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Encyclopedia > Wallace Stegner

Wallace Earle Stegner (February 18, 1909April 13, 1993) was an American historian, novelist, short story writer, and environmentalist. Some call him "The Dean of Western Writers." February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... A historian is someone who writes history, and history is a written accounting of the past. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in Lake Mills, Iowa and grew up in Great Falls, Montana, Salt Lake City, Utah and southern Saskatchewan, which he wrote about in his autobiography Wolf Willow. Stegner says he "lived in twenty places in eight states and Canada".[1] While living in Utah, he joined a Boy Scout troop at a Mormon church (though he was not Mormon but Presbyterian himself) and earned the Eagle Scout award. He received his B.A. at the University of Utah in 1930. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Harvard University, and settled in at Stanford University, where he founded the creative writing program. His students included Sandra Day O'Connor, Edward Abbey, Wendell Berry, Thomas McGuane, Ken Kesey, Gordon Lish, Ernest Gaines, and Larry McMurtry. He served as a special assistant to Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall. He was elected to the Sierra Club board of directors for a term that lasted 19641966. He also moved into a house in nearby Los Altos Hills and became one of the town's most prominent residents. Lake Mills is a city located in Winnebago County, Iowa. ... Great Falls, Montana the Electric City at dusk Great Falls is a city located in Cascade County, Montana, United States. ... Salt Lake City redirects here. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English Flower Western Red Lily Tree Paper Birch Bird Sharp-tailed Grouse Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... // Early history (1910-1950) Since the 1920s, the LDS church has become influential in Scouting, and it was adopted as an official youth program of the Mormons. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the most-recognized architectural symbol of Mormonism For other uses, see Mormon (disambiguation). ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU) is a public university in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... Edward Paul Abbey (January 29, 1927 - March 14, 1989) was an American author and essayist noted for his advocacy of environmental issues and criticism of public land policies. ... Wendell Berry (born August 5, 1934) is an American novelist, essayist, poet, professor, cultural critic, and farmer. ... This redirect page has been listed on Wikipedia:Redirects for deletion. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a (counter) cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... Gordon Jay Lish (born February 11, 1934 in Hewlett, New York) is an American author and editor. ... Ernest J. Gaines (b. ... One of McMurtrys bookstores in Archer City, Texas Larry McMurtry (born June 3, 1936 in Wichita Falls, Texas) is an Academy Award winning screenwriter, American novelist and essayist. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Stewart Udall Stewart Lee Udall (born January 31, 1920) was an American politician. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known conservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Los Altos Hills (IPA: ) is a town in Santa Clara County, California, United States. ...


Stegner's novel Angle of Repose won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1972, and was directly based on the letters of Mary Hallock Foote (later published as the memoir A Victorian Gentlewoman in the Far West). Stegner's use of uncredited passages taken directly from Foote's letters caused a minor controversy[2]. Stegner also won the National Book Award for The Spectator Bird in 1977. He refused a National Medal from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1992 due to his opposition to the way the NEA had become politicized in the late 1980s. Angle of Repose is a 1971 novel by Wallace Stegner about a wheelchair bound historian, Lyman Ward, who has lost connection with his son and living family and decides to write about his frontier era grandparents. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Mary Foote Mary Hallock Foote (November 9, 1847 – June 25, 1938) was an American author and illustrator. ... The National Book Award is one of the most important literary prizes in the United States, presented annually for the best books by living U.S. citizens published in the U.S. The awards have been presented since 1950 in at least one category, and are presently awarded in each... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ...


He died in Santa Fe, New Mexico, while visiting the city to give a lecture. His death was the result of injuries suffered in an automobile accident on March 28, 1993[3]. He is the father of nature writer Page Stegner. Nickname: The City Different Location in the State of New Mexico Coordinates: Country United States State New Mexico County Santa Fe Founded 1607 Mayor David Coss Area    - City 96. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Galunggung in 1982, showing a combination of natural events. ...


Bibliography

Novels

  • Remembering Laughter (1937)
  • The Potter's House (1938)
  • On a Darkling Plain (1940)
  • Fire and Ice (1941)
  • The Big Rock Candy Mountain (autobiographical) (1943)
  • Second Growth (1947)
  • The Preacher And the Slave aka Joe Hill: A Biographical Novel (1951)
  • A Shooting Star (1961)
  • All the Little Live Things (1967)
  • Angle of Repose (1971)
  • The Spectator Bird (1976)
  • Recapitulation (1979)
  • Crossing to Safety (1987)

Collections Angle of Repose is a 1971 novel by Wallace Stegner about a wheelchair bound historian, Lyman Ward, who has lost connection with his son and living family and decides to write about his frontier era grandparents. ...

  • The Women On the Wall (1950)
  • The City of the Living: And Other Stories (1957)
  • Writer's Art: A Collection of Short Stories (1972)
  • Collected Stories of Wallace Stegner (1990)
  • Late Harvest: Rural American Writing (1996) (with Bobbie Ann Mason)

Chapbooks

  • Genesis: A Story from Wolf Willow (1994)

Nonfiction

  • Mormon Country (1942)
  • One Nation (1945)
  • Beyond the Hundredth Meridian: John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West (1954)
  • Wolf Willow: A History, a Story, and a Memory of the Last Plains Frontier (autobiography) (1955)
  • The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail (1964)
  • Teaching the Short Story (1966)
  • The Sound of Mountain Water (1969)
  • Writer in America (1982)
  • Conversations With Wallace Stegner on Western History and Literature (1983)
  • This Is Dinosaur: Echo Park Country And Its Magic Rivers (1985)
  • American Places (1985)
  • On the Teaching of Creative Writing (1988)
  • The Uneasy Chair: A Biography of Bernard Devoto (1989)
  • Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs, 'Living and writing in the west', (autobiographical) (1992)

First camp of the John Wesley Powell expedition, in the willows, Green River, Wyoming, 1871 John Wesley Powell (March 24, 1834 - September 23, 1902) was a U.S. soldier, geologist, and explorer of the American West. ... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ...

Further reading about Stegner

  • 1982 Critical Essays on Wallace Stegner, edited by Anthony Arthur, G. K. Hall & Co.
  • 1983 Conversations with Wallace Stegner on Western History and Literature, Wallace Stegner and Richard Etulain, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City
  • 1984 Wallace Stegner: His Life and Work by Jackson J. Benson

1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Awards

Plus: Three O. Henry Awards, twice a Guggenheim Fellow, Senior Fellow of the National Institute of Humanities, memberof National Institute and Academy of Arts and Letters, member National Academy of Arts and Sciences. 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The National Book Award is one of the most important literary prizes in the United States, presented annually for the best books by living U.S. citizens published in the U.S. The awards have been presented since 1950 in at least one category, and are presently awarded in each... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... This article is about the year. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... The O. Henry Awards are yearly prizes given to short stories of exceptional merit. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ...


See also

The timeline of environmental events is a historical account of events that have shaped humanitys perspective on the environment. ...

References

  1.   Stegner, Wallace, "Where the Bluebird Sings to the Lemonade Springs" Random House, 1992, back cover.
  2.   Mary Ellen Williams Walsh, Angle of Repose and the Writings of Mary Hallock Foote: A Source Study, in Critical Essays on Wallace Stegner, edited by Anthony Arthur, G. K. Hall & Co., 1982, pp. 184-209.
  3.   Honan, William H., "Wallace Stegner Is Dead At 84; Pulitzer-Prize Winning Author." New York Times, 15 April 1993, sec. B, p. 8.

Random House is a publishing division of the German media conglomerate Bertelsmann based in New York City. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Utah History Encyclopedia (538 words)
Wallace Earle Stegner was born in Lake Mills, Iowa, in 1909.
Stegner was a realist, and in his many novels he created characters with a psychological depth and social complexity far beyond the sterile formulas long associated with the western novel.
Stegner's several novels with a California setting show a concern with contemporary life--the ahistorical or hedonistic lack of values of the present impinging on the settled but sometimes narrow familial and social patterns of an older America--and the process of the salvaging of a personal past.
Wallace Stegner ~ Dean and Mentor of Western American Writers (1935 words)
Wallace Stegner is one of those secret pleasures and surprises of American literature.
Stegner was a student of Vardis Fisher, whose semi-autobiographical novels undoubtedly inspired Stegner to write his early works, and Stegner is the thread that connects the two great Old Irascibles of the West, Fisher and Stegner's creative writing student Edward Abbey.
Stegner's own Wolf Willow is an obvious inspiration for another famous student's work, Scott Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain, and his environmental concerns are carried to zealot extremes by Abbey.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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