Force) though the process almost kills him (In fact he even remarked that he doesn't think he could ever go that fast again because he probably couldn't come back), "Flash and Substance," a day in the life of The Flash in Central City during Flash Appreciation Day, and "The Great Brain Robbery," in which he switches bodies with Lex Luthor. Image File history File links Eclipsed. ... Image File history File links Eclipsed. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... The Elongated Man is a fictional comic book superhero in the DC universe. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... List of Justice League episodes Flash and Substance is the fifth episode of the second season of the Justice League Unlimited TV series. ... Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ...


Flash was voiced by Michael Rosenbaum, the actor who portrays young Lex Luthor in the live action television series Smallville,. Flash is shown to have an infatuation with Fire in the episode "I Am Legion". Michael Owen Rosenbaum (born July 11, 1972) is an American actor. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional DC Comics supervillain and a prominent member of Supermans rogues gallery. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Fire is a fictional superheroine published by DC Comics. ... List of Justice League episodes I Am Legion is the third season premiere of the Justice League Unlimited TV series. ...


Teen Titans animated series

Kid Flash in "Lightspeed"
Kid Flash in "Lightspeed"

Kid Flash appears in an episode of the Teen Titans animated series entitled "Lightspeed". While the character's true identity is never given, the fact that Michael Rosenbaum voices the character implies that he is intended to be Wally West as Rosenbaum also voices an older Flash/Wally West in Justice League. In the series, he is portrayed similar to the way that Wally was portrayed in comic books. His personality is often considered "laid back", and he is known to be comedic and sometimes flirtatious. Image File history File links KidFlash. ... Image File history File links KidFlash. ... Teen Titans was an American animated television series created by Sam Register and Glen Murakami and produced by Warner Bros. ... Michael Owen Rosenbaum (born July 11, 1972) is an American actor. ...


When Jinx asks Kid Flash who he is working for he says "I work alone these days", implying a previous partnership with The Flash. Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ...


When the Titans are searching for the Brotherhood of Evil and the Titans East have gone back home to Steel City, Kid Flash decides to help protect Jump City and stop crimes from being committed. When he interferes with the H.I.V.E. Five's criminal deeds, he flirts with their leader, Jinx, and tries to make her reevaluate her life of crime. Shortly afterwards the Brotherhood of Evil attempts to capture him and, after Madame Rouge tires him out, Jinx traps him in an electric field. He is nearly handed over to Madame Rouge, but is freed by Jinx when she realizes Madame Rouge isn't as great as she seemed and that Kid Flash was the one who truly cared for her well being. Afterwards, Jinx quits the H.I.V.E. Five and joins forces with him as a Titan and the two quickly form a romantic relationship. The Brotherhood of Evil is a group of DC Comics supervillains, arch-enemies of the original Doom Patrol and the Teen Titans. ... Titans East is the name of several DC Comics teams. ... The Steel City is a common nickname for many cities that were once known for their production of large amounts of steel. ... Jump City is the city where the Teen Titans are based, and have their T Tower, and is where most of the action takes place. ... The Fearsome Five is a fictional group of comic book supervillains from DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Jinx (disambiguation). ... The Brotherhood of Evil is a group of DC Comics supervillains, arch-enemies of the original Doom Patrol and the Teen Titans. ... Madame Rouge is a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ...


He briefly appears in a shot of all the Titans in "Calling All Titans", where it is revealed the Titans have come in contact with him and he has a Titan communicator. In "Titans Together", he brings Jinx to the Brotherhood's lair as his ally and helps the speedsters Más y Menos and the other Titans freeze the Brothehood's member villains inside cryogenic cases. Más y Menos are very impressed by Kid Flash's speed and abilities which he can engage on his own. Más and Menos are fictional teenaged superhero characters from the Teen Titans animated television series, affiliated with the Titans East team. ... Cryogenics is the study of very low temperatures or the production of the same, and is often confused with cryobiology, the study of the effect of low temperatures on organisms, or the study of cryopreservation. ...


Kid Flash is one of the few Titans in the animated series to fully resemble his comic counterpart. However, Wally's eyes in the comics are currently green. The design of Kid Flash with blue eyes remains consistent with his original appearances, pre-Crisis.


Kid Flash is mentioned in issue #28 of Teen Titans Go!, and makes cameo appearances in several other issues. He is featured in a worldwide race against Más y Menos in issue #34. Although knowing that Jinx obviously has feelings for him, he inadvertently flirts with Raven, Argent, and several other girls behind while running the race, making Jinx jealous and causing him to lose the race to Más y Menos when Jinx shows up at the finish line and confronts him about his flirtatious nature. Teen Titans Go! is a 2000s comic book published by DC Comics. ... A cameo role or cameo appearance (often shortened to just cameo) is a brief appearance of a known person in a work of the performing arts, such as plays, films, video games and television. ... Raven is a fictional character and superhero in the DC Comics. ... Argent is a DC Comics fictional superhero. ...


Stop Motion

Stop Motion, a novel about Wally West by Mark Schultz, adds depth to our understanding of the relationships between Wally and those closest to him: his mentor Barry, his aunt Iris, and his fellow members of the JLA. However, it contradicts established continuity on several points, most notably frequent mentions of a genetic link between Wally and Iris, who the comics have established as adopted. Mark Schultz is an American comicbook writer and artist. ...


Amalgam Comics

In Amalgam Comics, Wally West is combined with Daniel Ketch to form Speed Demon. Amalgam Comics was a metafictional American comic book publisher, and part of a collaboration between Marvel Comics and DC Comics, in which the two comic book publishers merged their characters to create new ones (e. ... Daniel Ketch is a fictional, supernatural superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Harry Lampert seen at Motor City Comic-Con 2002 Harry Lampert (November 3, 1916 in New York - November 13, 2004 in Boca Raton, Florida) was a cartoonist and author. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Iris West Allen is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Johnny Quick is the name of a Golden Age DC Comics character with the power of superhuman speed. ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of The Flash. ... Abra Kadabra is a DC Comics supervillain and a primary foe of the Flash. ... The Black Flash is a fictional comic book character from DC Comics. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... George Digger Harkness and his son Owen Mercer, both known as Captain Boomerang, are fictional characters in the DC Universe. ... Cobalt Blue is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy to the Flash. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Heat Wave is a fictional villain in the DC Universe and a primary foe of the Flash. ... Inertia is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Manfred Mota is a DC Comics villain and adversary to The Flash. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ... The Top was a DC Comics supervillain and one of the earliest rogues of The Flashs (Barry Allen). ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Weather Wizard is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ... Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ... Keystone City is a fictional city featured in stories of the Flash published by DC Comics. ... The Flash Museum is a museum that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... The much-homaged cover of The Flash #123 Flash of Two Worlds! is a landmark [1] comic book story that was published in The Flash #123 (Sept. ... Throughout his 60 year history, the Flash has appeared in numerous media. ... The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... The Flash is an video game based on the Comic book hero created by DC Comics. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ...

Bibliography

  • The Flash (Vol. 2) #1 - 230; #231 - (June 1987 - March 2006; Oct. 2007-present), #0 (Oct. 1994), #1,000,000 (Nov. 1998)
    • Annuals 1 - 13 (1987-2000)
    • Special 1 (1990)
  • All Flash #1 (Sept. 2007)

References

  1. ^ Identity Crisis #2
  2. ^ http://forum.newsarama.com/showthread.php?t=118446

This article is about the DC Comics series. ...

External links

  • Titans Tower biography
  • Crimson Lightning - an online index to the comic book adventures of the Flash.
  • Alan Kistler's Profile On: The Flash - an analysis of the history of the Flash by comic book historian Alan Kistler
  • The Flash: Those Who Ride The Lightning - fan site with information about the super-speed characters of the DC Universe
  • The Unofficial Flash Biography
  • Photon Torpedoes - Flash Facts

 
 

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