FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Vladimir Nabokov
Vladimir Nabokov

Born Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov
April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899
Saint Petersburg, Russian Empire
Died July 2, 1977 (aged 78)
Montreux, Switzerland
Occupation novelist, lepidopterist, professor
Literary movement Modernism, Postmodernism
Notable work(s) Lolita (1955)
Pale Fire (1962)
Spouse(s) Véra Nabokov
Children Dmitri Nabokov
This page is about the novelist. For his father, the politician, see Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, Russian pronunciation: [vlɐˈdʲimʲɪr nɐˈbokəf]) (April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899, Saint PetersburgJuly 2, 1977, Montreux) was a multilingual Russian-American novelist and short story writer. Nabokov wrote his first nine novels in Russian, then rose to international prominence as a master English prose stylist. He also made significant contributions to entomology and had an interest in chess problems. Image File history File linksMetadata Nabokov_book_cover. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Montreux (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... A lepidopterist is a person who catches and collects, or simply studies, lepidopterans, members of an order comprising butterflies, skippers, and moths. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... ... Modernist literature is the literary form of Modernism and especially High modernism; it should not be confused with modern literature, which is the history of the modern novel and modern poetry as one. ... The term Postmodern literature is used to describe certain tendencies in post-World War II literature. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Penguin Classics edition of Pale Fire Pale Fire (1962) is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, his fourteenth in total and fifth in English. ... Dmitri Nabokov (born May 10, 1934), is the only child of Russian writer Vladimir Nabokov. ... Leon Bakst Portrait of Andrei Bely Andrei Bely (Андрей Белый) was the pseudonym of Boris Nikolaevich Bugaev (October 14, 1880 (Old Style)- January 8, 1934), a Russian novelist, poet, theorist, and literary critic. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ... Kafka redirects here. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – May 8, 1880) was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol (Russian: ; IPA: ; Ukrainian: ) (April 1, 1809 — March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Proust redirects here. ... Thomas Mayne Reid (April 4, 1818 - October 22, 1883), was an Irish-American novelist. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy(Lyof, Lyoff) (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , IPA:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Jeffrey Kent Eugenides (b. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa LahiÅ—i) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Zadie Smith (born October 27, 1975) is an English novelist. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov (July 15, 1870 - March 28, 1922) was a Russian criminologist, journalist, and liberal politician. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Montreux (disambiguation). ... Bilingual redirects here. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Godfrey Heathcote Hampstead and Highgate Express, 1905-06 (First Prize) White to move and mate in two. ...


Nabokov's Lolita (1955) is frequently cited as his most important novel, and is his most widely known, exhibiting the love of intricate wordplay and descriptive detail that characterized all his works.[2]. This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Word play is a literary technique in which the nature of the words used themselves become part of the subject of the work. ...

Contents

Biography

Nabokov House - the house in Saint Petersburg where Nabokov was born and lived the first 18 years of his life
Nabokov House - the house in Saint Petersburg where Nabokov was born and lived the first 18 years of his life

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1029 KB) Summary en:Nabokov House Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vladimir Nabokov Nabokov House Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1029 KB) Summary en:Nabokov House Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vladimir Nabokov Nabokov House Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Nabokov House Nabokov House is the house in Saint Petersburg with the modern street number of 47 Great Morskaya Street (Bolshaia morskaia ulitsa), 190000. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland...

Russia

The eldest son of Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov and his wife, née Elena Ivanovna Rukavishnikova, he was born to a rich and prominent Orthodox family of the untitled nobility of Saint Petersburg. He spent his childhood and youth there and at the country estate Vyra near Siverskaya. Nabokov's childhood, which he called "perfect," was remarkable in several ways. The family spoke Russian, English and French in their household, and Nabokov was trilingual from an early age. In fact, much to his father's patriotic chagrin, Nabokov could read and write English before he could Russian. In Speak, Memory Nabokov recalls numerous details of his privileged childhood, and his ability to recall in vivid detail memories of his past was a boon to him during his permanent exile, as well as providing a theme which echoes from his first book, Mary, all the way to later works such as Ada or Ardor: A Family Chronicle. In 1916 Nabokov inherited the estate Rozhestveno, next to Vyra, from his uncle Vasiliy Ivanovich Rukavishnikov ("Uncle Ruka" in Speak, Memory), but lost it in the revolution one year later; this was the only house he would ever own. Vladimir Dmitrievich Nabokov (July 15, 1870 - March 28, 1922) was a Russian criminologist, journalist, and liberal politician. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Набоков; pronounced: vlah-DEE-meer nah-BAWK-awf) (April 10 O.S. [April 22 N.S.], 1899 - July 2, 1977) was a Russian-American author. ... Mary (Russian: Машенька) or Mashenka, is the name of Vladimir Nabokovs first novel. ... Ada or Ardor: A Family Chronicle is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1969. ...

Nabokov inherited the Rastrelli- designed estate "Rozhestveno" in 1916; the only house he ever owned
Nabokov inherited the Rastrelli- designed estate "Rozhestveno" in 1916; the only house he ever owned

Francesco Bartolomeo Rastrelli (1700-71) was the most important baroque architect working in Russia. ...

Emigration

The Nabokov family left Saint Petersburg in the wake of the 1917 Revolution for a friend's estate in the Crimea, where they remained for 18 months. The family did not expect to be out of Saint Petersburg for very long, but in fact they would never return. In September of 1918, they moved to Livadia. After the withdrawal of the German Army (November 1918) and following the defeat of the White Army in early 1919, the Nabokovs left for exile in western Europe. On April 2, 1919, the family left Sevastopol. They settled briefly in England, where Vladimir enrolled in Trinity College, Cambridge and studied Slavic and Romance languages. His Cambridge experiences would later help him in the writing of the novel Glory. In 1920, his family moved to Berlin where his father set up the émigré newspaper Rul'. VN would follow to Berlin after his studies at Cambridge two years later. The February Revolution in 1917 in Russia was the first stage of the Russian Revolution of 1917. ... Motto: ÐŸÑ€Ð¾Ñ†Ð²ÐµÑ‚ание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem: ÐÐ¸Ð²Ñ‹ и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... Livadiya is a suburban district of Yalta, Crimea. ... White army may refer to: The military arm of the White movement, a loose coalition of anti-Bolshevik forces in the Russian Civil War The Saudi Arabian National Guard The National Guard of Kuwait This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Glory is a Russian novel written by Vladimir Nabokov between 1930 and 1932. ...


In 1922, Nabokov's father was assassinated in Berlin by Russian monarchists as he tried to shelter their real target, Pavel Milyukov, a leader of the Constitutional Democratic Party-in-exile. This episode of mistaken, violent death would echo again and again in the author's fiction, where characters would meet their deaths under mistaken terms. In Pale Fire, for example, the poet Shade is murdered accidentally when an assassin fires his weapon at a former king. Shortly after his father's death, his mother and sister moved to Prague. VN, however, stayed in Berlin where he became a recognized poet and writer within the émigré community and published under his pen name V. Sirin - it may signify an owl or a mythological bird - , a pseudonym he used for his Russian writings for about four decades. In Berlin, he also tutored and gave tennis lessons. Pavel Nikolayevich Milyukov (Cyrillic: Павел Николаевич Милюков) (1859-1943) was (alongside Vladimir Lenin and Peter Stolypin) the greatest Russian politician of pre-revolutionary years. ... Penguin Classics edition of Pale Fire Pale Fire (1962) is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, his fourteenth in total and fifth in English. ... Sirin bird on a grape tree. ...


In 1922 Nabokov became engaged to Svetlana Siewert; the engagement was broken off in early 1923 as he had no steady job. In May 1923, he met Véra Evseyevna Slonim and married her in 1925. Their only child, Dmitri, was born in 1934. Dmitri Nabokov (born May 10, 1934), is the only child of Russian writer Vladimir Nabokov. ...


In 1936, when Vera lost her job due to the antisemitic environment, and the assassin of his father was appointed second-in-command of the Russian émigré group, Nabokov started to look for jobs in the English-speaking world. He left Germany with his family in 1937. He and his family moved to Paris, but also stayed during this journey at times at Prague, Cannes, Menton, Cap d'Antibes, and Frejus. In May 1940 the Nabokov family fled from the advancing German troops to the United States on board the Champlain. This article is about the capital of France. ...


America

The Nabokovs settled down in Manhattan and VN started a job at the American Museum of Natural History. In October he met Edmund Wilson, who introduced Nabokov's work to American editors, leading eventually to his recognition. Main Lobby in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ...


Nabokov came to Wellesley College in 1941 as resident lecturer in comparative literature. The position, created specifically for him, provided an income and free time to write creatively and pursue his lepidoptery. Nabokov is remembered as the founder of Wellesley's Russian Department. His lecture series on major nineteenth-century Russian writers was hailed as "funny," "learned," and "brilliantly satirical."[citation needed] The Nabokovs resided in Wellesley, Massachusetts during the 1941-42 academic year; they moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts in September 1942 and lived there until June 1948. Following a lecture tour through the United States, Nabokov returned to Wellesley for the 1944–45 academic year as a lecturer in Russian. He served through the 1947-48 term as Wellesley's one-man Russian Department, offering courses in Russian language and literature. His classes were popular, due as much to his unique teaching style as to the wartime interest in all things Russian. At the same time he was curator of lepidoptery at Harvard's Museum of Comparative Biology. After being encouraged by Morris Bishop, Nabokov left Wellesley in 1948 to teach Russian and European literature at Cornell University. In 1945, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States. For other uses, see Wellesley College (disambiguation). ... A lepidopterist is a person who catches and collects, or simply studies, lepidopterans, members of an order comprising butterflies, skippers, and moths. ... A lepidopterist is a person who catches and collects, or simply studies, lepidopterans, members of an order comprising butterflies, skippers, and moths. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Morris Gilbert Bishop (1893-1973) was a Professor of Romance Literature, University Historian, and an alumnus of Cornell University. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ...



Nabokov wrote his novel Lolita while traveling on butterfly-collection trips in the western United States. (Nabokov never learned to drive, Vera acted as chauffeur; when VN attempted to burn unfinished drafts of Lolita, it was Vera who stopped him. He called her the best-humored woman he had ever known.) [3] In June 1953 he and his family came to Ashland, Oregon, renting a house on Meade Street from Professor Taylor, head of the Southern Oregon College Department of Social Science. There he finished Lolita and began writing the novel Pnin. He roamed the nearby mountains looking for butterflies, and wrote a poem Lines Written in Oregon. On October 1, 1953, he and his family left for Ithaca, New York. [4] This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Oregon County Jackson Settled 1852 Government  - Mayor John Morrison Area  - City  6. ... Southern Oregon University is a university in Ashland, Oregon. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Pnin is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1957. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The City of Ithaca (named for the Greek island of Ithaca) sits on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York State. ...


Montreux

After the great financial success of Lolita, Nabokov was able to return to Europe and devote himself exclusively to writing. Also his son had gotten a position as an operatic bass at Reggio Emilia. On October 1, 1961, he and Véra moved to the Montreux Palace Hotel in Montreux, Switzerland; he stayed there until the end of his life. From his sixth-floor quarters he conducted his business and took tours to the Alps, Corsica, and Sicily to hunt butterflies. In 1976 he was hospitalized with an undiagnosed fever; rehospitalized in Lausanne in 1977, he suffered from severe bronchial congestion, and died on July 2. His remains were cremated and are buried at the Clarens cemetery in Montreux.[5] This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Country Italy Region Emilia-Romagna Province Reggio Emilia (RE) Mayor Graziano Delrio (from July 1, 2004) Elevation 58 m Area 231 km² Population  - Total 141,383  - Density 612/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Reggiani Dialing code 0522 Postal code 42100 Frazioni see list Patron San Prospero  - Day... For other uses, see Montreux (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Montreux (disambiguation). ...


At the time of his death, he was working on a novel titled The Original of Laura. His wife Vera and son Dmitri were entrusted with Nabokov's literary executorship, and though he asked them to burn the manuscript, they were unable to destroy his final work. The manuscript, which is said to consist of around 50 handwritten index cards, has remained in a Swiss Bank vault ever since. Only two people, his son Dmitri and an unknown person, have access to the vault. Portions of the manuscript have been shown to Nabokov scholars. The Original of Laura is a novel that Vladimir Nabokov was writing at the time of his death. ... A literary executor is a person with decision-making power in respect of a literary estate. ...


Birth date

Nabokov was born on April 10, 1899 according to the Julian calendar in use in Russia at that time. The Gregorian equivalent is April 22, which is achieved by adding 12 days to the Julian date. Some sources have incorrectly calculated a date of April 23, by inappropriately using the 13-day difference in the calendars that applied only after February 28, 1900. In Speak, Memory Nabokov explains the cause of the error and confirms the correct date of April 22. But he himself celebrated his birthday on April 23, and stated in an interview with The New York Times, "That is also Shakespeare’s and Shirley Temple’s, so I have nothing to lose by saying I was born on the 23rd."[6] is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Work

May 23, 1969 TIME magazine cover

Nabokov's first writings were in Russian, but he came to his greatest distinction in the English language. For this achievement, he has been compared with Joseph Conrad; yet some view this as a dubious comparison, as Conrad composed only in English, never in his native Polish. (Nabokov himself disdained the comparison for aesthetic reasons, lamenting to the critic Edmund Wilson, "I am too old to change Conradically" — which John Updike later called, "itself a jest of genius." Nabokov, in the very early fifties, offered the critic Edmund Wilson a pocket appraisal: "Conrad knew how to handle readymade English better than I; but I know better the other kind. He never sinks to the depths of my solecisms, but neither does he scale my verbal peaks.") [7] Nabokov translated many of his own early works into English, sometimes in cooperation with his son Dmitri. His trilingual upbringing had a profound influence on his artistry. He has metaphorically described the transition from one language to another as the slow journey at night from one village to the next with only a candle for illumination. Nabokov himself translated two books he wrote in English into Russian, Conclusive Evidence, and Lolita. The first "translation" was made because of Nabokov's feeling of imperfection in the English version. Writing the book, he noted that he needed to translate his own memories into English, and to spend a lot of time explaining things which are well-known in Russia; then he decided to re-write the book once again, in his first native language, and after that he made the final version, Speak, Memory (Nabokov first wanted to name it "Speak, Mnemosyne"). Nabokov was a proponent of individualism, and rejected concepts and ideologies that curtailed individual freedom and expression, such as totalitarianism in its various forms as well as Freud's psychoanalysis.[8] Poshlost, or as he transcribed it, poshlust, is disdained and frequently mocked in his works.[9] Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Nabokov_time_may_23_1969. ... Image File history File links Nabokov_time_may_23_1969. ... TIME redirects here. ... // Joseph Conrad (born Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski; 3 December 1857 – 3 August 1924) was a Polish-born English novelist. ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes confused with Mneme or compared with Memoria) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... Individualism is a term used to describe a moral, political, or social outlook that stresses human independence and the importance of individual self-reliance and liberty. ... Totalitarianism is a term employed by some political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ... Sigmund Freud His famous couch Sigmund Freud (May 6, 1856 - September 23, 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of the psychoanalytic school of psychology, a movement that popularized the theory that unconscious motives control much behavior. ... Today psychoanalysis comprises several interlocking theories concerning the functioning of the mind. ...


Nabokov is noted for his complex plots, clever word play, and use of alliteration. He gained both fame and notoriety with his novel Lolita (1955), which tells of a grown man's devouring passion for a twelve-year-old girl. This and his other novels, particularly Pale Fire (1962), won him a place among the greatest novelists of the 20th century. His longest novel, which met with a mixed response, is Ada (1969). He devoted more time to the composition of this novel than any of his others. Nabokov's fiction is characterized by its linguistic playfulness. For example, his short story "The Vane Sisters" is famous in part for its acrostic final paragraph, in which the first letters of each word spell out a message from beyond the grave. Alliteration is the repetition of a leading consonant sound in a phrase. ... Ada or Ardor: A Family Chronicle is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1969. ... The Vane sisters is the second to last short story by Vladimir Nabokov, written in March of 1951; it is famous for providing one of the most extreme examples of an unreliable narrator. ... For the word puzzle, see Acrostic (puzzle). ...


Nabokov's stature as a literary critic is founded largely on his four-volume translation of and commentary on Aleksandr Pushkin's epic of the Russian soul, Eugene Onegin, published in 1964. That commentary ended with an appendix titled Notes on Prosody which has developed a reputation of its own. It stemmed from his observation that while Pushkin's iambic tetrameters had been a part of Russian literature for a fairly short two centuries, they were clearly understood by the Russian prosodists. On the other hand, he viewed the much older English iambic tetrameters as muddled and poorly documented. In his own words: Look up translate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... Eugene Onegin (Russian: Евгений Онегин, BGN/PCGN: Yevgeniy Onegin) is a novel in verse written by Aleksandr Pushkin. ... The book Notes on Prosody by bi-lingual author Vladimir Nabokov compares differences in iambic verse in the English and Russian languages, and highlights the effect of relative word length in the two languages on rhythm. ... An iamb or iambus is a metrical foot used in various types of poetry. ... In poetry, a tetrameter is a line of four metrical feet: And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea (Anapaest tetrameter) (Byron, The Destruction of Sennacherib) You who are bent and bald and blind (Iambic tetrameter, except for the first foot which is a trochee) (W... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ... Iambic tetrameter is a meter in poetry. ...

I have been forced to invent a simple little terminology of my own, explain its application to English verse forms, and indulge in certain rather copious details of classification before even tackling the limited object of these notes to my translation of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin, an object that boils down to very little—in comparison to the forced preliminaries — namely, to a few things that the non-Russian student of Russian literature must know in regard to Russian prosody in general and to Eugene Onegin in particular.

Nabokov's translation was the focus of a bitter polemic with Edmund Wilson and others; he had rendered the very precisely metered and rhyming novel in verse to (by his own admission) stumbling, non-rhymed prose. He argued that all verse translations of Onegin fatally betrayed the author's use of language; critics replied that failure to make the translation as beautifully styled as the original was a much greater betrayal. Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ...


Nabokov's Lectures on Literature also reveals his controversial ideas concerning art. He firmly believed that novels should not aim to teach and that readers should not merely empathise with characters but that a 'higher' aesthetic enjoyment should be attained, partly by paying great attention to details of style and structure. He detested what he saw as 'general ideas' in novels, and so when teaching Ulysses, for example, he would insist students keep an eye on where the characters were in Dublin (with the aid of a map) rather than teaching the complex Irish history that many critics see as being essential to an understanding of the novel. Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ...


Nabokov's detractors fault him for being an aesthete and for his over-attention to language and detail rather than character development. In his essay "Nabokov, or Nostalgia," Danilo Kiš wrote that Nabokov's is "a magnificent, complex, and sterile art." Russian poet Yvgeny Yevtushenko said in a Playboy interview that he could hear the clatter of surgical tools in VN's prose. Danilo KiÅ¡ (Serbian Cyrillic: Данило Киш) (February 22, 1935 – October 15, 1989) was a Serbian writer of Hungarian/Jewish-Serbian/Montenegrin origin. ...


Not until glasnost did Nabokov's work become officially available in his native country. Gorbachev authorized a five-volume edition of his writing in 1988. //   (Russian: IPA: ) is politics of maximal openness, transparency of activity of all official (governmental) institutes, and freedom of information. ... Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev (Russian: ; Pronunciation: mih-kha-ILL ser-GHE-ye-vich gor-bah-CHOFF) (born March 2, 1931), was leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 until 1991. ...


Nabokov's synesthesia

Nabokov was a synesthete and described aspects of synesthesia in several of his works. In his memoir Speak, Memory, he notes that his wife also exhibited synesthesia; like her husband, her mind's eye associated colors with particular letters. They discovered that Dmitri shared the trait, and moreover that the colors he associated with some letters were in some cases blends of his parents' hues—"which is as if genes were painting in aquarelle". For other uses, see Synesthesia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Gene (disambiguation). ... Watercolor is a painting technique making use of water-soluble pigments that are either transparent or opaque and are formulated with gum to bond the pigment to the paper. ...


Vladimir Nabokov's case of synesthesia can be described in more detail than merely the association of colors with particular letters. For a synesthete letters are not simply associated with certain colors; they are colored. Nabokov frequently endowed his protagonists with a similar gift. In Bend Sinister Krug comments on his perception of the word "loyalty" as being like a golden fork lying out in the sun. In The Defense, Nabokov mentioned briefly how the main character's father, a writer, found he was unable to complete a novel that he planned to write, becoming lost in the fabricated storyline by "starting with colors." Many other subtle references are made in Nabokov's writing that can be traced back to his synesthesia. Many of his characters have a distinct "sensory appetite" reminiscent of synesthesia. For other uses, see Synesthesia (disambiguation). ... Bend Sinister is a 1947 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ...


Entomology

Echinargus in the family Lycaenidae: one of the many genera discovered and named by Nabokov
Echinargus in the family Lycaenidae: one of the many genera discovered and named by Nabokov

His career as an entomologist was equally distinguished. Throughout an extensive career of collecting he never learned to drive a car, and he depended on his wife Véra to take him to collecting sites. During the 1940s, as a research fellow in zoology, he was responsible for organizing the butterfly collection of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. His writings in this area were highly technical. This, combined with his specialty in the relatively unspectacular tribe Polyommatini of the family Lycaenidae, has left this facet of his life little explored by most admirers of his literary works. He identified the Karner Blue. The genus Nabokovia was named after him in honor of this work, as were a number of butterfly and moth species (e.g. many of the genera Madeleinea and Pseudolucia).[10] Echinárgus NABOKOV 1945 [Lycáenidae]: a new genus of butterflies named by Vladimir Nabokov File links The following pages link to this file: Vladimir Nabokov ... Subfamilies Curetinae - Sunbeams Liphyrinae Lipteninae Lycaeninae - Coppers Miletinae - Harvesters Polyommatinae - Blues Poritiinae Styginae (disputed) Theclinae - Hairstreaks, Elfins and see text The Lycaenidae are the second-largest family of butterflies, with about 6000 species worldwide, whose members are also called gossamer-winged butterflies. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... Entomology is the scientific study of insects. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Genera See text. ... Subfamilies Curetinae - Sunbeams Liphyrinae Lipteninae Lycaeninae - Coppers Miletinae - Harvesters Polyommatinae - Blues Poritiinae Styginae (disputed) Theclinae - Hairstreaks, Elfins and see text The Lycaenidae are the second-largest family of butterflies, with about 6000 species worldwide, whose members are also called gossamer-winged butterflies. ... The Karner Blue, Lycaeides melissa samuelis, is a small, blue butterfly found in small areas of New Jersey, the Great Lakes region, and eastern upstate New York. ... For other uses, see Genus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ...

Butterflies drawn by V (Vladimir) for V (Vera).Nabokov House of Saint Petersburg.
Butterflies drawn by V (Vladimir) for V (Vera).
Nabokov House of Saint Petersburg.

The paleontologist and essayist Stephen Jay Gould discussed Nabokov's lepidoptery in an essay reprinted in his book I Have Landed. Gould notes that Nabokov was occasionally a scientific "stick-in-the-mud"; for example, Nabokov never accepted that genetics or the counting of chromosomes could be a valid way to distinguish species of insects, and relied on the traditional (for lepidopterists) microscopic comparison of their genitalia. The Harvard Museum of Natural History, which now contains the Museum of Comparative Zoology, still possesses Nabokov's "genitalia cabinet", where the author stored his collection of male blue butterfly genitalia. [1], [2] "Nabokov was a serious taxonomist," according to the museum staff writer Nancy Pick, author of The Rarest of the Rare: Stories Behind the Treasures at the Harvard Museum of Natural History. "He actually did quite a good job at distinguishing species that you would not think were different—by looking at their genitalia under a microscope six hours a day, seven days a week, until his eyesight was permanently impaired." [3] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 820 KB) [edit] Summary Butterflies drawn by en:Vladimir Nabokov for his wife Colection of en:Nabokov House [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 820 KB) [edit] Summary Butterflies drawn by en:Vladimir Nabokov for his wife Colection of en:Nabokov House [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Nabokov House Nabokov House is the house in Saint Petersburg with the modern street number of 47 Great Morskaya Street (Bolshaia morskaia ulitsa), 190000. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... A scheme of a condensed (metaphase) chromosome. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... Harvard Museum of Natural History complex The Harvard Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum on the grounds of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Many of Nabokov's fans have tried to ascribe literary value to his scientific papers, Gould notes. Conversely, others have claimed that his scientific work enriched his literary output. Gould advocates a third view, holding that the other two positions are examples of the post hoc ergo propter hoc logical fallacy. Rather than assuming that either side of Nabokov's work caused or stimulated the other, Gould proposes that both stemmed from Nabokov's love of detail, contemplation and symmetry. For the episode of the television program The West Wing, see Post Hoc, Ergo Propter Hoc (The West Wing). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Fallacy. ...


Chess problems

Nabokov spent considerable time during his exile on the composition of chess problems. Such compositions he published in the Russian émigré press, Poems and Problems (18 chess compositions) and Speak, Memory (1 problem). He describes the process of composing and constructing in his memoir: "The strain on the mind is formidable; the element of time drops out of one consciousness..." To him, the "originality, invention, conciseness, harmony, complexity, and splendid insincerity" of creating a chess problem was similar to that of in any other art. Excelsior by Sam Loyd. ... Poems and Problems was an unusual book written by Vladimir Nabokov and published in 1969. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Набоков; pronounced: vlah-DEE-meer nah-BAWK-awf) (April 10 O.S. [April 22 N.S.], 1899 - July 2, 1977) was a Russian-American author. ...


Influence

The critic James Wood argued that Nabokov's use of descriptive detail proved an "overpowering, and not always very fruitful, influence on two or three generations after him", including authors such as Martin Amis and John Updike.[11] While a student at Cornell in the 1950s, Thomas Pynchon attended several of Nabokov's lectures;[12] Pynchon later referenced Lolita in his novel The Crying of Lot 49 (1966), and may have been influenced by Nabokov's preference for actualism over realism.[13] Of the authors who came to prominence during Nabokov's lifetime, John Banville,[14] Don DeLillo,[15] Salman Rushdie,[16] and Edmund White[17] were all influenced by Nabokov. James Wood (born 1965 in Durham, United Kingdom) is a literary critic and novelist. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... Thomas Ruggles Pynchon, Jr. ... The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is a novel by the author Thomas Pynchon. ... This article is about the philosophy actualism. ... John Banville (born 8 December 1945) is an Irish novelist and journalist. ... Don DeLillo (born November 20, 1936) is an American author best known for his novels, which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. ... Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie (born June 19, 1947) is an Indian-British novelist and essayist. ... Edmund Valentine White III (born January 13, 1940) is a novelist, short-story writer and critic. ...


Several authors who came to prominence in the 1990s and 2000s have also cited Nabokov's work as a literary influence. Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Michael Chabon listed Lolita and Pale Fire among the "books that, I thought, changed my life when I read them,"[18] and stated that "Nabokov's English combines aching lyricism with dispassionate precision in a way that seems to render every human emotion in all its intensity but never with an ounce of schmaltz or soggy language".[19] Pulitzer Prize winner Jeffrey Eugenides said that "Nabokov has always been and remains one of my favorite writers. He’s able to juggle ten balls where most people can juggle three or four."[20] T. Coraghessan Boyle said that "Nabokov's playfulness and the ravishing beauty of his prose are ongoing influences" on his writing,[21] and Jhumpa Lahiri,[22] Marisha Pessl,[23] and Zadie Smith[24] have also acknowledged Nabokov's influence. The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Jeffrey Kent Eugenides (b. ... T. Coraghessan Boyle (also known as T.C. Boyle, born Thomas John Boyle on December 2, 1948) is a U.S. novelist and short story writer. ... Jhumpa Lahiri Vourvoulias (born Nilanjana Sudeshna in 1967) (Bengali: ঝুম্পা লাহিড়ী Jhumpa LahiÅ—i) is a contemporary Indian American author based in New York City. ... Marisha Pessl (born 1977) is an American writer whose first novel, Special Topics in Calamity Physics (2006; ISBN 067003777X), was released in August 2006. ... Zadie Smith (born October 27, 1975) is an English novelist. ...


List of works

Fiction

Novels and novellas

Samizdat copies of Nabokov's works on display at Nabokov House
Samizdat copies of Nabokov's works on display at Nabokov House

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1045 KB) Samizadat copies of en:Vladimir Nabokovs works Colection of en:Nabokov House Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vladimir Nabokov Nabokov House... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 1045 KB) Samizadat copies of en:Vladimir Nabokovs works Colection of en:Nabokov House Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Vladimir Nabokov Nabokov House... Samizdat, book published by Pathfinder Press containing a collection of forbidden Trotskyist Samizdat texts. ... Nabokov House Nabokov House is the house in Saint Petersburg with the modern street number of 47 Great Morskaya Street (Bolshaia morskaia ulitsa), 190000. ...

Novels and novellas written in Russian
  • (1926) Mashen'ka (Машенька); English translation: Mary (1970)
  • (1928) Korol' Dama Valet (Король, дама, валет); English translation: King, Queen, Knave (1968)
  • (1930) Zashchita Luzhina (Защита Лужина); English translation: The Luzhin Defense or The Defense (1964) (also adapted to film, The Luzhin Defence, in 2001)
  • (1930) Sogliadatai (Соглядатай (Eavesdropper)), novella; first publication as a book 1938; English translation: The Eye (1965)
  • (1932) Podvig (Подвиг (Deed)); English translation: Glory (1971)
  • (1932) Kamera Obskura (Камера Обскура); English translations: Camera Obscura (1936), Laughter in the Dark (1938)
  • (1936) Otchayanie (Отчаяние); English translation: Despair (1937, 1966)
  • (1938) Priglasheniye na kazn' (Приглашение на казнь (Invitation to an execution)); English translation: Invitation to a Beheading (1959)
  • (1938) Dar (Дар); English translation: The Gift (1963)
  • (Unpublished novella, written in 1939) Volshebnik (Волшебник); English translation: The Enchanter (1985)

Mary (Russian: Машенька) or Mashenka, is the name of Vladimir Nabokovs first novel. ... King, Queen, Knave is a novel written by Vladimir Nabokov in 1928. ... The Defense - also titled The Luzhin Defense, a novel written by Vladimir Nabokov, published in 1930. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... The Luzhin Defence is a 2001 movie, directed by Dutch director Marleen Gorris. ... The Eye (Sogliadatai), written in 1930, and translated into English by Dmitri Nabokov in 1965, is Vladimir Nabokovs fourth novel. ... Glory is a Russian novel written by Vladimir Nabokov between 1930 and 1932. ... Laughter in the Dark (Original Russian title: Камера Обскура, Kamera Obskura) is a novel written by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Despair was written by Vladimir Nabokov and originally published in Russia as a serial in Sovremennye Zapiski during 1934. ... Invitation to a Beheading (Russian: Приглашение на казнь, Priglasheniye na kazn) is a novel by Russian-American author Vladimir Nabokov. ... This article is about the Vladimir Nabokov novel. ...

Novels written in English

A shortish novel by Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Владимир Владимирович Набоков), (late 1938 to early 1939), written from a bidet as it were. ... Bend Sinister is a 1947 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Pnin is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1957. ... Penguin Classics edition of Pale Fire Pale Fire (1962) is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, his fourteenth in total and fifth in English. ... Ada or Ardor: A Family Chronicle is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1969. ... Transparent Things is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1972. ... Look At the Harlequins! is a novel written by Vladimir Nabokov, first published in 1974. ... The Original of Laura is a novel that Vladimir Nabokov was writing at the time of his death. ...

Short story collections

  • (1929) Vozvrashchenie Chorba ("The Return of Chorb"). Fifteen short stories and twenty-four poems, in Russian, by "V. Sirin".
  • (1947) Nine Stories
  • (1956) Vesna v Fial'te i drugie rasskazy ("Spring in Fialta and other stories")
  • (1958) Nabokov's Dozen: A Collection of Thirteen Stories (Also reprinted as Spring in Fialta and First Love and Other Stories.)
  • (1966) Nabokov's Quartet
  • (1968) Nabokov's Congeries; reprinted as The Portable Nabokov (1971)
  • (1973) A Russian Beauty and Other Stories
  • (1975) Tyrants Destroyed and Other Stories
  • (1976) Details of a Sunset and Other Stories
  • (1995) The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov (alternative title The Collected Stories) -- complete collection of all short stories
  • (2005) Cloud, Castle, Lake

Nine Stories is an English-language collection of stories written in Russian, French, and English by Vladimir Nabokov. ... Nabokovs Dozen (1958) a collection of 13 short stories by Vladimir Nabokov previously published in American magazines. ... Nabokovs Congeries was a collection of work by Vladimir Nabokov published in 1968 and reprinted in 1971 as The Portable Nabokov. ... The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov (in some British editions, The Collected Stories) is a posthumous collection of every known short story that Vladimir Nabokov ever wrote, with the exception of The Enchanter. ... Cloud, Castle, Lake (ISBN 0141022353) is a short story anthology by Vladimir Nabokov. ...

Drama

  • (1938) Izobretenie Val'sa (The Waltz Invention); English translation The Waltz Invention: A Play in Three Acts (1966)
  • (1974) Lolita: A Screenplay (Despite the credits given in the earlier film version, this was not used.)
  • (1984) The Man from the USSR and Other Plays

Poetry

  • (1916) Stikhi ("Poems"). Sixty-eight poems in Russian.
  • (1918) Al'manakh: Dva Puti (An Almanac: Two Paths"). Twelve poems by Nabokov and eight by Andrei Balashov, in Russian.
  • (1922) Grozd ("The Cluster"). Thirty-six poems in Russian, by "V. Sirin".
  • (1923) Gornii Put' ("The Empyrean Path"). One hundred and twenty-eight poems in Russian, by "Vl. Sirin".
  • (1929) Vozvrashchenie Chorba ("The Return of Chorb"). Fifteen short stories and twenty-four poems, in Russian, by "V. Sirin".
  • (1952) Stikhotvoreniia 1929–1951 ("Poems 1929–1951") Fifteen poems in Russian.
  • (1959) Poems. The contents were later incorporated within Poems and Problems.
  • (1969) Poems and Problems (a collection of poetry and chess problems) ISBN 0-07-045724-7
  • (1979) Stikhi ("Poems"). Two hundred and twenty-two poems in Russian.

Poems and Problems was an unusual book written by Vladimir Nabokov and published in 1969. ...

Translations

From French into Russian

Romain Rolland. ... Romain Rolland (January 29, 1866 - December 30, 1944) was a French writer. ...

From English into Russian

Alice in Wonderland redirects here. ...

From Russian into English

Pushkin may refer to: People Aleksandr Pushkin - a famous Russian poet Apollo Mussin-Pushkin - chemist and plant collector Aleksei Musin-Pushkin - statesman, historian, art collector Other Pushkin, a town in Russia Pushkin Square - square in Moscow Pushkin Museum - fine arts museum in Moscow This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Alternate meaning: Mikhail Lermontov (ship) Mikhail Lermontov in 1837 Mikail Yurevich Lermontov (Михаил Юрьевич Лермонтов), (October 15, 1814–July 27, 1841), Russian poet and novelist, often called the poet of the Caucasus, was born in Moscow, of Scottish descent (from the Learmount family), but belonged to a respectable family of... Fyodor Ivanovich Tyutchev (1803 - 1873) was a significant Russian lyric poet. ... A Hero of Our Time (Russian: ) is a short novel by Mikhail Lermontov, written in 1839 and revised in 1841. ... Mikhail Lermontov in 1837 Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (Михаил Юрьевич Лермонтов), (October 15, 1814–July 27, 1841), a Russian Romantic writer and poet, sometimes called the poet of the Caucasus, was the most important presence in the Russian poetry from Alexander Pushkins death until his own four years later, at the age... The Tale of Igors Campaign (Old East Slavic: Слово о плъку Игоревѣ, Slovo o pălku Igorevě; Modern Russian: Слово о полку Игореве, Slovo o polku Igoreve) is an anonymous masterpiece of East Slavic literature written in Old East Slavic language and tentatively dated by the end of 12th century. ... Eugene Onegin (Russian: Евгений Онегин, BGN/PCGN: Yevgeniy Onegin) is a novel in verse written by Aleksandr Pushkin. ... Aleksandr Pushkin by Vasily Tropinin Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, Aleksandr Sergeevič PuÅ¡kin,  ) (June 6, 1799 [O.S. May 26] – February 10, 1837 [O.S. January 29]) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet[1] [2][3] and the founder of modern Russian... The book Notes on Prosody by bi-lingual author Vladimir Nabokov compares differences in iambic verse in the English and Russian languages, and highlights the effect of relative word length in the two languages on rhythm. ...

Nonfiction

Criticism

  • (1944) Nikolai Gogol
  • (1963) Notes on Prosody (Later appeared within Eugene Onegin.)
  • (1980) Lectures on Literature
  • (1980) Lectures on Ulysses. Facsimiles of Nabokov's notes.
  • (1981) Lectures on Russian Literature
  • (1983) Lectures on Don Quixote

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol (Russian: ; IPA: ; Ukrainian: ) (April 1, 1809 — March 4, 1852) was a Russian-language writer of Ukrainian origin. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... This article is about the fictional character and novel. ...

Autobiographical and other

  • (1951) Conclusive Evidence: A Memoir - first version of Nabokov's autobiography. (British edition titled Speak, Memory: A Memoir)
  • (1954) Drugie Berega (Другие берега, "Other Shores") - revised version of the autobiography
  • (1967) Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited - final revised and extended edition of Conclusive Evidence. It includes information on his work as a lepidopterist.
  • (1973) Strong Opinions. Interviews, reviews, letters to editors.
  • (1979) The Nabokov–Wilson Letters Letters between Nabokov and Edmund Wilson
  • (1984) Perepiska s Sestroi (Переписка с Сестрой (Correspondence with the Sister)) Correspondence between Nabokov and Helene Sikorski; also includes some letters to his brother Kirill
  • (1987) Carrousel. Three long-forgotten short texts that had recently been rediscovered.
  • (1989) Selected Letters
  • (2001) Dear Bunny, Dear Volodya: The Nabokov–Wilson Letters, 1940–1971. A revised and augmented edition of The Nabokov–Wilson Letters.

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Набоков; pronounced: vlah-DEE-meer nah-BAWK-awf) (April 10 O.S. [April 22 N.S.], 1899 - July 2, 1977) was a Russian-American author. ... Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer, noted chiefly for his literary criticism. ... Carrousel is a booklet published in 1987 containing three short texts written by Vladimir Nabokov in 1923 for Karussel, a Russian cabaret. ...

Lepidoptery

  • (2000) Nabokov's Butterflies, collected works on butterflies. ISBN 0-8070-8540-5

Collected Works

  • Boyd, Brian, ed. Vladimir Nabokov, Novels and Memoirs 1943-1951 (Library of America, 1996) ISBN 978-1-88301118-5
  • Boyd, Brian, ed. Vladimir Nabokov, Novels 1955-1962 (Library of America, 1996) ISBN 978-1-88301119-2
  • Boyd, Brian, ed. Vladimir Nabokov, Novels 1969-1974 (Library of America, 1996) ISBN 978-1-88301120-8

Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...

Works about Nabokov

Biography

  • Boyd, Brian. Vladimir Nabokov: The Russian years. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1990. ISBN 0-691-06794-5 (hardback) 1997. ISBN 0-691-02470-7 (paperback). London: Chatto & Windus, 1990. ISBN 0-7011-3700-2 (hardback)
  • Boyd, Brian, Vladimir Nabokov: The American years. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1991. ISBN 0-691-06797-X (hardback) 1993. 0-691-02471-5 (paperback). London: Chatto & Windus, 1992. ISBN 0-7011-3701-0 (hardback)
  • Field, Andrew. VN The Life and Art of Vladimir Nabokov. New York: Crown Publishers. 1986. ISNB 0-517-56113-1
  • Proffer, Elendea, ed. Vladimir Nabokov: A pictorial biography. Ann Arbor, Mich.: Ardis, 1991. ISBN 0-87501-078-4 (a collection of photographs)
  • Schiff, Stacy. Véra (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov). New York, NY.: Random House, 1999. ISBN 0-679-44790-3.

Brian Boyd is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of English at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. ... Stacy Madeleine Schiff (born October 26, 1961[1]) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American nonfiction author and guest columnist for The New York Times. ...

Bibliography

  • Vladimir E. Alexandrov (editor), The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov, New York, Garland Publishing, 1995. ISNB 0-8153-0354-8.
  • Michael Juliar, Vladimir Nabokov: A Descriptive Bibliography, New York, Garland Pub., 1986. ISBN 0-8240-8590-6.

Fictional works

Peter Medak's short television film, Nabokov on Kafka, is a dramatization of Nabokov's lectures on Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis. The part of Nabokov is played by Christopher Plummer. Nabokov makes three cameo appearances, at widely scattered points in his life, in W. G. Sebald's The Emigrants. Peter Medak Peter Medak (December 23, 1937) is a Hungary-born director of British and American movies. ... Dramatization is an act of dramatizing, such as performing a demonstration of an unusual object into an object. ... Kafka redirects here. ... The Metamorphosis (German: ) is a novella by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915, and arguably the most famous of his works along with the longer works The Trial and The Castle. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... W.G. Sebald W. G. (Winfred Georg Maximilian) Sebald (May 18, 1944, Wertach im Allgäu–December 14, 2001, Norfolk, United Kingdom) was a German writer and academic. ... The Emigrants, or Utvandrarna, is a 1971 film which tells the story of a Swedish couple who emigrate to 19th century America. ...


Entomology

  • Johnson, Kurt, and Steve Coates. Nabokov's blues: The scientific odyssey of a literary genius. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-137330-6 (very accessibly written)
  • Sartori, Michel, ed. Les Papillons de Nabokov. [The butterflies of Nabokov.] Lausanne: Musée cantonal de Zoologie, 1993. ISBN 2-9700051-0-7 (exhibition catalogue, primarily in English)
  • Zimmer, Dieter. A guide to Nabokov's butterflies and moths. Privately published, 2001. ISBN 3-00-007609-3 (web page)

See also

Nabokov House Nabokov House is the house in Saint Petersburg with the modern street number of 47 Great Morskaya Street (Bolshaia morskaia ulitsa), 190000. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Nabokov said, "I do not believe that any particular writer has had any definite influence on me." (Strong Opinions, p. 46.) The list given above includes writers who he admired (including Mayne Reid, whose work Nabokov admired as a child) and writers he alluded to in fiction (such as Poe). Such a list might be extended greatly.
  2. ^ http://www.randomhouse.com/modernlibrary/100bestnovels.html
  3. ^ For Vera's varied roles, see her New York Times obituary, "Vera Nabokov, 89, Wife, Muse and Agent," April 11, 1991; the non-incinerated Lolita appears in Brian Boyd's Vladimir Nabokov: The American Years, p. 170; Vera's charm appears in both the Times obituary and p. 601 of Boyd.
  4. ^ Article, Medford Mail Tribune, Nov. 5, 2006, p. 2, "Snapshot: Nabokov's Retreat"
  5. ^ The Garland Companion to Vladimir Nabokov. Vladimir E. Alexandrov (editor). Garland Publishing. New York (1995) ISNB 0-8153-0354-8, pages xxix-l
  6. ^ Whitman, Alden. "Nabokov, Nearing 70, Describes His 'New Girl'." The New York Times, April 19, 1969, http://www.proquest.com/ (accessed December 12, 2007).
  7. ^ This lament came in 1941, with Nabokov an apprentice American for less than one year. Nabokov, Vladimir. Dear Bunny, Dear Volodya: The Nabokov–Wilson Letters, 1940–1971, p. 50. Nabokov, never pen-shy, added in parentheses "this is a good one." The Updike gloss appears in Updike, John, Hugging the Shore, p. 221. Later in the Wilson letters, Nabokov offers a solid, non-comic appraisal: "Conrad knew how to handle readymade English better than I; but I know better the other kind. He never sinks to the depths of my solecisms, but neither does he scale my verbal peaks." This is in November of 1950, p. 282.
  8. ^ The Garland Companion to VN, ibid, pages 412ff
  9. ^ The Garland Companion to VN, ibid, pages 628ff
  10. ^ butterflies
  11. ^ Wood, James. "Discussing Nabokov", Slate. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  12. ^ Siegel, Jules. "Who is Thomas Pynchon, and why did he take off with my wife?" Playboy, March 1977.
  13. ^ Strehle, Susan. "Actualism: Pynchon's Debt to Nabokov," Contemporary Literature 24.1, Spring 1983. 30-50.
  14. ^ "John Banville", The Guardian. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  15. ^ Gussow, Mel. "Toasting (and Analyzing) Nabokov; Cornell Honors the Renaissance Man Who, oh Yes, Wrote 'Lolita'", The New York Times, 1998-09-15.
  16. ^ http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Oct07/Rushdie.cover.gl.html "Bombs, bands and birds recalled as novelist Salman Rushdie trips down memory lane"], Cornell Chronicle, 2007-10-23. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  17. ^ "An Interview with Edmund White", Bookslut, February 2007. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  18. ^ Chabon, Michael (July 2006). It Changed My Life. www.michaelchabon.com. Archived from the original on 2006-10-20. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  19. ^ http://www.libraries.psu.edu/nabokov/vncol26.htm
  20. ^ "Q & A with Jeffrey Eugenides", 5th Estate. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  21. ^ "A Conversation with T. C. Boyle", Penguin Reading Guides.
  22. ^ "The Hum Inside the Skull, Revisited", The New York Times, 2005-01-16. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.
  23. ^ "An interview with Marisha Pessl", Bookslut.com, September 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  24. ^ "Zadie Smith", The Guardian. Retrieved on 2008-04-12.

The Mail Tribune is a seven-day daily newspaper based in Medford, Oregon, United States that serves Jackson County, Oregon, and adjacent areas of northern California. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Contemporary literature is literature, in any form or medium, produced in the present day (post-1960 is an approximate cutoff point). ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Persondata
NAME Nabokov, Vladimir Vladimirovich
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Russian-American novelist, lepidopterist, professor
DATE OF BIRTH April 22 [O.S. April 10] 1899
PLACE OF BIRTH Saint Petersburg, Russia
DATE OF DEATH July 2, 1977
PLACE OF DEATH Montreux, Switzerland
A lepidopterist is a person who catches and collects, or simply studies, lepidopterans, members of an order comprising butterflies, skippers, and moths. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Old Style redirects here. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and Petrograd (Петрогра́д, 1914–1924), is a city located in Northwestern Russia on the delta of the river Neva at the east end of the Gulf of Finland... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Montreux (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Vladimir Nabokov Centennial | Biography (299 words)
The Nabokovs were known for their high culture and commitment to public service, and the elder Nabokov was an outspoken opponent of antisemitism and one of the leaders of the opposition party, the Kadets.
The Nabokov household was trilingual, and as a child Nabokov was already reading Wells, Poe, Browning, Keats, Flaubert, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Tolstoy, and Chekhov, alongside the popular entertainments of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Jules Verne.
Vladimir Nabokov died in Montreux, Switzerland, in 1977.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m