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Encyclopedia > Voiceless alveolar lateral fricative
IPA – number 148
IPA – text ɬ
IPA – image Image:Xsampa-K2.png
entity ɬ
X-SAMPA K
Kirshenbaum s<lat>

The voiceless alveolar lateral fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents voiceless dental, alveolar, and postalveolar fricatives is ɬ, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is K. The symbol ɬ is called "belted l" and should not be confused with "l with tilde", [ɫ], which corresponds to a different sound, the velarized alveolar lateral approximant. It should also be distinguished from a voiceless alveolar lateral approximant, although either are often described as a "voiceless l". The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... IPA symbols, detail from Image:Ipa-chart-consonants-pulmonic. ... HTML has been in use since 1991 (note that the W3C international standard is now XHTML), but the first standardized version with a reasonably complete treatment of international characters was version 4. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... Kirshenbaum, sometimes called ASCII-IPA, is a system used to represent the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in ASCII. It was developed for Usenet, notably the newsgroups sci. ... Image File history File links Voiceless lateral fricative. ... A consonant is a sound in spoken language that is characterized by a closure or stricture of the vocal tract sufficient to cause audible turbulence. ... One might be looking for the academic discipline of communications. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) is a system of phonetic notation devised by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) used in spoken human language. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth. ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... Fricatives (or spirants) are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together. ... The Extended SAM Phonetic Alphabet (X-SAMPA) is a variant of SAMPA developed in 1995 by John C. Wells, professor of phonetics at the University of London. ... The velarized alveolar lateral approximant (also known as dark l) is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. ... The alveolar lateral approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. ...

Contents


Features

Features of the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative:

In linguistics, manner of articulation describes how the tongue, lips, and other speech organs involved in making a sound make contact. ... Fricatives (or spirants) are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together. ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by semi-random, stochastic property changes. ... Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth. ... The alveolar ridge is the ridge on the roof of the mouth between the teeth and the hard palate. ... An apical consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the apex of the tongue (i. ... A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the blade of the tongue, which is the flat top front surface just behind the tip of the tongue. ... Phoneticians define phonation as use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth. ... Laterals are L-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue. ... In phonetics, initiation is the action by which an air-flow is created through the vocal tract. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ... The space between the vocal cords is called the glottis. ...

In English

English does not possess this sound, but English speakers can approximate it by pronouncing the sounds [h] and [l] simultaneously. A phonetically similar sound, the voiceless lateral approximant, occurs in English after /p/ and /k/ in words like 'plead' and 'clean'. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


In other languages

Welsh

In Welsh spelling, the digraph ll represents the voiceless lateral fricative. It is common in place names, many of which begin with Llan, the enclosure connected with a church or parish. The personal name Floyd, an anglicised spelling of llwyd ("grey"), was written with an fl in an attempt to capture both the lateral and fricative aspects of this sound. The more Welsh version of the name, Lloyd, is usually pronounced with an English [l] sound. Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Digraph has several meanings: Directed graph, or digraph Digraph (orthography) Digraph (computing) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Floyd is a variant spelling of the Welsh name Lloyd People: Uncle Floyd aka Floyd Vivino, host of the The Uncle Floyd Show Carlisle Floyd, composer Keith Floyd, British chef Floyd Patterson, boxer Robert Floyd, computer scientist Places: Floyd County, Kentucky Floyd County, Virginia Floyd County, Indiana Floyd County, Georgia... The name Lloyd is a variation of the Welsh word llwyd or clwyd, which means grey or brown. The double-l represents the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative of Welsh, and was sometimes also represented as F, yielding the related name Floyd. ...


Xhosa and Zulu

In Xhosa and Zulu spelling, the letters hl correspond to this sound. Xhosa is one of the official languages of South Africa. ... Zulu, also known as isiZulu, is a language of the Zulu people with about 9 million speakers, the vast majority (over 95%) of whom live in South Africa. ...


Tera

Written as tl -- see [1]


Damin

Damin has an ingressive voiceless lateral fricative [ɬ↓]. That is, the sound is made by inhaling air over the sides of the tongue. This is the only confirmed example in the world of a phoneme regularly produced by inhaling. A secret language spoken in the Gulf of Carpentaria used in mens initiation rites. ...


Proto-Semitic

Main articles: Śat, and [[]], and [[]], and [[]], and [[]]

The sound is assumed as a phoneme for Proto-Semitic, usually transcribed as ś, since it evolved into Arabic [ʃ], Hebrew, [s]: Åšat is a letter of the Geez abugida, descended from South Arabian . ... Proto-Semitic is the hypothetical proto-language of the Semitic languages. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Hebrew (עִבְרִית ‘Ivrit) is a Semitic language of the Afro-Asiatic language family spoken by more than 7 million people, mainly in Israel, the West Bank, the United States and by Jewish communities around the world. ...

Proto-Semitic Akkadian Arabic Phoenician Hebrew Aramaic Ge'ez
ś ش š š š שׂ s שׂ s ś

Amongst Semitic langauges, the sound still exists in contemporary Soqotri. Akkadian (lišānum akkadītum) was a Semitic language (part of the greater Afro-Asiatic language famaily) spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Phoenician was a language originally spoken in the coastal region of what is now Lebanon. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Bible, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early middle ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Aramaic is a Semitic language with a 3,000-year history. ... Geez (also spelt Giiz, translitered Gə‘əz, and pronounced ) is an ancient language that developed in the Ethiopian Highlands of the Horn of Africa as the language of the peasantry. ... Phoenician Sin. ... Soqotri is the native language of the island of Socotra off the southern coast of Yemen. ...


The voiceless lateral approximant

In Icelandic spelling, the initial letters hl, as well as the l in lp, lt, lk are voiceless lateral approximants. Tibetan also has this, for example in the city name Lhasa. However, these sounds lack the striking fricative quality of the Welsh and Zulu lateral fricative. The Tibetan language is typically classified as member of the Tibeto-Burman which in turn is thought by some to be a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family. ... Lhasa prefecture-level city in Tibet Autonomous Region Lhasa (Tibetan: ལྷ་ས་; Wylie: lha-sa; Simplified Chinese: 拉萨; Traditional Chinese: 拉薩; pinyin: Lāsà), sometimes called Llasa, is the traditional capital of Tibet and the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


See also



A acoustic phonetics affricate airstream mechanism Alfred C. Gimson allophone alveolar approximant alveolar consonant alveolar ejective fricative alveolar ejective alveolar flap alveolar nasal alveolar ridge alveolar trill alveolo-palatal consonant apical consonant approximant consonant articulatory phonetics aspiration auditory phonetics B back vowel bilabial click bilabial consonant bilabial ejective bilabial nasal...

  Consonants (List, table) See also: IPA, Vowels  
Pulmonics Bilabial Lab'den. Dental Alveolar Postalv. Retroflex Palatal Velar Uvular Pharyn. Epiglottal Glottal   Non-pulmonics and other symbols
Nasals m ɱ n ɳ ɲ ŋ ɴ  Clicks  ʘ ǀ ǃ ǂ ǁ
Plosives p b t d ʈ ɖ c ɟ k ɡ q ɢ ʡ ʔ  Implo­­sives  ɓ ɗ ʄ ɠ ʛ
Fricatives ɸ β f v θ ð s z ʃ ʒ ʂ ʐ ç ʝ x ɣ χ ʁ ħ ʕ ʜ ʢ h ɦ  Ejec­­tives 
   Approximants    β̞ ʋ ɹ ɻ j ɰ Other laterals  ɺ ɫ
Trills ʙ r ʀ Co-articulated approximants  ʍ w ɥ
Flaps & Taps ɾ ɽ Co-articulated fricatives  ɕ ʑ ɧ
Lat. Fricatives ɬ ɮ Affricates  ʦ ʣ ʧ ʤ
Lat. Appr'mants l ɭ ʎ ʟ Co-articulated stops  kp ɡb ŋm
This page contains phonetic information in IPA, which may not display correctly in some browsers. [Help]
Where symbols appear in pairs, the one to the right represents a voiced consonant. Shaded areas denote pulmonic articulations judged impossible.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Voiceless alveolar lateral fricative - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (572 words)
Its manner of articulation is fricative, which means it is produced by constricting air flow through a narrow channel at the place of articulation, causing turbulence.
Its place of articulation is alveolar, which means it is articulated with either the tip or the blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, termed respectively apical and laminal.
It is a lateral consonant, which means it is produced by allowing the airstream to flow over the sides of the tongue, rather than the middle of the tongue.
Alveolar consonant - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (421 words)
Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth.
Alveolar consonants may be articulated with the tip of the tongue (so-called apical consonants), as in English, or with the flat of the tongue just above the tip (the "blade" of the tongue; called laminal consonants), as in French and Spanish.
The laminal alveolar articulation is often mistakenly called dental, because the tip of the tongue can be seen near to or touching the teeth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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