FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Waiter" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Waiter
A waiter in a resort setting

A waiter is one who "waits" on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar. A female who "waits" on tables is often called a waitress. The gender-neutral server and collective waitstaff can also be used. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Toms Restaurant, a restaurant in New York made familiar by Suzanne Vega and the television sitcom Seinfeld A restaurant is an establishment that serves prepared food and beverages to order, to be consumed on the premises. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ... Gender-neutral language (gender-generic, gender-inclusive, non-sexist, or sex-neutral language) is language that attempts to refer neither to males nor females when discussing an abstract or hypothetical person whose sex cannot otherwise be determined. ...


Waiting tables is one of the most common occupations in the U.S. (along with nursing, and teaching). The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that, as of May 2005, there are over 2.2 million persons employed as waiters and waitresses in the U.S.[1] This article focuses on the education and regulation of nurses. ... A teacher writes on a blackboard in an American college. ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics was founded in 1884 by President Chester A. Arthur. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Duties of a waiter

Waiters' duties include preparing tables for a meal, taking customers' orders, serving drinks and food, and cleaning up before, after and during servings in a restaurant. Depending on the restaurant, other less common duties may be required, such as singing birthday songs to customers who are celebrating a birthday. A theme restaurant may even require waiters to dance (e.g. Joe's Crab Shack). There are now event caterers that outsource waiter/s/esess to events and specific functions. Theme restaurants are restaurants in which the concept of the restaurant takes priority over everything else, influencing the architecture, food, music, and overall feel of the restaurant. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into catering. ...


Silver service waiters are specially trained to serve at banquets or high-end restaurants. They follow specific rules of service and it is a skilled job. They generally wear black and white with a long, white apron (extending from the waist to ankle). Silver Service is the name given to the highest standard of Table service, this usually includes serving at table. ...

A waitress taking an order.
A waitress taking an order.

The head waiter or waitress is in charge of the staff of waiters and/or waitresses, and is also responsible for assigning seating. This person can also be referred to as the maître d'hôtel. Some restaurants employ busboys or busgirls to assist the waiters and/or waitresses. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1174x779, 143 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Waiter ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1174x779, 143 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Waiter ... The maître dhôtel, literally master of the hall, in a suitably staffed restaurant, is the person in charge of assigning customers to tables in the establishment, and dividing the dining area into areas of responsibility for the various waiters on duty. ... A busboy is an assistant to a waiter or waitress, mainly specializing in setting and clearing tables or in some types of restaurants, in bringing the introductory foods, for example tortilla chips and salsa in a Mexican restaurant or bread in an Italian restaurant. ...


The English writer, Wilfred Gowers-Round, wrote a number of Rules For Waiters that he called a "Manifesto" [2]:

  • A waiter's job is to serve and never to impose himself.
  • The goal of waiting is inconspicuous service.
  • Waiters must be clean and smart and should never wear cologne.
  • Under no circumstances should a waiter ever touch a diner.
  • Wine glasses should never be filled too full.
  • Unasked for advice should never be offered.
  • If diners are content to pour the wine themselves, let them.
  • Unless asked, no plates should be removed until all have finished.
  • Women diners should be afforded respect equal to men.
  • The bill should be placed on the table without ceremony.

Tipping

Main article: Tip

In the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, most other Western countries and the Middle-East, it is customary for customer to pay tip to a waiter or waitress after a meal. In the U.S., waiters and waitresses, like other "tipped" employees, can be paid a lower minimum wage than other occupations. For example, waiters and waitresses in Georgia are generally paid around $2.13 an hour. Tips are commonly between 10% and 20% of the total bill, depending the level and quality of service. In the UK around 10% is a standard tip. In restaurants where a ‘service charge’ is automatically applied (which is usually between 10% and 15%) an additional voluntary tip is not usually given. Service charges are normally optional and often only apply to large parties. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ...


In contrast, waiters and waitresses in Japan refuse tips, which are sometimes even considered an insult. It is believed there that leaving a tip implies that the waiter or waitress is not being paid enough by his or her employer.[citation needed]


Tipping is not customary in Asia including Australia and New Zealand and is not factored into wages of waitstaff. However, tips are appreciated especially if the customer or party has been unusually difficult or has left a mess. For example, parents of small children may leave a small tip. World map showing the location of Asia. ...


Waiters in fiction and film

W. Somerset Maugham as photographed in 1934 by Carl Van Vechten. ... Of Human Bondage (1915) is a novel by William Somerset Maugham. ... James Mallahan Cain (July 1, 1892 – October 27, 1977) was an American journalist and novelist. ... For other uses, see Mildred Pierce (disambiguation). ... Terrence McNally (born November 3, 1939), is an American playwright. ... Frankie and Johnny is a 1991 motion picture directed by Garry Marshall. ... Claude Sautet (February 23, 1924 - July 22, 2000) was a French author and film director. ... Claude Sautet - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Audrey Tautou (IPA: ; born August 9, 1978) is a French film actress, best known to worldwide audiences as the title character in the award-winning French film Amélie (2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain) and as Sophie Neveu in The Da Vinci Code (2006). ... Released in 2001, Le Fabuleux Destin dAmélie Poulain (The Fabulous Destiny of Amélie Poulain), or Amélie, as it is known in the English-speaking world, is a quirky French romantic comedy, or a modern fairy tale, starring Audrey Tautou. ... Fight Club[1] (1996) is the first published novel by American author Chuck Palahniuk. ... Reservoir Dogs is the 1992 debut feature film of director Quentin Tarantino. ... This article is about the film. ... Steven Vincent Buscemi (born December 13, 1957) is an Emmy and Golden Globe nominated American film and stage character actor and film director, based in New York City. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of rock and roll. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ... Waiting. ... Jim Jarmusch Jim Jarmusch (born January 22, 1953 in Akron, Ohio) is a noted American independent film director. ... Coffee and Cigarettes is a 2003 independent film directed by Jim Jarmusch. ... It Could Happen to You is a 1994 film starring Nicholas Cage and Bridget Fonda. ... Cocktail movie poster Cocktail was a hit movie released by Touchstone Pictures in 1988. ... Jennifer Aniston (born February 11, 1969) is an Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American film and television actress. ... Office Space is a cult 1999 comedy film written and directed by Mike Judge. ... Regina Hall Regina Hall (born on December 12, 1970 in Washington, D.C.) is an American film and television actress best known for her roles in the Scary Movie films. ... Cover of a book about the Honeymooners. ... Gabrielle Monique Union (born on October 29, 1972 in Omaha, Nebraska) is an American actress and former model. ... For the film, see The Honeymooners (2005 film). ... Starting in 1971, Isaac Asimov wrote a series of mystery short stories about a men-only dinner club called the Black Widowers. ...

References

  1. ^ U.S. Department of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics (24). Occupational Employment and Wages - Waiters and Waitresses. US Department of Labor. Retrieved on 2006-12-31.
  2. ^ http://icscotland.icnetwork.co.uk/eatdrink/restaurants/guide/glasgow/tm_headline=drop-the-bread-donkey-please&method=full&objectid=14374034&siteid=50141-name_page.html

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
waiter: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (782 words)
A waiter is one who "waits" on tables, often at a restaurant or a bar.
The head waiter or waitress is in charge of the staff of waiters and/or waitresses, and is also responsible for assigning seating.
Many cultures in the region believe that leaving a tip implies that the waiter or waitress is not being paid enough by his or her employer.
Everyday Money: Waiter tip tricks - Aug. 26, 2004 (814 words)
Waiters and waitresses who crouch down mimic our posture, establish better eye contact and bring their faces closer to ours -- all behaviors that we associate with greater rapport, Lynn notes.
So you may find a waiter or waitress suggesting some of the more expensive items on the menu if you ask for recommendations or appear undecided about what to order.
That's not always a bad thing, if you trust that the waiter knows what he's talking about and isn't just hyping the priciest entree or wine for the sake of it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m