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Encyclopedia > Wallingford, Connecticut

Wallingford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 43,026 at the 2000 census. Image File history File links US-CT-Wallingford. ... New Haven County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Wallingford was established on October 10, 1667, when the Connecticut General Assembly authorized the "making of a village on the east river" to 38 planters and freemen. On May 12, 1670, Wallingford was incorporated and about 126 people settled in the town. Six acre lots were set out and by the year 1675, 40 houses stretched along today's Main Street. In 1775 and again in 1789, George Washington passed through Wallingford. The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ...


In the 1800s, Wallingford was known for its pewterware and silver industries, which were later merged into the International Silver Company with its headquarters in Meriden, Connecticut. Meriden is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ...


In October, 1871, Wallingford's train station was completed for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. Noted for its mansard roof, ornamental brackets and stone quoins — the interlocking exterior corners — the station is among the few remaining of its kind that were built during President Grant's administration at the height of railway expansion. The town undertook an overhaul to the roof and exterior with the help of state and federal grants in the early 1990s. 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad (AAR reporting mark NH) was a railroad that operated in the northeast United States. ... Jules Hardouin-Mansart, marble bust by Jean-Louis Lemoyne: a full-dress Baroque portrait bust demonstrates that the Kings architect is no mere craftsman Jules Hardouin-Mansart (Paris, April 16, 1646 – Marly, France, May 11, 1708) was a French architect whose work is generally considered to be the...


Wallingford was the birthplace of Moses Yale Beach (1800–1868), who would go on to found the Associated Press; singer Morton Downey; conservative talk show host Morton Downey, Jr.; and Georgia governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Lyman Hall. It was also the childhood home of World War I flying ace Raoul Lufbery. The town produces its own electricity and maintains an electric company with rates well below the state's average. Moses Yale Beach (1800-1868) was an American inventor and publisher. ... Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Morton Downey (14 November 1901-October 25, 1985) was a singer popular in the United States in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Morton Downey, Jr. ... Lyman Hall (April 12, 1724–October 19, 1790), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of Georgia. ... Combatants Allied Powers: France Italy Russia Serbia United Kingdom United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul von Hindenburg Reinhard... The Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen, perhaps the most famous ace of all. ... Major Raoul Lufbery poses next to his Nieuport fighter Gervais Raoul Lufbery (March 14, 1885 – May 19, 1918) was an French-American fighter pilot and flying ace in World War I. Because he served in both the French and later the American air services in World War I, he is...


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 103.3 km² (39.9 mi²). 101.1 km² (39.0 mi²) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it (2.16%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an Imperial unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (5,280 feet, 1,760 yards, 1,609. ...


The Town of Wallingford includes the villages of East Wallingford, Quinnipiac, Tracy, Wallingford Center, and Yalesville. Wallingford Center is a census-designated place located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Yalesville is a village in Wallingford, Connecticut. ...


Education

Wallingford is home to the Choate Rosemary Hall school (which graduated John F. Kennedy, John Dos Passos, Glenn Close, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Douglas, Bill Simmons, and Adlai Stevenson) Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall is a coed prep school for boarding and day students. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... John Rodrigo Dos Passos (January 14, 1896 — September 28, 1970) was an important American novelist and artist. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... Curtis on the DVD cover of Blue Steel, 1990 Jamie Lee Curtis (born November 22, 1958), known under British law as The Right Honourable Jamie Lee, Baroness Haden-Guest, is a Golden Globe-winning American film actress and a succesful author of books for children. ... Douglas at the Cinedom Movie Theater in Cologne, Germany, January, 1997 For other uses, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation). ... Bill Simmons (born 1969), best known as The Sports Guy, is a columnist for Page2 on ESPN.com and ESPN The Magazine. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ...


Public High Schools
Lyman Hall
Mark T. Sheehan


Public Middle Schools
Dag Hammarskjold (also named New England Spotlight School)
James H. Moran


Public Elementary Schools
Rock Hill
Pond Hill
Moses Y Beach
Cook Hill
Parker Farms
Yalesville
Evart C. Stevens
Highland


Pariochial Schools
Holy Trinity


Private Schools
Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall is a coed prep school for boarding and day students. ...


Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 43,026 people, 16,697 households, and 11,587 families residing in the town. The population density was 425.7/km² (1,102.7/mi²). There were 17,306 housing units at an average density of 171.2/km² (443.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 94.77% White, 1.02% African American, 0.17% Native American, 1.75% Asian, 1.16% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.52% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The following is a list of sources used in the creation of encyclopedia articles on various geographic topics and locations, such as cities, counties, states, and countries. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Race, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget, is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 16,697 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.3% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 25.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.07. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the town the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males.


The median income for a household in the town was $57,308, and the median income for a family was $68,327. Males had a median income of $47,017 versus $34,074 for females. The per capita income for the town was $25,947. About 2.4% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.0% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Points of interest

Home to the Connecticut Colonials The Center Street Cemetery in Wallingford, Connecticut is a 6 acre cemetery dating from 1670. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall is a coed prep school for boarding and day students. ... Nehemiah Royce House. ... The Oakdale Theater is located on South Turnpike Road in Wallingford, Connecticut. ... Plans for an octagon house An octagon house is exactly what it sounds like—an eight-sided building. ... Paul Mellon Arts Center, Choate Rosemary Hall, Wallingford, Connecticut. ... The Yalesville Underpass is a 30 degree skew arch at the intersections of Routes 150 and 71 in Wallingford, Connecticut. ...


External links

  • Town of Wallingford
State of Connecticut
 Topics 

Culture | Geography | Government | History | Images  Image File history File links Flag_of_Connecticut. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Minor parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The History of Connecticut begins as a number of unrelated colonial villages. ...

 Capital  Hartford
 Regions 

Coastal Connecticut | Greater New Haven | Greater Hartford | Litchfield Hills | Lower Connecticut River Valley | Naugatuck River Valley | New York metropolitan area/Gold Coast | Quiet Corner | Southeastern Connecticut | Southwestern Connecticut Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, site of first U.S. capital. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This list of regions of the United States includes official (governmental) and non-official areas within the borders of the United States, not including U.S. states, the federal district of Washington, D.C. or standard subentities such as cities or counties. ... Coastal Connecticut is comprised of all of Connecticuts southern border, along Long Island Sound, from Stamford in the west to Stonington to the east. ... The Greater New Haven area is the metropolitan area whose extent includes those towns in Connecticut that share an economic, social, political, and historical focus on New Haven, Connecticut. ... The Greater Hartford region is a region located in the state of Connecticut centered around the states capital of Hartford. ... The Litchfield Hills is a region of the state of Connecticut located in the northwestern corner of the state; it is a term that is semi-contiguous with the boundaries of Litchfield County, for which it is named. ... The Lower Connecticut River Valley is a region of the state of Connecticut focused around Middlesex County, eastern sections of New London County, and the juncture where the Connecticut River meets Long Island Sound. ... The Naugatuck River Valley is a region of the state of Connecticut located in the central-southwest of the state, and is focused around the southern reaches of the Naugatuck and Housatonic Rivers. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... The Gold Coast is a region of the state of Connecticut roughly contiguous with the boundaries of Fairfield County; it derives its regional nickname from Fairfield County being ranked as one of the wealthiest counties in the United States and being the headquarters to most of the hedge funds in... The Quiet Corner is a region of the state of Connecticut, located in the northeastern corner of the state. ... The Southeastern Connecticut region comprises, as the name suggests, the southeastern corner of the state of Connecticut. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

 Counties 

Fairfield | Hartford | Litchfield | Middlesex | New Haven | New London | Tolland | Windham List of Connecticut counties: Connecticut counties Fairfield County: one of four original counties created in Connecticut in 1666. ... Fairfield County is located in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Hartford County is located in the north central part of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Litchfield County is located in the northwestern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... Middlesex County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... New Haven County is located in the south central part of the state of Connecticut. ... New London County is located in the southeastern corner of the state of Connecticut. ... Tolland County is a county located in the northeastern part of the state of Connecticut. ... Windham County is a county located in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ...

 Cities 

Ansonia | Bridgeport | Bristol | Danbury | Derby | Groton | Hartford | Meriden | Middletown | Milford | New Britain | New Haven | New London | Norwalk | Norwich | Shelton | Stamford | Torrington | Waterbury | West Haven This page lists all municipalities incorporated as cities in the state of Connecticut. ... Ansonia is a city and town located in New Haven County, Connecticut, on the Naugatuck River, immediately north of Derby and about 12 miles northwest of New Haven. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties Fairfield County Mayor John M. Fabrizi Area    - City 19. ... Nickname: Mum City Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Incorporated (town) 1785 Incorporated (city) 1911 Government type Mayor-council Mayor William T. Stortz Area    - City 26. ... Nickname: The Hat City Located in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: Counties Fairfield County Mayor Mark Boughton (R) Area    - City 44. ... Derby is a town located in New Haven County, Connecticut. ... Groton is a city located in New London County, Connecticut. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Meriden is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: Forest City Coordinates: Counties Middlesex County Mayor Sebastian N. Giuliano Area    - City 42. ... Milford town hall. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Beehive City Location Location within the state of Connecticut Government County Hartford County Mayor Timothy T. Stewart Geographical characteristics Area     City 34. ... Nickname: The Elm City Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... Nickname: The Whaling City Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: Country United States of America State Connecticut County New London Established 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated 1784 Mayor Beth Sabilla City Manager Martin Berliner Supt. ... Motto: The Right Place, The Right Time Location in Fairfield County, Connecticut Coordinates: Counties Fairfield County Mayor Dick Moccia Area    - City 36. ... Norwich, known as The Rose of New England, is a city in New London County, Connecticut, United States. ... Shelton is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: The City That Works Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties Fairfield County Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area    - City 52. ... Nickname: none Location within the state of Connecticut County Litchfield County Mayor Ryan Bingham Area    - City 104. ... Nickname: The Brass City Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties New Haven County Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area    - City 28. ... West Haven is a city in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States. ...

 Places 

Towns | Boroughs | Villages | Historic Places | Geography The U.S. state of Connecticut is divided into 169 towns. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Wallingford, Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (658 words)
Wallingford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States.
Wallingford was established on October 10, 1667, when the Connecticut General Assembly authorized the "making of a village on the east river" to 38 planters and freemen.
In the 1800s, Wallingford was known for its pewterware and silver industries, which were later merged into the International Silver Company with its headquarters in Meriden, Connecticut.
Wallingford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (831 words)
Wallingford is a small market town and civil parish in the upper Thames Valley in the English county of Oxfordshire (historically in Berkshire until 1974 reorganization).
Wallingford Castle was built soon afterwards and became a key strategic centre for the Empress Matilda's party during the civil war that had begun after her father's death.
Wallingford had flourished as a trading centre throughout most of the Middle Ages, and Wallingford Priory produced two of the greatest minds of the age, the mathematician Richard of Wallingford and the chronicler John of Wallingford.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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