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Encyclopedia > Vulpecula
Vulpecula
Vulpecula
Click for larger image
Abbreviation: Vul
Genitive: Vulpeculae
Symbology: the Fox
Right ascension: 20 h
Declination: 25°
Area: 268 sq. deg. (55th)
Main stars: 5, 20
Bayer/Flamsteed stars:
Stars with known planets: 0+0+3=3
Bright stars: 0
Nearby stars: 0
Brightest star: α Vul (Anser) (6 Vul) (4.44m)
Nearest star:  ( ly)
Messier objects: 1
Meteor showers:
Bordering constellations: Cygnus
Lyra
Hercules
Sagitta
Delphinus
Pegasus
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −55°
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of September

Vulpecula (IPA: /vʌlˈpɛkjələ/, Latin: "little fox") is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. This is a celestial map of the constellation Vulpecula the Fox. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... Fox is a general term applied to any one of roughly 27 species of small to medium-sized omnivorous canids in the tribe vulpini with sharp features and a brush-like tail. ... Equatorial Coordinates Right ascension (abbrev. ... In astronomy, declination (abbrev. ... Here is a list of the 88 modern constellations by their area in the sky, measured in square degrees. ... Many of the brighter stars are given names which are known as Bayer designations. ... Flamsteed designations for stars are similar to Bayer designations, except that they use numbers instead of Greek letters. ... Alpha Vulpeculae (α Vul / α Vulpeculae) is the brightest star in the constellation Vulpecula. ... // Headline text HEY!! HOW ARE YOU ALL?? Its nice of you to come read this page. ... A light-year or lightyear, symbol ly, is a unit of length. ... The Messier objects are a set of astronomical objects catalogued by Charles Messier in his catalogue of Nebulae and Star Clusters first published in 1774. ... Leonid Meteor Shower A meteor shower, also known as a meteor storm, is a celestial event where a large number of meteors are seen within a very short period. ... Cygnus (IPA: , Latin: ) is a northern constellation. ... For other uses, see Lyra (disambiguation). ... Hercules (IPA: ) is the fifth largest of the 88 modern constellations. ... Sagitta, being Latin for Arrow, is the third-smallest of all constellations (only Equuleus and Crux are smaller). ... Delphinus, being Latin for Dolphin, is a rather small (ranked 69th) northern constellation very close to the celestial equator. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological Pegasus, named for the winged horse. ... For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words see here. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Fox is a general term applied to any one of roughly 27 species of small to medium-sized omnivorous canids in the tribe vulpini with sharp features and a brush-like tail. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Summer Triangle is an astronomical asterism involving an imaginary triangle drawn on the northern hemispheres celestial sphere, with its defining vertices at Altair, Deneb, and Vega. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a recognized pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is neither an official constellation nor a true star cluster. ... Deneb (α Cyg / α Cygni / Alpha Cygni) is the brightest star in the constellation Cygnus and one of the vertices of the Summer Triangle. ... Vega (α Lyr / α Lyrae / Alpha Lyrae) is a white main sequence star approximately 25. ... Altair (α Aql / α Aquilae / Alpha Aquilae / Atair ) is the brightest star in the constellation Aquila and the twelfth brightest star in the nighttime sky, at visual magnitude 0. ...

Contents

Notable features

There are no stars brighter than 4th magnitude in this constellation. The brightest star in Vulpecula is α Vulpeculae, a magnitude 4.44m red giant at a distance of 297 light-years. The star is an optical binary (separation of 413.7") that can be split using binoculars. The star also carries the traditional name Anser, which refers to the goose the little fox holds in its jaws. Alpha Vulpeculae (α Vul / α Vulpeculae) is the brightest star in the constellation Vulpecula. ... // Headline text HEY!! HOW ARE YOU ALL?? Its nice of you to come read this page. ... Cross section of a red giant showing nucleosynthesis and elements formed According to the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, a red giant is a large non-main sequence star of stellar classification K or M; so-named because of the reddish appearance of the cooler giant stars. ... A light-year, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in one year: exactly 9. ... When two stars are so nearly in the same direction as seen from Earth that they appear to be a single star to the naked eye but may be separated by the use of telescopes, they are referred to as a double star. ...


In 1967, the first pulsar, PSR B1919+21, was discovered in this little constellation by Antony Hewish and Jocelyn Bell, in Cambridge. While they were searching for scintillation of radio signals of quasars, they found a very regular signal consisting of pulses of radiation at a rate of one every few seconds. Terrestrial origin of the signal was ruled out because the time it took the object to reappear was a sidereal day instead of a solar day. This anomaly was finally identified as the signal of a rapidly rotating neutron star. The pulses arrive every 1.3373 seconds — too regular to be associated with any other object. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Composite Optical/X-ray image of the Crab Nebula pulsar, showing surrounding nebular gases stirred by the pulsars magnetic field and radiation. ... PSR B1919+21 is a pulsar with a period of 1. ... Antony Hewish (born Fowey, Cornwall, May 11, 1924) is a British radio astronomer who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1974 (together with fellow radio-astronomer Martin Ryle) for his work on the development of radio aperture synthesis and its role in the discovery of pulsars. ... Jocelyn Bell Burnell (born Jocelyn Bell, 15 July 1943), British astrophysicist who discovered the first radio pulsars with her thesis advisor Antony Hewish. ... This article is about Cambridge, England; see also other places called Cambridge. ... Artists impression of quasar GB1508 A quasar (contraction of QUASi-stellAR radio source) is an astronomical source of electromagnetic energy, including light, which shows a very high redshift. ... On a prograde planet like the Earth, the sidereal day is shorter than the solar day. ... Solar time is based on the idea that when the sun reaches its highest point in the sky, it is noon. ... A neutron star is one of the few possible endpoints of stellar evolution. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Notable deep sky objects

Two well-known deep sky objects can be found in Vulpecula. The Dumbbell Nebula (M27), is a large, bright planetary nebula which was discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier in 1764 as the very first object of its kind. It can be seen with good binoculars in a dark sky location, appearing as a dimly glowing disk approximately 6 arcminutes in diameter. A telescope reveals its double-lobed shape, similar to that of an hourglass. Brocchi's Cluster (Collinder 399) is an asterism formerly thought to be an open cluster. It is also called "the Coathanger" because of its distinctive star pattern when viewed with binoculars or a low power telescope. Deep sky object (DSO) is a term used often in amateur astronomy to denote objects in the night sky other than solar system objects (such as planets, comets and asteroids), single stars and multiple star systems. ... Messier Object 27, the Dumbbell Nebula The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Messier Object 27, M27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula in the Vulpecula constellation, at a distance of about 1250 light years. ... NGC 6543, the Cats Eye Nebula A planetary nebula is an astronomical object consisting of a glowing shell of gas and plasma formed by certain types of stars at the end of their lives. ... Charles Messier Charles Messier (June 26, 1730 – April 12, 1817) was a French astronomer who in 1774 published a catalogue of 45 deep sky objects such as nebulae and star clusters. ... 1764 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Porro-prism binoculars with central focusing Binocular telescopes, or binoculars, (also known as field glasses) are two identical or mirror-symmetrical telescopes mounted side-by-side and aligned to point accurately in the same direction, one to be viewed through each of the users eyes to present the viewer... A minute of arc, arcminute, or MOA is a unit of angular measurement, equal to one sixtieth (1/60) of one degree. ... A telescope (from the Greek tele = far and skopein = to look or see; teleskopos = far-seeing) is an instrument designed for the observation of remote objects. ... Brocchis Cluster, also know as Collinder 399 or The Coathanger, is an asterism located in the constellation Vulpecula. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a recognized pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is neither an official constellation nor a true star cluster. ... The Pleiades is one of the most famous open clusters. ...


Vulpecula is also home to HD 189733b, the closest planet currently being studied by the Spitzer Space Telescope HD 189733 (HD 189733 A) is a yellow dwarf star about 63 light-years away in the constellation Vulpecula, and host to at least one extrasolar planet. ... The Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly the Space Infrared Telescope Facility [SIRTF]) is an infrared space observatory, the fourth and final of NASAs Great Observatories. ...


History

Vulpecula et Anser in Uranographia 1801
Vulpecula et Anser in Uranographia 1801

In the late 17th century the astronomer Johannes Hevelius created this constellation. It was originally known as Vulpecula cum ansere = "the little Fox with the Goose" or Vulpecula et Anser = "the little Fox and the Goose". Hevelius didn't regard Vulpecula and Anser to be two separate constellations, but later the stars were actually subdivided into a separate Anser and a Vulpecula. The Goose, which was represented in the jaws of the Fox, is no longer officially in the sky but remains in the name of star α Vulpeculae: Anser. The name Vulpecula correctly means "little fox", but the translation "Fox" is widely used. Image File history File links Vulpecula-et-Anser-Bode. ... Image File history File links Vulpecula-et-Anser-Bode. ... Johannes Hevelius Johannes Hevelius (Latin), also called Johann Hewelke, Johannes Höwelcke or Johannes Hewel (in German), or Jan Heweliusz (in Polish), (born January 28, 1611 – died January 28, 1687), was a councillor and mayor in Danzig (GdaÅ„sk). ... Alpha Vulpeculae (α Vul / α Vulpeculae) is the brightest star in the constellation Vulpecula. ...


Since it was invented in the 17th century, from faint stars, there is no earlier mythology associated with the constellation Vulpecula.


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Vulpecula
  • The Deep Photographic Guide to the Constellations: Vulpecula
  • Vulpecula page at SEDS (Students for the Exploration and Development of Space)
  • M-27 page at SEDS
The 88 modern Constellations
Andromeda • Antlia • Apus • Aquarius • Aquila • Ara • Aries • Auriga • Boötes • Caelum • Camelopardalis • Cancer • Canes Venatici • Canis Major • Canis Minor • Capricornus • Carina • Cassiopeia • Centaurus • Cepheus • Cetus • Chamaeleon • Circinus • Columba • Coma Berenices • Corona Australis • Corona Borealis • Corvus • Crater • Crux • Cygnus • Delphinus • Dorado • Draco • Equuleus • Eridanus • Fornax • Gemini • Grus • Hercules • Horologium • Hydra • Hydrus • Indus • Lacerta • Leo • Leo Minor • Lepus • Libra • Lupus • Lynx • Lyra • Mensa • Microscopium • Monoceros • Musca • Norma • Octans • Ophiuchus • Orion • Pavo • Pegasus • Perseus • Phoenix • Pictor • Pisces • Piscis Austrinus • Puppis • Pyxis • Reticulum • Sagitta • Sagittarius • Scorpius • Sculptor • Scutum • Serpens • Sextans • Taurus • Telescopium • Triangulum • Triangulum Australe • Tucana • Ursa Major • Ursa Minor • Vela • Virgo • Volans • Vulpecula

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vulpecula, mythology, history, characteristics and obseravations by telescope (941 words)
Vulpecula, or the fox, is a small nailed square constellation of 278º in the North hemisphere closely together of the galactic equator of our galaxy, the Milky Route nailed to the south of the Cygnus swan, and rich in shining stellar fields and weak stars.
Vulpecula is visible in the North hemisphere and the south until latitudes of South 50º from June to December, culminating during the month of September in the North hemisphere on our heads, in the zenith.
Vulpecula limits the north with the constellations of Cygnus and Lyra, to the east with Hercules, the south with the constellations of Sagitta and Delphinus and to the west with the constellation of Pegasus.
Vulpecula - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (492 words)
Vulpecula, being Latin for Fox, is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair.
It was originally known as Vulpecula cum ansere: the Fox and the Goose.
The Goose, which was represented in the jaws of the Fox, is no longer officially in the sky but remains in the name of the alpha star: Anser.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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