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Encyclopedia > WFAN
WFAN
City of license New York City
Broadcast area New York City area
Branding Sports Radio 66
The Fan
Slogan Your Flagship Station For New York Sports
First air date March 2, 1922 (as WEAF)
Frequency 660 kHz AM (Also on HD Radio)
Format Commercial; Sports
Power 50,000 watts
Class A
Callsign meaning the word fan
Former callsigns WEAF (1922-1946)
WNBC (1946-1954 and 1960-1988)
WRCA (1954-1960)
Owner CBS Radio
Sister stations WCBS, WCBS-FM, WINS, WWFS, WXRK
Webcast Listen Live!
Website wfan.com

WFAN (660 kHz), often referred to as "Sports Radio 66" or "The FAN", is a radio station in New York City. The station broadcasts on a clear channel and is owned by CBS Radio.[1] Its studios are located within the Kaufman-Astoria Studios complex in the Astoria section of Queens, New York, and the transmitter is located on High Island in the Bronx, New York. WFAN may refer to: Women, Food & Agriculture Network WFAN, a sports radio station in New York. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... In the United States (and potentially elswhere), each radio station or TV station is assigned a city of license by the Federal Communications Commission that they must serve. While this has become far less meaningful over the decades, stations are still required to post their public file somewhere within the... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The New York metropolitan area is the most populous in the United States and the fourth most populous in the world (after Tokyo, Seoul, and Mexico City). ... Look up slogan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Frequency (disambiguation). ... A kilohertz (kHz) is a unit of frequency equal to 1,000 hertz (1,000 cycles per second). ... Mediumwave radio transmissions (sometimes called Medium frequency or MF) are those between the frequencies of 300 kHz and 3000 kHz. ... HD Radio is an in-band on-channel (IBOC) digital radio system created by iBiquity for broadcasting via existing FM and AM radio stations. ... A radio format or programming format describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station. ... Commercial Radio Hong Kong is one of the two commercial radio broadcasting company in Hong Kong (the other being Metro Radio). ... Nominal power is a measurement of a mediumwave radio stations output used in the United States. ... For other uses, see Watt (disambiguation). ... This is a list of broadcast station classes applicable in much of North America under international agreements between the United States, Canada and Mexico. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... CBS Radio Inc. ... In broadcasting, sister stations are broadcast stations owned by the same company. ... WCBS (880 kHz. ... WCBS-FM (101. ... WINS (1010 kHz. ... WWFS is a New York City FM radio station operating at 102. ... WXRK (92. ... A webcast is a live media file distributed over the Internet using streaming media technology. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A clear channel, in the general sense, is a communications channel (such as a radio frequency) on which only one transmitter operates at a time. ... CBS Radio Inc. ... The Kaufman Astoria Studios are in Queens, New York, and home to productions like Sesame Street. ... Astoria, New York is a neighborhood in the northwestern part of Queens, New York. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... High Island is a small private island next to City Island. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ...


WFAN pioneered, and has been one of the most successful examples of, the sports radio format. Over the years, WFAN has been the broadcast home to several big names in the world of radio, including the sports-talk team of Mike and the Mad Dog (Mike Francesa and Christopher "Mad Dog" Russo) and the comedian/shock jock/political commentator Don Imus, whose Imus in the Morning program was nationally syndicated. // Sports radio (or sports talk radio) is a radio format devoted entirely to discussion and broadcasting of sporting events. ... A radio format or programming format describes the overall content broadcast on a radio station. ... Mike and the Mad Dog is an afternoon drive sports radio program on WFAN in New York City. ... Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... For the Apprentice 2 candidate Chris Russo, see The Apprentice 2 candidates. ... John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ... Imus in the Morning was a comedy, news, and political radio program the United States, hosted by radio personality Don Imus. ...


The 660 AM frequency in New York had a long history as WNBC prior to this format, which was the flagship station of the historic NBC Radio Network, and later was a local station with a tumultuous programming history. This article is about the television network. ...

Contents

NBC network radio

In 1922 AT&T Western Electric began broadcasting as WEAF (supposedly the call letters stood for Western Electric AT&T Fone), although another meaning was given as Water, Earth, Air, and Fire (the 4 classical elements).[2] Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the current AT&T. For the 1885-2005 company, see American Telephone & Telegraph. ... Company Masthead Logo Logo until circa 1969, also current logo on company web site Logo 1969-1983 Western Electric (sometimes abbreviated WE and WECo) was an American electrical engineering company, the manufacturing arm of AT&T from 1881 to 1995. ...


Another story is that the licensee didn't like the originally assigned call letters, WDAM, and the FCC assigned the next available callsign in alphabetical order.


In 1922, WEAF ran the first radio advertisement which promoted an apartment development in Jackson Heights near a new elevated train line, (the IRT's Flushing-Corona line, now the number 7 line).[3] The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the operator of the original New York Subway line that opened in 1904 and additional rapid transit lines in the City of New York. ... Services that use the IRT Flushing Line through midtown have been colored purple since 1979. ... Main Street to Times Square An R36 7 local northbound at 33rd Street–Rawson Street. ...


It was acquired in 1926 by NBC as the flagship station of the NBC Radio Network (later the NBC Red Network), and moved to 660 kHz in 1928. The station's call letters were changed to WNBC in 1946, then to WRCA in 1954, and back to WNBC in 1960. This article is about the television network. ... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... This article is about the television network. ... In radio (including television), a callsign or call sign (also call letters) is a unique designation for amateur, broadcast, and sometimes military radio use, as well as for broadcast television. ...


See NBC Radio Network for network programming during this time. This article is about the television network. ...


WNBC local programming

Main article: WNBC (AM)

Sportsradio 66 WFAN AM 660 kHz, often reffered to as The FAN is a radio station in the city of New York. ...

1960s

By the early 1960s the station switched from NBC network programs to more local-oriented programs. In 1964 they adopted a talk format, the first in New York radio. Hosts included genial morning-drive companion Big Wilson, Tonight Show announcer Ed McMahon, New York-based actor Robert Alda, NBC Radio comedian/satirist Mort Sahl, the witty mid-morning game-show host ("Fortune Phone") Sterling Yates, late-morning talk radio provocateur Joe Pyne, midday voices Lee Leonard and later Jim Gearhart, sports talk host Bill Mazer, plus late-nighters Brad Crandall (later of NFL Films) and Long John Nebel. For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... The First Lady of the United States, Laura Bush and current host Jay Leno. ... Edward Ed Peter Leo McMahon, Jr. ... Robert Alda (February 26, 1914 – May 3, 1986) born Alfonso Giuseppe Giovanni Roberto DAbruzzo, was an American actor. ... Time Magazine, August 15, 1960 Morton Lyon Sahl (born May 11, 1927) is a Montreal-born actor/comedian/humorist credited with pioneering a style of stand-up comedy that paved the way for Lenny Bruce, Nichols & May, Dick Gregory, and others less famous. ... Joe Pyne (December 22, 1925- March 23, 1970) was a radio and television talk show host, who pioneered the confrontational style of hosting in which the host advocates a viewpoint and argues with guests and audience members. ... Lee Leonard (born in New York City on April 3, 1929) is an American television personality who was involved in the launch of two of the most influential networks in TV history. ... Bill Mazer is a TV/radio personality. ... NFL Films is a Mount Laurel, New Jersey-based company devoted to producing commercials, television programs, feature films, and documentaries on the National Football League, as well as other unrelated major events and awards shows. ... Long John Nebel (born John Zimmerman) (June 11, 1911 – April 10, 1978) was an influential New York City talk radio show host. ...


On weekends, WNBC aired almost all of the NBC Radio Network's Monitor program, which featured many of WNBC's own hosts as well as the already established lineup holding court at NBC's Radio Central (Gene Rayburn, Henry Morgan, Bill Cullen, David Wayne, Kitty Carlisle and Wayne Howell). Monitor host Dave Garroway NBC Monitor was a weekend radio program broadcast from June 12, 1955 to January 26, 1975. ... Gene Rayburn (December 22, 1917 – November 29, 1999) was an Emmy-nominated American radio and television personality. ... Sir Henry Morgan (Hari Morgan in Welsh), (ca. ... William Bill Lawrence Frances Cullen (February 18, 1920 – July 7, 1990), was an Emmy Award-winning American radio and television personality. ... Kitty Carlisle in Die Fledermaus, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Kitty Carlisle Hart (b. ... Wayne Howell (died July 8, 1993) was a voice-over announcer for the NBC television network from the 1950s through the 1980s. ...


Later in the decade WNBC shed its "Conversation Station" format and readopted a middle-of-the-road (MOR) music format, covering songs from the 1940s to the 1960s with non-rock and soft rock hits recorded after 1955. The format would feature such artists as Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Nat "King" Cole, the Everly Brothers, Tom Jones, the Fifth Dimension, Peggy Lee, and Dionne Warwick. Hosts during this transition back to music included Wilson, Jack Spector (formerly of WMCA), Jack Hayes, Charlie Brown and later Ted Brown, hired away from then-dominant standards/MOR station WNEW. Well-known MOR host and vocalist Jim Lowe joined WNBC for a time during one of his many shuttles to and from WNEW. By 1971, music from such acts as Sinatra and Cole would disappear, separating WNBC from its WNEW-like beginnings. Middle of the Road was a Scottish pop group who enjoyed great success across Europe in the early 1970s. ... “Sinatra” redirects here. ... “Elvis” redirects here. ... Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole (March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965) was a popular American singer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... Phil (left) and Don in 1962 The Everly Brothers, (Don Everly, born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937, Brownie, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Phil Everly, born Phillip Everly, January 19, 1939, Chicago, Illinois) are male siblings who were top-selling country-influenced rock and roll performers, best known for their steel... For other uses, see Tom Jones (disambiguation). ... The Fifth Dimension The Fifth Dimension (also known as The 5th Dimension) is an American popular music vocal group, whose repertoire also includes R&B, soul, and jazz. ... Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. ... Marie Dionne Warrick (born December 12, 1940), known professionally as Dionne Warwick, is an acclaimed five-time Grammy Award-winning African American singer best known for her work with Hal David and Burt Bacharach as songwriters and producers. ... WMCA, 570 AM, is a radio station in New York City, most known for its Good Guys Top 40 era in the 1960s. ... WBBR is a radio station, broadcasting at 1130 AM in New York City. ... Jim Lowe (born 1927), a native of Springfield, Missouri, USA and graduate of the University of Missouri, sang The Green Door, the number-one hit song of 1956 in the United States. ...


1970s

Don Imus was hired in December 1971, giving New York its first exposure to the shock jock genre. Imus stayed with the station for most of the next two decades, except for a couple of years in the late 1970s when there was a general purge of the air staff. John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ... A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ...


Despite somewhat different formats, WNBC saw itself as a mostly unsuccessful competitor to New York Top 40 powerhouse WABC. Thus they brought in Murray "the K" Kaufman in 1972, and Wolfman Jack opposite WABC's Bruce "Cousin Brucie" Morrow in 1973. This did not improve ratings much. Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... WABC (770 kHz), known as NewsTalkRadio 77, is a radio station in New York City. ... Murray Kaufman (February 14, 1922 – February 21, 1982) professionally known as Murray the K, was a famous and influential rock and roll impresario and disc jockey of the 1950s, 60s and 70s. ... Robert Weston (Bob) Smith (21 January 1938 – 1 July 1995) became world famous in the 1960s and 1970s as a disc jockey using the stage name of Wolfman Jack. ... Bruce Morrow (born Bruce Meyerowitz on October 13, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American radio personality, known to generations of New York metropolitan area listeners as Cousin Brucie. ...


By 1973, WNBC was an Adult Contemporary radio station featuring the Carpenters, Carole King, the Stylistics, Neil Diamond, James Taylor, and other artists of that era. They also began to play more 1960s-era rock and roll oldies at that point. Adult contemporary music, frequently abbreciated to just AC, is a type of radio format that plays mainstream and pop music, without hip-hop or rap since, as per the name, it is geared more towards adults than teens. ... For other uses, see Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Carole King (born February 9, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... The Stylistics was one of the best-known Philadelphia soul groups of the 1970s. ... Neil Leslie Diamond (born January 24, 1941) is an American singer, songwriter and sometime Actor. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ...


Ted Brown would leave in the early 1970s and return to WNEW. In 1974, WNBC hired Bruce Morrow away from WABC. Norm N. Nite arrived from WCBS-FM in 1975, as did Joe McCoy in 1976. The ratings were still mediocre. Ted Brown (b. ... Norm N. Nite was born in 1941, and is the author of the Rock On! series of books. ... WCBS-FM (101. ... Joe McCoy (born May 11, 1905 – died January 28, 1950) was an African American blues musician. ...


By 1975, WNBC was playing an Adult Top 40 format and competing with WXLO. They featured hits from 1964 to what was then current product. Unfortunately, most of the playlist decisions were mediocre at best. WRKS-FM (98. ...


In 1977, Bob Pittman was hired as WNBC's new Program Director. His first decision was to lay-off most of the station's veteran personalities (including Don Imus, Cousin Brucie, Norm N. Nite and Joe McCoy), replacing them with younger-sounding disc jockeys. He also shifted the format to mainstream Top 40, with occasional nods to FM radio (such as commercial-free hours). As a result of this tweaking, the station was now playing artists such as Andy Gibb, KC & the Sunshine Band, Boston, Peter Frampton, Fleetwood Mac, the Eagles, Billy Joel, the Bee Gees, and others. However, listenership did not go up substantially, and while some of the new air personalities would find success (Johnny Dark, Frank Reed, and Allen Beebe would be heard on the station well into the 1980s), others would not (Ellie Dylan, who replaced Imus in morning drive, would be gone within months), and by mid-1979 Pittman would leave WNBC (he would soon become the founder of MTV) and Don Imus returned from a brief stint in Cleveland to host the morning show. WNBC's playlist was tweaked back to an Adult top 40 format, though ratings continued to be mediocre. Andrew Roy Gibb (March 5, 1958 – March 10, 1988) was an English-born Australian singer and teen idol, and the younger brother of Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, also known as the Bee Gees. ... KC and the Sunshine Band is an American musical group. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... This article is about the band. ... “The Eagles” redirects here. ... William Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... The Bee Gees were a singing trio of brothers — Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb — that became one of the most successful musical acts of all time. ... Johnny Dark is an American comic with many past appearances on television, nowadays appearing on CBS’ Late Show with David Letterman, doing a comic spot as the oldest page at CBS (serving an extraordinary 39 years when a normal pages career lasts not much longer than a year or... Frank Reed is the current lead singer of the singing group known as the Chi-Lites. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


1980s

In 1981 WABC added evening talk and evolved musically to adult contemporary. WNBC followed suit with the music (but did not add evening talk), moving to a similar AC format to sister station WYNY. WNBC adopted as its slogan "The Next One", meaning that it would be the number-one ranked station in New York City. As part of that slogan, the commercials would say "We're #2". When an Arbitron report was released that WNBC believed confirmed that it was in fact the most popular radio station in New York City, the slogan was changed to "The New One". Once WABC moved to all talk, WNBC added a few rock songs that were not heard on any AC stations in the area. By summer 1982, WNBC was near the top with some of their best ratings ever. WQHT, also known as Hot 97, is a New York City-based radio station at 97. ... Arbitron is a radio audience research company in the United States. ...


In fall 1982 to much fanfare, Howard Stern was brought in from WWDC-FM in Washington, D.C., to do afternoon drive. Initially Stern played music (about 10 to 12 songs an hour), much to his dismay, though his ratings were high. Then, in 1983 with ABC-owned WPLJ evolving to a Contemporary Hit Radio (CHR) format, as well as WHTZ's debut with the same format, WNBC began to lose some listeners. In 1984 Stern cut down to four songs an hour and began to talk much more. That fall former children's television show host Soupy Sales started a talk-intensive program in middays. This article is a biography of Howard Stern as an individual; for information regarding his radio show see The Howard Stern Show. ... WWDC-FM is a radio station which broadcasts in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... WPLJ (95. ... WHTZ, also known as Z100, is a radio station that serves New York City and the neighboring Northern New Jersey region, broadcasting on the FM band at a frequency of 100. ... Soupy Sales (born Milton Supman on January 8, 1926) is an American comedian and actor. ...


Throughout his three years at WNBC, Stern had continuous battles with station management and other jocks at the station, specifically Don Imus. Much of these conflicts were dramatized in Stern's autobiographical book and film Private Parts which included an amusing scene where he is instructed by program director Kevin Metheny (referred to in the film as "Kenny" or "Pig Vomit", and played by Paul Giamatti) on the preferred "W-ehhNNN-B-C" pronunciation of the station's call letters. Private Parts, a 1997 movie about Howard Stern. ... Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ...


By early 1985, WNBC had evolved to more of a full service AC station, with music as a background and personality as the foreground. On weekends they became oldies-based, emphasizing 1960s oldies while still playing current product in moderation; they were basically out of the Top 40/CHR realm by then. Their younger audience base had already gone to WHTZ or WPLJ, but with Stern in afternoons and Imus in the morning they continued to do reasonably well. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Top 40 (radio format). ...


On September 30, 1985, Howard Stern was terminated abruptly after a series of outrageous bits and listener complaints. In Private Parts, Stern detailed how WNBC management expected that his last day would be September 26, and that Stern would not go in to work on September 27 due to Hurricane Gloria. However, Stern went in, and because there was no station management on hand, Stern did his show as normal. is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 1985; for other storms of the same name, see Tropical Storm Gloria (disambiguation). ...

The final WNBC logo, used from 1986 to 1988.

After Stern's dismissal, ratings plummeted and they were under a two-share by 1986. Initially they played a bit more music and then went through several afternoon shows like Joey Reynolds, Bill Grundfest, and Alan Colmes. Soupy Sales then left. With radiocasts of the New York Knicks and New York Rangers already on the schedule, WNBC added sports talk in the evenings, as well as bringing back Wolfman Jack on overnights on a syndicated show before his untimely death. But despite these changes, by the fall of 1986 WNBC was in a ratings crisis. Image File history File links Wnbc. ... Image File history File links Wnbc. ... Joey Reynolds is the pseudonym for Joey Pinto, the host of the national radio program, The Joey Reynolds Show via the WOR Radio Network. ... Alan B. Colmes (b. ... Soupy Sales (born Milton Supman on January 8, 1926) is an American comedian and actor. ... “Knicks” redirects here. ... The New York Rangers are a professional ice hockey team based in New York, New York, U.S.A. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). ...


On the afternoon of October 22, 1986, the station's "N-Copter" traffic helicopter crashed into the Hudson River killing traffic reporter Jane Dornacker and severely injuring pilot Bill Pate. As millions of WNBC listeners heard Dornacker giving her traffic report she suddenly paused, a grinding noise could be heard in the background and Dornacker screaming in terror "Hit the water! Hit the water! Hit the water!", then the radio transmission was cut off and a very shaken radio host Joey Reynolds awkwardly tried to figure out what had happened by saying "Okay, we're going to play some, uh, some music here, I think." Dornacker had recently gotten back to flying in a helicopter after surviving a previous crash of the N-Copter into the Hackensack River in New Jersey a few months earlier. An episode of NBC's television show Third Watch featured a similar incident (although it may have been more of a reference to the crash of WNBC-TV's helicopter, which crashed into the Passaic River in New Jersey over a decade later, with no deaths). is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... Jane Dornacker (October 1, 1947 - October 22, 1986) was an American rock musician, actress, and comedian turned traffic reporter for WNBC 66 AM (which became WFAN 66 in 1987 ). She was married to Bob Knickerbocker. ... In communications, transmission is the act of transmitting electrical messages (and the associated phenonomena of radiant energy that pass through media). ... Joey Reynolds is the pseudonym for Joey Pinto, the host of the national radio program, The Joey Reynolds Show via the WOR Radio Network. ... The Hackensack River, as seen from the New Jersey Turnpike. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Third Watch is an NBC television drama set in New York City that ran from 1999 to 2005. ... WNBC-TV, NBC4 is the flagship TV station of the NBC television network, with studios located in Rockefeller Center in Manhattan. ... The Great Falls of the Passaic River in Paterson, New Jersey The Passaic River is a tributary of Newark Bay, approximately 80 mi (129 km long), in northern New Jersey in the United States. ...


In the summer of 1987, WNBC modified their format, keeping Imus in the morning playing a few AC cuts and a couple oldies an hour with his usual talk. Ray D'Ariano (Soupy Sales' former cohost) played oldies during middays, and Alan Colmes hosted an afternoon drive talk show. In evenings, Dave Sims held court with sports talk along with Knicks/Rangers games. Big Jay Sorensen hosted overnights with The Time Machine, an oldies (1955-74) show complete with old jingles and an echo effect, resulting in a sound similar to WABC's during its Top 40 heyday. The Time Machine was also heard on weekends with hosts Dan Taylor, The Real Bob James, Jim Collins, Dale Parsons and others. Dave Sims is an American sportscaster. ... This article is about audio effect. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The beginning of WFAN and the end of WNBC: 1987-1988

On July 1, 1987, Emmis Communications-owned WFAN signed on at 1050 kHz, replacing country music station WHN, and billing itself as the world's first 24-hour-per-day sports talk station. The first voice heard on WFAN was that of Suzyn Waldman with a sports update at 3:00 p.m.[4], followed by the first show, which was hosted by Jim Lampley. Waldman would report for the station, covering the Yankees and Knicks, for 14 years. Other personalities that hosted shows besides Lampley in the 1050 kHz years included Bill Mazer, Pete Franklin, Greg Gumbel and Ed Coleman. WFAN also inherited broadcast rights to the defending World Series champion New York Mets from WHN, who had held the rights for several years. is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Emmis Communications is an Indianapolis, Indiana-based radio and television group. ... WHN was a radio station in New York City located at 1050 KHZ. It played country music from 1972 to 1987 when it switched to all-sports formatted WFAN. Today 1050 is New Yorks ESPN radio station. ... Suzyn Georgie Girl Waldman (born September 15, 1948 ) (age 58) in Newton, MA) is an American sports broadcaster. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bill Mazer is a TV/radio personality. ... Pete Franklin (1928 - November 23, 2004) (The King) was a U.S. sports radio talk show who worked in San Francisco, Cleveland and New York. ... Greg Gumbel (born May 3, 1946) is an American television sportscaster. ... Ed Coleman is a radio reporter/host for the New York Mets on WFAN. He also did some radio work for the 1988 and 1992 Summer Olympics, as well as the 1994 Winter Olympics. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league...


In early 1988 General Electric, which now owned NBC through its purchase of RCA two years earlier, announced that it would sell off the NBC Radio division. In February of that year GE made a multi-station deal with Emmis and, in New York, the WNBC license for 660 was included in the sale. On October 7, 1988 at 5:30 p.m., WFAN moved down the radio dial to replace WNBC at 660 kHz, which at 50 kilowatts (or 50,000 watts) has a much stronger signal. The last voice heard on WNBC was that of Alan Colmes, who counted down the seconds to WNBC's demise with the legendary NBC chimes (the notes G-E-C) playing in the background. After 66 years, the long history of NBC radio in New York had come to an end. “GE” redirects here. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan B. Colmes (b. ... The NBC chimes of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) radio network in the United States was/were the first ever audio trademark (and the first service mark of any kind, in as much as it denotes a non-tangible form of commerce) to be accepted by the U.S. Patent...


In the complicated switch that saw WFAN move to the 660 frequency, the 1050 frequency that was formerly the home of WFAN became that of Spanish-language WUKQ, owned by Spanish Broadcasting System. However, SBS already owned an AM station in the market, Newark-based WSKQ at 620 kHz, and in those days FCC rules stipulated that companies could own only one AM station per market. As a result, SBS received a temporary waiver to run 1050 while exploring the sale of either AM frequency. SBS chose to keep 620 (it is now WSNR), and 1050 was traded to Forward Communications, which owned WEVD, then at 97.9 FM. After that deal was approved, WEVD's call letters and programming moved to 1050 AM (it is now WEPN and ironically a sports station), and SBS took over 97.9 as WSKQ-FM. The October NBC-Emmis switch also saw Emmis's WQHT (then at 103.5 MHz.) move to 97.1 MHz., which had been the home of NBC's WYNY. Emmis sold the 103.5 frequency to Westwood One, who also acquired the WYNY call letters and its country music format. The Spanish Broadcasting System is one of the largest owners and operators of radio stations in the United States. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County County Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - City 67. ... FCC redirects here. ... WSNR, AM 620, is a radio station in the New York City area with an all-sports format. ... WEPN (1050 kHz), branded as 1050 ESPN Radio, is a 24-hour sports radio station in New York City featuring national and local sports talk programs and live broadcasts of sports matches. ... WSKQ-FM, known on-air as Mega 97. ... WQHT, more commonly known as Hot 97, is a high-profile Rhythmic Contemporary radio station in New York City under the corporate ownership of Emmis Communications. ... 103. ... Westwood One, Inc. ...


In all this, WFAN retired two of the oldest radio call letters from the dawn of commercial radio: WHN and WNBC.


WFAN

Early history

One of the keys to WFAN's early success on 660 was acquiring Don Imus to do the morning show. WFAN's original morning show on 1050 was hosted by Greg Gumbel. The show was a straight-forward sports show (not dis-similar to Mike and Mike in the Morning currently on ESPN Radio), but was not doing well in the ratings. At the time of the switch, sports talk radio was still an untested format with questionable prospects, and the idea of bringing on board a host that appealed to a broader audience would get more people to try the station out. WFAN also benefitted from the inertia from Imus's fans who were used to tuning in to 660 kHz on weekday mornings to listen. WFAN instantly took advantage of their Imus inheritance, for example, they featured a special live monologue by Imus character Billy Sol Hargus from Shea Stadium moments after taking over the 660 frequency. Greg Gumbel (born May 3, 1946) is an American television sportscaster. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... ESPN Radio is a national sports radio network based in the United States. ... William A. Shea Municipal Stadium, usually shortened to Shea Stadium, is an American baseball stadium in Flushing, New York. ...


It quickly became apparent that WFAN's gambit of bringing Imus on board worked. Ratings for the morning show were strong, and it was successful to a point in driving ratings for the rest of WFAN's programming day. This model of using a general-interest morning host for a sports talk radio station (especially at launch) has been used at other sports radio stations across the country.


WFAN was also the first station in the country to roll out sports updates every 20 minutes. These updates, called 20-20 Sports Flashes, are now considered an industry standard. When WFAN first started updates were done every 15 minutes. Additionally, in a nod to the former WNBC, update anchors often end their top-of-the-hour updates with the catchphrase "And that's what's happening...", which is how WNBC on-air news readers had ended their updates. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


Other programming that WFAN had at launch included a midmorning show with Ed Coleman and Mike Francesa, and a drive time show with Pete Franklin, who in Cleveland had become one of the first polarizing, outrageous talk show hosts. During his stay in New York, Franklin would probably become best known for an incident where he used a four-letter expletive on air, in error, when trying to say "All you folks" (he was not disciplined for the incident.) Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... Pete Franklin (1928 - November 23, 2004) (The King) was a U.S. sports radio talk show who worked in San Francisco, Cleveland and New York. ...


Running a close second was a 30-second Franklin diatribe on whether he had been offensive -- "Do I offend anyone? I'm not here to offend you, dammit!" -- that has been replayed ever since, especially on the July 1 WFAN anniversaries.) is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In a further drive to boost ratings, Imus instigated a feud with Franklin, much as he had with Howard Stern at WNBC in the mid-80's. Both Imus and Franklin would take shots at each other during their shows, Franklin calling Imus "Minus" and Imus recording parodies of radio commercials where he would bash Franklin as a "dinousaur", among other things.


Franklin would leave WFAN in August 1989. On September 5, 1989, a jointly hosted afternoon drive show with Francesa and Christopher "Mad Dog" Russo - who had been a weekend/fill-in host to that time - would premiere. The Mike and the Mad Dog show would become the defining show of WFAN, one of the most consistently popular radio shows in New York, and one of the most influential sports talk radio shows in the country. is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Apprentice 2 candidate Chris Russo, see The Apprentice 2 candidates. ... Mike and the Mad Dog is an afternoon drive sports radio program on WFAN in New York City. ...


Recent history

Over the years WFAN has continued to have a broad-based sports talk and play-by-play format. WFAN ratings gradually rose and in fact at some points it has been the top-billing station in New York and the country. In 1992 Emmis sold WFAN to Infinity Broadcasting, which would be purchased by Westinghouse Electric Corporation -- CBS' then-parent company -- in 1997. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation was an organization founded by George Westinghouse in 1886 as Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


WFAN's broadcast day begins at 5:00 a.m. (Eastern time) with an hour-long program hosted by Chris Carlin, then followed by Boomer and Carton, hosted by former NFL quarterback Boomer Esiason and Craig Carton. The 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. timeslot is co-hosted by Joe Benigno and Evan Roberts. The Mike and the Mad Dog show runs for five-and-a-half hours from 1:00 to 6:30 p.m.. The YES Network has been airing a video simulcast of Mike and the Mad Dog since March 19, 2002. Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... Chris Carlin born in Albany, New York May 13, 1973is an on-air personality for WFAN 660, an AM radio station in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Craig Carton is an American radio personality and shock jock who has worked on a variety of radio stations and talk formats. ... Joseph Benigno (born September 1953) is an American sports radio personality. ... Evan Roberts (born July 11, 1983) is an American sports radio personality. ... The Yankees Entertainment and Sports (YES) Network is a New York City regional cable TV channel dedicated to broadcasting baseball games of the New York Yankees, and basketball games of the New Jersey Nets. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


On Monday nights during the NFL season, Benigno and Tony Siragusa host a football show leading into the Monday Night Football broadcast at 8:00. Anthony Siragusa (born May 14, 1967 in Kenilworth, New Jersey) is a former American football defensive tackle who spent twelve seasons in the NFL with the Indianapolis Colts and the Baltimore Ravens. ...


Steve Somers hosts during most other evenings, often leading into and following live game broadcasts. Tony Paige works the majority of the overnight shifts, as he is on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday mornings, as well as on late Saturday nights. Another WFAN personality is longtime New York rock radio fixture Richard Neer. Adam Schein hosts various shows on weekends in addition to his work hosting NFL shows on Sirius Satellite Radio. Ed Randall hosts a radio version of the Talking Baseball show that aired on TV for many years. Steve Somers Steve Somers is an American radio host on the New York City sports radio station WFAN (660 AM). ... Tony Paige (born October 14, 1962 in Washington, D.C. is a former professional American football player who played running back for nine seasons for the New York Jets, Detroit Lions, and Miami Dolphins. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Sirius Satellite Radio NASDAQ: SIRI is one of two satellite radio (SDARS) services operating in the United States and Canada, along with XM Satellite Radio. ...


WFAN is the flagship station of Westwood One's NFL, NHL, Notre Dame college football, and NCAA basketball tournament radio broadcasts. NFL redirects here. ... “NHL” redirects here. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


WFAN stands out in that all of its sports-talk shows are currently local in origin, not syndicated as is the practice of most sports-talk radio stations (usually except during the morning and/or drive-time periods).


Over the years WFAN has established a tight bond with its listeners, to the point where one of them (Benigno) eventually landed a plum mid-morning show. Benigno was a frequent caller to "The Fan" (especially the Mike and the Mad Dog show) as "Joe from Saddle River". His calls were typically interesting and insightful. He was chosen to host a one-hour show during a promotion where listeners were invited to host a show. The show went well, and he parlayed this into a regular overnight show, which was parlayed into a mid-morning show.


WFAN also features the "20-20 Flash", a one to two minute update on sports scores and news, which occurs every 20 minutes (on the hour, twenty after and forty after). The update team consists of Rich Ackerman, Harris Allen, Mike McCann, Erica Herskowitz, Bob Heussler, Marc Malusis, John Minko, Jerry Recco, and Joe Tolleson. The station also employs beat reporters to cover the Mets (Ed Coleman), Yankees (Sweeny Murti), Jets (Kevin Burkhardt) and football Giants (Carlin). Bob Heussler (born Brooklyn, New York, currently resides in Hamden, Connecticut), is a radio sports broadcaster at WFAN in New York where he has made regular appearances on the Mike and the Mad Dog Show since 1993. ... John Minko is a 20/20 sports anchors on radio station WFAN in New York and has worked there since its inception in 1987. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Currently, WFAN has radio broadcasting rights for New York Mets baseball, New York Giants football, New Jersey Devils hockey, and New Jersey Nets basketball. WFAN is also a promotional partner of the New York Yankees, as fellow CBS-owned WCBS has been the team's flagship station since 2002. WFAN is given exclusive game-day rights to broadcast at the ballpark. The exclusive access seems to give WFAN an information edge over WEPN, which features Yankees television voice Michael Kay in drivetime. Kay is often forced to do his show from outside the stadium, and then leave to do the TV broadcast an hour before the game. Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The New Jersey Devils are a professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The New Jersey Nets are a professional basketball team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... This article is about the sport. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... WCBS (880 kHz. ... Michael Kay (born February 2, 1961) is the main play-by-play voice of the New York Yankees, host of Centerstage on the YES Network and the host of The Michael Kay Show on WEPN. // Kay began reporting as a youth at the Bronx High School of Science and then...


WFAN has marketed itself in recent years as the "Flagship Station for New York Sports", but its close partnerships with the Mets and Yankees could easily render it "New York's Baseball Station." Willie Randolph and Joe Torre, managers of the Mets and Yankees, respectively, make exclusive appearances on WFAN during the season. WFAN usually also contracts at least one Giants and one Jets player to make exclusive appearances on the station during the NFL season, as well as Giants head coach Tom Coughlin. Willie Larry Randolph (born July 6, 1954, in Holly Hill, South Carolina) is the current manager of the New York Mets and a former Major League Baseball player for the Pittsburgh Pirates, New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland Athletics, Milwaukee Brewers, and New York Mets. ... Joseph Paul Torre (born July 18, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is the manager of the New York Yankees. ... For information on the former Wal-Mart executive, see Tom Coughlin (Wal-Mart). ...


The station was also the longtime radio home for the New York Jets, New York Rangers and New York Knicks (the latter two were inherited from WNBC), as well as St. John's University basketball for several years. Currently WFAN's primary competition is WEPN, the New York ESPN Radio affiliate, ironically located at WFAN's old 1050 kHz frequency. WEPN carries many of the teams that WFAN previously did, plus national ESPN Radio programming, which WFAN also once carried. City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... St. ... ESPN Radio is a national sports radio network based in the United States. ...


Beginning at 3 p.m. on April 11, 2006, WFAN started streaming live on the Internet[5]. Live games are offered separately through the various league websites as annual subscriptions (except for the NHL, which currently does not charge for game audio). The stream can be found at wfan.com. is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Radiothon

Each spring beginning in 1990, WFAN has conducted the WFAN Radiothon to benefit children’s charities that seek to ensure the continuity of life in its earliest stages and the treatment and eventual elimination of childhood cancer. The three current beneficiaries of the radiothon are Tomorrows Children's Fund[6], the CJ Foundation for SIDS[7], and the Imus Ranch. As of 2005, the Radiothon has raised more than $30 million for the charities. The portions of the radiothon that aired during Imus and Mike and the Mad Dog were available on those shows' radio networks and television simulcasts. The Imus Ranch is a working cattle ranch of nearly 4,000 acres located in Ribera, New Mexico, 50 miles northeast of Santa Fe. ...


WFAN has also done other radiothons and special broadcasts to raise money for assorted charities.


Midday show controversy

The midday slot (generally from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.) has not been one of the better slots from a ratings perspective for WFAN. However, this slot's hosts have often found controversy.


In the early 1990s, popular hosts Ed Coleman and Dave Sims had their show cancelled. WFAN then announced that New York Daily News columnist Mike Lupica and WNBC-TV sports anchor Len Berman would co-host the new midday program. The show seemed all set to go when, at the last minute, Berman decided to back out of the show. He cited that he would have to work a near 14-hour day, combining his 10 a.m. start on radio with his 11:20 p.m. report on television. WFAN would not let Berman out of his contract, and as a result, the slot was split into two shows: Lupica hosted from 10 a.m. to noon, while Berman hosted from noon to 2 p.m.. The split format did not work, and eventually Berman's show would be cancelled and Lupica's show soon followed. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mike Lupica (born 1952) is an American newspaper columnist, best known for his provocative sports commentary in the New York Daily News and his appearances on ESPN. Lupica uses his sports column to constantly bash the business practices of the New York Yankees. ... Len Berman on WNBC in 2005. ...


WWOR-TV sports anchor Russ Salzberg, who also worked an evening sportscast, was more than willing to assume the midday show duties. In 1995, he would be joined by longtime overnight host Steve Somers. This show, billed as "The Sweater and the Schmoozer", would feature one of the most famous incidents in WFAN history. It occurred when Salzberg "banned" Eli from Westchester from calling his show due to his comments that Salzberg considered to be inappropriate. Salzberg's classic line to Somers, during another Atlanta Braves World Series appearance talking about Braves' manager Bobby Cox: "What about Cox, Steve? You like Cox...., don't you Steve?" WWOR-TV, channel 9, is a MyNetworkTV-affiliated television station licensed to Secaucus, New Jersey, and serving the New York City metropolitan area. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Robert Joseph Cox (born May 21, 1941 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA) is the current and longtime manager of the Atlanta Braves, and a former third baseman in Major League Baseball. ...


In 1999, with the ratings not being what WFAN management expected, the Salzberg/Somers show was cancelled. Initially Somers had been fired with Salzberg, but a large outcry from listeners -- including comedian Jerry Seinfeld, a native of Long Island -- led to WFAN management giving Somers the evening shift, which (despite frequent pre-emptions for live games) he continues to hold to the present day. In middays, Salzberg and Somers were replaced by Suzyn Waldman and Jody McDonald. Waldman was best known for her work covering the Yankees and Knicks for the station. McDonald, son of a former Mets general manager, was the weekend overnight host before leaving for WIP radio in Philadelphia, nearer to his southern New Jersey home. Both Waldman and McDonald had their fans and detractors at WFAN. This article is about the comedian. ... This article is about the island in New York State. ... WIP is a Philadelphia radio station with an all-sports format. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


Waldman would leave WFAN in late 2001, joining the YES Network's Yankee broadcast team the following year. She would be replaced by Sid Rosenberg who, despite his shock jock reputation, had an enormous knowledge of sports. Many felt there was great chemistry between McDonald and Rosenberg. However, the ratings still weren't what WFAN expected and in 2004 McDonald was let go, later to join WEPN, Sirius Satellite Radio, and WPEN radio in Philadelphia. A shock jock is a slang term used to describe a type of radio broadcaster (sometimes a disk jockey) who attracts attention using humor that a significant portion of the listening audience may find offensive. ... WPEN is an AM radio station broadcast on 950 kHz. ...


Former overnight host Joe Benigno would replace McDonald. Rosenberg was forced to resign from WFAN on September 12, 2005 after being given an ultimatum by station management for not showing up to host the New York Giants' pregame show the day before. Benigno hosted the show solo for over a year. On January 2, 2007, part-time overnight host Evan Roberts became Beningo's new midday co-host.[8][9] However, it will take some time to determine if the new pairing will affect ratings for the midday program, which does consistently outrate rivals Max Kellerman and Stephen A. Smith on WEPN. is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Max Kellerman (born August 6, 1973) is an American sports talk radio host from New York City. ... Stephen Anthony Smith (born October 14, 1967), usually referred to as Stephen A., is a sportswriter and media personality from Hollis, Queens in New York City. ...


Exit Imus, enter Boomer and Carton

On the April 4, 2007 broadcast of Imus in the Morning, John Donald Imus Jr. made a sexually and racially insensitive comment in reference to the Rutgers University women's basketball team. Imus made the remarks during a conversation with the show's producer, Bernard McGuirk, and Sid Rosenberg (who was on the phone). is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Bernard McGuirk is the former executive producer of the Imus in the Morning radio program. ...


Two days after making the comments, Imus issued a public apology. By that time, however, there were various calls for his dismissal, particularly from civil rights activists Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, who threatened to protest both CBS Radio and MSNBC (which aired a video simulcast of the program), as well as boycott companies who advertised on the program. WFAN offered its hosts and listeners a sounding board for their own feelings and comments, which were both for and against his dismissal. Chris Russo, in particular, expressed his disappointment at Imus for waiting two days before retracting his comments. Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... This biographical article needs additional references for verification. ... For the news website, see MSNBC.com. ...


Imus was initially given a two-week suspension which was scheduled to begin on April 16, allowing him to work the annual WFAN Radiothon on April 12 and 13. On consecutive days Imus appeared on both Sharpton's syndicated radio show (April 9) and NBC-TV's Today Show (April 10) to reiterate his regret for the remarks. But on April 11, MSNBC announced the cancellation of the video simulcast of Imus in the Morning. The following day, CBS Radio dismissed Imus, effectively ending his near-continuous run of 35 years in New York radio, and leaving WFAN with a very large programming -- and money-earning -- void in their schedule. is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Today Show (officially called Today) is currently, a long-running morning news show airing on the NBC television network in the United States. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Imus' last program was aired on the opening day of the radiothon. Imus's wife Deirdre joined his longtime co-host and news reader, Charles McCord, to anchor the final segment of the radiothon on April 13. It is unknown whether WFAN will air future radiothons, and if they do, whether the Imus Ranch will be one of the supported charities. Deirdre Coleman Imus fat coc k(born 1964) is the founder and president of the Deirdre Imus Environmental Center for Pediatric Oncology, part of [[Hackensack cleaning products. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...


From that point on, the 6:00 to 10:00 a.m. time slot was filled by various hosts. McCord and Chris Carlin remained on all the replacement shows as assistance and staff, in similar roles as they were on Imus's show, and the replacement shows continued to be syndicated via Westwood One. Mike Francesa and Chris Russo were the first to fill the spot, hosting for the two weeks (April 16-27) immediately after Imus' firing. Francesa and Russo also worked the shift separate from each other, as did fellow WFAN staffers Richard Neer, Joe Beningo and Evan Roberts, and Carlin, who worked both alone and with co-hosts, notably YES Network reporter Kimberly Jones and Washington Post sports columnist John Feinstein. Chris Carlin born in Albany, New York May 13, 1973is an on-air personality for WFAN 660, an AM radio station in New York City. ... Kimberly Jones (born in Dallastown, Pennsylvania) is a sports reporter for the YES Network, a position she has held since 2005. ... ... John Feinstein is an American sportswriter and commentator. ...


WFAN and Westwood One also brought in outside personalities into the slot. Among them were Boomer Esiason, Patrick McEnroe, Geraldo Rivera, Lou Dobbs, and Chicago sports radio host Mike North. As MSNBC also held its own claim to the slot, the cable network was able to have its own replacement shows simulcasted; these programs were hosted by in-house personalities David Gregory, Jim Cramer, and Joe Scarborough, who was named as MSNBC's replacement host. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Patrick McEnroe (born July 1, 1966) is an American former professional tennis player and the present Captain of the United States Davis Cup team. ... Geraldo redirects here. ... Lou Dobbs (born September 24, 1945), is the CNN anchor and managing editor for Lou Dobbs Tonight. ... Mike North has been a sports talk radio show host at WSCR The Score 670 in Chicago since the early 1990s, bringing a distinct Chicago working mans and sometimes, albeit, abrasive flavor to his listeners. ... David Gregory (June 3, 1659—October 10, 1708) was a Savilian Professor of astronomy at Oxford and a commentator on Isaac Newtons Principia. ... This article is about the television personality and host of Mad Money. ... Charles Joseph Joe Scarborough (born April 9, 1963) is the host of the programs Morning Joe and Scarborough Country on MSNBC and served in the United States House of Representatives, from 1995 to 2001, as a Republican from Florida. ...


On September 4, 2007, Boomer Esiason took over as the permanent host of the WFAN morning show, with veteran radio personality Craig Carton (previously of WKXW-FM in Trenton, New Jersey) serving as co-host, and Chris Carlin remaining to do sports updates. The new program will not be distributed nationally by Westwood One, and McCord left the station shortly after the announcement was made. Carlin and Jones were also given their own show in the one-hour time slot immediately preceding Esiason's show. is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Craig Carton is an American radio personality and shock jock who has worked on a variety of radio stations and talk formats. ... WKXW-FM, better known as New Jersey 101. ... Nickname: Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County Coordinates: , Country State County Mercer Incorporated November 13, 1792 Government  - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer Area  - City  8. ...


Influence of sports format

WFAN's success -- especially after the 1988 frequency switch -- proved that sports-talk radio could in fact be a steadily profitable and popular format. This in turn fueled the explosive growth of sports-talk radio in the 1990s and 2000s. Once a novelty, every major market (and many smaller markets) now has at least one sports radio station, and often more. ESPN Radio, Fox Sports Radio and Sporting News Radio have all launched 24-hour national sports talk radio networks. There are also nationally syndicated radio shows, such as The Jim Rome Show and 2 Live Stews. Additionally there are dedicated sports radio streams on satellite radio, such as NFL Radio on Sirius and MLB Home Plate on XM Satellite Radio. With the migration of music station to FM and other carriers all but complete, sports talk radio are considered to have been critical in saving the AM band as a viable broadcast medium. Fox Sports Radio, abbreviated FSR, is an international radio network consisting of sports talk programming all day, every day. ... Sporting News Radio is a sports radio network that broadcasts sports news, talk, scores, and highlights 24/7. ... The Jim Rome Show is a sports radio talk show hosted by Jim Rome. ... 2 Live Stews is a nationally-syndicated sports talk radio show hosted by Doug and Ryan Stewart; the show originates from WQXI in Atlanta, Georgia. ... For other uses, see Sirius (disambiguation). ... MLB Home Plate is a popular destination on the XM Satellite Radio dial for fans of Major League Baseball, as it features round the clock MLB related talk shows, as well as archives and live reports. ... “XM” redirects here. ...


It is worth noting that, for all the success and influence that WFAN has had, its signature Mike and the Mad Dog show has experienced limited syndication outside of New York state (the show is carried on WROW in Albany, New York, and WQYK in Tampa, Florida). This is primarily due to a desire by the hosts to keep their show New York-centric. However, the discussion does stray well beyond what other hosts usually talk about, as college sports and the NBA takeup a notable portion of the show outside of the standard emphasis on whatever New York players and teams are considered to be making headlines. WROW is a News/Talk radio station serving the Albany, New York Area. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... WQYK-AM is a classic country music radio station broadcasting on 1010 AM in the Tampa, Florida area. ... Nickname: Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida. ...


WFAN once produced some of Fox Sports Radio's programming, notably Chris "Mad Dog" Russo's Saturday show, but the relationship did not last even one year for the same reason that Mike and the Mad Dog is syndicated nationally only through the YES Network -- the hosts often talk about the NFL on a national basis, but stick mostly to local coverage of baseball. Nevertheless, callers from as far as California have made it to air. Recently on Mike and the Mad Dog, a caller from Norway made the air, crossing transatlantic boundaries for the first time in sports radio. Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Callers

The vast majority of WFAN programming that originates in studio makes listeners' calls an important facet of the broadcast. As a testament to this, Joe Benigno - a former caller himself - ends all of his shows with "I want to thank all the callers, great job as always; I couldn't do it without you." There are a number of callers who have earned a reputation over the years and become as familiar to listeners as the hosts themselves.


John from Sandy Hook

One of the most endearing and knowledgeable callers, especially with boxing insights and old classic baseball. Listeners called in condolences on learning of his death.


Bruce in Bayside

A retired high school history teacher, and Cleveland Indians fan, Bruce frequently calls in with trivia and other historical background on the topic at hand. He often tries to impress with his one-liners at the beginning of his calls, with limited success. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present...


Bruce from Flushing

Bruce is lifetime Yankee fan and was a long time caller of Joe Beningo in the overnights and Howie Rose in prime-time. Recently married, Bruce has taken a short hiatus from his daily calls to the FAN. He is still one of the most popular and knowledgeable callers, and both Marc Malusis and Rich Ackerman list Bruce as their favorite caller. Bruce claims that he was on hold, but never made it to the air, for WFAN's first show. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Howie Rose (born 1954) is an American sportscaster with the New York Mets and the New York Islanders for WFAN and Fox Sports New York. ...


Bill from Brentwood

Arugably the most popular and knowledgeable caller to WFAN is Bill from Brentwood, more popularly known as "Bill the Baker", who has an encyclopedic knowledge of baseball, along with an unmatched ability to recall not only specific baseball moments in the past 50+ years, but the exact dates that those games were played. Although Bill calls the FAN (particularly Steve Somers, who jokes that he is his co-host) on an almost daily basis, Steve - along with his listeners - is so constantly in awe and impressed with Bill's baseball intellect that he often jokes that Bill "has to be looking at a book".


Jerome from Manhattan

Another cherished caller is Jerome Mittelman[10], widely known as "Jerome from Manhattan." A die-hard Yankees and Knicks fan, Jerome is famous for his on-air take-no-prisoners blistering rants and raves, as well as his unique take on the English language. One of his favorite exclamatory phrases is "frickin' frack!" He refers to the bullpen as the "ballpen", and once shouted that the Yankees are "....done! D-O-E-N [sic], DONE!" His relationship status is intriguing enough for Steve Somers to once give Jerome $60 to take a lady out on a date, only for Jerome to keep the money and not go out on the date. Former host Sid Rosenberg once asked Jerome if he was upset that he was not taking his eagerly anticipated trip "....to Colorado?", and Jerome replied, "No, [it was] to Denver." He does "....not like jets. They make [him] seasick." Unfortunately, Mr. Mittelman's health problems have kept him from the WFAN airwaves on his usual daily basis since late 2004, although he did call on March 31, 2005 to appease his fans; he is under doctor's orders to refrain from calling because his hyperactive on-air demeanor may further complicate his health problems. His latest call-in was during the week of October 15, 2007, when he spoke with Somers. is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Doris from Rego Park

Doris Bauer [c.1945-2003], more affectionately known as "Doris from Rego Park", was a die-hard fan of the New York Mets, and was loved by many WFAN listeners. Her knowledge of the Mets and baseball as a whole approached that of Bill the Baker, and she called the station almost daily since its first night on-air. Doris suffered from neurofibromatosis, and at least three different cancers; nevertheless, she kept the Mets and WFAN close to her heart until her premature passing at age 58. Neurofibromatosis is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder. ...


Eli from Westchester

"Eli from Westchester" was another famous repeat caller. Citing racism as the underlying factor behind any number of sports happenings, he was occasionally banned from calling for periods of time. One of the most famous times he was banned was by former mid-day host Russ Salzberg. Eli claimed to be an ex college football player and know several pro stars. His shining moment was not on WFAN however, where he performed miserably during an on air tryout for the job which would eventually be Joe Benigno's. As a late night caller to the Lionel show on WABC, Eli fell asleep while waiting to go on air. Listneers were treated to a minute's worth of "Ellie"'s, as Lionel called him, snoring. Rumors were that this is Eli Strand from Tuckahoe NY, his college football was played at Iowa State and spent 2 years in the NFL, the last with the New Orleans Saints. This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ...


Jerry from Queens

"Jerry from Queens", aka Jerry Seinfeld, has called the station at many times over the years. An avid Mets and Steve Somers fan, Seinfeld has even appeared in-studio twice along with the Schmoozer. This article is about the comedian. ...


Joseph Abboud

Joseph Abboud, a noted clothing designer, has been a regular caller to the midday show to muse about his beloved Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees' sworn rival. Abbouds Threads book cover Joseph Abboud (born circa 1950) is an award-winning Lebanese-American menswear fashion designer and author who was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as...


Marc in the Bronx

Marc is known for calling usually during late nights, and mostly talks NFL Football. He is a die hard fan of the Denver Broncos, and is known for his angry rants about their performance after a loss. City Denver, Colorado Other nicknames Orange Crush (1977-1979 defense) Team colors Orange, Broncos Navy Blue, and White[1] Head Coach Mike Shanahan Owner Pat Bowlen General manager Ted Sundquist Mascot Miles League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American...


Miriam from Forest Hills

Miriam is a blind New York Islanders and New York Mets fan from Queens. The first Islanders game Miriam ever attended became the topic of a Rick Reilly column in Sports Illustrated.[11] The New York Islanders are a professional ice hockey team based in Uniondale, a hamlet located on Long Island in Town of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York, United States. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Richard Rick Paul Reilly (born February 3, 1958 in Boulder, Colorado) is the back-page sportswriter for Sports Illustrated. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Kelsey from Summit, NJ

A bumbling caller who only calls into the FAN in the middle of the night to complain about the Mets. He is always noticeably intoxicated.


Chris from Middletown, NY

Chris was a frequent caller to WFAN in the early 2000s to the Midday and Overnight shows. Chris was a rabid Mets fan who occasionally got into verbal spats with Midday host Jody MacDonald over many topics, usually lamenting about former Mets' manager Art Howe. He was also the station's resident Lakers fan, taking offense to Steve Somers when he referred to them as "the Fakers".


Tommy from Brooklyn

Tommy was a frequent caller to WFAN in the early 1990s. He was known for his passion for hockey. He was a caller to Christopher Russo and would frequently assist Russo with hockey issues. Tommy is best known for his passion for not wanting Russian players to play in the NHL.


Short Al from Brooklyn

Knowledgeable old time Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Mets Fan. A longtime favorite caller of overnight hosts. The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league...


Vinny from Queens

Vinny was a frequent caller to WFAN in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Vinny was a passionate Yankee fan and a popular caller among the hosts. Vinny died in 1996 in a car accident.


Ira from Staten Island

Ira is currently a frequent caller to WFAN. He is well known for being a knowledgable and passionate fan of the New York Jets. He is also well known for being a blatant homer and apologist for the Jets organization.


Val in Brooklyn

Val is an older male who speaks with a noticable stutter. He often brags about his female friends, notably his chauffeur named Sandra in the summer of 2007. “Stutter” redirects here. ... A chauffeur in Japan A driver in Kerala A chauffeur is one who drives an automobile as a job. ...


Reception of WFAN

WFAN's signal can be heard clearly on much of the East Coast of the United States and Eastern Canada after sunset because it is a FCC "Class A" clear channel station. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Eastern Canada, defined politically. ... FCC redirects here. ... A clear channel, in the general sense, is a communications channel (such as a radio frequency) on which only one transmitter operates at a time. ...


During the day, WFAN's groundwave signal can be heard faintly as far south as Washington, DC and as far north as the I-90 corridor (the New York State Thruway and Massachusetts Turnpike), about 150 miles north of New York City. WFAN can also allegedly be heard clearly on the northern beaches of North Carolina's Outer Banks during the day. Signal strength varies depending on factors such as weather and elevation. Still, a good car radio can pick up WFAN cleanly in most of eastern Pennsylvania and throughout Connecticut, as well as parts of the Philadelphia, Boston, Albany, and Syracuse markets, especially at night (WFAN does not broadcast on reduced power overnight, and thus needs very few affiliate stations for the teams it broadcasts). Callers from these locations are not uncommon, especially as some of the on-air staffers have backgrounds in those regions (Bob Heussler does radio play-by-play for the Connecticut Sun, Fairfield Stags basketball and has done radio play-by-play for UConn basketball and football, while Chris Carlin handles Rutgers football games), and attended Hobart. Alternatively, the callers listen to the streaming internet feed on wfan.com, or watch the "Mike and the Mad Dog" simulcast on YES. Depending on atmospheric conditions, the station can be allegedly picked up as far south as Havana, Cuba. In parts of South Florida after sunset, reception of WFAN is rumored to be clearer than Miami-based "competitors" including WAXY. Groundwave is the propagation of radio waves close to the surface of the Earth. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Interstate 90 is the longest interstate highway in the United States. ... The New York State Thruway (officially the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway) is a limited-access toll highway in the U.S. state of New York. ... View of the Turnpike from an overpass by Boston University, facing east (towards central Boston). ... North Carolinas Outer Banks separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Albemarle Sound (north) and Pamlico Sound (south). ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... For other uses, see Albany. ... Nickname: Location of Syracuse within the state of New York Coordinates: , City Government  - Mayor Matthew Driscoll (D) Area  - City 66. ... An affiliate is a commercial entity with a relationship with a peer or a larger entity. ... Bob Heussler (born Brooklyn, New York, currently resides in Hamden, Connecticut), is a radio sports broadcaster at WFAN in New York where he has made regular appearances on the Mike and the Mad Dog Show since 1993. ... The Connecticut Sun are a Womens National Basketball Association team based in Uncasville, Connecticut. ... // Fairfield University is a member of the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) and is classified as Division I-AA in the National Collegiate Athletic Association for its athletic programs. ... The University of Connecticut, commonly known as UConn, is the State of Connecticuts flagship land-grant university. ... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ... The Miami Urbanized Area stretches along the Atlantic Coast for most of the length of the Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach Metropolitan Area, but is confined to a relatively narrow area between the coast and the Everglades. ... Wax has traditionally referred to a substance that is secreted by bees (beeswax) and used by them in constructing their honeycombs. ...


Personalities

Joseph Benigno (born September 1953) is an American sports radio personality. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chris Carlin born in Albany, New York May 13, 1973is an on-air personality for WFAN 660, an AM radio station in New York City. ... Craig Carton is an American radio personality and shock jock who has worked on a variety of radio stations and talk formats. ... Ed Coleman is a radio reporter/host for the New York Mets on WFAN. He also did some radio work for the 1988 and 1992 Summer Olympics, as well as the 1994 Winter Olympics. ... Ian Eagle is an American sports announcer calling National Football League (NFL) games on CBS, New Jersey Nets games on the YES Network and hosts Full Court Press, a basketball talk show with former player Kenny Smith on Sirius Satellite Radio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Michael Patrick Tank Francesa, Jr. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Evan Roberts (born July 11, 1983) is an American sports radio personality. ... Christopher Mad Dog Russo (born October 18, 1959 in Syosset, New York) is an American sports radio personality. ... Steve Somers Steve Somers is an American radio host on the New York City sports radio station WFAN (660 AM). ... Richard Rick Wolff-a Harvard and Long Island University graduate-is a former minor league second baseman, coach, author and sports psychologist. ...

Current 20-20 Flash anchors

  • Rich Ackerman
  • Harris Allen
  • Erica Herskowitz
  • Bob Heussler
  • Mike McCann
  • John Minko
  • Jerry Recco
  • Greg Tartaglia
  • Joe Tolleson
  • Joey Wahler

Bob Heussler (born Brooklyn, New York, currently resides in Hamden, Connecticut), is a radio sports broadcaster at WFAN in New York where he has made regular appearances on the Mike and the Mad Dog Show since 1993. ... John Minko is a 20/20 sports anchors on radio station WFAN in New York and has worked there since its inception in 1987. ... Jerry Recco is a 20/20 sports anchor on all-sports radio station WFAN in New York and has been with the station since 1997. ...

Past hosts

Len Berman on WNBC in 2005. ... Mike Breen(born June 26, 1965) is a play-by-play commentator for the NBA on ABC. He also works NBA games for ESPN, and was formerly a play-by-play announcers for New York Giants preseason games, as well as for regular season NFL games on both FOX and... Roberto Clemente, Jr. ... Linda Cohn (born November 10, 1959) is an accomplished Jewish sportscaster who appears on ESPNs SportsCenter as an anchor. ... Howard David is a veteran American sportscaster. ... Scott Ferrall is a sports talk radio host who currently broadcasts for Sirius Satellite Radio on Howard 101. ... Pete Franklin (1928 - November 23, 2004) (The King) was a U.S. sports radio talk show who worked in San Francisco, Cleveland and New York. ... Greg Gumbel (born May 3, 1946) is an American television sportscaster. ... John Donald Don Imus, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Link title This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mike Lupica (born 1952) is an American newspaper columnist, best known for his provocative sports commentary in the New York Daily News and his appearances on ESPN. Lupica uses his sports column to constantly bash the business practices of the New York Yankees. ... Bill Mazer is a TV/radio personality. ... Howie Rose (born 1954) is an American sportscaster with the New York Mets and the New York Islanders for WFAN and Fox Sports New York. ... Sidney Arthur Sid Rosenberg (born c. ... Dave Sims is an American sportscaster. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Suzyn Georgie Girl Waldman (born September 15, 1948 ) (age 58) in Newton, MA) is an American sports broadcaster. ... Warner Wolf on WCBS in 2003 delivering his trademark line, Lets go to the videotape! Warner William Wolf (born November 11, 1937), is an American television and radio sports broadcaster, best known for being a very popular local news sports anchor in Washington, D.C. and New York City. ...

References and notes

  1. ^ FCC Info on WFAN. Retrieved on 2006-12-14.
  2. ^ Alice Brannigan (February 1998). The early days of WEAF New York. Popular Communications. Retrieved on 2006-12-14.
  3. ^ First WEAF commercial continuity. Retrieved on 2006-12-14.
  4. ^ NYC’s ‘FAN: in business 20 years & a day. Radio Ink. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  5. ^ WFAN to stream live talk shows online. mediabistro.com (2006-04-06).
  6. ^ Tomorrows Children's Fund
  7. ^ The CJ Foundation for SIDS
  8. ^ Neil Best (2006-12-08). WFAN to pair Roberts with Benigno. Newsday.
  9. ^ Neil Best (2006-12-12). Dialing up youth movement. Newsday.
  10. ^ John Freeman Gill (2004-10-24). Citypeople: seventh-inning kvetch. The New York Times.
  11. ^ Rick Reilly (2002-12-24). Vision of happiness. Sports Illustrated.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


Preceded by
WNBC
AM 660 in New York, New York
October 7, 1988 - Present
Succeeded by
WFAN
Preceded by
WHN
AM 1050 in New York, New York
July 1, 1987-October 7, 1988
Succeeded by
WUKQ

  Results from FactBites:
 
WFAN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5340 words)
WFAN (660 kHz), often referred to as "Sportsradio 66" or "The FAN", is a radio station in New York City.
WFAN is the flagship station of Westwood One's NFL, NHL, Notre Dame college football, and NCAA basketball tournament radio broadcasts.
WFAN aired Yankees coverage while WCBS-AM was airing coverage of the 2003 flout that greatly affected New York City and surrounding areas, and is given exclusive gameday radio access to the team.
WFAN: Information From Answers.com (4950 words)
WFAN aired Yankees coverage while WCBS-AM was airing coverage of the 2003 flout that greatly affected New York City and surrounding areas.
WFAN is rumored to be pursuing a co-host with a likely goal of choosing one by the end of Spring 2006.
Mittelman's health problems have kept him from the WFAN airwaves on his usual daily basis since late 2004, although he did call on 31 March 2005 to appease his fans; he is under doctor's orders to refrain from calling because his unsubdued demeanor while on-air may further complicate his health problems.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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