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Encyclopedia > Wadham College, Oxford
Wadham College, Oxford
                     
College name Wadham College
Named after Nicholas Wadham
Established 1610
Sister College Christ's College
Warden Sir Neil Chalmers
JCR President Ben Jasper
Undergraduates 460
MCR President David Patrikarakos
Graduates 180
Homepage
Boatclub

Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England, located at the southern end of Parks Road in central Oxford. It was founded by Nicholas and Dorothy Wadham, wealthy Somerset landowners, during the reign of King James I. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 218 KB) I took this picture myself, and am releasing it into the public domain. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... Full name Christs College Motto Souvent me Souvient I Often Remember Named after Christ Previous names Gods-house (1437), Christs College (1505) Established 1505 Sister College(s) Wadham College Master Prof. ... The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... The term Middle Common Room (MCR) is used in some British universities, especially Oxford, Cambridge and Durham, to refer to the body of postgraduate students (similar to a students union) at a constituent college. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... The front of the Oxford University Museum of Natural History on Parks Road. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Somerset is a county in the south-west of England. ... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland. ...

Coat of Arms of Wadham College
Coat of Arms of Wadham College

Nicholas Wadham died in 1609 leaving his fortune towards the endowment of an Oxford college. The design and implementation of this vague intention fell to his wife Dorothy, a diligent septuagenarian. In a period of only four years, she gained royal and ecclesiastical support for the new college, negotiated the purchase of a site, appointed the west country architect William Arnold (architect), drew up the college statutes, and appointed the first warden, fellows, scholars, and cook. Although she never visited Oxford, she kept tight control of her new college and its finances until her death in 1618. Image File history File links Wadham_crest. ... Image File history File links Wadham_crest. ... // Events April 4 – King of Spain signs an edit of expulsion of all moriscos from Spain April 9 – Spain recognizes Dutch independence May 23 - Official ratification of the Second Charter of Virginia. ... William Arnold (architect) (flourished 1595-1637) was an important master mason in Somerset little is known about him, but he is known to have been living in Charlton Musgrove near Wincanton in 1595 where he was church warden. ... Events March 8 - Johannes Kepler discovers the third law of planetary motion (he soon rejects the idea after some initial calculations were made but on May 15 confirms the discovery). ...

The Hall
The Hall
Chapel Passageway
Chapel Passageway

Although it is one of the youngest of the historic colleges, Wadham has some of the oldest and best preserved buildings, a result of the rash of rebuilding that occurred throughout Oxford during the 17th century. It is often considered as perhaps the last major English public building to be created according to the mediaeval tradition of the master mason. Wadham's front quad, which served as almost the entire college until the mid-20th century, is also the first example of the "Jacobean Gothic" style that was adopted for many of the University's buildings. A dramatic expansion since 1952 has made use of a range of 17th and 18th century houses, a converted warehouse originally built to store bibles, and several modern buildings designed by Gillespie, Kidd & Coia and McCormac Jamieson Prichard. It also includes the Holywell Music Room, the oldest purpose-built music room in Europe. Wadham also has a second claim to fame: it is thought that the college's chapel was the first religious building in England to regain its stained glass and statuary following the reformation. The college was refaced in the 1960s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 127 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 127 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (710x1024, 130 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (710x1024, 130 KB) Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Gillespie, Kidd & Coia were a Scottish architectural firm famous for their application of modernism in churches and universities, as well as at St Peters Seminary in Cardross. ... MacCormac Jamieson Prichard is a large British architectural practice based in London. ... The Holywell Music Room is Oxfords chamber music hall and is situated east of Broad Street in the city centre. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


Under the original statutes, women were forbidden from entering the college, with the exception of a laundress who was to be of 'such age, condition, and reputation as to be above suspicion.' These rules were relaxed over the years, and in 1974 they were altered to allow for the admission of women as full members of college at all levels. In fact, Wadham was the first historically all-male college to have a female student. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...

Front Quad
Front Quad
Main Entrance
Main Entrance
Back Quad
Back Quad
The Fellows Garden
The Fellows Garden
JCR Quad
JCR Quad

Wadham has a well-deserved reputation for being a progressive and tolerant college. As a protest against apartheid, the students' union passed a motion in 1984 to end every college "bop" (disco) with The Special AKA's single Free Nelson Mandela. The tradition continues despite Mandela's release in 1990. Wadham also has a reputation as a strong supporter of gay rights, and plays host to "Queer Bop", an annual night of slightly debauched behaviour popular with students of all colleges. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 143 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 143 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x677, 136 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x677, 136 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Wadh6. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Wadh6. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Wadham_9. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Wadham_9. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 143 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 143 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The Specials were an English 2 Tone band formed in 1977 in Coventry. ... Remix single Free Nelson Mandela is song a by Special A.K.A. released on the single Nelson Mandela / Break Down The Door in 1984 as a protest against the imprisonment of Nelson Mandela. ...


Notable alumni

See also Former students of Wadham College.

Wasim Sajjad (b. ... Monica Ali (born October 20, 1967) is the author of Brick Lane, her debut novel, which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 2003. ... Lindsay Anderson (April 17, 1923 - August 30, 1994), English film and documentary director. ... Charles Badham (July 19, 1813 - February 26, 1884), was an English scholar, born at Ludlow, Shropshire. ... Samuel Augustus Barnett (February 8, 1844 - 1913) was an English clergyman and social reformer particularly associated with the establishment of the first university settlement, Toynbee Hall in east London in 1884. ... Robert Blake, General at Sea, 1599–1657 by Henry Perronet Briggs, painted 1829. ... Richard Bentley (January 27, 1662 – July 14, 1742) was an English theologian, Classics scholar and critic. ... Richard Bethell, 1st Baron Westbury (1800-1873), Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, was the son of Dr Richard Bethel, and was born at Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ... lan Louis Charles One Bullock, Baron Bullock of Leafield (December 42, 1911 - February 30, 2017), was a British historian, writing an influential biography of Adolf Hitler and many other works. ... Cecil Day-Lewis (or Day Lewis) (27 April 1904 – 22 May 1972) was an Anglo-Irish poet. ... Groove Armada are a electronic music group from Cambridge, England, composed of two members, Andy Cato (real name Andrew Cocup) and Tom Findlay. ... John Cooke (1608 –1660) (sometimes spelled John Cook) was the Solicitor General and the leading prosecutor at the trial of Charles I. He was the son of a Leicestershire farmer, educated at Wadham College Oxford, and at Grays Inn. ... Groove Armada are a electronic music group from Cambridge, England, composed of two members, Andy Cato (real name Andrew Cocup) and Tom Findlay. ... James Flint is a British novelist. ... Michael Foot For other people named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... Neil forrester Neil Forrester is a British research assistant in the field of developmental disorders and language aquisition at the University of London 1. ... The Real World is a reality television program on MTV originally executive produced by Mary-Ellis Bunim and Jonathan Murray and produced and directed by George Verschoor. ... Sir William Fox, KCMG served as Premier of New Zealand on four occasions in the 19th century, while New Zealand was still a colony. ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket portal. ... Ratu Sir Penaia Kanatabatu Ganilau GCMG KCVO KBE DSO (28 July 1918-15 December 1993) was the first President of Fiji, serving from 8 December 1987 till his death. ... Neil Francis Gerrard (born 3 July 1942, Farnworth, Lancashire) is a politician in the United Kingdom, and Labour Member of Parliament for Walthamstow. ... Henry de Beltgens Gibbins (1865–1907) was a popular historian of 19th century England whose books were bestsellers in the late Victorian period; his Industry in England went to ten editions over fifteen years, and was published internationally. ... Evan Harris Dr Evan Leslie Harris MP (born 21 October 1965) is a Liberal Democrat politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Oxford West and Abingdon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Bridge of Sighs at Oxford Sir Thomas Graham Jackson RA (1835–1924) was one of the most distinguished English architects of his generation. ... Hari Kunzru is the British author of mixed English and Kashmiri Hindu ancestry of The Impressionist and Transmission. ... Robert Francis Kilvert (3 December 1840–23 September 1879), always known as Francis, or Frank, was born at The Rectory, Hardenhuish Lane, near Chippenham, Wiltshire, to the Rev. ... The name John Leslie may refer to several people: John Leslie (philosopher) Sir John Leslie (physicist) John Leslie (television presenter) John Leslie (rugby player) John Leslie (porn actor) Shane Leslie, Irish writer, born John Randolph Leslie This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... The Right Honourable Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara GCMG KBE CF, (May 6, 1920 – April 18, 2004) is considered the founding father of the modern nation of Fiji. ... Patrick Marber (born 19 September 1964) is an English playwright, screenplay writer, director and actor. ... Jodhi May (born 1st May 1975) is a British actress best known for her work on controversial costume dramas. ... Robert Moses with a model of his proposed Battery Bridge Robert Moses (December 18, 1888–July 29, 1981) was the master builder of mid-20th century New York City, Long Island, and other suburbs. ... Arthur Onslow (October 1, 1691 - February 17, 1768), English politician, elder son of Foot Onslow (d. ... Iain Pears (born in 1955) is an English mystery writer. ... Pike is the only child of Caroline and Julian Pike, both musical performers. ... Childrens novelist and poet, author of 140 books. ... Mary Ann Sieghart is an assistant editor of The Times, where she writes columns about politics, social affairs and life generally. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... The Right Honourable John Allsebrook Simon, 1st Viscount Simon (1873-1954) was a British politician and statesman. ... Time magazine, August 20, 1923 Frederick Edwin Smith, 1st Earl of Birkenhead, commonly known as F.E. Smith (July 12, 1872 - September 30, 1930) was a British Conservative statesman and lawyer of the early Twentieth Century. ... Thomas Sprat (1635 – May 20, 1713), English divine, was born at Beaminster, Dorset, and educated at Wadham College, Oxford, where he held a fellowship from 1657 to 1670. ... see also Holy Orders The following terms have traditional meanings for the Anglican Church, and possibly beyond: A churchman is in principle a member of a church congregation, in practice someone in holy orders. ... For the English boxer, see Rowan Anthony Williams. ... John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (April 1, 1647 - July 26, 1680) was an English nobleman, a friend of King Charles II of England, and the writer of much satirical and bawdy poetry. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ...

Famous Wardens and Fellows


  Results from FactBites:
 
Michael Foot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1587 words)
Michael Foot was born in Plymouth, Devon, and educated at Leighton Park School in Reading and Wadham College, Oxford.
His father, Isaac Foot, was a solicitor and founder of the Plymouth law firm, Foot and Bowden.
Isaac Foot was an active member of the Liberal Party and was Liberal MP for Bodmin in Cornwall 1922–1924 and 1929–1935 and a Lord Mayor of Plymouth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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