FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Voiced consonant

A voiced consonant is a sound made as the vocal cords vibrate, as opposed to a voiceless consonant, where the vocal cords are relaxed. See phonation for a continuum of degrees of tension in the vocal cords. The vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, are composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched horizontally across the human larynx. ... See Oscillator (disambiguation) for particular types of oscillation and oscillators. ... In phonetics, a voiceless consonant is a consonant that doesnt have voicing. ... Phoneticians define phonation as use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ...


Examples of voiced-voiceless pairs of consonants are:

Voiced Voiceless
[b] [p]
[d] [t]
[g] [k]
[dʒ] (judge) [tʃ] (church)
[v] [f]
[ð] (them, thy) [θ] (thing, thigh)
[z] [s]
[ʒ] (pleasure, allusion) [ʃ] (pressure, Aleutian [in some dialects])

If you place your fingers on your voice box (Adam's apple in your upper throat), you can feel a buzz when you pronounce zzzz, but not when you pronounce ssss. That buzz is the vibration of your vocal cords. Except for this, the sounds [s] and [z] are practically identical, with the same use of tongue and lips. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Thyroid cartilage. ...


Other voiced sounds in English are the nasals /m, n, ŋ/, the approximants /l, r, w, j/ (the latter spelled "y"), and the vowels. A nasal consonant is produced when the velum—that fleshy part of the palate near the back—is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ... Approximants are speech sounds that could be regarded as intermediate between vowels and typical consonants. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-07-18, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


In most languages, the difference between /b, d, g/ and /p, t, k/ is that /b, d, g/ are voiced, while /p, t, k/ are not. However, in English, the main distinction is not that /b, d, g/ are voiced, but rather that /p, t, k/ are aspirated. That is, they differ in voice onset time. In most English dialects, /b, d, g/ are partially voiceless in some environments, such as word initially. In fact, after an /s/, where /p, t, k/ lose their aspiration, the contrast with /b, d, g/ is lost; when a child learning English has acquired voicing distinctions, but not yet acquired the /sp, st, sk/ clusters, the child's pronunciation of spy, sty, sky sounds to an adult like buy, die, guy. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... In phonetics, aspiration is the strong burst of air that accompanies the release of some obstruents. ... In phonetics, voice onset time, commonly abbreviated VOT, is the length of time that passes between when a stop consonant is released and when voicing, vibration of the vocal cords, begins. ... In phonetics, a voiceless consonant is a consonant that doesnt have voicing. ... In linguistics, a consonant cluster is a group of consonants which have no intervening vowel. ...


There are two variables to degrees of voicing: intensity (discussed under phonation), and duration (discussed under voice onset time). When a sound is described as "half voiced" or "partially voiced", it is not always clear if that means that the voicing is weak (low intensity), or if the voicing only occurs during part of the sound (short duration). In the case of English, it is the latter. Phoneticians define phonation as use of the laryngeal system to generate an audible source of acoustic energy, i. ... In phonetics, voice onset time, commonly abbreviated VOT, is the length of time that passes between when a stop consonant is released and when voicing, vibration of the vocal cords, begins. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Voiced consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (338 words)
A voiced consonant is a sound made as the vocal cords vibrate, as opposed to a voiceless consonant, where the vocal cords are relaxed.
Other voiced sounds in English are the nasals /m, n, ŋ/, the approximants /l, r, w, j/ (the latter spelled "y"), and the vowels.
When a sound is described as "half voiced" or "partially voiced", it is not always clear if that means that the voicing is weak (low intensity), or if the voicing only occurs during part of the sound (short duration).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m