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"The Roaring Trumpet" in Unknown, May 1940

Harold Shea was a name given to a series of stories by L. Sprague deCamp, Fletcher Pratt, and in some cases Christopher Stasheff. They are also known as the "Enchanter" series, the "Incomplete Enchanter series" after the first collection of them, or the "Complete Enchanter" series. In these stories Psychologist Harold Shea travels to various parallel worlds where ancient myths and legends are reality. The method Shea uses is called "the Mathematics of Magic" and there is considerable humor drawn both from the culture shock of his encounters and from the reality that usually he doesn't understand this math well enough to be able to predict which myths he's going to face when he arrives where he is going. For example, in the first story, "The Roaring Trumpet, he is going to the world of Irish Mythology. Instead he ends up in a Norse world. Unknown (also known as Unknown Worlds) was a pulp fantasy magazine, edited by John W. Campbell, that was published from 1939 to 1943. ... Lyon Sprague de Camp, (November 27, 1907-November 6, 2000) was a science fiction and fantasy author born in New York City. ... Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897–1956) was a science fiction and fantasy writer; he was also well-known to the public as a writer on naval history and on the American Civil War. ... Although many of the manuscripts containing texts relating to Irish mythology have failed to survive, and much more material was probably never committed to writing, there is enough remaining to enable the identification of four distinct, if overlapping, cycles: the Mythological Cycle, The Ulster Cycle, the Fenian Cycle and the... Norse mythology, Viking mythology or Scandinavian mythology refer to the pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian people. ...


The original publication of the first three Pratt and DeCamp collaborations ("Roaring Trumpet", "Mathematics of Magic" and The Castle of Iron) appeared in Unknown Magazine during its brief run. The stories collected in Wall of Serpents appeared in Beyond Fantasy Magazine and Fantasy Magazine a few years later. Sir Harold and the Gnome King originally appeared as a chapbook, the stories with Stasheff as regular trade books. Unknown (also known as Unknown Worlds) was a pulp fantasy magazine, edited by John W. Campbell, that was published from 1939 to 1943. ...


Harold Shea

  1. The Incomplete Enchanter (1941) (L. Sprague DeCamp with Fletcher Pratt)

includes: The Roaring Trumpet in Unknown, May 1940 Harold Shea was a name given to a series of stories by L. Sprague deCamp, Fletcher Pratt, and in some cases Christopher Stasheff. ...

  • "The Roaring Trumpet" (1940)
  • "The Mathematics of Magic" (1940)
  1. The Castle of Iron (1941) (L. Sprague DeCamp with Fletcher Pratt)
  2. Wall of Serpents (1953) (L. Sprague DeCamp with Fletcher Pratt)

includes: The Roaring Trumpet in Unknown, May 1940 Harold Shea was a name given to a series of stories by L. Sprague deCamp, Fletcher Pratt, and in some cases Christopher Stasheff. ...

  • "The Wall of Serpents"
  • "The Green Magician"
  1. Sir Harold and the Gnome King (1991) (L. Sprague DeCamp)
  2. The Enchanter Reborn (1992) (L. Sprague DeCamp with Christopher Stasheff)
  3. The Exotic Enchanter (1995) (L. Sprague DeCamp with Christopher Stasheff)

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Serpent's Wall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (129 words)
Serpent's Wall (Ukrainian: Змієві вали, Zmiyevi valy) is a landmark in the north of Ukraine, near the city of Kiev.
The ancient walls were built between the second century BC and seventh century AD, according to carbon dating.
The purpose of the walls was evidently defence from the nomads of the southern steppes.
Funerary Compositions - Theban Mapping Project (301 words)
The right (southwest) wall of corridor D of the tomb of Rameses IX (KV 6) is decorated with two such scenes.
The top register consists of a series of sand-filled circles, each containing an inverted spread-eagled man. There is a solar bark bearing a scarab at the far end of the middle register and from it arrows fly to pierce serpents and goddesses standing on mounds adoring the sun [15599].
The rear wall of the burial chamber in KV 6 has traces of a scene showing the resurrection of Osiris beneath a representation of the morning and evening solar barks.
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