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Encyclopedia > Volcae

The Volcae in the 2nd century BC were a large and powerful Celtic nation of Gallia Transalpina, comprised of two branches, the Volcae Arecomici and the Volcae Tectosages. (3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events BC 168 Battle of Pydna -- Macedonian phalanx defeated by Romans BC 148 Rome conquers Macedonia BC 146 Rome destroys Carthage in the Third Punic War BC 146 Rome conquers... A Celtic cross. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. ...


Etymology

Some believe that the name Volcae is related in some manner to the English word "folk", derived from Proto-Germanic *fulka "people" or "host". This is uncertain, since it would imply a loan from Germanic to Celtic. Another posibility would be derivation from PIE ulkwos "wolf" (c.f. Russian volk). This is also unlikely, since the expected P-Celtic form of the word would be volp-. A more likely suggestion is a derivation from PIE *velk, a word for water or dampness (Old Irish failc "bathe"; cognate to English wallow, welkin[1]; c.f. Volga), according to which the Volcae would have been the "river people" [2]. The Proto-Germanic sound change that changed Volcae into *Walha is known as Grimm's law, so that the contact between the Volcae and the early Germanic tribes would have occurred before that sound change, in the later 1st millennium BC. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Map of the Pre-Roman Iron Age culture(s) associated with Proto-Germanic, ca 500 BC-50 BC. The area south of Scandinavia is the Jastorf culture Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish... A slice of strawberry-rhubarb pie à la mode A pie is a baked dish with a pastry shell that covers or completely contains a filling of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, cheeses, creams, chocolate, custards, nuts, or other sweet or savoury ingredient. ... Binomial name Canis lupus Linnaeus, 1758 The Grey Wolf (Canis lupus), also known colloquially as the wolf, is a mammal of the Canidae family and the ancestor of the domestic dog. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... A slice of strawberry-rhubarb pie à la mode A pie is a baked dish with a pastry shell that covers or completely contains a filling of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, cheeses, creams, chocolate, custards, nuts, or other sweet or savoury ingredient. ... Old Irish is the name given to the oldest form of the Irish language which can be more or less fully reconstructed from extant sources. ... For other meanings of the word Volga see Volga (disambiguation) Волга Length 3,690 km Elevation of the source 225 m Average discharge  ? m³/s Area watershed 1. ... Map of the Pre-Roman Iron Age culture(s) associated with Proto-Germanic, ca 500 BC-50 BC. The area south of Scandinavia is the Jastorf culture Proto-Germanic, the proto-language believed by scholars to be the common ancestor of the Germanic languages, includes among its descendants Dutch, Yiddish... Grimms law (also known as the [First] Germanic Sound Shift; German: Erste Deutsche (Germanische) Lautverschiebung) was the first non-trivial systematic sound change ever to be discovered; its formulation was a turning-point in the development of linguistics, enabling the introduction of rigorous methodology in historical linguistic research. ... (2nd millennium BC – 1st millennium BC – 1st millennium – other millennia) Events The Iron Age began in Western Europe Egypt declined as a major power The Tanakh was written Buddhism was founded Cyrus the Great conquered Babylon and created the Persian Empire (6th century BC) Sparta and Athens fought the Peloponnesian...


The Volcae are consequently believed to have originally been settled in along the Rhine, in what is now south-western Germany, and for some time, the Volcae would have blocked Germanic expansion southwards. It is consequently not surprising that it became the generic name for southerners, i.e. Celts and Romans, contained in Wales, Wallis, Walloon, and Wallachia (see also Etymology of Vlach). The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1,320 km Elevation of the source Vorderrhein: approx. ... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English(100%), Welsh(20. ... Wallis can stand for: German name for canton of Switzerland Valais short name for French territory Wallis and Futuna John Wallis (1616 - 1703), an English mathematician Alfred Wallis (1855 - 1942), an English artist Barnes Wallis (1887 - 1979), an British scientist Hal B. Wallis (1898 - 1986), an American motion picture producer... The term Walloon may refer to either the Walloon language, or to the ethnic people of the same name. ... Map of Romania with Wallachia in yellow. ... Vlach is a Slavic term used to designate the Latin peoples of South-Eastern Europe: Romanians, Aromanians, Megleno-Romanians and Istro-Romanians. ...


Volcae Arecomici

The Volcae Arecomici of their own accord surrendered to the Roman Republic in 121 BC, after which they occupied the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, the southern part of Gallia Transalpina. They held their assemblies in the sacred wood of Nemausus, the site of modern NĂ®mes. See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century) The Roman Republic (Latin: Res Publica Romanorum) was the republican government of the city of Rome and its territories from 510 BC until the establishment of the Roman Empire, which sometimes placed at 44 BC the year of Caesar... Centuries: 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - 1st century BC Decades: 170s BC 160s BC 150s BC 140s BC 130s BC - 120s BC - 110s BC 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC Years: 126 BC 125 BC 124 BC 123 BC 122 BC - 121 BC - 120 BC 119 BC... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120 AD. In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin, provincia, pl. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. ... Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis, 120 AD Gallia Narbonensis was a Roman province located in what is now Provence in southern France. ... Nemausus is often said to have been the Celtic patron god of Nemausus (Nîmes). ... Nîmes is a city and commune of southern France, préfecture (capital) of the Gard département. ...


Volcae Tectosages

The territory of the Volcae Tectosages lay outside the Roman Republic, to the southwest of the Volcae Arecomici. From the 3rd century BC, the capital city of the Volcae Tectosages was Tolosa (modern Toulouse), which was incorporated into the Roman Empire as part of the province of Gallia Aquitania with the conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar in 52 BC. (4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC - other centuries) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events The first two Punic Wars between Carthage and Rome over dominance in western Mediterranean Rome conquers Spain Great Wall of China begun Indian traders regularly visited Arabia Scythians occupy... The Capitole, the 18th century city hall of Toulouse and best known landmark in the city; in the foreground is the Place du Capitole, a hub of urban life at the very center of the city Toulouse (pronounced in standard French, in local Toulouse accent) (Occitan: Tolosa, pronounced ) is a... The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Caesar Augustus). ... Gallia Aquitania, in ancient geography, was a province of the Roman Empire, located in present-day southwest France and bordered by the provinces of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis. ... Map of Gaul circa 58 BC Gaul (from Latin Gallia, c. ... Bust of Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS¹) (b. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 100s BC 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC - 50s BC - 40s BC 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC Years: 57 BC 56 BC 55 BC 54 BC 53 BC 52 BC 51 BC 50 BC 49...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Volcae - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (617 words)
The Volcae are consequently believed to have originally been settled north-east of the Rhine, in what is now western and central Germany in the basin of the Weser River where there are toponyms of supposed Celtic origin.
The territory of the Volcae Tectosages lay outside the Roman Republic, to the southwest of the Volcae Arecomici.
From the 3rd century BC, the capital city of the Volcae Tectosages was Tolosa (modern Toulouse), which was incorporated into the Roman Republic as part of the province of Gallia Aquitania with the conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar in 52 BC.
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