FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > W.G. Grace
W.G. Grace
England (Eng)
Batting style Right-handed batsman (RHB)
Bowling type
  Tests First-class
Matches 22 870
Runs scored 1098 54211
Batting average 32.29 39.45
100s/50s 2/5 124/251
Top score 170 344
Balls bowled 666 124831
Wickets 9 2809
Bowling average 26.22 18.14
5 wickets in innings 0 240
10 wickets in match 0 64
Best bowling 2/12 10/49
Catches/Stumpings 39/0 876/5
Test debut: 6 September 1880
Last Test: 3 June 1899
Source: [1] (http://uk.cricinfo.com/db/PLAYERS/ENG/B/BOWDEN_MP_01000114/)
Edit this template

William Gilbert Grace (July 18, 1848October 23, 1915) was an English cricketer who, by his extraordinary skills, made cricket perhaps the first modern spectator sport, and who developed most of the techniques of modern batting. Large sized flag of England/St Georges Cross/State flag of Gurnsey, 1936-1985 File links The following pages link to this file: The Ashes Arsenal F.C. Cambridgeshire Charlton Athletic F.C. City of London London Borough of Croydon Cheshire Chelsea F.C. Devon England Essex Exeter England... The English cricket team is a national cricket team representing England and Wales. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Cricket batsman A batsman in the sport of cricket is a player whose speciality in the game is batting. ... In the sport of cricket there are two categories of bowler: pace bowler and spin bowler. ... Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Batting average is a statistic in both baseball and cricket measuring the performance of baseball hitters and cricket batsmen, respectively. ... This article is about the cricket term. ... Bowling average is a statistic measuring the performance of bowlers in the sport of cricket. ... This article is about the cricket term. ... An innings, or inning, is a segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which a side takes its turn to bat. ... This article is about the cricket term. ... In the sport of cricket, the term stump has three different meanings: part of the wicket, a manner of dismissing a batsman, and the end of the days play (stumps). Part of the wicket The stumps are three vertical posts supporting the bails to form a wicket at each... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 69 days remaining. ... 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For more coverage of cricket, go to the Cricket Portal. ...

Contents

Family

W. G. Grace was born at Downend, near Bristol. He found himself in an atmosphere charged with cricket, his father (Henry Mills Grace) and his uncle (Alfred Pocock) being as enthusiastic over the game as his elder brothers, Henry, Alfred, and Edward Mills; indeed, with Edward Mills, as E.M. Grace, the family name first became famous. A younger brother, George Frederick, also added to the cricketing reputation of the family. W.G. witnessed his first great match when he was barely six years old, the occasion being a game between W. Clarke's All-England Eleven and twenty-two of West Gloucestershire. Bristol is a port city in south-western England, on the River Avon. ...


He was married in 1873 to Miss Agnes Day. One of his sons (W.G. Grace Junior) played for two years in the University of Cambridge XI (and also for Gloucestershire, London County, and the M.C.C.). He didn't live up to his illustrious name, averaging 15 with the bat and nearly 40 with the ball. Another son (C.B. Grace) played a few matches for London County. 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Cambridge University Cricket Club (now subsumed into the Cambridge University Centre of Cricketing Excellence) is a first-class cricket team. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced glostersher or sometimes glostersheer) is a ceremonial and administrative county in southwest England. ... The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) was the original governing body of international cricket. ...


Athletic abilities

Grace was endowed by nature with a splendid physique as well as with powers of self-restraint and determination. At the apex of his career he stood a full 6ft 2in. (1.88m), and was powerfully proportioned, loose yet strong of limb.


A non-smoker, and very moderate in all matters, he kept himself in condition all year round by shooting, hunting, or running with the beagles as soon as the cricket season was over. Shooting is the act of causing a gun to fire at a target. ... Hunting is, in its most general sense, the pursuit of a target. ...


He was also a fine runner, 440yds (400m) over 20 hurdles being his best distance, and it may be quoted as proof of his stamina that on 30 July 1866 he scored 224 not out for England v. Surrey, and two days later won a race in the National and Olympian Association meeting at the Crystal Palace. Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Hurdling is running over obstacles. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ... 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Surrey is a county in southern England, one of the Home Counties. It is divided into a number of districts - Elmbridge, Epsom and Ewell, Guildford, Mole Valley, Reigate and Banstead, Runnymede, Spelthorne, Surrey Heath, Tandridge, Waverley, Woking, and borders on Hampshire, Berkshire, Greater London, Kent, East Sussex and West Sussex. ... A huge iron and glass building, The Crystal Palace was one of the wonders of, if not the world, Britain. ...


First Class career

The title of champion was well earned by one who for thirty-six years (18651900 inclusive) was actively engaged in first-class cricket. In each of these years Grace was invited to represent the Gentlemen in their matches against the Players, and, when an Australian eleven visited England, to play for the mother country. As late as 1899 he played in the first of the five international contests; in 1900 he played against the players at the Oval, scoring 58 and 3. 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


He averaged 39.45 at first class level, a figure undoubtedly dragged down by his playing into his late fifties. At his peak in the 1870s his first-class season averages were regularly between 60 and 70, at a time when uncovered, poorly-prepared pitches meant that scores were far lower than the modern game. Events and Trends Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871) results in the collapse of the Second French Empire and in the formation of both the French Third Republic and the German Empire. ...


At fifty-three he scored nearly 1,300 runs in first-class cricket, made 100 runs and over on three different occasions, and could claim an average of 42 runs. Moreover, his greatest triumphs were achieved when only the very best cricket grounds received serious attention — when, as some consider, bowling was maintained at a higher standard, and when all hits had to be run out. He, with his two brothers, E.M. and G.F., assisted by some fine amateurs, in one season turned Gloucestershire into a first-class county, and it was he who first enabled the amateurs of England to meet the paid players on equal terms and to beat them. A professional cricket match In the sport of cricket, bowling is the action of propelling the ball towards the batsman. ...


Fielding and bowling

There was hardly a record connected with the game which did not stand to his credit. Grace was one of the finest fieldsmen in England, in his earlier days generally taking long-leg and cover-point, later generally standing point (see Fielding positions in cricket). He was, at his best, a fine thrower, fast runner, and safe catcher. As a bowler he was long in the first flight, originally bowling fast, but in later times adopting a slower and more tricky style, frequently very effective. Fielding in the sport of cricket is what fielders do to collect the ball when it is struck by the batsman in such a way as to either limit the number of runs that the batsman scores or get the batsman out by catching the ball or running the batsman... A bowler in the sport of cricket is usually a player whose speciality is bowling. ...


Profession

Photograph of Grace taking guard, signed in ink in the lower white border, undated
Photograph of Grace taking guard, signed in ink in the lower white border, undated

By profession Grace was a medical man, though he did not finally qualify as a doctor until he was in his thirties. Thereafter he practised in Easton, a largely poor district of Bristol, employing two locums during the cricket season. It seems that despite his amateur status, the greater part of his income came from cricketing activities. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Geography Easton is an inner city area of the city of Bristol in the United Kingdom Informally the area is considered to stretch east of Bristol City Centre from Lawrence hill in the South to the M32 motorway, although its western and eastern borders are less defined. ... Bristol is a port city in south-western England, on the River Avon. ...


He was the recipient of two national testimonials: the first, amounting to £1,500, being presented to him in the form of a clock and a cheque at the Lord's ground by Lord Charles Russell on the 22 July 1879; the second, collected by the M.C.C., the county of Gloucestershire, the Daily Telegraph, and the Sportsman, amounted to about £10,000, and was presented to him in 1896. The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, can generally refer to the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... A clock (from the Latin cloca, bell) is an instrument for measuring time. ... A check or cheque (borrowed from Persian چك Chek) is a document instructing a financial institution to pay a specific amount of a specific currency from a specific demand account held in the maker/depositors name with that institution. ... July 22 is the 203rd day (204th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 162 days remaining. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) was the original governing body of international cricket. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced glostersher or sometimes glostersheer) is a ceremonial and administrative county in southwest England. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... A sport consists of a normal physical activity or skill carried out under a publicly agreed set of rules, and with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of skill, or some combination of these. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In later years he became (paid) secretary and manager of the London County Cricket Club, based at Crystal Palace in Sydenham, London, which played first-class cricket from 1900 to 1904. Crystal Palace or Upper Norwood is an area in south London, England within the postcode London SE19. ... For other uses of the name Sydenham, see Sydenham (disambiguation). ... Greater London and the Regions of England. ...


He lived for some years in Mottingham, a south-east London suburb (a blue plaque marks his residence, 'Fairmont' in Mottingham Lane, where he died on 23 October 1915). Mottingham is a place in SE9, England in the London Borough of Greenwich, although part (to the west of Mottingham Road) is in the London Borough of Bromley. ... A Greater London Council blue plaque at Alexandra Palace, commemorating the launch of BBC Television there in 1936. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 69 days remaining. ... 1915 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Early career

Grace played his first great match in 1863 when, being only fifteen years of age, he scored 32 against the All-England Eleven against the bowling of Jackson, Tarrant, and Tinley. The scores that first brought him to prominence, however, were made in 1864: 170 and 56 not out for the South Wales Club against the Gentlemen of Sussex. It was in 1865 that he first took an active part in first-class cricket, being then 6ft (1.83 m) high, and 11 stone (70 kg) in weight, and playing twice for the Gentlemen v. the Players, but his selection was mainly due to his bowling powers, the best exposition of which was his aggregate of 13 wickets for -84 runs for the Gentlemen of the South v. the Players of the South. His highest score was 400 not out, made in July 1876 against twenty-two of Grimsby. On three occasions he was twice dismissed without scoring in matches against odds, a fate that never befell him in important cricket matches. 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For alternate meanings, see Wales (disambiguation) National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Official languages: English and Welsh Capital: Cardiff First Minister: Rhodri Morgan AM Area  - Total:  - % water: Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² xx% Population  - Total (2001):  - Density: Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... Sussex as a traditional county. ... Weight is the force exerted upon an object by virtue of its position in a gravitational field. ... Look up Aggregate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The term aggregate may refer to— inert material, most commonly stone of sand- and gravel_sized particles. ... This article is about the cricket term. ... July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


Tours

Grace visited Australia in 1873–1874 (captain), and in 18911892 with Lord Sheffield's Eleven (captain). He visited the United States and Canada in 1872, with R. A. Fitzgerald's team. Events January - April January 1 - New York City annexes The Bronx January 23 - Marriage of the Duke of Edinburgh, second son of Queen Victoria, to Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna of Russia, only daughter of Emperor Alexander III of Russia. ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Records and statistics

Highest score

In first-class matches Grace's highest score was 344, made for the M.C.C. v. Kent at Canterbury in August 1876; two days later he made 177 for Gloucestershire v. Notts, and two days after that 318 not out for Gloucestershire v. Yorkshire, the latter two innings against counties with exceptionally strong bowling attacks. Thus in three consecutive innings Grace scored 839 runs, and was only out twice. His 344 was the third highest individual score made in a big match in England up to the end of 1901. He also scored 301 for Gloucestershire v. Sussex at Bristol in August 1896. His 318 against Yorkshire stood as a Gloucestershire record for 128 years until it was broken by Craig Spearman's 341 against Middlesex in June 2004. An innings, or inning, is a segment of a game in any of a variety of sports – most notably baseball and cricket – during which a side takes its turn to bat. ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Double centuries

Grace made over 200 runs on ten occasions, the most notable perhaps being in 1871, when he performed the feat twice, each time in benefit matches, and each time in the second innings, having been each time got out in the first over of the first innings.


Centuries

Grace scored over 100 runs on 121 occasions, the hundredth score being 288, made at Bristol for Gloucestershire v. Somersetshire in 1895. 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


He made every figure from 0 to 100, on one occasion closing the innings when he had made 93, the only total he had never made between these limits.


In 1871 he made ten centuries, ranging from 268 to 116. 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In the matches between the Gentlemen and Players he scored three figures fifteen times, and at every place where these matches have been played.


He made over 100 in each of his first appearances at Oxford and Cambridge.


Three times he made over 100 in both innings of the same match:

  • at Canterbury, in 1868, for South v. North of the Thames, 130 and 102 not out;
  • at Clifton, in 1887, for Gloucestershire v. Kent, 101 and 103 not out;
  • at Clifton, in 1888, for Gloucestershire v. Yorkshire, 148 and 153.

1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...

Partnerships and other miscellaneous statistics

In 1869, playing at the Oval for the Gentlemen of the South v. the Players of the South, Grace and B.B. Cooper put on 283 runs for the first wicket, Grace scoring 180 and Cooper 101. In 1886 Grace and Scotton put on 170 runs for the first wicket of England v. Australia; this occurred at the Oval in August, and Grace's total score was 170. 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) Events January 18 _ Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


In consecutive innings against the Players from 1871 to 1873 he scored 217, 77, and 112, 117, 163, 158, and 70.


He only twice scored over 100 in a big match in Australia, nor did he ever make 200 at Lord's, his highest being 196 for the M.C.C. v. Cambridge University in 1894. The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). ... 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Season totals

Grace's highest aggregates were 2,739 (1871), 2,622 (1876), 2,346 (1895), 2,139 (1873), 2,135 (1896), and 2,062 (1887). 1876 is a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Other feats

Grace scored three successive centuries in first-class cricket in 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, and 1876.


Playing against Kent at Gravesend in 1895, he was batting, bowling, or fielding during the whole time the game was in progress, his scores being 257 and 73 not out. Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Gravesend is a town in North-West Kent, England, on the south bank of the Thames, opposite Tilbury in Essex. ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


His portrait was used as the face of God in the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a comedy film from 1974. ...


The Double

Grace scored over 1,000 runs and took over 100 wickets in seven different seasons:

  • in 1874, 1,664 runs and 139 wickets;
  • in 1875, 1,498 runs and 191 wickets;
  • in 1876, 2,622 runs and 130 wickets;
  • in 1877, 1,474 runs and 179 wickets;
  • in 1878, 1,151 runs and 152 wickets;
  • in 1885, 1,688 runs and 117 wickets;
  • in 1886, 1846 runs and 122 wickets.

(statistics taken from The Association of Cricket Statisticians & Historians (http://www.cricinfo.com/link_to_database/SOCIETIES/ENG/ACS/STATS/GRACE/GRACE_WG_CAREER_SUMMARY.html). Note that Cricket Archive (http://www.cricketarchive.co.uk/Archive/Players/0/43/f_Bowling_by_Season.html) shows that Gilbert Grace took 153, not 152, first-class wickets in 1878. 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Bowling records

Grace never captured 200 wickets in a season, his highest record being 192 in 1875. Playing against Oxford University in 1886, he took all the wickets in the first innings, at a cost of 49 runs.


1895

In 1895 Grace not only made his hundredth century, but actually scored 1,000 runs in the month of May alone, his chief scores in that month being 103, 288, 256, 73, and 169, he being then forty-seven years old. He also made during that year scores of 125, 119, 118, 104, and 103 not out, his aggregate for the year being 2,346, and his average 51; his innings of 118 was made against the Players (at Lord's), the chief bowlers being Richardson, Mold, Peel, and Attewell; he scored level with his partner, A.E. Stoddart (his junior by fifteen years), the pair making 151 before a wicket fell, Grace making in all 118 out of 241. This may fairly be considered one of his most wonderful years. May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


Gentlemen v Players, 1898

In 1898 the match between Gentlemen v. Players was, as a special compliment, arranged by the M.C.C. committee to take place on Grace's birthday, and he celebrated the event by scoring 43 and 31 not out, though handicapped by lameness and an injured hand. 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In twenty-six different seasons he scored over 1,000 runs, in three of these years being the only man to do so, and five times being one of only two.


Unconfirmed stories

There are several unconfirmed stories regarding Grace. The most popular holds that Grace was bowled out on the first ball of a charity match, but continued to play, exclaiming “They came to see me bat, not to see you bowl”. It is also rumoured that on one occasion he faced a delivery which pitched up rather sharply and went straight through his beard.


Career overview

During the thirty-six years up to and including 1900, Grace scored nearly 51,000 runs, with an average of 43, and in bowling he took more than 2,800 wickets, at an average cost of about 20 runs per wicket. He made his highest aggregate (2,739 runs) and had his highest average (78) in 1871; his average for the decade 1868–1877 was 57 runs. His style as a batsman was more commanding than graceful, but as to its soundness and efficacy there were never two opinions; the severest criticism ever passed upon his powers was to the effect that he did not play slow bowling quite as well as fast. He played Test cricket against Australia in the 1880s, but he was already past his peak at that stage. He played his last Test at the age of 50. Cricket batsman A batsman in the sport of cricket is a player whose speciality in the game is batting. ... Test cricket is the longest form of the sport of cricket. ... Events and Trends Technology Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ...



Preceded by:
Walter Read
English national cricket captain
1888
Succeeded by:
Sir Aubrey Smith
Preceded by:
Sir Aubrey Smith
English national cricket captain
1890
Succeeded by:
Walter Read
Preceded by:
Walter Read
English national cricket captain
1891/2-1893
Succeeded by:
Andrew Stoddart
Preceded by:
Lord Hawke
English national cricket captain
1896
Succeeded by:
Andrew Stoddart


Walter William Read (23 November 1855-6 January 1907) was an English cricketer, who was a right hand bat, right hand slow underarm bowler, but right hand fast roundarm bowler. ... This is a list of cricketers who have captained the English cricket team for at least one Test match. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Sir Charles Aubrey Smith (known as Sir Aubrey Smith) (21 July 1863-20 December 1948) was an English cricketer and actor. ... Sir Charles Aubrey Smith (known as Sir Aubrey Smith) (21 July 1863-20 December 1948) was an English cricketer and actor. ... This is a list of cricketers who have captained the English cricket team for at least one Test match. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Walter William Read (23 November 1855-6 January 1907) was an English cricketer, who was a right hand bat, right hand slow underarm bowler, but right hand fast roundarm bowler. ... Walter William Read (23 November 1855-6 January 1907) was an English cricketer, who was a right hand bat, right hand slow underarm bowler, but right hand fast roundarm bowler. ... This is a list of cricketers who have captained the English cricket team for at least one Test match. ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Andrew Ernest Stoddart (11 March 1863_4 April 1915) was an English cricketer and rugby union player. ... Martin Bladen Hawke (16 August 1860-10 October 1938), from 1887 known as Lord Hawke was an English cricketer who, Wisden wrote, strode the cricketing world like a colossus for half a century, as a player and administrator, and one who played a major part in the modernisation of the... This is a list of cricketers who have captained the English cricket team for at least one Test match. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Andrew Ernest Stoddart (11 March 1863_4 April 1915) was an English cricketer and rugby union player. ...


See also

The legendary WG Grace, who played Test cricket until he was aged 50. ... The History of Test cricket in the period from 1884 to 1889 was one of English dominance over the Australians. ... Test matches in the 19th century were somewhat different affairs than what they are today. ... Founded in 1862, Clifton College is a major coeducational public school in Clifton, Bristol, England. ...

External links

  • Player Profile: W. G. Grace (http://www.cricinfo.com/link_to_database/PLAYERS/ENG/G/GRACE_WG_01000043/) from Cricinfo
  • ACS career stats (http://www.cricket.org/link_to_database/SOCIETIES/ENG/ACS/STATS/GRACE/GRACE_WG_CAREER_SUMMARY.html)
  • Cricketarchive stats (http://www.cricketarchive.co.uk/Archive/Players/0/43/43.html)
  • E. W. Swanton on Grace (http://www.cricket.org/link_to_database/ARCHIVE/CRICKET_NEWS/1998/JUL/SWANTON_ON_GRACE_18JUL1998.html)
  • Manchester Guardian obituary (http://www.guardiancentury.co.uk/1910-1919/Story/0,6051,99003,00.html)

  Results from FactBites:
 
W. G. Grace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2120 words)
One of his sons (W.G. Grace Junior) played for two years in the University of Cambridge XI (and also for Gloucestershire, London County, and the M.C.C. He didn't live up to his illustrious name, averaging 15 with the bat and nearly 40 with the ball.
Grace was one of the finest fieldsmen in England, in his earlier days generally taking long-leg and cover-point, later generally standing point (see Fielding positions in cricket).
His style as a batsman was more commanding than graceful, but as to its soundness and efficacy there were never two opinions; the severest criticism ever passed upon his powers was to the effect that he did not play slow bowling quite as well as fast.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m