FACTOID # 29: 73.3% of America's gross operating surplus in motion picture and sound recording industries comes from California.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Viterbo" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Viterbo
Comune di Viterbo
Coat of arms of Comune di Viterbo
Municipal coat of arms
Country Italy Italy
Region Lazio
Province Viterbo (VT)
Mayor Giampiero Gabbianelli
Elevation 326 m
Area 406,28 km²
Population
 - Total 60,537
 - Density 148.63/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 42°25′N 12°06′E
Gentilic Viterbesi
Dialing code 0761
Postal code 01100
Frazioni Fastello, Grotte Santo Stefano, Sant'Angelo, Monterazzano, Bagnaia, La Quercia, San Martino al Cimino
Patron Saint Rose of Viterbo
 - Day September 4

Location of Viterbo in Italy
Website: comune.viterbo.it

No file by this name exists; you can upload it. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Provinces of Latium Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... Viterbo (It. ... Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of UTC+1 time zone, 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... Saint Rose of Viterbo (1235 – March 6, 1252) was a virgin saint, born at Viterbo, Italy. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... Image File history File links Italy_Regions_220px_(including_Pelagie_Islands). ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ...


Coordinates: 42°25′N 12°06′E Viterbo is an ancient city and comune in the Lazio region of central Italy, the capital of the province of Viterbo. It is approximately 100 kilometers (60 mi) north of Rome on the Via Cassia, and it is surrounded by the Monti Cimini and Monti Volsini. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... In Italy, the comune, (plural comuni) is the basic administrative unit of both provinces and regions, and may be properly approximated in casual speech by the English word township or municipality. ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Viterbo (It. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Lazio Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The Via Cassia was an important Roman road striking out of the Via Flaminia near the Milvian Bridge in the immediate vicinity of Rome and, passing not far from Veii traversed Etruria. ...


Apart from agriculture, the main resources of Viterbo's area are pottery, marble and wood. The town also hosts the Italian gold reserves, an important Academy of Fine Arts, the University of Tuscia and is located in a wide thermal area attracting many tourist from the whole central Italy.

Contents

History

Although Viterbo is very ancient, its precise origins are unknown. According to the notorious forger, Annio of Viterbo, it originated as an Etruscan town called Surrena. Under the baneful effects of local boosterism, this fabrication continues to be credited in certain quarters; but it has been demonstrated to be sheer invention, designed to endow his native town with an antiquity it did not possess. Map showing the extent of the Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ...


At any rate, on the present site of Viterbo, or nearby, there was a little Roman colony (Vicus Elbii); whether this is the same centre referred to as Vetus Urbs ("Old City") in the Middle Ages is uncertain.


The first firm report of the new city dates to the 8th century, when it is identified as Castrum Viterbii. It was fortified in 773 by the Lombard king Desiderius in his vain attempt to conquer Rome. When the Popes switched to the Frankish support, Viterbo became part of the Papal States, but this status was to be highly contested by the Emperors in the following centuries, until in 1095 it is known it was a free commune. (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ... Events Charlemagne crosses the Alps and invades the kingdom of the Lombards. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... Desiderius, the last king of the Lombards, is chiefly known through his connection with Charlemagne. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Lazio Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious denomination of Christianity with over one billion members. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... Events The country of Portugal is established for the second time. ... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ...


In a period in which the Popes had difficulties asserting their authority over Rome, Viterbo became their favourite residence, beginning with Pope Eugene III (1145-1146) who was besieged in vain in the city walls. In 1164 Frederick Barbarossa made Viterbo the seat of his Antipope Paschal III. Three years later he gave it the title of "city" and used its militias against Rome. In 1172 Viterbo started its expansion, destroying the old city of Ferentum and conquering other lands: in this age it was a rich and prosperous commune, one of the most important of Central Italy, with a population of almost 60,000. Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Lazio Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The Blessed Eugene III, né Bernardo Pignatelli (d. ... Events Pope Lucius II is succeeded by Pope Eugene III Nur ad-Din ascends to power in Syria Construction begins on Notre-Dame dChartres in Chartres, France Korean historian Kim Pusik compiled the historical text Samguk Sagi. ... Events Saint Bernard of Clairvaux preaches the Second Crusade at Vezelay, Burgundy First written mention of Bryansk. ... Events Count Henry I of Champagne marries Marie de Champagne. ... Frederick in a 13th century Chronicle Frederick I (German: Friedrich I. von Hohenstaufen)(1122 – June 10, 1190), also known as Friedrich Barbarossa (Frederick Redbeard) was elected king of Germany on March 4, 1152 and crowned Holy Roman Emperor on June 18, 1155. ... Antipope Paschal III (or Paschal III) was Antipope from 1164 to September 20, 1168. ... Events Duke Richard of Aquitaine becomes Duke of Poitiers. ...


In 1207, Pope Innocent III held a council in the cathedral, but the city was later excommunicated as favourite seat of the heretical Patari and even defeated by the Romans. In 1210, however, Viterbo managed to defeat the Emperor Otto IV and was again in war against Rome. Events Stephen Langton consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury June 17 by Pope Innocent III Births September 8 - King Sancho II of Portugal October 1 - King Henry III of England (d. ... Innocent III, born Lotario de Conti di Segni (Gavignano, near Anagni, ca. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Tsuchimikado, emperor of Japan Emperor Juntoku ascends to the throne of Japan Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor excommunicated by Pope Innocent III for invading southern Italy in 1210 Gottfried von Strassburg writes his epic poem Tristan about 1210 Beginning of Delhi Sultanate Births... Otto IV of Brunswick (died 1218) was King of Germany (1208-1215) and Holy Roman Emperor from 1209 - 1215. ...


In the 13th century it was ruled alternately by the tyrants of the Gatti and Di Vico families. Frederick II drew Viterbo to the Ghibelline side in 1240, but when the citizens expelled his turbulent German troops in 1243 he returned and besieged the city, but in vain. From that point Viterbo was always a loyal Guelph. Between 1257 and 1261 it was the seat of Pope Alexander IV, who also died here. His successor Urban IV was elected in Viterbo. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Frederick II (December 26, 1194 – December 13, 1250), Holy Roman Emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212, unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 until his death in 1250. ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in Italy during the 12th century and 13th century. ... Events Batu Khan and the Golden Horde sack the Ruthenian city of Kyiv Births Pope Benedict XI Deaths April 11 - Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, also known as Llywelyn The Great Prince of Gwynedd Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile... // Events Innocent IV was elected pope. ... The Siege of Viterbo was fought in 1243 between the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II and the rebellious city of Viterbo. ... Guelph has several meanings: Guelph is a city in Ontario, Canada. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Events July 25 - Constantinople re-captured by Nicaean forces under the command of Michael VIII Palaeologus, Byzantine Empire re-formed August 29 - Urban IV becomes Pope, the last man to do so without being a Cardinal first Bela IV of Hungary repels Tatar invasion Charles of Anjou given rule of... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti (Anagni, ca. ... Urban IV, born Jacques Pantaléon (Troyes, ca. ...


In 1266-1268 Clement IV chose Viterbo as the base of his ruthless fight against the Hohenstaufen: here, from the loggia of the Papal Palace, he excommunicated the army of Conradin of Swabia which was passing on the Via Cassia, with the prophetical motto of the "lamb who is going to the sacrifice". Other popes elected in Viterbo were Gregory IX (1271) and John XXI (1276) (who died in the Papal Palace when the floor of his room crumbled down), Nicholas III and the French Martin IV. The Viterbese, who did not agree with the election of a foreigner directed by the King of Naples, Charles I of Anjou, invaded the cathedral where the conclave was held, arresting two of the cardinals. They were subsequently excommunicated, and the Popes avoided Viterbo for 86 years. For broader historical context, see 1260s and 13th century. ... Conradin (right) is executed by Charles I of Sicily, thus extinguishing the Hohenstaufen dynasty, in 1268. ... Clement IV, né Gui Faucoi le Gros ( Guy Foulques the Fat or Guido le Gros) (Saint-Gilles-du-Gard, November 23, year uncertain – Viterbo, November 29, 1268), was elected Pope February 5, 1265, in a conclave held at Perugia that took four months, while cardinals argued over whether to call... Arms of the Hohenstaufen Dynasty The Hohenstaufen (or the Staufer(s)) were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... Portrait of Conradin from the Codex Manesse (Folio 7r). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Via Cassia was an important Roman road striking out of the Via Flaminia near the Milvian Bridge in the immediate vicinity of Rome and, passing not far from Veii traversed Etruria. ... Papal Arms of Pope Gregory IX. Gregory IX, né Ugolino di Conti (Anagni, ca. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... John XXI, born Pedro Julião (1215 – May 20, 1277), a Portuguese also called Pedro Hispano (Latin, Petrus Hispanus), was Pope from 1276 until his death. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... . Nicholas III, né Giovanni Gaetano Orsini (Rome, ca. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion (ca. ... The Kingdom of Naples was born out of the division of the Kingdom of Sicily after the Sicilian Vespers rebellion of 1282. ... Charles I (March 1227 - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous son of King Louis VIII of France, created Count of Anjou by his elder brother King Louis IX in 1246, thus founding the second Angevin dynasty. ... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ...


Without the Popes, the city fell into the hands of the Di Vicos. In the 14th century, Giovanni Di Vico had created a seignory extending to Civitavecchia, Tarquinia, Bolsena, Orvieto, Todi, Narni and Amelia. His dominion was crushed by Cardinal Gil de Albornoz in 1354, sent by the Avignonese popes to recover the Papal States, who built the Castle. In 1375 the city gave its keys to Francesco Di Vico, son of the previous tyrant, but thirteen years later the people killed him and assigned the city first to Pope Urban VI, and then to Giovanni di Sciarra di Vico, Francesco's cousin. But Pope Boniface IX's troops drove him away in 1396 and established a firm Papal suzerainty over the city. The last Di Vico to hold power in Viterbo was Giacomo, who was defeated in 1431. This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Civitavecchia is a town and comune of the province of Rome in the central Italian region of Lazio, a sea port on the Tyrrhenian sea, 50 miles WNW of Rome, 42°06N 11°47E. According to the 2003 census, its population was 50,100. ... Tarquinia, formerly Corneto and in Antiquity Tarquinii, is an ancient city in the province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy. ... Bolsena is a town and comune of Italy, in the province of Viterbo in northern Lazio, 43°39N 11°59E, at 350 meters (1148 ft) above sea-level on the eastern shore of Lake Bolsena. ... The site of Orvieto is an Etruscan acropolis. ... Panorama of Todi. ... Bridge of Narni over the Nera River, Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot, 1826. ... Look up amelia, Amelia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gil Alvarez De Albornoz (1310-1367), Spanish cardinal, was born at Cuenca early in the 14th century. ... Events End of reign of John VI Cantacuzenus, as Byzantine emperor. ... View over the Rhône River to North-East with Mt Ventoux at the rear Palais des papes Square below the Palace of the Popes Paul Vs coat-of-arms on the Palais des papes The Notre Dame des Doms cathedral is located in the heart of Avignon, near... The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... Events October 24 - Valdemar IV of Denmark dies and is succeeded by his grandson Olaf III of Denmark. ... Pope Urban VI (Naples c. ... Boniface IX, né Piero Tomacelli (1356 – October 1, 1404), was the second Roman Pope of the Western Schism from November 2, 1389 – until October 1, 1404). ... Events September 25 - Bayazid I defeats Sigismund of Hungary and John of Nevers at the Battle of Nicopolis. ... Events February 21 - The trial of Joan of Arc March 3 - Eugenius IV becomes Pope May 30 - In Rouen, France, 19-year old Joan of Arc is burned at the stake. ...


Thenceforth Viterbo became a city of secondary importance, following the vicissitudes of the Papal States and becoming part of Italy in 1871. The Papal States (Gli Stati della Chiesa or Stati Pontificii, States of the Church) was one of the major historical states of Italy before the boot-shaped peninsula was unified under the Piedmontese crown of Savoy (later a republic). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Palazzo Papale.
Palazzo Papale.
The Cathedral.
The Cathedral.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 182 KB) Summary Palazzo Papale in Viterbo, Italy. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 182 KB) Summary Palazzo Papale in Viterbo, Italy. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x600, 159 KB) Cathedral of San Lorenzo, Viterbo, Lazio, Italy Photographer: Kanchelskis Image history of it:Immagine:Viterbo SanLorenzo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (900x600, 159 KB) Cathedral of San Lorenzo, Viterbo, Lazio, Italy Photographer: Kanchelskis Image history of it:Immagine:Viterbo SanLorenzo. ...

Main sights

Viterbo's historic center is one of the best preserved medieval towns of central Italy. Many of the older buildings (particularly churches) are built on top of ancient ruins, recognizable by their large stones, 50 centimeters to a side.


The main attraction of Viterbo is the Papal Palace (Palazzo dei Papi), that served as a country residence and a repair in time of trouble in Rome. The columns of the palace are spolia from a Roman temple. A detail of the Loggia of the Papal Palace of Viterbo. ...


The second most important monument of the city is the Cathedral of S. Lorenzo. It was erected in Romanesque style by Lombard architects over a temple of Hercules. It was variously rebuilt from the 16th century on, and was heavily damaged in 1944 by Allied bombs. The notable Gothic belfry is from the first half of the 14th century, and shows influence of Senese artists. The church houses the sarcophagus of Pope John XXI and the picture Christ Blessing by Gerolamo da Cremona (1472). The Duomo di Viterbo, (or Viterbo Cathedral), officially named the Cathedral of San Lorenzo is the main Roman Catholic church of the city of Viterbo in the Province of Viterbo in the northern part of the Italian state of Lazio. ... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... Lombardy (Italian: Lombardia) is a region in northern Italy between the Alps and the Po river valley. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1944 calendar). ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... John XXI, born Pedro Julião (1215 – May 20, 1277), a Portuguese also called Pedro Hispano (Latin, Petrus Hispanus), was Pope from 1276 until his death. ... Events February 20 - The Orkneys and Shetlands are annexed to the crown of Scotland Discovery of Newfoundland by Didrik Pining and João Vaz Corte-Real. ...


Other notable monuments are:

  • The Palazzo Comunale (begun 1460), Palazzo del Podestà (1264) and Palazzo della Prefettura (rebuilt 1771) on the central square Piazza del Plebiscito. The Palazzo Comunale houses a series of 16th century and Baroque frescoes by Tarquinio Ligustri, Bartolomeo Cavarozzi and others.
  • The small Gothic church of Santa Maria della Salute, which has a rich portal.
  • The Romanesque Chiesa del Gesù (11th century). Here the sons of Simon de Montfort stabbed to death Henry of Almain, son of Richard of Cornwall.
  • The Palazzo Farnese (14th-15th century), where Alessandro Farnese, the future Pope Paulus III, lived in his youth together with his beautiful sister, Giulia Farnese.
  • The Rocca (castle).
  • The Romanesque churches of Santa Maria Nuova (12th century), San Sisto (second half of the 9th century), and San Giovanni in Zoccoli (11th century).
  • The Palazzo degli Alessandri in the old district, a typical patrician house of Middle Ages Viterbo.
  • The Fontana Grande, began in 1206.
  • The Gothic church of San Francesco, built over a pre-existing Lombard fortress. It has a single nave with Latin cross plan. It houses the sepulchre of Pope Adrian V, who died in Viterbo on August 17, 1276, considered the first monument by Arnolfo di Cambio.

The Museo Civico (City Museum) houses many archeological specimens from the pre-historical to Roman times, plus a Pinacoteca (gallery) with paintings of Sebastiano del Piombo, Antoniazzo Romano, Salvator Rosa, Antiveduto Grammatica and others. Events The first Portuguese navigators reach the coast of modern Sierra Leone. ... Events May 12 - The Battle of Lewes begins (ends May 14). ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The Western (Royal) Portal at Chartres Cathedral ( 1145). ... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester, also Simon IV de Montfort (1160 – June 25, 1218) was a French nobleman who took part in the Fourth Crusade (1202 - 1204) and was a prominent leader of the Albigensian Crusade. ... Henry of Almain (1235 – March 13, 1271), so called from his fathers German connections, was the son of Richard, Earl of Cornwall and king of the Romans. ... Richard (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272) was Count of Poitou (bef. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... Pope Paul III (February 29, 1468 – November 10, 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope from 1534 to 1549. ... Giulia Farnese was one of the mistresses of the Pope Alexander VI. She was known as Giulia la bella, which in Italian means Giulia the Beautiful. Lorenzo Pucci described her as most lovely to behold. Cesare Borgia, the son of Alexander VI, described her as having dark colouring, black eyes... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... Events Temujin is proclaimed Genghis Khan of the Mongol people, founding the Mongol Empire Qutb ud-Din proclaims the Mameluk dynasty in India, the first dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate. ... Adrian V (also known as Hadrian V), né Ottobuono de Fieschi (c. ... August 17 is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... The tabernacle over the high altar of St. ... Sebastiano del Piombo (1485 – June 21, 1547), Italian painter, was born at Venice. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Salvator Rosa (1615 - March 15, 1673) was an Italian painter and poet of the Neapolitan school. ... David returning triumphant with the head of Goliath, Whitfield Fine Art Antiveduto Grammatica was an proto-Baroque Italian painter, active near Rome. ...


Patron Saints

Santa Maria Rosa is the patron saint of Viterbo. The legend of Santa Rosa is that she helped to eradicate those few who supported the emperors instead of the Popes, around 1250. San Lorenzo is the male patron saint. Events December 13 - Death of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor Louis IX of France is captured by Muslims and has to ransom himself Mabinogion appears Albertus Magnus isolates the element arsenic Vincent of Beauvais writes proto-encyclopedic The Greater Mirror City of Stockholm founded Alphonso III of Portugal takes Algarve...


"La Macchina di Santa Rosa"

The transport of the Macchina di S. Rosa takes place every year, on September 3, at 9 o'clock in the evening. The Macchina is an artistic illuminated bell-tower with an imposing height of 30 m. It weighs between 3.5 and 5 tonnes and is made of iron, wood and papier-mâché. At the top of the tower, the statue of the Patron Saint is enthusiastically acclaimed by the people in the streets of the town centre, where lights are turned off for the occasion. One hundred and thirty Viterbesi men (known as the Facchini) carry the Macchina from Porta Romana through the each of the major streets of Viterbo, concluding with a strenuous ascension up to the Piazza di Santa Rosa, its final resting place. Each Macchina has a life span of five years, after which a new one is built. September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Papier-mâché around a form such as a balloon to create a pig. ...


Stemmi

Viterbo has two stemmi (heraldic badges): The Lion and the Palm Tree. The lion represents Hercules, one of the mythological founders of Viterbo. The palm tree was added sometime in the dark ages (4th-9th century CE) when Viterbo conquered and absorbed a neighboring town. The letters FAUL, often surrounding the badges, refer to four legendary Etruscan nobles families, believed to be involved in the founding of the city. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Heracles. ...


List of Viterbo'Bishop

  • Giovanni Francesco Gàmbara (1568 - 1580)
  • Tiberio Muti (19 Dec 1611 - 14 Apr 1636)
  • Alessandro Cesarini (Jr.) (14 May 1636 - 1638)
  • Francesco Maria Brancaccio (13 Sep 1638 - 2 Jun 1670)
  • Stefano Brancaccio (2 Jun 1670 - 8 Sep 1682)
  • Michelangelo dei Conti (1 Aug 1712 - 14 Mar 1719)
  • Dionisio Ridolfini Conestabile (26 Sep 1803 - 17 Dec 1806)
  • Antonio Gabriele Severoli (11 Jan 1808 - 8 Sep 1824)
  • Gaspare Bernardo Pianetti (3 Jul 1826 - 4 Mar 1861)
  • Gaetano Bedini (18 Mar 1861 - 6 Sep 1864)
  • Matteo Eustachio Gonella (22 Jun 1866 - 15 Apr 1870)
  • Luigi Serafini (27 Jun 1870 - 20 Feb 1880)
  • Antonio Maria Grasselli, O.F.M. Conv. (19 Jun 1899 - 1913)
  • Emidio Trenta (17 Jul 1914 - 1942)
  • Adelchi Albanesi (14 Apr 1942 - 21 Mar 1970)
  • Luigi Boccadoro (8 Jun 1970 - 30 Sep 1986)
  • Fiorino Tagliaferri (14 Mar 1987 - 30 Jun 1997)
  • Lorenzo Chiarinelli (30 Jun 1997- )

Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Luigi Serafini is an Italian graphic artist famous for his unusual and obscure works, such as the Codex Seraphinianus. ...

External links

  • Official Site, including a virtual tour of the city
  • ViterboOnline.Com
  • Festa delle Ciliegie (Cherry Festival and other information)
  • SYA.Org
  • Viterbo on Wikitravel
  • Tourist information about Viterbo on the Francesco Mecucci official website
  • Basket in Tuscia Basketball in Viterbo area

  Results from FactBites:
 
Viterbo City (614 words)
The origins of viterbo appeareance from the archaeological results that have been find again In the centuries, indicating existence to you, since the primordial of the neolithic one, one native etruscan population around to the City of viterbo, the research to the rinaldone and the Riello of are the testimony.
During the fights between papacy and empire, the City of viterbo had alternate vicissitudes, emperor federico II the granted ones varies privileges, between which that one to coin Currency; Viterbo county of the patrimony of saint peter, that is of all the territories donates you to the church.
Viterbo must its importance also to its mineral sorgive waters that gush out in the outskirtses of the city and have rendered famous from old period for its sulphureous waters that has fed numerous etruscan terms and the roman one, whose ruderi are Scattered on the territory.
Diocese of Viterbo and Toscanella (2610 words)
The city of Viterbo in the Province of Rome stands at the foot of Monte Cimino, in Central Italy, in an agricultural region.
Viterbo is famous for its numerous and copious mineral springs, the chief of which is the little sulphur lake of Bulicame; other sulphur springs are those of Bagnaccio, Torretta, and Cruciata.
The government of Viterbo was subsequently confided to, instead of the governor of the Patrimony, a cardinal legate; after 1628 it was the residence of a simple governor.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m