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Encyclopedia > Voice instrumental music

Voice instrumental music is the term used for compositions and improvisations for the human voice. This kind of music treats the human voice as an instrument just like the violin or the piano. It seeks to use the expressive capabilities of the human voice to express and perform music without words like a spontaneous improvisation on percussion or a violin sonata. It involves a class of singing which does not use words. In these cases the voice is normally being used as if it is a musical instrument with the mouth producing timbre and rhythm. Wikibooks has more about this subject: Singing Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, often constrasted with speech. ... Look up word in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Word may mean: Word (linguistics), a unit of language that symbolizes or communicates a meaning Microsoft Word, a word processor Word (computer science), a small group of bits Word may also be: In hip hop slang, an exclamation indicating deep and complete... The word voice can mean: The human voice. ... A musical instrument is a device that has been constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... In music, timbre is determined by its spectrum, which is a specific mix of keynote, overtones, noise, tune behaviour, and envelope, as well as the temporal change of the spectrum and the amplitude. ... Rhythm (Greek ρυθμός = tempo) is the variation of the duration of sounds or other events over time. ...


Most of all the increase in the listening of music across cultures has inadvertently made the experience of songs of different languages as voice instrumentals.

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Mediterranean-voice instrumentals

Elaborate traditions of improvisations was and still is an important element in Turkish and Middle Eastern music traditions. Such voice music existed prior to the 1200s and the First Crusade into Palestine and the city of Jerusalem, possibly even before the year 900. The early Christian plainsongs and Gregorian chants have their origins in Jewish voice instrumental music called as nigun. A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1150s 1160s 1170s 1180s 1190s - 1200s - 1210s 1220s 1230s 1240s 1250s Years: 1200 1201 1202 1203 1204 1205 1206 1207 1208 1209 Events and Trends 1200 University of Paris receives charter from Philip II of France 1202-1204 Fourth Crusade - diverted to... The First Crusade was launched in 1095 by Pope Urban II to regain control of the sacred city of Jerusalem and the Christian Holy Land from Muslims. ... Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם Yerushalayim; Arabic: القدس al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Events Persian scientist, Rhazes, distinguished smallpox from measles in the course of his writings. ... Broadly speaking, plainsong is the name given to the body of traditional songs used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. ... Nigun (pl. ...


Ancient voice music

Its use may even be older, considering that contemporary music and classic European music developed as a derivative of its parents, the Classic Poetry and the Myth-Drama plays from the Fertile Crescent Civilizations of Ancient Asia Minor and Northern Africa (Egypt, Rome, Persia, Mesopotamia Valley, Greece, Ethiopia, etc). In the broadest sense, contemporary music is any music being written in the present day. ... Bust of Homer, one of the earliest European poets, in the British Museum Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... The Fertile Crescent is a region in the Middle East incorporating present-day Israel, West Bank, and Lebanon and parts of Jordan, Syria, Iraq and south-eastern Turkey. ... A civilization or civilisation has a variety of meanings related to human society. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Democratici di Sinistra) Area  - City Proper  1290 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,546,807 almost 4,000,000 1... The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Mesopotamia [mesuputāmÄ“u] (Greek: Μεσοποταμία, translated from Old Persian Miyanrudan the Land between the Rivers; Aramaic name being Beth-Nahrain House of Two Rivers) is a region of Southwest Asia. ...


Interestingly, the modern descendants of the ancient !Kung tribes and clans of Southern Africa utilize similar traditional music techniques. That could mean the practice of musical onomatopoeia may be as old as human civilization. Africa is the worlds second-largest continent and second most populous after Asia. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music Wikicities has a wiki about Music: Music MusicNovatory: the science of music encyclopedia Science of Music... The sound of hitting a ball can be described as Whack. In rhetoric, linguistics and poetry, onomatopoeia is a figure of speech that employs a word, or occasionally, a grouping of words, that imitates, echoes, or suggests the object it is describing, such as bang, click, fizz, hush or buzz...


European classical - Voice instrumental music

In European classical music, especially, since the music of Arnold Schoenberg, Carl Orff and Wagnerian composers, the role of voice instrumental music for solo vocalist, voices or chorus, as part of the orchestral score, has become very prominent. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 For the American music critic and journalist, see Harold Charles Schonberg. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895 – March 29, 1982) was a German composer born in Munich. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 in Leipzig – February 13, 1883 in Venice) was next to J.S.Bach and Ludwig v. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... In classical music a chorus is any substantial group of performers in a play, revue, musical or opera who act more or less as one. ... Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ...


The tradition of voice instrumental is very old and strong one in European classical music. It has its roots in the Jewish Nigun and further elaborated in the Gregorian chants. The Vocal instrumental concerto and the figured bass, along with a cappella compositions, during the baroque were a form of the use of the voice as an elaborate instrument. Later on Mozart operas had many arias begin in gibberish using the voice as a tonal instrument. This led to the serious use of voice instrumental music in classical compositions. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... Nigun (pl. ... Gregorian chant is also known as plainchant or plainsong, and is a form of monophonic, unaccompanied singing, which was developed in the Catholic church, mainly during the period 800-1000. ... Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of integer musical notation used to indicate intervals, chords, and nonchord tones, in relation to a bass note. ... A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens: dynamic figures spiral down around a void: draperies blow: a whirl of movement lit in a shaft of light, rendered in a free bravura handling of paint In arts, the Baroque (or baroque) is both a period and the style that dominated it. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... This article is about the musical term aria. ...


However, it was only with the rise of orchestral harmonic-chromatic music that voice instrumental music became a forceful feature in compositions. Richard Wagner used the voice as an integral instrument of the orchestra. His music interwoved the human voice and the orchestral counterpoints into a structural whole. Continuing this German neo-romantic tradition was the music of Gustav Mahler. His compositions used the voice as an orchestral instrument. Even though the voices are assigned words, the essential purpose of the voice is to express the human voice beyond words and linguistic meaning. This is exemplified in the symphonic compositions Das Lied von der Erde and Symphony no 8 also called as symphony of a thousand, because of its usage of a 150 musician voice orchestra along with a 120 person symphony orchestra. In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 in Leipzig – February 13, 1883 in Venice) was next to J.S.Bach and Ludwig v. ... The word voice can mean: The human voice. ... Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Melbourne Symphony Orchestra Orchestra at City Hall (Edmonton). ... Gustav Mahler Gustav Mahler (July 7, 1860–May 18, 1911) was a Bohemian-Austrian composer and conductor. ... Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) is particularly interesting among Gustav Mahlers symphonic works. ...


Voice instrumental in 20th century Classical music

In 20th century classical music, one of the most prominent voice instrumental composers was the German composer Carl Orff. He composed voice instrumental music like Carmina Burana and Catulli Carmina, using voices and choral music which created forceful and primitive inspired rhythmic patterns and simple but powerful harmonic structure. The Second viennese school, especially Alban Berg and Arnold Schoenberg made the elaborate use of voice as instrument in what they called as Sprechmusik and Sprechstimme. Schoenberg employed these in his music Pierrot Lunaire, while Berg employed it in Wozzeck. Their music was also called as Sprechgesang. Voice orchestra was also used in the Kyrie by the Swiss composer Frank Martin. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Carl Orff Carl Orff (July 10, 1895 – March 29, 1982) was a German composer born in Munich. ... The name Carmina Burana refers both to a collection of 13th-century songs and poetry, and 20th-century musical settings of texts from it. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ... Alban Maria Johannes Berg (February 9, 1885 – December 24, 1935) was an Austrian composer. ... Arnold Schoenberg, Los Angeles, 1948 For the American music critic and journalist, see Harold Charles Schonberg. ... Sprechgesang (German for speech song) or Sprechstimme (speech voice) is a technique of vocal production halfway between singing and speaking. ... Pierrot Lunaire (Moonstruck Pierrot or Pierrot in the moonlight) is an important work of Arnold Schoenberg, a setting of Albert Girauds work of French poems of the same name to music, translated into German. ... Wozzeck is the first and most famous opera by Alban Berg. ... Sprechgesang (German for speech song) or Sprechstimme (speech voice) is a technique of vocal production halfway between singing and speaking. ... Kyrie is the vocative case of the Greek word κύριος (kyrios - lord) and means O Lord. ... Frank Martin (September 15, 1890 – November 21, 1974) was a Swiss composer, who lived a large part of his life in the Netherlands, but always remained famous in Switzerland. ...


In avant-garde music, voice instrumental musics became an integral aspect of aleatory music by composers like Luciano Berio and Steve Reich. The Russian saxophonist Vladimir Chekasin performed a piece called Concerto for Voice and Orchestra, which used the voice of Datevik Hovhannessian as a soloist instrument instead of the violin or the piano. Other concerto for voices were written by John Herbert Foulds : Lyra Celtica: Concerto for voice and orchestra op. 50 (1920s) and Reinhold M. Glière : concerto for voice and orchestra (1943). A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music Wikicities has a wiki about Music: Music MusicNovatory: the science of music encyclopedia Science of Music... Luciano Berio (October 24, 1925 – May 27, 2003) was an Italian composer. ... Steve Reich (born October 3, 1936; last name pronounced []) is an American composer. ...


The Polish composer Henryk Górecki composed a prominent part for voice as an instrument in his third symphony Symphony of sorrowful songs, evoking the Holocaust. Henryk MikoÅ‚aj Górecki (born December 6, 1933) is a Polish composer of classical music. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ...


At present elaborate voice instrumental improvisations have become an important part of European free improvisation. This is a type of European classical music that combines the flow of improvisations and the rigour of atonal music. Free improvisation or free music is improvised music without any rules beyond the taste of the musicians involved, and not in any particular style. ... Atonality in a general sense describes music that departs from the system of tonal hierarchies that are said to characterized the sound of classical European music from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries. ...


Voice Transmutation in experimental Classical music

The French composer Pierre Boulez makes use of voice transmutation which he calls as centre and absence. In this the voice is used as an initial compositional model but which would not appear in the final form. Voice transmutation are also done by composers like Jonathan Harvey in compositions like Mortuos plango, vivos voco which interpolates the voice into instrument with the aid of computer techniques. A composer is a person who writes music. ... Pierre Boulez (IPA: /pjɛʁ. ... Jonathan Harvey is a British playwright whose work has earned multiple awards. ...


Maja Ratkje is a Norwegian vocalist and composer using various extended techniques. Extended technique is a term used in music to describe unconventional, unorthodox or improper techniques of singing, or of playing musical instruments. ...


Various folk traditions

A form of Voice improvisation called as Thillana is a very important feature of Carnatic music from South India. Voice instrumental music is the term used for compositions and improvisations for the human voice. ... Tarana is a vocal style in Indian music in which meaningless syllables are used in a very fast rendition. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A map of South India, its rivers, regions and water bodies. ...


Tuvinian throat singing often features wordless and improvised song. The sygyt technique is a particularly good example of this. The Tuva Republic (Tuvan: Тыва Республика; Russian: ) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... Throat singing, also known in the western world as overtone singing, harmonic singing, or harmonic chant; and many other regional names, is a type of singing that manipulates the harmonic resonances (or formants) created as air travels through the human vocal folds and out the lips. ... Sygyt is a technique used in Tuvan throat-singing (xoomii) that utilizes a mid-range fundamental and produces a high-pitched, rather piercing harmonic reminiscent of whistling. ...


The Sámi yoik is also a predominantly wordless form of vocal expression. Sami flag The Sami people (there are other names and spellings including Sámi, Saami and Lapp) are an indigenous people of northern Sweden, Norway, Finland and Russia, covering a total area in the Nordic countries corresponding to the size of Sweden. ... Yoik or juoiggus is a traditional Sami form of song. ...


The musical tradition of "mouth music" was used in various forms of traditional music in the Anglo-Saxon and Gaelic communities. The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... The Gaels are an ethnic group in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, whose language is one that is Gaelic (Goidelic). ...


Hasidic Jews use a form of voice improvisation called nigunim. This consists of wordless tunes vocalized with sounds such as "Bim-bim-bam" or "Ai-yai-yai!", often accompanied by rhthmic clapping and drumming on the table. Examples of this can be seen in the films The Chosen and A Stranger Among Us. Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Nigun (pl. ... The Chosen is a book by Chaim Potok published in 1967. ... A Stranger Among Us is a movie by Sidney Lumet, starring Melanie Griffith and released in 1992. ...


Voice instrumentals in Jazz and Popular Music

The most common types of voice improvisation in the Western world are found in jazz which knows it as scat singing and vocalese. Louis Armstrong was famous for his scat singing. In pop music, doo-wop and other forms of rhythm and blues music employ it; in the Gaelic tradition, there are many terms for it, one of which is diddling. The nonsense choruses of old English ballads, "Hey nonny nonny" and the like are another well known example. Some contemporary jazz musicians have used what they call voicestra, using the voice as an orchestral ensemble. Barbershop music style is also used in many a popular songs. Jazz composers like Rhiannon have concentrated on exploring the beauty of voice instrumental improvisations in jazz music. Jazz is a musical art form originally characterized by blue notes, syncopation, swing, call and response, polyrhythms, and improvisation. ... Scat singing is vocalizing either wordlessly or with nonsense words and syllables as employed by jazz singers who create the equivalent of an instrumental solo using only the voice. ... Vocalese is a style of jazz singing wherein lyrics are written for melodies that were originally part of an all-instrumental composition or improvisation. ... Louis Armstrongs stage personality matched his flashy trumpet as captured in this photo by William P. Gottlieb. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Rhythm and blues (or R&B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Jerry Wexler at Billboard magazine, used to designate upbeat popular music performed by African American artists that combined jazz and blues. ... The Gaels are an ethnic group in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, whose language is one that is Gaelic (Goidelic). ... A ballad is a story in song, usually a narrative song or poem. ... Gotcha!, 2004 International Barbershop Quartet Champion Barbershop harmony is a style of unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... In Welsh mythology, Rhiannon was a daughter of Hefeydd the Old. ... For other article subjects named Jazz see jazz (disambiguation). ...


Hip hop music has a very distinct form of vocal percussion known as beatboxing. It involves creating beats, rhythms, vocal scratching and melodies using the human voice as an instrument. Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ... Beatboxing is the vocal percussion of hip hop culture and music. ... Scratching is a DJ or turntablist technique originated by Grand Wizard Theodore, an early hip hop DJ from New York (AMG). ...


The neo-minimalist Film composer James Horner wrote music with voice instrumental passages by Charlotte Church for the motion picture A beautiful mind. A vocal orchestra music is used in the motion picture Paradise Road. It presented a 50 member female singing ensemble, set on the Japanese front of World War II. Minimalism describes movements in various forms of art and design, especially visual art and music, where the work is stripped down to its most fundamental features. ... James Horner (born August 14, 1953 in Los Angeles, California) is an American composer of film scores. ... Charlotte Church // Charlotte Church (born Charlotte Maria Reed on February 21, 1986 at Llandaff, Cardiff, South Glamorgan, Wales) is a soprano. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons like the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was by far the bloodiest, most expensive, and most significant war in...


Another contemporary example is the almost entirely a cappella album, Medúlla, by Icelandic singer/songwriter Björk. It features beatboxing, choral arrangements and throat singing. Medúlla is a music album by Icelandic singer/songwriter/musician Björk, which was released on August 31st of 2004 (see 2004 in music). ... Björk Björk Guðmundsdóttir IPA: , (born November 21, 1965 in Reykjavík, Iceland) is an Icelandic singer/songwriter with a great expressive range and an interest in many kinds of music including popular, trip-hop, alternative rock, jazz, electronica, folk, and classical. ... Beatboxing is the vocal percussion of hip hop culture and music. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ... Throat singing, also known in the western world as overtone singing, harmonic singing, or harmonic chant; and many other regional names, is a type of singing that manipulates the harmonic resonances (or formants) created as air travels through the human vocal folds and out the lips. ...


Our Prayer by Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys is a wordless, acapella workout, featuring multiple vocal lines that intertwine and modulate into various chord shapes. Brian Wilson today. ... The Beach Boys, 1963 (L to R, David Marks, Carl Wilson, Dennis Wilson, Mike Love, Brian Wilson) The Beach Boys are a pop music group formed in Hawthorne, California in 1961, whose popularity has lasted into the twenty-first century. ...


Voice instrumental music is featured in Pink Floyd's music; "The Great Gig in the Sky", from the album the Dark Side of the Moon. The progressive rock piece "Echoes" by Pink Floyd, also uses the voice as part of the instrumental music even though there are sparse lyrics assigned to the voice parts. Others include Yes and Queen, notably the latter's "Seaside Rendezvous" on the album A Night at the Opera. Pink Floyd circa 1971. ... Dark Side of the Moon (DSotM; the initial The is included in some versions of the title) is a 1973 concept album by Pink Floyd, dealing with the pressures of life such as time, money, war, mental illness, and death. ... Echoes is a song by Pink Floyd including lengthy instrumental passages. ... Yes in concert in Indianapolis in 1977 (left to right, Steve Howe, Alan White, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman) Yes are a progressive rock band that formed in London in 1968. ... The word Queen ultimately derives from an Indo-European root *gwena (woman) via Old English cwén (woman, wife, queen). ... A Night at the Opera is a rock album by British band Queen originally released in 1975. ...


Onomatopoeia

Onomatopoeic music uses the mouth and vocal folds (that is, voice) as the primary musical instrument. A common musical tool in European and American cultures is a method of voice music, technically called as solfege. A solfege is a vocalized musical scale that is commonly known as Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti. A solfege may be sung, spoken or used in a combination. A variety of similar tools are found in scat singing of jazz, Delta blues and also rock and roll and the ska of reggae (the last which is also called Two Tone). The word voice can mean: The human voice. ... This article is about the continent. ... Solfege table in an Irish classroom Do re mi Do Re Mi is also the name of a song by Nirvana. ... In music, a scale is a set of musical notes in order by pitch, either ascending or descending. ... Scat singing is vocalizing either wordlessly or with nonsense words and syllables as employed by jazz singers who create the equivalent of an instrumental solo using only the voice. ... For the emotional state, see Depression (mood). ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This page is about ska, the musical style. ... Reggae is a style of music developed in Jamaica. ...


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