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Image:Example.of.complex.text.rendering.svg This article contains Indic text.
Without rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes or other symbols instead of Indic characters; or irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts.

Brahmarshi Vishvamitra (Sanskrit िवश्वामित्र viśvā-mitra "all-friend") is one of the most venerated rishis or sages of since ancient times in India. He is also credited as the author of most of Mandala 3 of the Rigveda, including the Gayatri Mantra. The Puranas mention that only 24 Rishis since antiquity have understood the whole meaning of, and thus wielded the whole power of the Gayatri Mantra. Sage Vishvamitra is supposed to be the first, and Sage Yajnavalkya the last. Image File history File links Example. ... The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas (writing systems) used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, Manchuria. ... In Hinduism, Brahmarishi (from the Sanskrit words Brahma and Rishi) is the highest of the Rishis, the Hindu sages - one who has understood the meaning of Brahman. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... *mitra (Proto-Indo-Iranian, nominative *mitras) was an important Indo-Iranian divinity. ... A rishi (Sanskrit ऋषि: ṛṣi) is a Hindu saint or sage, originally a divinely inspired poet or singer. ... The third Mandala of the Rig Veda has 62 hymns, mainly to Agni and Indra. ... The Rigveda (Sanskrit: , a tatpurusha compound of praise, verse and knowledge) is a collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns dedicated to the gods. ... Gayatri (gāyatrī) is the feminine form of gāyatra, a Sanskrit word for a song or a hymn. ... Purana (Sanskrit: , meaning tales of ancient times) is the name of an ancient Indian genre (or a group of related genres) of Hindu or Jain literature (as distinct from oral tradition). ... A rishi (Sanskrit ऋषि: ṛṣi) is a Hindu saint or sage, originally a divinely inspired poet or singer. ... Sage Yajnavalkya (याज्ञवल्क्य) of Mithila advanced a 95-year cycle to synchronize the motions of the sun and the moon. ...

Contents

Kaushika

Vishvamitra was a mythical king, also called Kaushika ("the descendant of Kusha").[1] He was a valiant warrior and the great-grandson of a great sage king named Kusha. One of the four sons of Kusha was Kushanubha, who performed the Puthrakameshti sacrifice and obtained a son named Gadhi as the result. Kaushika, or Vishvamitra, was the son of king Gadhi.


Kaushika succeeded his father to the kingdom and ruled it ably. He was well liked by his people. Once he was on a tour of his kingdom, listening to the complaints of his subjects, and issuing orders to remedy them. Like all sages of ancient India, Viswamitra should be understood as common name appearing in a line of sages successively descended from a common ancestor of the same name.


Quarrel with Vasishta

On one of his exploits, he and his soldiers took rest in the ashram of Rishi Vasishta. There, his whole army was well fed and taken care of. This caused a doubt in the king's mind as to how it was possible for this simple ashram to take care of all the arrangements to feed an entire army. He expressed his surprise to the sage. Vasishta replied, An Ashram (Pronounced aashram) in ancient India was a Hindu hermitage where sages (See Rishi) lived in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... A rishi (Sanskrit ऋषि: ṛṣi) is a Hindu saint or sage, originally a divinely inspired poet or singer. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


"O king, this feast that you have partaken with your kinsmen, has been provided by my calf Nandini (sometimes referred as Sabala), who was gifted to me by Indra. You must know that she is the daughter of Indra's cow Kamadhenu. She provides me with everything I need." Nandini (The Enjoying), in Hindu Mythology was a Divine Cow that could grant wishes. ... Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ... Kamadhenu (SAMPA: /kam@Denu/) was a divine cow who was believed to be the mother of all Gods according to Hindu mythology. ...


Kaushika was filled with wonder when he heard this. He began to think that possessing this cow would mean a lot to him; after all, the sage did not have to provide food and sustenance for a large army everyday. He expressed a desire to the sage for obtaining Nandini from him. Vasishta was polite, but steadfast in his refusal. He would not be tempted by the offer of untold wealth that was made by Kaushika, for after all who can set a price on a cow, which can readily yield all the riches in the world.


The king grew exceedingly angry. He insulted the Brahmarishi with harsh words, and ordered his soldiers to seize the cow, and drive it to his kingdom. By his yogic powers, the great sage Vasishta, called forth an entire army of fierce warriors. They fought the army of Kaushika and defeated it thoroughly. Kaushika was captured and presented before Vasishta. The sage pardoned the king and sent him away with words of advice. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ...


Alternate Version

In other version, Vasishta destroys Kaushika's entire army by the simple use of his great mystic and spiritual powers, breathing the Aum syllable. Vasishta also thus kills one hundred of Kaushika's sons, while restoring his hermitage's beauty and life. Om redirects here. ...


Kaushika then undertakes a tapasya for several years to please Lord Shiva, who bestows upon him the knowledge of celestial weaponry. He proudly goes to Vasishta's ashram again, and uses all kinds of powerful weapons to destroy Vasishta and his hermitage. He succeeds in the latter but not in the former. Tapasya is a principle of austerity or willingness to bear suffering in Hinduism and related religions such as Buddhism and Jainism. ... This article is about the deity Shiva. ...


An enraged Vasishta brings out his brahmadanda, a wooden stick imbibed with the power of Lord Creator Brahma. It consumes Kaushika's most powerful weapons, including the brahmastra. Vasishta then attempts to attack Kaushika, but his anger is allayed by the Devas. Kaushika is left humiliated while Vasishta restores his hermitage. Brahma (IAST: Brahmā) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as ) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation, and one of the Hindu Trinity - Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... Brahmastra is an arrow created by Brahma. ... It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ...


There may be a historical nucleus to the legend, with relation to the Battle of the Ten Kings, where a large confederacy was defeated by a small force, with Vishvamitra claiming the credit of having gained divine favour for the smaller force by his prayers. Compare the Nandini story to the battle for the miraculous bull in the Irish Táin Bó Cúailnge, and other Indo-European cattle raiding myths. The Battle of the Ten Kings () is a war bettwen the Indo-Iranians alluded to in Mandala 7 of the Rigveda (hymns 18, 33 and 83. ... Táin Bó Cúailnge (the driving-off of cows of Cooley, more usually rendered The Cattle Raid of Cooley or The Táin) is the central tale in the Ulster Cycle, one of the four great cycles that make up the surviving corpus of Irish mythology. ... Cattle rustling or cattle raiding is the act of stealing livestock. ...


It is also possible that the fight over the cow is nothing more than fight for the fertile land of Punjab. This is a possible interpretation because in early Sanskrit, the word Gau meant not only cow but also earth or land. Gau also means Senses of body.


Tapasya

Image:Menaka Vishvamitra by RRV.jpg
Menaka seduces Vishvamitra. Painting by Raja Ravi Varma.

This incident made a deep impression on the King. He realized that the power obtained by penances was far greater than mere physical might. He renounced his kingdom and began his quest to become a greater rishi than Vasishta. He took on the name Vishvamitra. It is very interesting to see all the challenges that Visvamitra faced in his life to become a Brahmarishi, before eventually giving up the greed to possess the cow. After many trials and undergoing many austerities, Vishvamitra at last obtained the title of Brahmarishi from Vasishta himself. During this time he had a daughter named Shakuntala (who appears in the Mahabharata) with Menaka, an apsaras in the court of Indra. Son of Shakuntala became a great emperor. He came to be known as Emperor Bharata and it is in his name that the land of India got its name Bharat. Menaka was sent by Indra, the king of the Gods, to break the severe penance undertaken by Sage Vishwamitra. ... Raja Ravi Varma (1848-1906) was an Indian painter who achieved recognition for his depiction of scenes from the epics of the Mahabharata and Ramayana. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... The Recognition of Sakuntala is a play in Sanskrit written by Kalidasa. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Menaka was sent by Indra, the king of the Gods, to break the severe penance undertaken by Sage Vishwamitra. ... An apsaras from the Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, China. ... Bharata was the first king to conquer all of the world as known to the adherents of Hinduism, uniting it into a single entity which was named after him as Bharatavarsha. ...


Alternate Version

Kaushika seeks to attain the same spiritual power as Vasishta, to become his equal, a brahmarishi. He undertakes a fierce penance for one thousand years, after which Brahma names him a Rajarishi, or royal sage. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Brahma (IAST: Brahmā) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as ) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation, and one of the Hindu Trinity - Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ...


After another long penance of ten thousand years, Brahma names him a rishi, thus leaving his royal lineage permanently. A rishi (Sanskrit ऋषि: ṛṣi) is a Hindu saint or sage, originally a divinely inspired poet or singer. ...


At this point, Indra, the king of Swarga attempts to test the tapasvin by sending Menaka, an apsaras to seduce him. Kaushika falls in love with the beautiful apsara, and makes love with her for many years, losing his self-control and pious credits. After many years he awakes out of his reverie, and angrily confronts Menaka, who tells him everything. Kaushika knows that Menaka genuinely loves him, so with great sorrow he curses her just to be parted from him forever. Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ... In Hinduism, Svarga (or Swarga) is an underworld, located on Mt. ... Menaka was sent by Indra, the king of the Gods, to break the severe penance undertaken by Sage Vishwamitra. ... An apsaras from the Longmen Grottoes in Luoyang, China. ...


Kaushika now goes to the banks of the river Kaushiki, which is the spirit of his own sister. After many thousands of years of penance, Brahma names him maharishi, but also tells him that he hasn't become a jitendriya yet, lacking control over his passions. This is brought to light to Kaushika when he angrily curses Rambha, an apsara sent by Indra to seduce Kaushika again, to become a stone for a thousand years. Brahma (IAST: Brahmā) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as ) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation, and one of the Hindu Trinity - Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... Maharishi is a Rishi who has mastered many arts and is just before the stage of becoming a Brahmarishi. ... Rambha in Hindu mythology is the Queen of the Apsaras, the magical and beautiful female beings in Devaloka. ...


Rise to Brahmarishi

After cursing Rambha, Kaushika goes to the highest mountain of the Himalayas to perform an even more severe tapasya for over a thousand years. He ceases to eat, and reduces his breathing to a bare minimum. Perspective view of the Himalayas and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ...


He is tested again by Indra, who comes as a poor Hindu begging for food just as Kaushika is ready to break a fast of many years by eating some rice. Kaushika instantly gives his food away to Indra and resumes his meditation. Kaushika also finally masters his passions, refusing to be provoked by any of Indra's testing and seductive inteferences. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


At the penultimate culmination of a multi-thousand year journey, Kaushika's yogic power is at its terrible peak, upsetting the very balance of the universe, and sending the celestial order and natural phenomena into turmoil.


Lord Brahma, at the head of the Devas led by Indra, names Kaushika a brahmarishi, and names him Vishvamitra, or Friend of All for his unlimited compassion. He is also embraced by Vasishta, and their enmity is instantly ended. Brahma (IAST: Brahmā) (Devanagari ब्रह्मा, pronounced as ) is the Hindu god (deva) of creation, and one of the Hindu Trinity - Trimurti, the others being Vishnu and Shiva. ... It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ... Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


Vishwamitra's Characteristics

As a former king, and one over as vast a realm as he had been, Vishwamitra was known to retain a regal and often haughty bearing. He was known for his high temper and often cursed people in his anger, thereby depleting his yogic powers obtained by much penance. People feared his temper and prayed that their actions might not get misconstrued by the touchy sage.


However, as a former king, Vishwamitra also possessed great compassion for all beings. Having taken pity on Trishanku, he willingly exhausted all the punya he gained from his tapas, to enable him to ascend to the heavens. Following his attainment of the status of brahmarishi, he was known to use the power of his tapas to help anyone who was in need, whatever the cost to himself.


Kaushika's love of Menaka is considered to have been intense and passionate beyond estimation.


Legends

Vishvamitra is famous in many legendary stories and in different works of Hindu mythology. Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ...


Trisanku

Another story Vishvamitra is known for is his creation of his own version of Svarga or heaven, called Trisanku Svarga. When a proud King Trisanku asked his guru, Vasishta, to send him to heaven in his own body, the guru responded that the body cannot ascend to heaven. Guru - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Vasishta, in Hindu mythology was chief of the seven venerated sages (or Saptharishi) and the Rajaguru of the Suryavamsha or Solar Dynasty. ...


King Trisanku then asked Vashista's seven sons to send him to heaven. The sons, outraged that Trisanku should not come to them when their father had refused, cursed him to be a chandala, or untouchable. When Trisanku woke up the next day, he found himself entirely deformed. Since none of his subjects could recognize him, he was driven out of the kingdom.


He came across the sage Visvamitra, who agreed to help him. Visvamitra organized a great sacrifice and ritual proptiating the Devas, pleading that they accept Trisanku in heaven. Not one Deva responded. Angered, Visvamitra used his yogic powers and ordered Trisanku to rise to heaven. Miraculously, Trisanku rose into the sky until he reached heaven, where he was pushed back down by Indra. It has been suggested that Deva (tribe) be merged into this article or section. ... Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ...


Enraged even more by this, the powerful Visvamitra then commenced the creation of another heaven for Trisanku. He had only completed the heaven when Brihaspati ordered him to stop. Trisanku, however, did not enjoy Trisanku Svarga, he remained fixed in the sky and was transformed into a constellation. In Hinduism, Brihaspati is the god of magic and prayer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In the process of forming a new universe, Vishvamitra used up all the tapas he had gained from his austerities. Therefore after the Trisanku episode, Vishvamitra had to start his prayers again to attain the status of a Brahma Rishi, to equal Vashistha.


Harishchandra's Sacrifice

While undertaking a penance, Kaushika helps a boy named Shunashepa who has been sold by his parents to be sacrificed at Harishchandra's yagna to please Varuna, the God of the Oceans. The king's son Rohita does not want to be the one sacrificed, as was originally promised to Varuna, so young Sunashepa is being taken. A devastated and terrified Sunashepa falls at the feet of Kaushika, who is deep in meditation, and begs for his help. Harishchandra, in Hindu mythology was one of the kings of the Solar Dynasty. ... Yagna is an ancient vedic ritual, where sacrifices are made to a particular divinity, using fire (Agni) as a medium. ... In Vedic religion, Varuna (Devanagari:वरुण, IAST:) is a god of the sky, of rain and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. ...


Kaushika teaches secret mantras to Sunashepa. The boy sings these mantras at the ceremony, and is blessed by Indra and Varuna, and Harishchandra's ceremony is also completed. Indra (Sanskrit: इन्द्र or इंद्र, indra) is the god of weather and war, and lord of Svargaloka in Hinduism. ... In Vedic religion, Varuna (Devanagari:वरुण, IAST:) is a god of the sky, of rain and of the celestial ocean, as well as a god of law and of the underworld. ...


In the Ramayana

In the great epic Ramayana, Vishvamitra is the preceptor of Rama, prince of Ayodhya and the eighth Avatara of Vishnu, and his brother Lakshmana. For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... Ayodhya   (Hindi: अयोध्या, Urdu: ایودھیا IAST Ayodhyā) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... See Avatar (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being or Ultimate Reality for Vaishnavas and a manifestation of Brahman in the Advaita or Smarta traditions. ... Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna temple, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Laká¹£maṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero in the famous epic Ramayana. Within Hindu tradition Lakshmana is considered to be...


Vishwamitra gives them the knowledge of the Devastras or celestial weaponry, trains them in advanced religion and guides them to kill powerful demons like Tataka, Maricha and Subahu. He also leads them to the svayamvara ceremony for princess Sita, who becomes the wife of Rama. For the municipality in the Philippines, see Taraka, Lanao del Sur. ... In Hindu mythology, Maricha was a demon who played a very important part in twisting the tale of Ramayana. ... Subahu, in Hindu mythology was a demon who tried to interrupt Viswamitras yaga. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ...


Gotras

There are two gotras, or lineages, bearing the name of Visvamitra. A Gotra indicates lineage in the Hindu community. ...


Visvamitra Gotra

People belonging to the Visvamitra Gotra consider Brahmarishi Visvamitra as their ancestor. Brahmarishi is the highest of the Rishis. ...


There is an off-shoot of "Vishvamitra Gotra" called "Chakita Vishvamitra Gotra". Two explanations have been suggested for this off-shoot. The group is supposed to have sprung from a "surprised" reaction of Vishvamitra. The other, more likely, explanation, is that a group of descendants decided to split from the main group and started their own branch of this line.


Kaushika Gotra

People belonging to Kaushika (Kousika/Koushika/Kausika) Gotra take Rajarishi Kausika as their root. Kausika was one of the names of Visvamitra.11 Royal clans of 96 clan of Marathas belong to Kaushik gotra including the illustrious house of Shivaji and Rashtrakutas. 2 more clans belong to the Vishvamitra gotra. Rajarishi is a classification of Hindu Rishi sages. ...


See also

  • Ramesh Menon, The Ramayana (2001)
  • Hindu mythology, Ramayana

Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ...

External links

Ramayana by Valmiki
Characters
Dasharatha | Kausalya | Sumitra | Kaikeyi | Janaka | Manthara | Rama | Bharata | Lakshmana | Shatrughna | Sita | Urmila | Mandavi | Shrutakirti | Vishvamitra | Ahalya | Jatayu | Sampati | Hanuman | Sugriva | Vali | Angada | Jambavantha | Vibhishana | Tataka | Surpanakha | Maricha | Subahu | Khara | Ravana | Kumbhakarna | Mandodari | Mayasura | Indrajit | Prahasta | Akshayakumara | Atikaya | Lava | Kusha
Other
Ayodhya | Mithila | Lanka | Sarayu | Treta Yuga | Raghuvamsa | Lakshman Rekha | Aditya Hridayam | Oshadhiparvata | Sundara Kanda | Vedavati | Vanara
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For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Valmiki composes the Ramayana Maharishi Valmiki (Sanskrit: वाल्मिकी, vālmikÄ«) is the author of the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... Dasaratha in Hindu mythology is the king of Ayodhya and a descendant of Raghuvamsa. ... In Hindu Mythology, Kausalya is the wife of King Dasaratha and the mother of Rama. ... Kousalya, Sumitra and Kaike are the three wives of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, in the 24,000-verse Sanskrit epic called the Ramayana, and the mothers of the heroes Rama, Bharatha, and Lakshmana. ... Kousalya, Sumitra and Kaike are the three wives of King Dasaratha of Ayodhya, in the 24,000-verse Sanskrit epic called the Ramayana, and the mothers of the heroes Rama, Bharatha, and Lakshmana. ... In ancient India, Janaka (Sanskrit: जनक, janaka) or Raja Janaka (राजा जनक, rājā janaka) was the king of Mithila Kingdom. ... Manthara, in the Hindu epic Ramayana, is a servant who convinced Kaikeyi that the Ayodhya throne belonged to her son Bharata and that Rama should be exiled from the kingdom. ... Rama ( in IAST, in DevanāgarÄ«) or Ramachandra is a legendary or historical king of ancient India. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Bharata (Sanskrit: भरत, IAST Bharata) was the second brother of the main protagonist Lord Rama, and the son of Emperor Dasaratha and Kaikeyi of the Solar Dynasty. ... Lakshaman (far left) with Rama (centre), Sita (far right) and Hanuman (kneeling) - Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna temple, Watford, England Lakshmana (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण; IAST Laká¹£maṇa) was the brother and close companion of Rama, and himself a hero in the famous epic Ramayana. Within Hindu tradition Lakshmana is considered to be... Shatrughna (Sanskrit: शत्रुघ्न, á¹£atrughna), in Hindu epic Ramayana was the youngest brother of Lord Rama. ... Lord Rama (center) with wife Sita, brother Lakshmana and devotee Hanuman. ... In Hindu epic Ramayana, Urmila was the daughter of King Janaka of Mithila and the younger sister of Sita. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Mandavi was the daughter of Kushadvaja, a brother of King Janaka of Mithila and hence a cousin of Sita. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Shrutakirti was the daughter of Kushadvaja, a brother of King Janaka of Mithila and hence a cousin of Sita. ... Ahalya (Sanskrit: अहल्या, ahalyā) was the wife of Rishi Gautama. ... Ravana cuts Jatayus wings, by Ravi Varma In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Jatayu (Sanskrit: जटायू, jatāyÅ«) is the son of Aruna and nephew of Garuda. ... In Hindu mythology, Sampati was one of the two sons of Aruna the brother of Garuda. ... For the Tamil movie by same name see Anjaneya (film). ... In Hinduism, Sugriva was the younger brother of Vali. ... In the Hindu epic Ramayana, Vali was the monkey-King of Kishkindha, a son of Indra and the elder brother of Sugriva. ... In Hinduism, Angada is a Vanara who helped Rama find Sita in the Hindu epic Ramayana. ... Jambavantha (also known as Jambavan or Jamvanta) (Sanskrit: (जाम्‍बवान) is a bear in Hinduism and believe to lived from Treta Yuga to Dvapara Yuga. ... Vibhishana (Sanskrit: विभीषण, ) is a character in the epic Ramayana. ... For the municipality in the Philippines, see Taraka, Lanao del Sur. ... Surpanakha is Ravanas sister in the epic Ramayana Surpanakha is Ravanas sister in the epic Ramayana. ... In Hindu mythology, Maricha was a demon who played a very important part in twisting the tale of Ramayana. ... Subahu, in Hindu mythology was a demon who tried to interrupt Viswamitras yaga. ... Khara, in the Hindu epic Ramayana, was a man-eating Rakshasa. ... A depiction of Ravana, Hindu rakshasa King of Lanka In Hinduism, Ravana (Devanagari: रावण, IAST ; sometimes transliterated Raavana and as Ravan or Revana) is the principal antagonist of the Hindu epic, the Ramayana. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mandodari (Sanskrit: मंदोदरी) was the daughter of the King of Danavas, Mayasura and celestial dancer, Hema. ... In Hindu mythology, Maya, or Mayasura was a great ancient king of the Asura, Daitya and Rakshasa races upon earth. ... Victory of Meghanada. ... In the Hindu epic the Ramayana, Prahasta was a powerful rakshasa warrior and chief commander of Ravanas army of Lanka. ... Akshayakumara was one of the sons of Ravana. ... Atikaya was the son of Lord of Lanka, Ravana and Queen Dhanyamalini, who was the second wife of Ravana. ... Lava and his twin brother Kusha are the children of the Hindu God Rama and his wife Sita Devi, whose story is told in the Ramayana. ... Kusha (Sanskrit: कुश), in Hindu mythology, was one of the twin sons of Lord Rama and Sita (the other being Lava). ... Ayodhya   (Hindi: अयोध्या, Urdu: ایودھیا IAST Ayodhyā) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... Mithila (Sanskrit: मिथिला, mithilā) was a kingdom in ancient India. ... Lanka is the name given in Hindu mythology to the island fortress capital of the evil king Ravana in the epic Ramayana. ... The Sarayu (also Sarju; Dev. ... The Treta Yuga is the second out of four yugas, or ages of man, in the religion of Hinduism, following the Satya Yuga of perfect morality and preceding the Dvapara Yuga. ... // Introduction Raghuvamsa, in Hindu mythology is believed to be a lineage/race of warrior kings tracing its ancestry to Surya. ... Lakshman Rekha (Sanskrit: लक्ष्मण रेखा), in Hindu mythology, is a line drawn by Lakshmana around their abode, to protect Sita, while he is away searching for Rama. ... The Aditya Hridayam, is a hymn associated with the Sun or Surya and was recited by the great sage Agastya to Rama on the battlefield before fighting with Ravana. ... Oshadhiparvata, that is the mountain of medicinal herbs, was a mythical mountain described in the Ramayana. ... Sundara Kanda is a book of almost unbelievable spiritual quality which is reputed by its readers to be virtually death defying. ... In Hindu mythology, Vedavati is speculated to have been the spirit of Sita Devi, the wife of Rama in the epic Ramayana. ... Vanara is a Sanskrit word literally meaning monkey or inhabitants of forests=like the primitive tribes (probably vaanar as pronounced in hindi). ...

The Rigveda   (Mandalas: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10)
Deities: (Devas) Agni, Indra, Soma, Ushas | (Asuras) Mitra, Varuna, Vrtra | Visvedevas, Maruts, Ashvins
Rivers: Sapta Sindhu; Nadistuti; Sarasvati, Sindhu, Sarayu, Rasā
Rishis: Saptarishi; Gritsamada, Vishvamitra, Vamadeva, Atri, Angiras, Bharadvaja, Vasishta

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Viśwamitra (1289 words)
The most noteworthy and important feature in the legends of Vishvamitra is the active and enduring struggle between him and the Brahman Rishi Vasishtha, a fact which is frequently alluded to in the Rigveda, and is supposed to typify the contentions between the Brahmans and the Kshatriyas for the superiority.
Vishvamitra's hundred sons are represented as having been eaten or burnt up by the breath of Vasishtha.
Vishvamitra at length became ashamed of his passion, and "dismissing the nymph with gentle accents, he retired to the northern mountains, where he practiced severe austerities for a thousand years." He is said to have had an amour with the nymph Rambha.
Satyavrata (517 words)
Vishvamitra's intended sacrifice was strongly resisted by the sons of Vasishtha, but he reduced them to ashes, and condemned them to be born again as outcasts for seven hundred births.
While Satyavrata was a Chandala, and the famine was ragin, he supported Vishvamitra's family by hanging deer's flesh on a tree on the bank of the Ganges, so that they might obtain food without the degradation of receiving it from a Chandala: for this charity Vishvamitra raised him to heaven.
Vishvamitra was gratified by the assistance which Satyavrata had rendered to his family; "he installed him in his father's kingdom,.
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