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Encyclopedia > Waco, Texas
City of Waco
Downtown Waco
Location in Texas
Location in Texas
U.S. Census Map
Coordinates: 31°33′5″N 97°9′21″W / 31.55139, -97.15583
Country United States
State Texas
County McLennan
Government
 - Mayor Virginia DuPuy
Area
 - City 95.5 sq mi (247.4 km²)
 - Land 84.2 sq mi (218.1 km²)
 - Water 11.3 sq mi (29.3 km²)  11.85%
Elevation 470 ft (143.3 m)
Population (2005)
 - City 120,465
 - Density 1,350/sq mi (521.5/km²)
 - Metro 226,189
Time zone Central (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) Central (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 76700-76799
Area code(s) 254
FIPS code 48-76000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1370701GR3
Website: http://www.waco-texas.com/

Waco (pronounced /ˈweɪkoʊ/) is the county seat of McLennan County, Texas. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 113,726 (however, 2005 estimates place the population at 120,465[1]). It is the 26th largest city by population in Texas, and 195th in the US. The Waco MSA consists of McLennan County and has a population of 226,189.[2] It is served by Waco Regional Airport. Combatants ATF, FBI, U.S. Army Branch Davidians Commanders Assault: Phil Chojnacki Siege: Many David Koresh† Strength Assault: 75 ATF agents Siege: Hundreds of federal agents and soldiers 50+ men, 75+ women and children Casualties 4 dead, 21 wounded in assault 6 dead and 3+ wounded in assault, 79 dead... Waco may refer to multiple places in the United States of America: Waco, Texas Waco, Georgia Waco, Kentucky Waco, Missouri Waco, Nebraska Waco, North Carolina Waco may also refer to: a dialect of the Wichita language Waco Siege, a 1993 confrontation between U.S. federal agents and the Branch Davidians... Image File history File links Wacocity. ... Adapted from Wikipedias TX county maps by Seth Ilys. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Index: Contents: Top - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Anderson County formed in 1846 from part of Houston County. ... Location in the state of Texas Formed Seat Waco Area  - Total  - Water 2,746 km² (1,060 mi²) 48 km² (18 mi²) 1. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Mr. ... North American area code 254 is a state of Texas telephone area code for numbers in the Waco area. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Location in the state of Texas Formed Seat Waco Area  - Total  - Water 2,746 km² (1,060 mi²) 48 km² (18 mi²) 1. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The United States Census of year 2000, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... Waco Regional Airport (IATA: ACT, ICAO: KACT), also known as Waco Municipal Airport, is located in the northwest part of the City of Waco, in McLennan County, Texas. ...


The city is the fly-in point for George W. Bush for his visits to his Prairie Chapel Ranch in Crawford and support personnel and reporters stay in the city's hotels. It is the home of Baylor University. The Dr. Pepper soft drink (originally referred to as "Waco") was established here. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ...


The city's name is also applied to a high-profile 1993 siege, despite it having taken place outside the city limits. Combatants ATF, FBI, U.S. Army Branch Davidians Commanders Assault: Phil Chojnacki Siege: Many David Koresh† Strength Assault: 75 ATF agents Siege: Hundreds of federal agents and soldiers 50+ men, 75+ women and children Casualties 4 dead, 21 wounded in assault 6 dead and 3+ wounded in assault, 79 dead...

Contents

History

McLennan County Courthouse
McLennan County Courthouse
Burleson Square at Baylor University
Burleson Square at Baylor University
The Dr Pepper Museum is one of Waco's tourist attractions.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1168, 1333 KB) [edit] Summary Other versions No File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): McLennan County, Texas Waco, Texas Portal:Texas/Cities Portal:Texas/Cities/13 ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x1168, 1333 KB) [edit] Summary Other versions No File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): McLennan County, Texas Waco, Texas Portal:Texas/Cities Portal:Texas/Cities/13 ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2864x2148, 3303 KB)[edit] Summary Taken on the campus of Baylor University on 10/8/2006 with a Canon Rebel XT. [edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2864x2148, 3303 KB)[edit] Summary Taken on the campus of Baylor University on 10/8/2006 with a Canon Rebel XT. [edit] Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Dr_Pepper_Museum. ... Image File history File links Dr_Pepper_Museum. ...

1824-1865

Prior to the founding of the town, a Wichita Native American group known as the "Waco" or "Hueco" lived on the land of contemporary downtown Waco west of the Brazos River. In 1824, on an expedition to the Waco village, Thomas M. Duke reported the following to Stephen F. Austin: "This town is situated on the West Bank of the River about half a mile from the River. They have a spring almost as cold as Ice itself. All we want is some Brandy and Sugar to have Ice Toddy. They have about four hundred acres planted in corn, beans, pumpkins, and melons and that tended in good order. I think they cannot raise more than One Hundred Warriors." After Austin aborted the first attempt to destroy their village in 1825, he made a treaty with them. The Wacos were soon forced to abandon their village due to an invasion in 1830 by the Cherokee (who had been pushed westward in previous decades by colonization), and they moved upstream to what is now Palo Pinto County (west of Fort Worth). Tribal flag Wichita camp, 1904 For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... The Brazos River, originally called, the Rio Brazos de Dios which can be translated as The River of Gods Arms. is the 11th longest river in the United States at 2060 km (1280 miles) from its source of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico[1] to its mouth at... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... Palo Pinto County is a county located in the state of Texas. ... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ...


Neil McLennan settled in an area near the South Bosque River in 1838.[3] Jacob De Cordova bought McLennan's property[4] and hired a former Texas Ranger and surveyor named George B. Erath to inspect the area.[5] In 1849, Erath designed the first block of the city. Property owners wanted to name the city Lamartine, but Erath convinced them to name the area Waco Village, in honor of the Native Americans who had lived there.[citation needed] In March 1849, Shapley Ross built the first house in Waco, a double-log cabin on a bluff overlooking the springs. His daughter Kate soon became the first white child to be born in Waco.[6] The Bosque River is a river in Texas fed by four primary branches. ... Jacob De Cordova, (1808-1868), settled in Texas in 1839 and lived in Galveston. ... For other uses, see Texas Rangers. ...


1866-1900

In 1866, Waco's leading citizens embarked on an ambitious project to build the first bridge to span the wide Brazos River. They formed the Waco Bridge Company to build the 475-foot brick Waco Suspension Bridge, which was called the longest span of any bridge west of the Mississippi River when completed in 1870. The company commissioned a firm owned by John Augustus Roebling in Trenton, New Jersey to supply the cables and steelwork for the bridge, which was a pioneering engineering feat of the era. Roebling's firm began work on the Brooklyn Bridge in 1870. The economic effects of the Waco bridge were immediate and large, attracting cattle runs from the nearby Chisholm Trail and increasing the population of the city, as immigrants now had a safe passage for their horse drawn carriages to cross the river. Since 1971, the bridge is now open only to pedestrian traffic and is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Brazos River, originally called, the Rio Brazos de Dios which can be translated as The River of Gods Arms. is the 11th longest river in the United States at 2060 km (1280 miles) from its source of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico[1] to its mouth at... Waco Suspension Bridge, modern day The Waco Suspension Bridge crosses the Brazos River in Waco, Texas. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Categories: Stub | 1806 births | 1869 deaths | Engineers ... Nickname: Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County Coordinates: , Country State County Mercer Incorporated November 13, 1792 Government  - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer Area  - City  8. ... For other uses, see Brooklyn Bridge (disambiguation). ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


In 1873, AddRan College was founded by brothers Addison and Randolph Clark in Fort Worth. The school moved to Waco in 1895, changing its name to Add-Ran Christian University and taking up residence in the empty buildings of Waco Female College. Add-Ran changed its name to Texas Christian University in 1902 and left Waco after the school's main building burned down in 1910. TCU was offered a 50-acre campus and $200,000 by the city of Fort Worth to relocate there. Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fort Worth is the sixth-largest city in the state of Texas, located about 30 miles west of Dallas on the West Fork Trinity River and forming part of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. ...


In the late 1800s a red light district called the "Reservation" grew up in Waco. Prostitution was regulated by the city. The Reservation was abolished in the early 1900s.


In 1885, the soft drink Dr Pepper was invented in Waco at Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store. A soft drink is a drink that contains no alcohol. ... For the alcoholic cocktail said to taste the same, see Flaming Dr. Pepper. ...


In 1845, Baylor University was founded in Independence, Texas, making it the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of Texas. It moved to Waco in 1886 and merged with Waco University, becoming an integral part of the city. The university's Strecker Museum was also the oldest continuously operating museum in the state until it closed in 2003, and the collections were moved to the new Mayborn Museum Complex. Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Founded in 1835 in Washington County, Texas, Independence is located twelve miles northeast of Brenham, Texas, and is the original location of Baylor University. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The Mayborn Museum Complex The Mayborn Museum Complex is a 142,000 square foot facility that opened in May of 2004 at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. ...


In the 1890s, William Cowper Brann published the highly successful Iconoclast newspaper in Waco. One of his targets was Baylor University. Brann revealed that Baylor officials had been importing South American children recruited by missionaries and making house-servants out of them. Brann was shot in the back by Tom Davis, a Baylor supporter. Brann wheeled, drew his pistol, and killed Davis. Brann was helped home by his friends, and died there of his wounds. William Cowper Brann (1855–1898) was an American journalist. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ...


In 1894, the first Cotton Palace fair and exhibition center was built to reflect the dominant contribution of the agricultural cotton industry in the region. Since the end of the Civil War, cotton had been cultivated in the Brazos and Bosque valleys, and Waco became known nationwide as a top producer. Over the next 23 years, the annual exposition would welcome over eight million attendees. The opulent building which housed the month-long exhibition was destroyed by fire and rebuilt in 1910. In 1931, the exposition fell prey to the Great Depression, and the building was torn down. However, the annual Cotton Palace Pageant continues to the present day, hosted in late April in conjunction with the Brazos River Festival.
On September 15, 1896 "The Crash at Crush" took place about 15 miles north of Waco. "The Crash at Crush" was a publicity stunt done by the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad company(known as M-K-T or "Katy") featured two locomotives intentionally set on a head-on collision. Meant to be a family fun event with food, games and entertainment, the Crash turned deadly when both boilers exploded simultaneously, sending metal flying in the air. Two people died and six were seriously injured. Waco History Project Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


1901-Present

George W. Bush, Laura Bush, and Barney (dog) switch from Marine One to Air Force One at TSTC Waco Airport

During World War I, Waco was the site of two major Army bases, Camp MacArthur and Rich Field. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Laura Lane Welch Bush (born November 4, 1946) is the wife of the forty-third and current President of the United States George W. Bush and is thereby the First Lady of the United States. ... Barney on the Presidential podium Barney (born September 30, 2000 in New Jersey, U.S.A.), often referred to as the First Dog, is a Scottish Terrier owned by U.S. President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... TSTC Waco Airport formerly known as Waco Army Air Field, Connally Air Force Base and James Connally Air Force Base is an airport north of Waco, Texas. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Rich Field is a defunct Army base near Waco, Texas, used for air operations during World War I. The facility was built southwest of Waco near what is now the intersection of Bosque Blvd and 41st street. ...


In 1916, a black teenager named Jesse Washington was hanged and mutilated on the town square by a mob that seized him from a courthouse, where he had been convicted of murdering a white woman. The so-called 'Waco Horror" drew international condemnation and became the cause celebre of the nascent NAACP's anti-lynching campaign. In 2006, the Waco City Council officially condemned the lynching, which took place at City Hall without opposition from local leaders.


In 1923, the Texas Legislature created the Tenth Civil Court of Appeals and placed it in Waco. Today it is known as the 10th Court of Appeals. Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... The Texas judicial system has been called one of the most complex in the United States, if not the world. ...


In 1937, Grover C. Thomsen and R.H. Roark created a soft-drink called "Sun Tang Red Cream Soda". This would later become known as the soft drink Big Red. 12 fl oz bottle of Big Red Big Red is a soft drink that was created by Grover C. Thomsen in Waco, Texas (1937). ...


On May 5, 1942, Waco Army Air Field opened as a basic pilot training school and on June 10, 1949, the name was changed to Connally Air Force Base in memory of Col. James T. Connally, a local pilot killed in Japan in 1945. The name changed again in 1951 to the James Connally Air Force Base. The base closed in May, 1966 and is now the location of Texas State Technical College, formerly Texas State Technical Institute, since 1965. The airfield is still in operation and is currently used by Air Force One when US President George W. Bush visits his Prairie Chapel Ranch, also known as the Western White House, in Crawford, Texas. is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Texas State Technical College System is a system of two-year technical schools in Texas. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For the current aircraft, see Boeing VC-25. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... President Bush at his ranch Prairie Chapel Ranch is a 1583 acre (6. ... President George W. Bush gives remarks on Hurricane Katrina and the Iraqi constitution from his Crawford, Texas ranch on Sunday August 28, 2005. ... Crawford is a Waco suburb located in western McLennan County, Texas. ...


On May 11, 1953, a tornado hit downtown Waco, killing 114. As of 2007, it remains the tenth deadliest tornado in U.S. history and tied for the deadliest in Texas state history.[1] It was the first tornado tracked by radar and helped spur the creation of a nationwide storm surveillance system. is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of some tornado records. ...


In 1964 the Texas Department of Public Safety designated Waco as the site for the state-designated official museum of the legendary Texas Rangers law enforcement agency founded in 1823. In 1976 it was further designated the official Hall of Fame for the Rangers and renamed the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum. The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is a department of the government of the state of Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas Rangers. ... Main entrance to the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas. ...


In 1978, bones were discovered emerging from the mud at the confluence of the Brazos River and the Bosque River. Subsequent excavations revealed that the bones were 68,000 years old and belonged to a species of mammoth. Eventually, the remains of at least 24 mammoths, one camel, and one large cat were found at the site, making it one of the largest findings of its kind in the world. Scholars have puzzled over why such a large herd had been killed all at once. The site is currently being looked at by the National Park Service for possible inclusion on the National Park system. They are conducting a special resource study to be presented to Congress. The Brazos River, originally called, the Rio Brazos de Dios which can be translated as The River of Gods Arms. is the 11th longest river in the United States at 2060 km (1280 miles) from its source of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico[1] to its mouth at... The Bosque River is a river in Texas fed by four primary branches. ... This article is about the genus Mammuthus. ...


On February 28, 1993 there was a shoot out in which six Davidians and four agents of the United States Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) died. After 51 days on April 19, 1993 a standoff between FBI agents and Branch Davidians ended in a fire that destroyed their compound located in Mt. Carmel, near Waco. Seventy-four people, including leader David Koresh, died in the blaze. is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (abbreviated ATF, sometimes BATF or BATFE) is a United States federal agency; more specifically a specialized law enforcement and regulatory organization within the United States Department of Justice. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Combatants ATF, FBI, U.S. Army Branch Davidians Commanders Assault: Phil Chojnacki Siege: Many David Koresh† Strength Assault: 75 ATF agents Siege: Hundreds of federal agents and soldiers 50+ men, 75+ women and children Casualties 4 dead, 21 wounded in assault 6 dead and 3+ wounded in assault, 79 dead... The Branch Davidians are a religious sect which originated from a schism in 1955 from the Davidian Seventh Day Adventists, themselves former members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church who were disfellowshipped during the 1930s. ... Mount Carmel Center was the name of the Branch Davidian home outside of Waco Texas led by Benjamin Roden and later David Koresh. ... David Koresh (August 17, 1959 – April 19, 1993), (born Vernon Wayne Howell), was the leader of the Branch Davidians religious sect, believing himself to be the final prophet, until a 1993 raid by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and subsequent siege by the FBI ended...


In 1999, a charter school called the Emma L. Harrison Charter School was closed by the Texas Education Agency; the school was the first charter school which had its charter revoked in Texas.[7] This article is about the year. ... The Texas Education Agency (TEA) is a branch of the state government of Texas and oversees public primary and secondary education in the state. ...


Since the 2000 presidential election, Waco has been home to the various news bureaus covering the Western White House in Crawford, home of US President George W. Bush. Crawford is an outlying McLennan County community about 20 miles west of Waco. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... President George W. Bush gives remarks on Hurricane Katrina and the Iraqi constitution from his Crawford, Texas ranch on Sunday August 28, 2005. ... Crawford is a Waco suburb located in western McLennan County, Texas. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Geography and Climate

Waco is located at 31°33'5" North, 97°9'21" West (31.551516, -97.155930).GR1


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 247.4 km² (95.5 mi²). 218.1 km² (84.2 mi²) of it is land and 29.3 km² (11.3 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 11.85% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High °F 88 96 100 101 102 109 109 112 111 101 92 91
Norm High °F 57 62.3 70.2 77.6 84.8 92 96.7 96.9 90.1 80.4 67.8 59.1
Norm Low °F 35.1 39.3 46.8 54.2 63.3 70.6 74.1 73.5 67 56.7 45.8 37.5
Rec Low °F -5 4 15 27 37 52 60 53 40 25 17 -4
Precip (in) 1.9 2.43 2.48 2.99 4.46 3.08 2.23 1.85 2.88 3.67 2.61 2.76
Source: USTravelWeather.com [2]

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 113,726 people in the city, organized into 42,279 households and 24,775 families. The population density is 521.5/km² (1,350.6/mi²). There are 45,819 housing units at an average density of 210.1/km² (544.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 60.78% White, 22.65% African American, 1.38% Asian, 0.51% Native American, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 12.38% from other races, and 2.26% from two or more races. 23.64% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 42,279 households out of which 29.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.4% are married couples living together, 16.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.4% are non-families. 31.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.9% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.49 and the average family size is 3.19. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 20.3% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 16.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 28 years. For every 100 females there are 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.3 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $26,264, and the median income for a family is $33,919. Males have a median income of $26,902 versus $21,159 for females. The per capita income for the city is $14,584. 26.3% of the population and 19.3% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 30.9% of those under the age of 18 and 13.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Downtown

See also List of Waco's Neighborhoods

Downtown Waco is small compared to most other cities, such as Dallas or Houston, however, each day 17,000 people commute to work in downtown. Downtown Waco was built around the Waco Suspension Bridge, which was a crucial crossing of the Brazos River. In May 1953, the worst tornado in Texas history struck downtown Waco killing 114, and injuring hundreds. It caused millions of dollars in damage, and dented Waco's economy for years to come. Downtown Waco is mainly known for the ALICO tower, which was completed in 1910, and was once the tallest structure in the Southwest. Downtown Waco is now the location of the famous Dr Pepper Museum, where Dr Pepper was first invented, and the McLennan County Courthouse. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Nickname: Bayou City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Harris County Fort Bend County Montgomery County Mayor Bill White Area    - City 1,558 km²  (601. ... Waco Suspension Bridge, modern day The Waco Suspension Bridge crosses the Brazos River in Waco, Texas. ... The Brazos River, originally called, the Rio Brazos de Dios which can be translated as The River of Gods Arms. is the 11th longest river in the United States at 2060 km (1280 miles) from its source of Blackwater Draw, Curry County, New Mexico[1] to its mouth at... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... The ALICO Building is a 22-story office building in downtown Waco, Texas, located on Austin and 5th Streets. ... For the alcoholic cocktail said to taste the same, see Flaming Dr. Pepper. ... McLennan County is a county located in the state of Texas. ...


For the past few decades, Downtown Waco has slowly been decaying as Waco grew to the West away from Downtown. But recently Waco's city leaders have been taking strides into making Downtown Waco the city center again. There are two projects currently being worked on in Heritage Square, which takes up two blocks in downtown, between 3rd and 4th streets and Washington Avenue and Franklin Avenue. The first project is the new Chamber of Commerce of Waco, which will be an environment-friendly building. The second project, which is expected to break ground in the fall of 2007, is a mixed-use development with commercial and residential buildings. There are also other projects being talked about by the public.


Education

Waco Independent School District serves most of the city of Waco. However, Midway ISD and La Vega ISD also serve parts of Waco. There are three main high schools in Waco: Waco High, Midway High, and University High. The schools are all major rivals in sports, academics and pride. In addition to the public school systems in Waco, there are also many private and parochial schools in and around Waco, such as Vanguard College Preparatory School ,Reicher Catholic High School ,and Rapoport Academy. Waco Independent School District is a public school district based in Waco, Texas (USA). ... Midway Independent School District can refer to: Midway Independent School District (Clay County, Texas) Midway Independent School District (McLennan County, Texas) Categories: | ... La Vega Independent School District is a public school district based in Waco, Texas (USA). ... This article is about a high school in Texas. ... Midway High School is the only high school in Midway Independent School District of the Waco, Texas area. ... University High School is located at 2600 Bagby Avenue in Waco, Texas. ... Address 2517 Mt. ... Reicher Catholic High School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Waco, Texas. ...


There are also three universities/colleges in Waco. Baylor University is the oldest and largest baptist university in the world.


Colleges and Universities

Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... McLennan Community College is a college partially funded by the taxpayers of McLennan County, Texas. ... Texas State Technical College System is a system of two-year technical schools in Texas. ...

Attractions

Major Waco attractions include:

Professional sports

The Waco Thunder is a semi-pro sports football team, competing in the Texas United Football League. The league consists of over 32 teams all over the state of Texas. The 2007 Season was the Thunder's inaugural season, played in the spring. The Thunder play their home games at Texas Christians Academy's Stars Field located off of Bagby Ave. The team is owned and operated by Jason Turnbo. The Head Coach is Dennis Bates. The primary goal of the Thunder is to provide players a Second Chance with their football career to obtain a pro contract or a college scholarship. In the Thunder inaugural season 2 players accomplished what they set out for and got picked up by colleges - Adrian Porter (Mexia High School) & Edmond Roberts (Connally High School). The Thunder has players from all over Central Texas on the roster including local standouts John Henry (Lorena/Baylor), Freddie Rollins (McGregor/UMHB), Richard White(Waco High), Josh Williams (Waco High), Steve Schroeder (China Spring) Greg Washington (Mexia) those just to name a few. The Thunder also has a Cheerleading Squad, directed by Rebecca Turnbo.


The American Basketball Association has announced an expansion franchise for the 2006-2007 season, the Waco Wranglers. The team is scheduled to begin play in November 2006 at Reicher Catholic High School. The team practices at Texas State Technical College. The American Basketball Association (ABA) is a mens basketball league founded in 1999. ... The Waco Wranglers are a basketball team that plays in both American Basketball Association and the United Basketball League in Waco, Texas. ... Reicher Catholic High School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Waco, Texas. ... Texas State Technical College System is a system of two-year technical schools in Texas. ...


Previous professional sports franchises in Waco have proven unsuccessful. The Waco Marshals of the National Indoor Football League lasted less than two months amidst a midseason ownership change in 2004. (The team became the beleaguered Cincinnati Marshals the following year.) The Waco Wizards of the now-defunct Western Professional Hockey League fared better, lasting into a fourth season before folding in 2000. Both teams played at the Heart O' Texas Coliseum, one of Waco's largest entertainment and sports venues. National Indoor Football League is a minor league indoor football league that is based in the United States. ... City [[Cincinnati, Ohio]] Team colors {{{colors}}} Head Coach {{{coach}}} Owner(s) {{{owner}}} General manager {{{general manager}}} Local radio Announcer(s): {{{announcers}}} League/Conference affiliations National Indoor Football League ({{{NIFL_start_yr}}}-present) {{{division_hist}}} Team history Cincinnati Marshals ({{{hist_yr}}}-present) League titles League Championships (0) Conference Championships (0) Division Championships (0) Home fields... The Western Professional Hockey League (abbreviated WPHL) was a minor league in ice hockey in the United States from 1996 to 2001, with teams in the Southern United States, mainly Texas. ... The Heart O Texas Coliseum is a 9,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Waco, Texas. ...


Professional baseball first came to Waco in 1889 with the formation of the Waco Tigers, a member of the Texas League. The Tigers were renamed in 1905 to the Navigators, and later to the Steers. In 1920, the team was sold to Wichita Falls. In 1923, a new franchise called the Indians was formed in Waco and was a member of the Class D Texas Association. In 1925, Waco rejoined the Texas League with the formation of the Waco Cubs. The Texas League is a minor league baseball league which operates in the South Central United States. ... Wichita Falls is a city in Wichita County, Texas, United States. ...


On June 20, 1930, the first night game in Texas League history was played at Katy Park in Waco. The lights were generously donated by Waco resident, Charles Redding Turner who owned a local farm team for recruits to the Chicago Cubs. is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the night of August 6, 1930, baseball history was made at Katy Park: in the eighth inning of a night game against Beaumont, Waco left fielder Gene Rye became the only player in the history of professional baseball to hit three home runs in one inning. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


1930 was the last year that Waco had a team in the Texas League, but Waco fielded some strong semi-pro teams in the 1930s and early 1940s. During the World War II years of 1943-45, the powerful Waco Army Air Field team was probably the best in the state; many major leaguers played for the team, and it was managed by big league catcher Birdie Tebbetts. George Robert Birdie Tebbetts (November 10, 1912 - March 24, 1999) was born in Burlington, Vermont, and was raised in Nashua, New Hampshire. ...


In 1947, the Class B Big State League was organized with Waco as a member called The Waco Dons.


In 1948, A.H. Kirksey, owner of Katy Park, persuaded the Pittsburgh Pirates Professional club to take over the Waco operation and the nickname was changed to Pirates. The Pirates vaulted into third place in 1948. They dropped a notch to fourth in 1949, but prevailed in the playoffs to win the league championship. The Pirates then tumbled into the second division, bottoming out with a dreadful 29-118, 0.197 club in 1952. This mark ranks as one of the 10 worst marks of any 20th century full-season team. When the tornado struck in 1953, it destroyed the park. The team relocated to Longview to finish the season and finished a respectable third with a 77-68 record. This article is about the baseball team. ... Longview refers to several things: Longview is a city in Gregg County, Texas. ...


People with Waco ties

See also: List of Baylor University people

The following is a list of people associated with Baylor University. ...

Sports

William Lance Berkman (born February 10, 1976 in Waco, Texas) is a Major League Baseball player for the Houston Astros. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... Kwame Cavil (born March 5, 1979 in Waco, Texas) is a Canadian Football League wide receiver for the Edmonton Eskimos. ... CFL redirects here. ... The wide receiver (WR) position in American and Canadian football is the pass-catching specialist. ... The Edmonton Eskimos are a Canadian Football League team based in Edmonton, Alberta. ... Zachary Thomas (Zach) Duke (born April 19, 1983 in Clifton, Texas) is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who currently plays for the Pittsburgh Pirates. ... Midway High School is the only high school in Midway Independent School District of the Waco, Texas area. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article is about the baseball team. ... // Dave Eichelberger (born September 3, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an American professional golfer who has won several tournaments at both the PGA Tour and Champions Tour levels. ... In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The Champions Tour, a golf tour run by the PGA TOUR, hosts 30 events annually in the United States and Canada for golfers 50 and older. ... Casey Paul Fossum (born January 6, 1978 in Cherry Hill, New Jersey) is a pitcher in Major League Baseball who plays with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays since 2005. ... Midway High School is the only high school in Midway Independent School District of the Waco, Texas area. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Melton Andrew Andy Hawkins (born January 21, 1960 in Waco, Texas) is a former major-league pitcher. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... A baseball pitcher delivers the ball to home plate In baseball, pitching is the act of throwing the baseball from the pitchers mound toward the catcher with the goal of retiring a batter who attempts to make contact with it, or draw a walk. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... Sherrill Headrick (born 1937) was an American college and professional football player from Texas Christian University. ... The American Football League (AFL) was a professional football league that operated from 1960 until 1969, when all of its teams were absorbed into the National Football League (NFL). ... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and yellow Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and yellow Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... NFL redirects here. ... Chargers redirects here. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Southwest Conference (SWC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ... Derrick OHara Johnson (born November 11, 1982 in Waco, Texas) is an American football linebacker drafted fifteenth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. ... City Kansas City, Missouri Team colors Red, white and yellow Head Coach Herman Edwards Owner The Hunt Family (Clark Hunt, chairman)[1] General manager Carl Peterson Mascot K.C. Wolf (1989-present) Warpaint (1963-1988) League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League... The Bronko Nagurski Trophy has been awarded annually since 1993 to the best all-around defensive college football player. ... The Dick Butkus Award, instituted in 1985, is given annually to the top linebacker in college football. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities, and six are health institutions. ... Hallsburg is a city located in McLennan County, Texas. ... Michael Duane Johnson (born September 13, 1967) is a retired American sprinter who holds world records in the 200 meters, 400 meters and 4 x 400 m relay. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Sprints are short running races in athletics. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... Dominic Dondrell Rhodes (born January 17, 1979 in Waco, Texas) is an American football running back who plays for the Oakland Raiders. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... City Oakland, California Other nicknames The Silver and Black Team colors Silver and Black Head Coach Lane Kiffin Owner Al Davis General manager Al Davis League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–1969) Western Division (1960–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC West (1970... Bill Rogers (b. ... “British Open” redirects here. ... LaDainian Tomlinson (born June 23, 1979) is an American football player who currently plays running back for the San Diego Chargers of the National Football League. ... NFL redirects here. ... Chargers redirects here. ... Rosebud is a city located in Falls County, Texas. ... University High School is located on Bagby Avenue in Waco, Texas. ... William Lance Berkman (born February 10, 1976 in Waco, Texas) is a Major League Baseball player for the Houston Astros. ... Melton Andrew Andy Hawkins (born January 21, 1960 in Waco, Texas) is a former major-league pitcher. ... Rudy Karl Law (born October 7, 1956 in Waco, Texas), is a former professional baseball player who played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1978-1986. ... Arthur Lee Rhodes (born October 24, 1969 in Waco, Texas) is a left-handed relief pitcher for the Seattle Mariners. ... Lynwood Thomas Schoolboy Rowe (January 11, 1910 _ January 8, 1961) was an American right_handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, primarily for the Detroit Tigers, during the 1930s and 1940s. ...

Movies

Shannon Elizabeth (born September 7, 1973) is an American actress, poker player, and former fashion model. ... American Pie is a 1999 film, the first by director Paul Weitz, written by Adam Herz. ... Houston redirects here. ... Peri Gilpin (born Periwinkle Kay OBrien on May 27, 1961, in Waco, Texas) is an American actress best known for the role of Roz Doyle on the successful U.S. television series Frasier, for which she won a Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble in a Comedy Series. ... Roz Kaveney, a British writer and editor Roz Weston, a Canadian entertainment reporter Roz Doyle, a Frasier character Roz Chast, an American cartoonist Roz Forrester, a fictional character from the Virgin New Adventures Roz Hammond, Rosalind Hammond, often credited as Ros or Roz, an Australian comic actress and writer. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Dallas redirects here. ... This article is about the author Thomas Harris. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... For other uses, see Steve Martin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an Assyrian American film director. ... The Thin Red Line is an Academy Award nominated 1998 film which tells the story of United States forces during the Battle of Guadalcanal in World War II. It marked director Terrence Malicks return to filmmaking after a twenty year absence. ... Kevin Reynolds refers to: Kevin Reynolds (director) Kevin Reynolds (figure skater) Category: ... Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves was a 1991 film directed by Kevin Reynolds. ... The Count of Monte Cristo is a 2002 film based upon the book The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Where the Heart Is was a soap opera which aired on CBS from September 8, 1969 to March 23, 1973. ... Natalie Portman (‎; born June 9, 1981) is a Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated Israeli-American actress. ... Ashley Judd (born April 19, 1968) is an American actress. ... Stockard Channing press kit photo Stockard Channing (born Susan Antonia Williams Stockard on February 13, 1944) is an American actress. ... Mary Louise Cecilia Texas Guinan (January 12, 1884 – November 5, 1933) was a saloon keeper, actress, and entrepreneur. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... A Speakeasy was an establishment that was used for selling and drinking of alcoholic beverages during the period of U.S. history known as Prohibition, when selling or buying alcohol was illegal. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Jules Bledsoe (1903–1943), baritone, was an renowned opera singer and the first African American artist to gain regular employment in Broadway. ... For films based on the musical, see Show Boat (film). ... Florenz Ziegfeld (March 21, 1869 - July 22, 1932) was a Broadway impresario who achieved fame by perfecting the United States revue. ... Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, fellow traveler, Spingarn Medal winner, and Stalin Peace Prize laureate. ... Jules Bledsoe (1903–1943), baritone, was an renowned opera singer and the first African American artist to gain regular employment in Broadway. ... Ol Man River (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II) is a song in the 1927 musical Show Boat that tells the story of African American hardship and struggles of the time. ...

Music

David Crowder Band is a 6-piece electronic rock and Worship band from Waco, Texas. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ITunes. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Roy Hargrove, born in 1969 in Waco, Texas, has gone from a child prodigy to become an established young jazz trumpeter, with several albums as a leader under his belt. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... A trumpeter may be one of several things: A trumpeter is a musician who plays the trumpet. ... For other uses, see Hi5. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... Willie Nelson (born Willie Hugh Nelson, April 30, 1933) is an American entertainer and songwriter, born and raised in Abbott, Texas. ... Abbott is a city located in Texas. ... Ashlee Nicole jane smith Simpson (born October 3, 1984) is an American pop rock singer, songwriter, and actress. ... Hank Thompson (born September 3, 1925) is a country music entertainer whose career has spanned six decades and who has sold over 60 million records worldwide. ... country music, see Country music (disambiguation) Country music, the first half of Billboards country and western music category, is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ... Billy Joe Shaver (He was born August 16, 1939 in Corsicana, Texas) is an American country music singer and songwriter. ... Fisher A. (Aubrey) Tull (b. ...

Politics

Albert Parsons, ca. ... Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski on the cover of Time magazine. ... For the 1947 Soviet film about the trials, see Nuremberg Trials (film). ... A special prosecutor is a lawyer from outside the government appointed by the attorney general or Congress to investigate a federal official for misconduct while in office. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994) was the thirty-sixth (1953–1961) Vice President, and the thirty-seventh (1969–1974) President of the United States. ... Watergate redirects here. ... This article is about the American politician/teacher, for the Australian-American actress, see Ann Richards (actress). ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... The 1988 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at The Omni in Atlanta, Georgia from July 18–21, 1988 to select a candidate for the 1988 United States presidential election. ... Lacy-Lakeview is a city located in McLennan County, Texas. ...

Other

Thomas Berry Brazelton (born May 10, 1918) is a noted pediatrician and author in the United States. ... Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics or pædiatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants and children. ... The Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS) was developed in 1973 by Dr. T. Berry Brazelton and his colleagues. ... Heloise (born Kiah Michelle Cruse on April 15, 1951 in Waco, Texas, current name Poncé Kiah Marchelle Heloise Cruse Evans) is an American writer, author, speaker, specializing in lifestyle hints, including consumer issues, pets, travel, food, home improvement, and health. ... Glenn McGee, Ph. ... Bioethics is the ethics of biological science and medicine. ... Doris Dorie Miller (October 12, 1919 – November 24, 1943) was an African American cook in the United States Navy and a hero during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... USN redirects here. ... This article is about the actual attack. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... USN redirects here. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... Cuba Gooding Jr. ... Pearl Harbor is an Oscar-winning war film released in the summer of 2001 by Touchstone Pictures. ... Charles Wright Mills (August 28, 1916, Waco, Texas – March 20, 1962, West Nyack, New York) was an American sociologist. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Robert Wilson (born 4 October 1941) is an internationally acclaimed American avant-garde stage director and playwright who has been called [America]s — or even the worlds — foremost vanguard theater artist [1]. Over the course of his wide-ranging career, he has also worked as a choreographer, performer, painter... David Koresh (August 17, 1959 – April 19, 1993), (born Vernon Wayne Howell), was the leader of the Branch Davidians religious sect, believing himself to be the final prophet, until a 1993 raid by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and subsequent siege by the FBI ended... The Branch Davidians are a religious group originating from the Seventh_day Adventist church. ... Combatants ATF, FBI, U.S. Army Branch Davidians Commanders Assault: Phil Chojnacki Siege: Many David Koresh† Strength Assault: 75 ATF agents Siege: Hundreds of federal agents and soldiers 50+ men, 75+ women and children Casualties 4 dead, 21 wounded in assault 6 dead and 3+ wounded in assault, 79 dead...

See also

Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... The Waco Tribune-Herald is an American daily newspaper serving Waco, Texas and vicinity. ...

References

  1. ^ www.census.gov/popest/cities/tables/SUB-EST2005-04-48.xls.
  2. ^ www.census.gov/population/www/estimates/metro_general/2006/CBSA-EST2006-01.xls.
  3. ^ www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/MM/fmc89.html.
  4. ^ www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/DD/fde3.html.
  5. ^ www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/EE/fer1.html.
  6. ^ Davis, Joe Tom (1989), Legendary Texians, Vol. 4, Austin, Texas: Eakin Press, p. 151, ISBN 0890156697
  7. ^ 64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:UojdMaz2cW4J:www.texasmonthly.com/preview/1999-12-01/education+Texas+Education+Agency+revoke+charter&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=7.

Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ...

External links

Texas Portal

Coordinates: 31.551516° N 97.15593° W Image File history File links This image, including all photography and graphics used in it, was taken and created by myself, Shem Daimwood. ... The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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