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Encyclopedia > Viswamitra
This page contains Indic text. Without rendering support, you may see irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts. More...

Brahmarishi Viswamitra or Vishwamitra (Sanskrit: विश्वमित्र, viṣvamitra) is one of the most venerated sages of Hinduism. He was a Hindu by birth. He is also known for discovering the Gayatri Mantra. Hindu scriptures mention that only 24 Rishis since antiquity have understood the whole meaning of, and thus wielded the whole power of, the Gayatri Mantra. Sage Vishwamitra is supposed to be the first, and Sage Yajnavalkya the last. Through the power attained this way, Vishwamitra was able to create a counterpart of the cosmos. Image File history File links Created by me. ... The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas used in South Asia, Tibet and Southeast Asia. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Sanskrit ( संस्कृतम्) is an Indo-European classical language of India and a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. ... Hinduism (Sanskrit , also known as and ) is an Indian religious tradition that is based on the Vedas, and is among the oldest still practiced today. ... A Hindu (archaic Hindoo), as per modern definition is an adherent of philosophies and scriptures of Hinduism, the predominant religious, philosophical and cultural system of the Indian subcontinent and the island of Bali. ... Gayatri (gāyatrī) is the feminine form of gāyatra, a Sanskrit word for a song or a hymn. ... In Hinduism, a Rishi () is a sage and/or seer who heard (cf. ... Sage Yajnavalkya of Mithila (perhaps 1800 BC) advanced a 95-year cycle to synchronize the motions of the sun and the moon. ...

Contents


Kaushika

Vishwamitra was a king named Kaushika, and was a valiant warrior and the great-grandson of a great sage named Kusha. One of the four sons of Kusha was Kushanubha, who performed the Puthrakameshti sacrifice and obtained a son named Gadhi as the result. Kaushika was the son of king Gadhi. Brahmarishi Viswamitra or Vishwamitra (Sanskrit: विश्वमित्र, viṣvamitra) is one of the most venerated sages of Hinduism. ...


Kaushika succeeded his father to the kingdom and ruled it ably. He was well liked by his people. Once he was on a tour of his kingdom, listening to the complaints of his subjects, and issuing orders to remedy them.


Quarrel with Vasishta

On one of his exploits, when he was a Hindu, he and his soldiers took rest in the ashram of rishi Vasishta. There, his whole army was well fed and taken care of. This caused a doubt in the king's mind as to how it was possible for this simple ashram to take care of all the arrangements to feed an entire army. He expressed his surprise to the sage. Vasishta replied, Ashrams in ancient India were Hindu hermitages where sages lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... In Hinduism, a Rishi () is a sage and/or seer who heard (cf. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


"O king, this feast that you have partaken with your kinsmen, has been provided by my calf Nandini (sometimes referred as Sabala), who was gifted to me by Indra. You must know that she is the daughter of Indra's cow Kamadhenu. She provides me with everything I need." Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ...


Kaushika was filled with wonder when he heard this. He began to think that possessing this cow would mean a lot to him; after all, the sage did not have to provide food and sustenance for a large army everyday. He expressed a desire to the sage for obtaining Nandini from him. Vasishta was polite, but steadfast in his refusal. He would not be tempted by the offer of untold wealth that was made by Kaushika, for after all who can set a price on a cow, which can readily yield all the riches in the world.


The king grew exceedingly angry. He insulted the Brahmarishi with harsh words, and ordered his soldiers to seize the cow, and drive it to his kingdom. By his yogic powers, the great sage Vasishta, called forth an entire army of fierce warriors. They fought the army of Kaushika and defeated it thoroughly. Kaushika was captured and presented before Vasishta. The sage pardoned the king and sent him away with words of advice. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ...


Alternate Version

In other version, Vasishta destroya Kaushika's entire army by the simple use of his great mystic and spiritual powers, breathing the Aum syllable. Vasishta also thus kills one hundred of Kaushika's sons, while restoring his hermitage's beauty and life. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Kaushika then undertakes a tapasya for several years to please Lord Shiva, who bestows upon him the knowledge of celestial weaponry. He proudly goes to Vasishta's ashram again, and uses all kinds of powerful weapons to destroy Vasishta and his hermitage. He succeeds in the latter but not in the former. Tapasya is a principle of austerity or willingness to bear suffering in Hinduism and related religions such as Buddhism and Jainism. ... This article is about the Hindu God Åšiva. ...


An enraged Vasishta brings out his brahmadanda, a wooden stick imbibed with the power of Lord Creator Brahma. It consumes Kaushika's most powerful weapons, including the brahmastra. Vasishta then attempts to attack Kaushika, but his anger is allayed by the Devas. Kaushika is left humiliated while Vasishta restores his hermitage. Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST transliteration) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as brəhmα:) is the Hindu creator god, and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... Brahmastra is an arrow created by Brahma. ... A Deva, in Hinduism, is a deity, controlling forces of nature such as fire, air, etc. ...


Tapasya

This incident made a deep impression on the King. He realized that the power obtained by penances was far greater than mere physical might. He renounced his kingdom and began his quest to become a greater rishi than Vasishta. He took on the name Vishwamitra. It is very interesting to see all the challenges that Viswamitra faced in his life to become a Brahmarishi, before eventually giving up the greed to possess the cow. After many trials and undergoing many austerities, Vishwamitra at last obtained the title of Brahmarishi from Vasishta himself. During this time he had a daughter named Shakuntala (who appears in the Mahabharata) with Menaka, an apsara in the court of Indra. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... The Recognition of Sakuntala is a play in Sanskrit written by Kalidasa. ... The Mahabharata (Devanagari: महाभारत, phonetically Mahābhārata - see note), sometimes just called Bharata, is one of the two major ancient Sanskrit epics of India, the other being the Ramayana. ... Menaka was sent by Indra, the king of the Gods, to break the severe penance undertaken by Sage Vishwamitra. ... For other uses, see Apsara (disambiguation). ...


Alternate Version

Kaushika seeks to attain the same spiritual power as Vasishta, to become his equal, a brahmarishi. He undertakes a fierce penance for one thousand years, after which Brahma names him a Rajarishi, or royal sage. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST transliteration) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as brəhmα:) is the Hindu creator god, and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ...


After another long penance of ten thousand years, Brahma names him a rishi, thus leaving his royal lineage permanently. In Hinduism, a Rishi () is a sage and/or seer who heard (cf. ...


At this point, Indra, the king of Swarga attempts to test the tapasvin by sending Menaka, an apsara to seduce him. Kaushika falls in love with the beautiful apsara, and makes love with her for many years, losing his self-control and pious credits. After many years he awakes out of his reverie, and angrily confronts Menaka, who tells him everything. Kaushika knows that Menaka genuinely loves him, so with great sorrow he curses her just to be parted from him forever. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... In Hinduism, Svarga (or Swarga) is an underworld, located on Mt. ... Menaka was sent by Indra, the king of the Gods, to break the severe penance undertaken by Sage Vishwamitra. ... For other uses, see Apsara (disambiguation). ...


Kaushika now goes to the banks of the river Kaushiki, which is the spirit of his own sister. After many thousands of years of penance, Brahma names him maharishi, but also tells him that he hasn't become a jitendriya yet, lacking control over his passions. This is brought to light to Kaushika when he angrily curses Rambha, an apsara sent by Indra to seduce Kaushika again, to become a stone for a thousand years. Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST transliteration) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as brəhmα:) is the Hindu creator god, and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... Maharishi is a Rishi who has mastered many arts and is just before the stage of becoming a Brahmarishi. ... Rambha in Hindu mythology is the Queen of the Apsaras, the magical and beautiful female beings in Devaloka. ...


Rise to Brahmarishi

After cursing Rambha, Kaushika goes to the highest mountain of the Himalayas to perform an even more severe tapasya for over a thousand years. He ceases to eat, and reduces his breathing to a bare minimum. Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ...


He is tested again by Indra, who comes as a poor brahmin begging for food just as Kaushika is ready to break a fast of many years by eating some rice. Kaushika instantly gives his food away to Indra and resumes his meditation. Kaushika also finally masters his passions, refusing to be provoked by any of Indra's testing and seductive inteferences. Panini // Who is a Brahmin? To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


At the penultimate culmination of a multi-thousand year journey, Kaushika's yogic power is at its terrible peak, upsetting the very balance of the universe, and sending the celestial order and natural phenomena into turmoil.


Lord Brahma, at the head of the Devas led by Indra, names Kaushika a brahmarishi, and names him Vishwamitra, or Friend of the Universe for his unlimited compassion. He is also embraced by Vasishta, and their enmity is instantly ended. Brahma (written Brahmā in IAST transliteration) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as brəhmα:) is the Hindu creator god, and one of the Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... A Deva, in Hinduism, is a deity, controlling forces of nature such as fire, air, etc. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


Kaushika's Passions

One of Vishwamitra's chief faults was his short temper. He was very quick to anger and sometimes uttered curses on helpless victims, thereby depleting his yogic powers obtained by much penance. People feared his temper and prayed that their actions might not get misconstrued by the touchy sage.


Kaushika's love of Menaka is also considered to have been intense and passionate beyond estimation.


Legends

Vishwamitra is famous in many legendary stories and in different works of Hindu mythology. Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ...


Trisanku

Another story Vishwamitra is known for is his creation of his own version of Swarga or heaven, called Trisanku Swarga. When a proud King Trisanku asked his guru, Vasishta, to send him to heaven in his own body, the guru responded that the body cannot ascend to heaven. References ^ Tirha, B. B. A Taste of Trascendence, (2002) p. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


King Trisanku then asked Vashista's seven sons to send him to heaven. The sons, outraged that Trisanku should come to them when the father had refused, cursed him to be a chandala, or untouchable. When Trisanku woke up the next day, he found himself entirely deformed. Since none of his subjects could recognize him, he was driven out of the kingdom.


He came across Sage Viswamitra, who agreed to help him. Viswamitra organized a great sacrifice and ritual proptiating the Devas, pleading that they accept Trisanku in heaven. Not one Deva responded. Angered, Viswamitra used his yogic powers and ordered Trisanku to rise to heaven. Miraculously, Trisanku rose into the sky until he reached heaven, where he was pushed back down by Indra. Deva can refer to: Deva (Hinduism), a Hindu deity. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


Enraged even more by this, the powerful Viswamitra then commenced the creation of another heaven for Trisanku. He had only completed the heaven when Brihaspati ordered him to stop. Trisanku, however, did not enjoy Trisanku Swarga, he remained fixed in the sky and was transformed into a constellation. In Hinduism, Brihaspati is the god of magic and prayer. ... Pierce this website is not very reliable!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Some well-known constellations contain striking and familiar patterns of bright stars. ...


In the process of forming a new universe, Vishwamitra used up all the tapas he had gained from his austerities. Therefore after the Trisanku episode, Vishwamitra had to start his prayers again to attain the status of a Brahma Rishi, to equal Vashistha.


Harishchandra's Sacrifice

While undertaking a penance, Kaushika helps a poor brahmin boy who has been sold by his parents to be sacrificed at Harishchandra's yagna to please Varuna, the God of the Oceans. The king's son Rohita does not want to be the one sacrificed, as was originally promised to Varuna, so young Sunashepa is being taken. A devastated and terrified Sunashepa falls at the feet of Kaushika, who is deep in meditation, and begs for his help. Panini // Who is a Brahmin? To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Harishchandra, in Hindu mythology was one of the kings of the Solar Dynasty. ... Yagna is an ancient vedic ritual, where sacrifices are made to a particular divinity, using fire (Agni) as a medium. ... This article is about the god. ...


Kaushika teaches secret mantras to Sunashepa. The boy sings these mantras at the ceremony, and is blessed by Indra and Varuna, and Harishchandra's ceremony is also completed. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... This article is about the god. ...


In the Ramayana

In the great epic Ramayana, Vishwamitra is the preceptor of Rama, prince of Ayodhya and the eighth Avatara of Vishnu, and his brother Lakshmana. The Rāmāyana (Sanskrit: रामायण, march or journey (Āyana) of Rāma) is part of the Hindu smriti, written by Valmiki. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... Ayodhya (अयोध्या) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... For other uses of the name Vishnu, see Vishnu (disambiguation). ... Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Lakṣmaṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero of the epic Ramayana. ...


Vishwamitra gives them the knowledge of the Devastras or celestial weaponry, trains them in advanced religion and guides them to kill powerful demons like Tataka, Maricha and Subahu. He also leads them to the swayamvara ceremony for princess Sita, who becomes the wife of Rama. For the municipality in the Philippines, see Taraka, Lanao del Sur. ... In Hindu mythology, Maricha was a demon who played a very important part in twisting the tale of Ramayana. ... Subahu, in Hindu mythology was a demon who tried to interrupt Viswamitras yaga. ... Swayamvara, in ancient India, was a practice of choosing a life partner, among a list of suitors by a girl of marriageable age. ... Sita Devi SITA ...


Gotra

Kousika (Kaushik) is one of many gotras that consider Viswamitra as their root node. A gotra (lit. ...


Another Gothra also exist name "Viswamitra" itself. These people takes transformed Viswamitra as their root.


See also

  • Ramesh Menon, The Ramayana (2001)
  • Hindu mythology, Ramayana
The Rāmāyana by Valmiki - edit
Characters
Dasaratha | Kousalya | Sumitra | Kaikeyi | Janaka | Manthara
Rama | Bharata | Lakshmana | Shatrughna | Sita | Urmila
Viswamitra | Ahalya | Jatayu | Sampati
Hanuman | Sugriva | Vali | Angada | Jambavantha | Vibhishana
Taraka | Surpanakha | Maricha | Subahu | Khara
Ravana | Kumbhakarna | Mandodari | Mayasura
Indrajit | Prahasta | Aksayakumara | Atikay
Lava | Kusha
Places
Ayodhya | Kosala | Mithila | Lanka | Sarayu
Other
Treta Yuga | Raghuvamsa | Lakshman Rekha | Aditya Hridayam | Oshadhiparvata | Sundara Kanda | Pushpaka Vimana | Vedavati | Vanara

 
 

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