FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Wade Hampton III
Wade Hampton during the Civil War

Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, representing it as governor and U.S. Senator. Image File history File links Wade_Hampton. ... Image File history File links Wade_Hampton. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... French Republican Guard - May 8, 2005 celebrations Cavalry (from French cavalerie) were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Hampton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the eldest son of Wade Hampton II (1791–1858), known as "Colonel Wade Hampton", one of the wealthiest planters in the South (and the owner of the largest number of slaves)[1], an officer of dragoons in the War of 1812, and an aide to General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans. He was grandson of Wade Hampton (1754–1835), lieutenant colonel of cavalry in the American War of Independence, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and brigadier general in the War of 1812. Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Wade Hampton II (April 21, 1791-February 10, 1858) was an American plantation owner and soldier in War of 1812. ... French dragoon, 1745. ... Combatants United States British Empire Canada Newfoundland Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Edward Pakenham† John Lambert Alexander Cochrane Andrew Jackson Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New Orleans, also known as the Battle of Chalmette... Wade Hampton (1752-February 4, 1835) served in the American Revolution and was a member of Congress from 1795-1797 and from 1803-1805, and a presidential elector in 1801. ... In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


Hampton grew up in a wealthy family, receiving private instruction. He had an active outdoor life, riding horses and hunting. He was known for taking hunting trips alone into the woods, hunting bears with only a knife. Some accounts credit him with killing as many as 80 bears. In 1836 he graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina), and was trained for the law, although he never practiced. He devoted himself, instead, to the management of his great plantations in South Carolina and Mississippi,[1] and took part in state politics. He was elected to the South Carolina General Assembly in 1852 and served as a Senator from 1858 to 1861. Hampton's father died in 1858 and the son inherited a vast fortune, the plantations, and one of the largest collections of slaves in the South. The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... // This article is about crop plantations. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Civil War

Wade Hampton
Wade Hampton

Although his views were conservative concerning the issues of secession and slavery, and he had opposed the division of the Union as a legislator, at the start of the Civil War, Hampton was loyal to his home state. He resigned from the Senate and enlisted as a private in the South Carolina Militia; however, the governor of South Carolina insisted that Hampton accept a colonel's commission, even though he had no military experience at all. Hampton organized and partially financed the unit known as "Hampton's Legion", which consisted of six companies of infantry, four companies of cavalry, and one battery of artillery. He personally financed all of the weapons for the Legion. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 512 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (3216 × 3768 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 512 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (3216 × 3768 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the Northern states during the American Civil War. ... Hamptons Legion was a American Civil War military unit of the Confederate States of America, organized and partially financed by wealthy South Carolina plantation owner Wade Hampton III. Initially composed of infantry, cavalry, and artillery battalions, elements of Hamptons Legion participated in virtually every major campaign in the...


Despite his lack of military experience and his relatively advanced age of 42, Hampton was a natural cavalryman—brave, audacious, and a superb horseman. He merely lacked some of the flamboyance of his contemporaries, such as his eventual commander, J.E.B. Stuart, age 30. He was one of only two officers (the other being Nathan Bedford Forrest) to achieve the rank of lieutenant general in the cavalry service of the Confederacy. James Ewell Brown Stuart (February 6, 1833 – May 12, 1864) was an American soldier from Virginia and a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... For the World War II general, see Nathan Bedford Forrest III. Nathaniel Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821–October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ...


Hampton first saw combat in July 1861, at the First Battle of Bull Run, where he deployed his Legion at a decisive moment, giving the brigade of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson time to reach the field. Hampton was wounded for the first of five times during the war when he led a charge against a federal artillery position, and a bullet creased his forehead. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Irvin McDowell Joseph E. Johnston P.G.T. Beauregard Strength 35,000 effectives 32,500 effectives Casualties 2,896 (460 killed, 1,124 wounded, 1,312 captured/missing) 1,982 (387 killed, 1,582 wounded, 13 missing) For other uses... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ...


Hampton was promoted to brigadier general on May 23, 1862, while commanding a brigade in Stonewall Jackson's division in the Army of Northern Virginia. In the Peninsula Campaign, at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1862, he was severely wounded in the foot, but remained on his horse while it was being treated, still under fire. Hampton returned to duty in time to lead a brigade at the end of the Seven Days Battles, although the brigade was not significantly engaged. A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Army of Northern Virginia was the primary military force of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War in the eastern theater. ... McClellan and Johnston of the Peninsula Campaign The Peninsula Campaign (also known as the Peninsular Campaign) of the American Civil War was a major Union operation launched in southeastern Virginia from March through July 1862, the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Joseph E. Johnston G. W. Smith Strength 41,797 41,816 Casualties 5,031 (790 killed, 3,594 wounded, 647 captured/missing) 6,134 (980 killed, 4,749 wounded, 405 captured/missing) The Battle of Seven Pines... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan Robert E. Lee Strength Army of the Potomac; 105,445 Army of Northern Virginia; 90,500 Casualties 1,734 killed 8,062 wounded 6,053 missing/captured 3,286 killed 15,009 wounded 946 missing/captured Peninsula...


After the Peninsula Campaign, General Robert E. Lee reorganized his cavalry forces as a division under the command of J.E.B. Stuart, who selected Hampton as his senior subordinate, to command one of two cavalry brigades. During the winter of 1862, around the Battle of Fredericksburg, Hampton led a series of cavalry raids behind enemy lines and captured numerous prisoners and supplies without suffering any casualties, earning a commendation from General Lee. During the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hampton's brigade was stationed south of the James River, so saw no action. // This article is about the Confederate general. ... Template:Infobox Military Conflict TiTIES The Battle of Fredericksburg, fought in and around Fredericksburg, Virginia, on December 13, 1862, between General Robert E. Lees Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and the Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Joseph Hooker Robert E. Lee Stonewall Jackson† Strength 133,868 60,892 Casualties 17,197 (1,606 killed, 9,672 wounded, 5,919 missing)[1] 12,764 (1,665 killed, 9,081 wounded, 2,018 missing)[1] The Battle of...


In the Gettysburg Campaign, Hampton was slightly wounded in the Battle of Brandy Station, the war's largest cavalry battle. His brigade then participated in Stuart's wild adventure to the northeast, swinging around the Union army and losing contact with Lee. Stuart and Hampton reached the vicinity of Gettysburg late on July 2, 1863. While just outside of town, Hampton was confronted by a Union cavalryman pointing a rifle at him from 200 yards. Hampton charged the trooper before he could fire his rifle, but another trooper blindsided Hampton with a saber cut to the back of his head. On July 3, Hampton led the cavalry attack to the east of Gettysburg, attempting to disrupt the Union rear areas, but colliding with Union cavalry. He received two more saber cuts to the front of his head, but continued fighting until he was wounded again with a piece of shrapnel to the hip. He was carried back to Virginia in the same ambulance as General John Bell Hood. Meade and Lee of Gettysburg Gettysburg Campaign (through July 3); cavalry movements shown with dashed lines. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Alfred Pleasonton J.E.B. Stuart Strength 11,000 9,500 Casualties 907 (69 killed, 352 wounded, 486 missing/captured)[1] 523[1] The Battle of Brandy Station was the largest predominantly cavalry engagement of the American Civil War. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Bell Hood (June 1[1] or June 29[2], 1831 – August 30, 1879) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and an old friend of Lt. ...


On August 3, 1863, Hampton was promoted to major general and received command of a cavalry division. His wounds from Gettysburg were slow in healing, so he did not actually return to duty until November. During the Overland Campaign of 1864, Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern and Hampton was given command of the Cavalry Corps on August 11, 1864. He distinguished himself in his new role at the bloody Battle of Trevilian Station, defeating Philip Sheridan's cavalry, and in fact, lost no cavalry battles for the remainder of the war. In September, Hampton conducted what became known as the "Beefsteak Raid", where his troopers captured over 2400 head of cattle and over 300 prisoners behind enemy lines. is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, opposing commanders in the Overland Campaign The Overland Campaign, also known as Grants Overland Campaign and the Wilderness Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during May and June 1864, in the American Civil War. ... On May 11th, 1864, Confederate General Jeb Stuart was shot at Yellow Tavern by a Union sharpshooter at a distance of 30 feet (10 m). ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Battle of Trevilian Station (also called Trevilians) was fought June 11–12, 1864, in Union General Ulysses Grants Overland Campaign against Confederate Gen. ... Philip Henry Sheridan (March 6, 1831 – August 5, 1888) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Union general in the American Civil War. ...


While Lee's army was bottled up in the Siege of Petersburg, in January 1865, Hampton returned to South Carolina to recruit additional soldiers. He was promoted to lieutenant general on February 14, 1865, and surrendered to the Union along with Joseph E. Johnston's army in North Carolina. Hampton was reluctant to surrender. His home in South Carolina had been burned by Sherman, much of his fortune had been depleted supplying his soldiers, and his many slaves had been freed. Understandably bitter, Hampton was one of the original proponents, alongside General Jubal A. Early, of the Lost Cause movement, attempting to explain away the Confederacy's loss of the war. Hampton was especially angry upon the arrival of black Federal troops to occupy his home state. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee Strength 67,000 – 125,000 average of 52,000 Casualties 53,386 ~32,000 The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to March... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Joseph E. Johnston Joseph Eggleston Johnston (February 3, 1807 – March 21, 1891) was a career U.S. Army officer and one of the most senior generals in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Jubal Anderson Early (November 3, 1816 – March 2, 1894) was a lawyer and Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... George Washington Custis Lee, 1832-1913, on horseback, with staff reviewing Confederate Reunion Parade in Richmond, Virginia, June 3, 1907, in front of monument to Jefferson Davis. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Postbellum career

Hampton was offered the nomination of governor in 1865, but refused because he felt that those in the North would be suspicious of a former Confederate General seeking political office only months after the end of the Civil War. Despite his refusal, Hampton had to campaign for his supporters not to vote for him in the gubernatorial election. In 1868, Hampton became the chairman of the state Democratic Party central committee. He tried to limit the influence of the extremists in the party and promote a conciliatory policy towards the blacks, but it was to no avail as the Radical Republicans crushed the Democrats in the election. His role in the politics of the state ceased until 1876, although he tried to help M. C. Butler in the Union Reform campaign of 1870. A list of South Carolina Governors. ... The 1865 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on October 18, 1865 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. ... The South Carolina Democratic Party is the South Carolina affiliate of the national Democratic Party. ... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... The 1868 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on June 2 and June 3, 1868 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. ... Prior to the 1960s, the state Democratic Party was firmly in control of the government of South Carolina at all levels. ... Matthew Calbraith Butler (March 8, 1836 – April 14, 1909) was an American military commander and politician from the state of South Carolina. ... The Union Reform Party of South Carolina was a political party of South Carolina during reconstruction. ... The 1870 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on October 10, 1870 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. ...


Hampton was a leading fighter against radical Republican Reconstruction policies in the South, and re-entered South Carolina politics in 1876 as the first southern gubernatorial candidate to run on a platform in opposition to Reconstruction. Hampton, a Democrat, ran against Radical Republican incumbent governor Daniel Henry Chamberlain. Supporters of Hampton were called Red Shirts, and were very violent. However, supporters of Chamberlain, mostly black militia members, responded with violence. Therefore, the 1876 South Carolina gubernatorial election was the bloodiest in the history of the state. The vote was very close, and both parties claimed victory. For over six months, there were two legislatures in the state, both claiming to be authentic. Eventually, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled Hampton as the winner of the election. The election of the first Democrat in South Carolina since the end of the Civil War, as well as the national election of Rutherford B. Hayes as President, signified the end of the long period of Reconstruction in the South. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Radical Republicans were an influential faction of American politicians in the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras, 1860-1876. ... Daniel Henry Chamberlain (June 23, 1835–1907) was a governor of South Carolina and member of the Yale based Skull and Bones Society. ... The Red Shirts of South Carolina were the supporters of Wade Hampton in the South Carolina gubernatorial election of 1876 and the gubernatorial election of 1878. ... The 1876 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 7, 1876 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...


After the election, Hampton became known as the "Savior of South Carolina." He was reelected in 1878 to a second term, but two days after the election he was thrown from a mule while deer hunting and fractured his right leg. Called the "Mule Fraud" by the New York Times, the newspaper claimed that it was a political trick planned by Hampton so that he would not have to sign election certificates even though the Governor of South Carolina does not sign such certificates. Despite refusing to announce his candidacy for the Senate, Hampton was elected to the United States Senate by the General Assembly, albeit on the same day as the amputation of his leg. He resigned from the governorship in 1879 and served two terms in the Senate until 1891 after being denied a third term by the Tillmanites in the state elections of 1890. The 1878 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 5, 1878 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... A list of South Carolina Governors. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... The South Carolina General Assembly, also called the South Carolina Legislature, is the legislative branch of South Carolina and consists of the South Carolina House of Representatives and the South Carolina Senate. ... Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847 - July 3, 1918) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina from 1890 to 1894 and as a United States Senator from 1895 until his death. ...


From 1893 to 1897, he served as United States Railroad Commissioner, appointed by President Grover Cleveland. In 1899, his home in Columbia, South Carolina, was destroyed by fire. An elderly man, he had limited funds and limited means to find a new home. Over his strong protests, a group of friends raised enough funds to build him one. For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Nickname: Location in Richland County in the state of South Carolina Coordinates: , Country United States State South Carolina Counties Richland County, South Carolina Government  - Mayor Bob Coble, (D) Area  - City  133. ...


In 1890, Hampton's niece Caroline, an operating room nurse, married the father of American surgery, William Halsted. It was because of her skin reaction to surgical sterilization chemicals that Halsted invented the surgical glove the previous year. “Surgeon” redirects here. ... The Four Doctors by John Singer Sargent, 1905. ...


Hampton died in Columbia and is buried there in Trinity Cathedral Churchyard. Statues of him were erected in the South Carolina Capitol building and the United States Capitol. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


In memoriam

Statue of Wade Hampton at South Carolina State House

To honor Hampton for his leadership in the Civil War and the redemption of the state, the General Assembly created Hampton County from Beaufort County in 1878. The town of Hampton Courthouse (later shortened to Hampton) was incorporated on December 23, 1879, to serve as the county seat of Hampton County. Across South Carolina many towns and cities renamed streets for the revered statesman. At least eight municipalities in South Carolina have a street named "Wade Hampton" (Beaufort, Charleston, Duncan, Greenville, Greer, Hampton, Taylors, Walterboro) and in approximately 47 towns of South Carolina are streets named "Hampton." Two high schools in South Carolina are named "Wade Hampton High School," one in Greenville and the other in Hampton. A residence hall at Hampton's alma mater, the University of South Carolina, is called the "Wade Hampton." Hampton Park in Charleston and Columbia are also named after Hampton. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Hampton County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Beaufort County is a county located in the state of South Carolina. ... Hampton is a town located in Hampton County, South Carolina. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Beaufort is a city located in Beaufort County, South Carolina, USA and situated on the Beaufort River. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Duncan is a town located in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. ... Greenville is the third largest city in the state of South Carolina. ... Greer is a town between Greenville and Spartanburg in Greenville and Spartanburg counties in South Carolina. ... Hampton is a town located in Hampton County, South Carolina. ... Taylors is a census-designated place located in Greenville County, South Carolina. ... Walterboro is a city located in Colleton County, South Carolina. ... Greenville is the third largest city in the state of South Carolina. ... Hampton is a town located in Hampton County, South Carolina. ... The University of South Carolina, Columbia (USC or Carolina) is a public, co-educational, research university located in Columbia, South Carolina, United States. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ...


In 1913, Judge John Randolph Tucker named the Wade Hampton Census Area in Alaska to commemorate his father-in-law. An artillery battery was named after Wade Hampton at Fort Crockett, built on Galveston Island, Texas. The Wade Hampton Battery was one of four coastal artillery batteries and contained two 10-inch guns. During World War II, the SS Wade Hampton, a Liberty ship named in honor of the general, was sunk off the coast of Greenland by a German U-boat. Wade Hampton Census Area is a census area located in the state of Alaska. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... Fort Crockett is a government reservation originally built as a defense installation on Galveston Island overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. ... A map of Galveston Island, a barrier island on the Texas Gulf coast in the United States Galveston Island is a barrier island on the Texas Gulf coast in the United States, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) south of Houston. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ...


References

  • Eicher, John H., and Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-8047-3641-3.
  • Jarrell, Hampton M. (1969). Wade Hampton and the Negro. University of South Carolina Press. 
  • Tagg, Larry, The Generals of Gettysburg, Savas Publishing, 1998, ISBN 1-882810-30-9.
  • Wells, E. L., Hampton and Reconstruction, Columbia, South Carolina: 1907.

In Fiction

Harry Turtledove's eleven volume alternate history series, Settling Accounts makes reference to a Wade Hampton V as a President of the Confederate States of America who is assassinated. In fact, Wade Hampton III had only twin daughters, so while he has descendents living in the 21st Century, including one now resident in Florida who is named for one of those daughters, none bear the name Wade Hampton V or the last name Hampton. Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949) is an American historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion...


In Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone With the Wind, Scarlett O'Hara's first husband, Charles Hamilton, serves in Wade Hampton's regiment, dying of measles only seven weeks later. As it was fashionable (according to Mitchell) to name baby boys after their fathers' commanding officers, Scarlett's son by Charles is therefore named Wade Hampton Hamilton. For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ... Gone with the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... Scarlett OHara (full name Katie Scarlett OHara Hamilton Kennedy Butler) of French-Irish ancestry is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel, Gone with the Wind, and in the later film of the same name. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b Tagg, p. 359.

Further reading

  • Ackerman, Robert K., Wade Hampton III, University of South Carolina Press, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-1570036675
  • Cisco, Walter Brian, Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior, Conservative Statesman, Potomac Books, 2004, ISBN 1-57488-626-6.
  • Meynard, Virginia G., The Venturers, The Hampton, Harrison and Earle Families of Virginia, South Carolina and Texas, Southern Historical Press, Inc, Greenville, South Carolina, 1981, ISBN 0-89308-241-4.
  • Willimon, William H, Lord of the Congaree, Wade Hampton of South Carolina, Sandlapper Press, 1972, ISBN 0-87844-010-0.

External links

  • Online biography
Preceded by
Daniel Henry Chamberlain
Governor of South Carolina
1877–1879
Succeeded by
William Dunlap Simpson
Preceded by
John J. Patterson
United States Senator (Class 3) from South Carolina
1879–1891
Served alongside: Matthew C. Butler
Succeeded by
John L. M. Irby

  Results from FactBites:
 
Wade Hampton III Summary (1927 words)
Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, representing it as governor and U.S. Senator.
Hampton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the eldest son of Wade Hampton II (1791–1858), known as "Colonel Wade Hampton", one of the wealthiest planters in the South, an officer of dragoons in the War of 1812, and an aide to General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.
Hampton's father died in 1858 and the son inherited a vast fortune, the plantations, and one of the largest collections of slaves in the South.
Wade Hampton III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1436 words)
Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 – April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, representing it as governor and U.S. Senator.
Hampton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the eldest son of Wade Hampton II (1791–1858), known as "Colonel Wade Hampton", one of the wealthiest planters in the South, an officer of dragoons in the War of 1812, and an aide to General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans.
Hampton's father died in 1858 and the son inherited a vast fortune, the plantations, and one of the largest collections of slaves in the South.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m