FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Walkover

A walkover is the awarding of a victory to a contestant because there are no other contestants, or because the other contestants have been disqualified or have forfeited. The term can apply in sport, but can also apply to elections. Look up Victory in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Forfeiting is the act of voluntarily admitting defeat in a competition or contest, thereby surrendering victory to the opposition. ... An election is a decision making process where people choose people to hold official offices. ...


A walkover is usually the sign of a very strong mandate or unanimous support. It can however can be interpreted by critics of the faction the walkover is awarded to as a suspicious sign of electoral fraud or gerrymandering to prevent other candidates from participating. The circumstances of such an interpretation are usually controversial. Walkovers can thus often be a sign of an illiberal democracy. In politics, a mandate is the authority granted by an electorate to act as its representative. ... Unanimity is near complete agreement by everyone. ... Electoral fraud is illegal interference with the process of an election. ... Gerrymandering is a controversial form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ... Technically speaking, an illiberal democracy could be any democracy that is not a liberal democracy. ...


However many liberal democracies in history, including the history of United States, have had uncontested elections because support for the uncontested candidate was so strong. In the United States presidential elections of 1789 and 1792, George Washington ran uncontested for President, although in the latter election the ballot for the Vice President was contested by both Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans. Liberal democracy is a form of government. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... The Federalist Party was a United States political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s; this is sometimes called the First Party System. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ...


Singapore, Ireland, Algeria, and Iceland are multi-party systems that have held uncontested presidential elections.


 
 

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