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Encyclopedia > Vision (comics)

The Vision is a fictional character who appears in the comic books published by Marvel Comics, most notably as a member of the superhero team, the Avengers. He is an android, referred to in the comics as a "synthezoid." A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Avengers are an elite Marvel Comics superhero team that first appeared in The Avengers vol. ... The android Data, portrayed by Brent Spiner, from the TV series Star Trek: The Next Generation An android is a robot made to resemble a human, usually both in appearance and behavior. ...


Created by writer Roy Thomas and artist John Buscema, the Vision first appeared in The Avengers, volume 1, #57 (October 1968). The character's name (and some incidental details) came from the 1940s Timely Comics character of the same name, a supernatural superhero created by writer Joe Simon and artist Jack Kirby. Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... Timely Comics is the 1940s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Joe Simon (born 1915) was a comic book author and cartoonist who created or co-created many memorable characters in the Golden Age. ... Jack Kirby (August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books. ...

Contents

Vision (Avengers, 1968-2004)

Vision


The Vision. Art by Brian Haberlin. Image File history File links Tpbvision. ...

Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Avengers # 57
(October 1968)
Created by Roy Thomas
John Buscema
Characteristics
Alter ego Inapplicable, brain patterns based on Wonder Man and Alex Lipton
Affiliations Avengers
Notable aliases Victor Shade
Abilities
  • Density control
  • Energy blasts
  • Computer interfacing
  • Superhuman strength, endurance and intelligence

Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... This article is on the Marvel Comics character. ... The Avengers are an elite Marvel Comics superhero team that first appeared in The Avengers vol. ...

Fictional character biography

The modern Vision was created by the robot Ultron, who intended to use this artificial lifeform against Ultron's creator, Henry Pym (Ant-Man/Giant Man/Goliath/Yellowjacket), and his wife, the Wasp. (The Vision's body was thought to have been created from that of the original Human Torch, while the patterns of his synthetic brain were based on those of the then-deceased Wonder Man, Simon Williams. It was later revealed that the time lord Immortus used the power of the Forever Crystal to split the original Human Torch into two separate entities:one remained the original Torch while the other was rebuilt as the Vision by Ultron). The Vision rebelled against his "father" Ultron and joined the Avengers, and later became romantically involved with the Scarlet Witch, Wanda Maximoff. The synthezoid and the mutant eventually married, and appeared to have somehow had twins via the Witch's mutant hex powers. It was later revealed that this was not the case (see two paragraphs below). Ultron is a fictional character, an android supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Dr. Henry Hank Pym is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe, a founding member of the superhero group The Avengers. ... The Wasp is a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Human Torch is a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... This article is on the Marvel Comics character. ... Spoiler warning: Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who began as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine. ... It has been suggested that A-Z of mutants be merged into this article or section. ...


In the earliest stories, the Vision was described as, although artificial, physically identical to a human being in every other respect. As explained in his debut in Avengers #57(1968), "he's every inch a human being --- except that all his body organs are constructed of synthetic materials!" This concept was varied somewhat by artist Neal Adams in Avengers #93, where he had Ant-Man shrink in size and travel inside the synthezoid body, displaying internal organs that had little in common with those of a human being. The nature of the Vision was changed even more radically by writer/artist John Byrne during his run on the West Coast Avengers, where he drew a scene of the Vision without clothing to illustrate that he was lacking in external genitalia, a break with previous continuity that was part of Byrne's reconceptualization of the relationship between the Vision and the Scarlet Witch.


Rogue agents of the United States government, manipulated by the time traveler Immortus, abducted the Vision and dismantled him. Once his remains were recovered by the Avengers, Hank Pym rebuilt him as best he could. However, Simon Williams would not allow his brain patterns to be used again to provide a matrix for Vision's emotions, as he felt the original process had "ripped out his soul" and been done without his consent. Although his love for Wanda led him to feel guilt, he attempted to justify his actions by claiming that the Vision was never anything more than a copy of him, a claim which a number of other Avengers, including the Wasp, believed. This, along with damage to the Vision's synthetic skin when he was dismantled, resulted in his resurrection as a colorless, emotionless synthezoid. Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Spoiler warning: Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ...


Meanwhile, the original Human Torch returned from apparent death, casting doubt on the Vision's identity. The Vision and the Scarlet Witch's children were then revealed not to be children at all, but rather fragments of the soul of the demon Mephisto, who had been broken apart by Franklin Richards shortly before the "birth" of the "twins." The twins were absorbed back into Mephisto, which temporarily drove the Witch insane. Although she recovered, she and the Vision separated, each operating on a different Avengers team. The Human Torch is a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... St. ... Mephisto is a fictional character that appears in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Franklin Richards is a fictional character in Marvel Comics universe. ...

The Avengers #57 (Oct. 1968), debut of the Silver Age Vision. Cover art by penciler-inker John Buscema.

The Vision gradually regained his emotions by adopting new brain patterns from the deceased scientist Alex Lipton, and gained a new body that resembled his original. In addition, Simon Williams's brain patterns gradually reemerged and melded with Lipton's patterns, restoring the Vision to full emotion once more (first Vision miniseries). While recovering from a crippling injury, the Vision gave up his attempt to reconcile with his wife, yet remained a member of the Avengers, briefly becoming romantically involved with teammates Carol Danvers (Warbird) and Mantis before making another attempt at reconciliation with the Scarlet Witch. The cover of Marvel Comics Avengers Vol. ... The cover of Marvel Comics Avengers Vol. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... For the other Marvel Comics character called Ms. ... Mantis is a fictional character, a superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe, and former member of the Avengers. ...


Recently, grief over the loss of the twins again drove the Scarlet Witch insane. She tried to rewrite reality to recreate them, causing a series of threats and incidents to inexplicably occur one after the other. The Vision crashed an Avengers Quinjet into the Avengers Mansion. Walking out of the rubble, he apologized to the other Avengers, telling them he was no longer in control of his body before melting and expelling several spheres from his mouth. The spheres grew into five Ultrons, which were fought and destroyed by the assembled Avengers. During the fight, She-Hulk became enraged and tore apart the remains of the Vision. She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters-Jameson) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ...


The Avengers later believed that Ultron may have put a command in the Vision that would have been activated by the Avengers' Code White alert. It is unknown whether Wanda's magic or Ultron's command was responsible.

The Vision and the Scarlet Witch, as a couple: The Vision and the Scarlet Witch (Vol. 2) #3. Cover art by Richard Howell.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x616, 551 KB)Cover to The Vision and the Scarlet Witch (v2) #3. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (400x616, 551 KB)Cover to The Vision and the Scarlet Witch (v2) #3. ...

Powers and abilities

The Vision was powered by solar energy absorbed through the gem on his forehead. In addition to his ability to discharge this energy via high-intensity solar-powered optic blasts, the Vision possessed the ability to manipulate his mass and density. When the Vision decreased his mass and density to near-nothingness, he could fly by manipulating air currents; when he increased his density to his maximum, he possessed superhuman strength and diamond-like durability. The Vision's speed and agility suffered accordingly. Density, or volumic mass (ISO 31), is a measure of mass per given unit volume. ...


The Vision often used his ability to alter his density to attack his opponents by sticking his intangible hand in their chests and then rematerializing it, a process he described as "physical disruption." The process caused opponents great pain, and typically resulted in their incapacitation.


The Vision's body was capable of self-repair, although massive injuries would leave him temporarily infirm. He also was capable of rapid analysis of data, and could access and communicate with other computer systems. Even as an artificial lifeform, however, the Vision's mind has been shown to be "close enough" to human to be affected by telepathy.


The Vision was one of the most powerful beings on Earth. While not possessing as much raw strength as others like Thor, Wonder Man, and the Hulk, the Vision's ability to manipulate his mass and density make him a formidable adversary. The Vision has defeated the Squadron Supreme's Hyperion, a being with strength rivaling that of Thor. On another occasion he used his density-altering powers to defeat Count Nefaria, another highly powerful individual that also possesses an extremely high level of superhuman strength. Thor (often called The Mighty Thor) is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... This article is on the Marvel Comics character. ... Look up Hulk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hulk may refer to: Hulk (comics), a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe Hulk (film), a 2003 film based on the comic book character, directed by Ang Lee Hulk (ship), a type of ships Hulk (roller coaster), a roller coaster... The Squadron Supreme is a team of comic book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe, a thinly disguised version of DC Comics Justice League of America. ... Origin Hyperion is a Titan from Greek mythology. ... Count Luchino Nefaria is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe. ...


Bibliography

  • The Avengers # 57 (Oct. 1968)
  • The Vision and the Scarlet Witch # 1-4
  • The Vision and the Scarlet Witch (vol. 2) # 1-12
  • The Vision # 1-4
  • The Vision (vol. 2) # 1-4 (also called Avengers Icons: The Vision)

Vision II (Young Avengers, 2005-)

Vision


The young Vision. Art by Jim Cheung. Image File history File links Youngvisionx. ...

Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Young Avengers # 4
Created by Allan Heinberg
Jim Cheung
Characteristics
Alter ego Inapplicable, brain patterns based on Iron Lad
Affiliations Secret Avengers
Young Avengers
Abilities
  • Density control
  • Energy beams
  • Computer interfacing

After the Vision's destruction in Avengers Disassembled, a new Vision based upon him was introduced in Young Avengers by Allan Heinberg and Jim Cheung. This Vision is based on his predecessor's "operating system", but has none of the life experience of the former Vision. Consequently, the Vision has all of the physical and emotional potential of his "father," but where his mind was based on Wonder Man's brain patterns, the new one is based on Iron Lad's. Marvel Comics is an American comic book line published by Marvel Entertainment, Inc. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to the date or issue of a characters first appearance. ... Allan Heinberg is an American film scriptwriter, who currently writes Young Avengers for Marvel Comics, and has been a writer and producer on Party of Five, Sex and the City, Gilmore Girls, and The O.C. Heinbergs series Young Avengers was originally thought to be a distorted concept, with... Jim Cheung is a comic book artist. ... Iron Lad (Nathaniel Richards) is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Avengers are an elite Marvel Comics superhero team that first appeared in The Avengers vol. ... Young Avengers is a comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Avengers Disassembled, referred to in some participating series as Disassembled, is a crossover event between several Marvel Comics series. ... Young Avengers is a comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Allan Heinberg is an American film scriptwriter, who currently writes Young Avengers for Marvel Comics, and has been a writer and producer on Party of Five, Sex and the City, Gilmore Girls, and The O.C. Heinbergs series Young Avengers was originally thought to be a distorted concept, with... Jim Cheung is a comic book artist. ... Iron Lad (Nathaniel Richards) is a fictional character, a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Fictional character biography

Iron Lad, a teenage version of Kang the Conqueror landed in the "present" several months after the Vision's destruction. After being ignored by Captain America and Iron Man, he found the Vision's mangled remains and downloaded his operating system into his armor. He was able to use plans the Vision had created in case the Avengers fell to assemble a new team of "Young Avengers." Once Iron Lad was forced to remove his armor to stop Kang the Conqueror from tracking him, the Vision's operating system caused the armor to become a sentient being for the first time - just in time to save the Young Avengers and buy them some time. Kang was able to use his intimate knowledge of the armor to shut it, along with the Vision, down relatively quickly, before donning the armor. Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ... It has been suggested that Iron Maniac be merged into this article or section. ... Young Avengers is a comic book published by Marvel Comics. ...


When Iron Lad was forced to leave the time period, he left the armor behind with the Vision's operating system activated. Upon Iron Man's examination, it was determined that the new Vision was not the Vision they had known but merely based upon his operating system, and had been sentient for only a very short time.


This Vision is found to be superior to his "father," due to his abilities, but is unable to join the reformed Avengers, as they're concerned that he is still being controlled by Kang the Conqueror. Recently, he used the failsafe program to find another Young Avenger, Thomas Shepherd. The Vision has become something of a leader, due to his brain patterns being based on Iron Lad's. Also, the Vision has changed his appearance from his Iron Lad-like look to that of the original Vision to comfort Iron Lad's former crush, Cassie Lang, the Young Avenger known as Stature and daughter of Ant-Man II (Scott Lang). Kang the Conqueror is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. ... Thomas Shepherd is a fictional character and member of the Young Avengers, a team of superheroes in the Marvel Universe. ... Stature is a fictional character, a superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The second Ant-Man in the Marvel Comics universe is the superhero alter ego of Scott Lang, an electronics expert and reformed thief. ...


It appears that, having inherited Iron Lad's brain patterns, the Vision also inherited his feelings; the Vision and Stature have tended toward a certain degree of physical contact — such as the latter shrinking herself and perching on his shoulder rather than sitting in a chair — and the Vision was noticeably distracted when she seemed to be showing signs of affection for Victor Mancha. After a brief period of wearing the Vision as armor, Chase Stein of the Runaways remarked that "all of a sudden Cassie's like the prettiest, most perfect girl in the world," which the Vision explained were actually his thoughts having been translated to Stein's mind due to psychic feedback. Victor Mancha is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe; a cyborg made by Ultron, he is most popularly known as the character who is one day supposedly going to kill every hero in the Marvel Universe. ... Chase Stein is a comic book character in the ongoing series Runaways, published by Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Runaways (disambiguation). ...


Powers and abilities

It appears that the new Vision by default uses the armor to recreate the former Vision's powers, although the armor itself has additional capabilities, including time-travel. It is unknown exactly how the new Vision's body works or what the Vision can do with it. So far, he has displayed abilities including an approximation of the original Vision's density control, energy blasts in place of the first Vision 's microwave beams, minor shapeshifting similar to Iron Lad's to alter his default appearance, and holographic projections to display information and create disguises.


Other versions

Ultimate Visions

The new Ultimate Vision. Art by Brandon Peterson.
The new Ultimate Vision. Art by Brandon Peterson.

There have been two Vision robots that exist in the Ultimate Marvel Universe. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x825, 280 KB)Cover to the Ultimate Vision back-up story for Ultimate X-Men #56. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (550x825, 280 KB)Cover to the Ultimate Vision back-up story for Ultimate X-Men #56. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ...


In Ultimate Nightmare, members of the Ultimates and the Ultimate X-Men discovered a damaged, sentient robot, who stated that the closest English translation to its name was "Vision". The robot said it had come to Earth 100 years ago to warn them of a threat, but its ship malfunctioned, causing it to crash-land on Earth, in Russia. Under the auspices of the former Soviet Union, the Vision was partially disassembled by government scientists; that, plus damage done in the crash, had kept the robot immobile. It warns that Gah Lak Tus, Eater of Worlds is headed for Earth. Ultimate Nightmare is a five-issue comic book limited series written by Warren Ellis of Transmetropolitan, Planetary, and The Authority fame, after signing an exclusive two-year work-for-hire contract with Marvel Comics, penciled by Trevor Hairsine, noted for working on the Ultimate Six limited series with Brian Michael... The Ultimates are a group of fictional characters, a government-sponsored team of superheroes in the Ultimate Marvel Universe, appearing primarily in their self-titled comic book limited series The Ultimates and The Ultimates 2, published by Marvel Comics, written by Mark Millar and drawn by Bryan Hitch. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Galactus, sometimes called the Devourer of Worlds or Ravager of Planets, is a fictional comic book cosmic entity within Marvel Comics universe. ...


In a four-page-per-installment back-up story running in several Ultimate series, the first Ultimate Vision reappears, in United States government custody and under repair. Those repairs enable the Vision to activate its own self-repair systems and restore itself fully, revealing a true form that is, from a human perspective, decidedly female. It then proceeds to use its restored abilities to show holographic records of its travels as it warned planets of Gah Lak Tus' approach, only to see each planet in turn fail in its own defense and fall to the Eater of Worlds. The story ends with ninety-six hours remaining until Gah Lak Tus arrives, leading directly into the Ultimate Extinction series. Vision has downloaded a complete record of Earth and is repairing its ship so it may move on to the next system in the path of Gah Lak Tus. In Ultimate Extinction #4, the Vision is convinced by Jean Grey to help with a plan Jean has formulated to repel Gah Lak Tus, roughly a day before the Eater of Worlds is expected to reach Earth orbit. Ultimate Extinction is a six-issue comic book limited series that takes place in the Ultimate Marvel universe. ... For the rapper, see Jean Grae. ...


Gah Lak Tus was driven away from the Earth after it was telepathically overloaded with human thoughts and 20% of its mass was destroyed with the Ultimates version of the Ultimate Nullifier - a cannon that fired the energy from an alternate universe's Big Bang. Gah Lak Tus quickly left the solar system in search of weaker prey. The Ultimates decided to upload the Ultimate Vision robot with the plans for the cannon and dispatch it to other worlds, enabling them to defend themselves should Gah Lak Tus threaten again. Warning: This is NOT a scientific article. ... The Ultimate Nullifier is a fictional item of immense power in the Marvel Universe. ...


However, as she left Earth, Vision detected a Gah Lak Tus signal emanating from a space station in Earth orbit. Phasing into the command center which sent it, she discovered it was a ruse meant to attract her to the station. The station's commander leads her through the corridors, where she is shown several experiments. She is then brought to a chamber holding a Gah Lak Tus module, where the station's commander tells her the reason she was brought there was to communicate with the module in order to send a command for all the other modules to destroy themselves. She hesitates, but agrees, mainly out of guilt for having recorded dying worlds while being helpless to save them. However, this too turns out to be a ruse: Vision is being made to communicate with the module in an attempt to control it, not to shut it down. As she realizes this, the module fires, disabling her. The station's commander then gives the order to contact A.I.M and hints at some vast game. Comic book fiction invariably features characters with superhuman, supernatural, or paranormal abilities, often referred to as superpowers (also spelled super-powers). Below is a list of many of those that have been known to be used. ... A.I.M., or Advanced Idea Mechanics, is a fictional group in the Marvel Universe. ...


Later, former Ultimates member Hank Pym created another robot, called the Vision II. It is shown as being identical to a robot named Ultron that Hank Pym had been working on, and is presumably just a copy bearing a different name for ease of identification. Pym took the robots to show Nick Fury in an attempt to rejoin the team. While exiting the building, the Vision II encountered the Scarlet Witch who began to flirt with him. Yellowjacket. ... Ultron is a fictional character, an android supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Yellowjacket. ...


The Vision series ran in the following comic books:

  1. Ultimate Spider-Man #86 (released November 16, 2005)
  2. Ultimate X-Men #65 (released November 23, 2005)
  3. Ultimate Fantastic Four #25 (released November 30, 2005)
  4. Ultimate Spider-Man #87 (released December 7, 2005)
  5. Ultimate Spider-Man #88 (released December 21, 2005)
  6. Ultimate Fantastic Four #26 (released December 28, 2005)

Ultimate Spider-Man is a superhero comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate X-Men is a superhero comic book published by Marvel Comics. ... Ultimate Fantastic Four is a comic book published by Marvel Comics, part of the Ultimate Marvel line featuring classic Marvel Universe characters re-imagined for a modern audience. ...

MC2

An older version of the original Vision has appeared in the MC2 universe, in Spider-Girl #94. Stepping out of earlier retirement, Vision chose to rejoin the young heroes in A-Next together with Ant-Man (Scott Lang) and the Scarlet Witch. He also acts as a link between G. W. Bridge, the President of the United States of the MC2 world, which has already caused some conflicts on both sides. Spider-Girl (May Mayday Parker) is a comic book superheroine, active in an alternate future of the Marvel Comics universe. ... A-Next is the Marvel Comics MC2 Universe version of the Avengers. ... Yellowjacket. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who began as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine. ... G.W. Bridge is the name of a fictional character, appearing in Marvel Comics universe. ...


Appearances in other media

Television

  • The Vision was also one of the Avengers whe starred in Fox Kids' short-lived Avengers animated series. His origin was modified slightly for television: a creation of Ultron sent to destroy the Avengers, this Vision was responsible for "killing" Wonder Man, and thus his "emotion patterns" were transferred to the Vision. The series ran for thirteen episodes during the 1999-2000 season. The Vision was voiced by Ron Ruben.

The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship comic book superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This article treats about Fox Kids in United States. ... Ron Rubin (born August 27, 1959 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is a veteran voice actor whose voice is most easily recognized as that of Artemis from the English translation of Sailor Moon. ...

Video games

Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... Captain America and the Avengers is the title of a side-scrolling coin-op arcade game released by Data East in 1991 and based on the Marvel Comics series The Avengers. ... Data East (データイースト dēta īsuto) was a Japanese video game company, also known as DECO (Data East Corporation, データイースト株式会社 dēta īsuto kabushikigaisha). ... // Marvel Ultimate Alliance This game is an Action/RPG being made by RavenSoft (Published by Activision), and is the same vein as the previous two X-Men Legends games by the two companies. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Vision: Information from Answers.com (2240 words)
The Vision first appeared in The Avengers #57 (October 1968) and was considered so much the signature character of the series that for a significant period in the 1970s, he was the character displayed in the title's masthead image on the cover.
The Vision is a complex humanoid android referred to in the comics as a "synthezoid." Stories about the Vision have explored how a being of artificial intelligence can feel human emotion, particularly in his marriage to a teammate, the Scarlet Witch.
The Vision and the Scarlet Witch's children were then revealed not to be children at all, but rather fragments of the soul of the demon Mephisto, who had been broken apart by Franklin Richards shortly before the "birth" of the "twins." The twins were absorbed back into Mephisto, which temporarily drove the Witch insane.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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