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Encyclopedia > Virtual Console

Virtual Console, sometimes abbreviated as VC, is a specialized section of the Wii Shop Channel, an online service that allows players to purchase and download games and other software for the Wii gaming console. The Virtual Console lineup consists of titles originally released on now defunct past consoles. These titles are run in their original forms through software emulation. The library of past games currently consists of titles originating from the Nintendo Entertainment System, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, and Nintendo 64, as well as Sega's Mega Drive/Genesis and Master System, NEC's TurboGrafx-16 and TurboGrafx-CD, and SNK's Neo Geo AES.[1] Upcoming support for MSX has been announced for Japan, to begin in May 2008. Sega Master System support was added on February 26, 2008 for Japan's Virtual Console, March 31, 2008 for North America's Virtual Console and April 11, 2008 for Europe's Virtual Console. Game Gear support under the Master System label is to follow at currently unknown times.[2] Commodore 64 support was added on March 28, 2008 for Europe's Virtual Console.[3] The Wii Shop Channel is a Wii Channel that lets the player buy new content straight from Nintendo. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... An emulator reproducing a console games playable atmosphere on a Windows computer. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... This article is about the video game company. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... For other uses, see NEC (disambiguation). ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... SNK redirects here. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... C-64 redirects here. ...


Over ten million Virtual Console titles have been downloaded as of December 2007.[4]

Contents

Library history

While the gameplay remains unchanged for all of the classic titles offered for the Virtual Console, Nintendo has stated that some games may be improved with sharper graphics or better frame rates.[5] Certainly, many PAL SNES games run with significantly reduced borders compared to the original cartridge releases. As with disc-based games, the Virtual Console service is region-locked - that is, different versions of games are provided to different regions, and game availability may vary from region to region.[6]


Nintendo had stated that the Wii Shop will not be used exclusively for retro games, and Wiiware games have appeared in North America as of May 12, 2008.[7] However, when original games are made available, it will be through the WiiWare part of the Wii Shop, as opposed to through the Virtual Console. The Wii Menu as displayed on a widescreen television The Wii Menu is the top level menu interface of the Wii game console. ... The Wii Menu as displayed on a widescreen television The Wii Menu is the top level menu interface of the Wii game console. ...


Satoru Iwata stated in a speech on March 23, 2006, that Nintendo, Sega, and Hudson Soft were working in collaboration to bring a "best of" series of games to the Wii.[8] At the following E3, Hudson also declared it would bring upwards of 100 titles to the Wii's Virtual Console. Additionally, Hudson mentioned that its lawyers were working on acquiring the licenses to games from now defunct companies.[9] Nintendo announced MSX compatibility on September 19, 2006,[10] announcing on February 23, 2007 that the MSX titles Eggy and Aleste would be released in Japan.[11] In February 2007, a heading for Neo Geo games was added to the Japanese Virtual Console page,[12][13] and in September of that same year games for that system appeared on the list of future releases, priced at 900 points each.[14][15] Also in September Hudson announced that games made for the TurboGrafx-CD format would also join the Virtual Console beginning in October 2007, with five titles to be released for the remainder of 2007 and ten titles for 2008. They will be priced at 800 points.[16] Satoru Iwata , born December 6, 1959) is the fourth president and CEO of Nintendo succeeding the long-standing previous president of the company, Hiroshi Yamauchi in 2002. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Hudson Soft is a Japanese electronic entertainment publisher. ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Aleste ) is the first game in the Aleste series of video games. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... October 2007 is the tenth month of that year. ...


On June 1, 2007, Nintendo of America issued a press release to announce the upcoming release of its 100th Virtual Console title, which was Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. Within this press release, Nintendo stated that more than 4.7 million Virtual Console games had been downloaded, at a rate of more than 1,000 titles an hour.[17] is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ...


On October 9, 2007, Nintendo announced that 7.8 million VC titles had been downloaded.[18] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Over ten million Virtual Console titles have been downloaded as of December 2007.[19]


Upcoming support for MSX has been announced for Japan, to begin in May 2008. Sega Master System support was added on February 26, 2008 for Japan's Virtual Console, with other regions and Game Gear support under the Master System label to follow at currently unknown times.[2] Commodore 64 support was added on March 28, 2008 for Europe's Virtual Console.[20] Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... C-64 redirects here. ...


More systems

Many gaming publications and consumers have called for games from additional systems to be added to the Virtual Console library, particularly from the Sega Master System, citing the popularity of games like Alex Kidd in Miracle World and Phantasy Star.[21] Nintendo released Neo-Geo titles onto the Japanese Virtual Console on September 18, 2007, becoming the first addition to the list of consoles since the TurboGrafx-16 was added two days after the U.S. launch.[22][23] Sega Master System and Sega Game Gear support was added on February 26, 2008 for Japan's Virtual Console and March 31, 2008 for North America's Virtual Console, with other regions and Game Gear support under the Master System label to follow at currently unknown times.[24]. Commodore 64 support was added on March 28, 2008 for Europe's Virtual Console.[25], eventually, several other systems including the MSX were announced to have games released to the Virtual Console library in the future. Alex Kidd in Miracle World is a platform game for the 8-bit Sega Master System video game console. ... Phantasy Star game. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... C-64 redirects here. ...


Third party support

Unnamed Nintendo employees have reportedly speculated that licensing issues will be a predominant factor in determining whether a game is available for Virtual Console,[26] giving the examples of GoldenEye 007 and Tetris as games that might be too expensive to license for the Virtual Console. Tecmo has announced it plans to "aggressively" support Virtual Console by re-releasing classic games such as Ninja Gaiden, Rygar, and Tecmo Bowl.[27] Tecmo was the first third-party game developer to release a game on the Virtual Console (Solomon's Key from the NES). Since then, Capcom and Konami, among others, have also released titles. For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... For the film, see GoldenEye. ... Tetris (Russian: ) is a falling-blocks puzzle video game, released on a large spectrum of platforms. ... Tecmo, Ltd. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... For the 2002 PlayStation 2 game, see Rygar: The Legendary Adventure. ... Tecmo Bowl is an arcade video game released in 1987 by Tecmo, Inc. ... In the video game industry, a third-party developer is a developer that is not directly tied to the primary product the consumer is using. ... For other uses, see Solomons Key (disambiguation). ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ...


Matt Casamassina of IGN reported that Rare titles absent of Nintendo-owned characters, such as Banjo-Kazooie, would be unavailable for purchase due to Microsoft's acquisition of Rare,[28] but Rare has hinted the possibility of such titles being released on Virtual Console.[29] SNK Playmore has announced intentions to release the Samurai Shodown series and a few other games to the Virtual Console and have brought the Neo Geo to the list of consoles available.[30] Midway also plans to bring classic Mortal Kombat games to the Virtual Console.[31] Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Rare, Ltd is a United Kingdom-based video game development company. ... Banjo-Kazooie is a 3-D platform/adventure video game for the Nintendo 64. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... SNK redirects here. ... Samurai Shodown (Samurai Spirits in Japan) is the name of a fighting game series by SNK. It is considered to be the premier 2D weapons fighter, and is one of the best-known video games created by SNK. Despite the name of the series, most of the characters are not... For other uses, see Mortal Kombat. ...


Confirmed third-party companies supporting Virtual Console include:

2K Sports is a subsidiary of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. ... Agetec is a small video game publishing company that is best known for porting Japanese titles, 3rd party peripherials, and their designer series (i. ... Arc System Works ) is a video game developer based in Yokohama, Japan. ... Artdink is a Japanese developer of console and computer games, currently based in Tsukishima, Tokyo. ... This article is about the corporate brand. ... Atlus ) is a Japanese computer and video game developer and publisher. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Chunsoft ) is a Japanese video game developer specializing in console RPGs. ... Commodore Gaming are a recent rebirth of Commodore International that manufactures gaming-oriented PCs. ... Culture Brain (カルチャーブレーン) is a small Japanese videogame developer and publisher that was founded in October 5, 1980. ... current EA Sports logo EA Sports is a brand name used by Electronic Arts since 1993 to distribute games based on sports. ... Enterbrain, Inc. ... Factor 5 is a software and video game developer that is best known for the Star Wars series Star Wars: Rogue Squadron. ... Fujisankei Communications International, Inc. ... Hudson Soft is a Japanese electronic entertainment publisher. ... Irem (アイレム) is a Japanese video game console developer and publisher and formerly a developer and manufacturer of arcade games as well. ... Jaleco (TYO: 7954 ) was founded as Japan Leisure Corporation on October 3rd 1974. ... Categories: Stub | Computer and video game companies ... Koeis Current Company Logo Koei Co. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... Majesco Entertainment is a video game publisher founded in 1986. ... Marvelous Interactive Inc. ... Midway Games (NYSE: MWY) (formerly Midway Manufacturing) is an American video game publisher. ... Namco Bandai Holdings, Inc. ... The logotype of Natsume Inc. ... One of Japans oldest game companies, Nihon Falcom has produced dozens of titles for a wide range of home console systems, as well as PC. Some of the companys famous series include Ys, Dragon Slayer, Lord Monarch, and Vantage Master. ... Paon is a new video game development company based in Japan. ... Pony Canyon is a large Japanese company, established on October 1st 1966, which publishes music, DVD and VHS videos, movies and video games. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Spike is a Japanese video game developer and publisher. ... SQUARE ENIX (Japanese: スクウェア・エニックス) is a Japanese producer of popular video games and manga. ... Sunsoft is a video game development company founded in 1985 as a division of Sun Corporation, itself a division of Sun Electronics, or Sun Denshi (サン電子) in Japan (its U.S. subsidiary operated under the name Sunsoft of America, though games they published showed a logo that read only SUNSOFT). ... SNK redirects here. ... Taito may mean: Taito Corporation, a Japanese developer of video game software and arcade hardware. ... Tecmo, Ltd. ... Takara Co. ... TOMY Co. ... Ubisoft Entertainment (formerly Ubi Soft) is a computer and video game publisher and developer with headquarters in Montreuil-sous-Bois, France. ...

Pricing

On September 14, 2006, Nintendo revealed that Virtual Console games in Japan would be priced starting at JP¥500 for NES titles, JP¥800 for Super NES titles, and JP¥1000 for Nintendo 64 titles, with points purchasable via credit card or a "Wii Points" card. In the United States, Wii Points are priced at one cent per point (with the ability to buy in denominations of $10, $20, $30 and $50), with game prices of US$5, US$8, and US$10, respectively.[32][33] is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Wii Point is a payment system that Nintendo uses for its Wii console through the Wii Shop Channel. ...

Country NES

Master System
Game Gear
Flag of the United States Flag of Japan Flag of Europe
“NES” redirects here. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


C64
Flag of Europe C-64 redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

TurboGrafx-16 Flag of the United States Flag of Japan Flag of Europe

Mega Drive For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ...


Flag of Japan Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ...

MSX

Flag of Japan Sony MSX 1, Model HitBit-10-P MSX was the name of a standardized home computer architecture in the 1980s. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ...

SNES

TurboGrafx-CD
Flag of the United States Flag of Japan Flag of Europe Mega Drive/Genesis Flag of the United States Flag of Europe The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Neo Geo

Flag of the United States Flag of Japan Flag of Europe Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

N64

Flag of the United States Flag of Japan Flag of Europe The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Wii Points 500 600 700 800 900 1000
Australia $7.50 $9 - $12 $13.50 $15
Canada $6.25 $7.50 - $10 $11.25 $12.50
Eurozone 5 € 6 € - 8 € 9 € 10 €
Japan ¥500 ¥600 ¥700 ¥800 ¥900 ¥1000
Mexico
(only available online)
$50 MXN $60 MXN - $80 MXN $90 MXN $100 MXN
New Zealand $9 $10.80 - $14.40 $16.20 $18
Saudi Arabia
(with points bought on point cards)
$8.4 $10 - $13.4 $15.2 $17
Singapore
(with points bought on point cards)
$9.50 $11.40 - $15.20 $17.10 $19
South Korea ₩4000 (400 points) - - ₩6000 (600 points) - ₩8000 (800 points)
Sweden (approximately) 46 SEK 55 SEK - 74 SEK 83 SEK 92 SEK
United Kingdom
(with points bought on either point cards OR online)
£3.75/ £3.50 £4.50/ £4.20 - £6.00/ £5.60 £6.75/ £6.30 £7.50/ £7.00
United States $5 $6 - $8 $9 $10

Nintendo president Satoru Iwata has indicated that new small-scale titles could be developed and sold through the Wii Shop Channel at a price of between JP¥500 and ¥1000 (approximately US$5-$10, GB£2-£5),[34][35] and that free downloads may be offered as a bonus with the purchase of specific Wii titles, similar to Nintendo Europe's VIP 24:7 incentives.[36] A Wii Point is a payment system that Nintendo uses for its Wii console through the Wii Shop Channel. ... The Eurozone (less frequently called the Euro Area or Euroland) refers to a currency union among the European Union member states that have adopted the euro as their sole official currency. ... ISO 4217 Code MXN User(s) Mexico Inflation 3. ... Satoru Iwata , born December 6, 1959) is the fourth president and CEO of Nintendo succeeding the long-standing previous president of the company, Hiroshi Yamauchi in 2002. ...


The Wii Shop Channel has functionality to allow games to be updated. This has been used four times so far to update Military Madness, Star Fox 64/Lylat Wars and Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards (in North America and Europe)[37] and Mario Kart 64 (in Europe and Australia). Several NES and SNES games released before March 30, 2007 have also been given updates in Europe and Australia to fix previous problems with the Wii Component Cables. These updates are free of charge to those who have downloaded a previous version of the game. Nectaris (Military Madness in the US) was a series of sci-fi-themed, hex-based, turn-based strategy games for a variety of systems. ... Star Fox 64 ), known in Australia and Europe as Lylat Wars due to trademark issues, is a scrolling shooter video game for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ... Mario Kart 64 ) is a racing video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Wii (pronounced the same as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ...


Storage

Games downloaded from the Virtual Console library are stored in the Wii's built-in 512 MB flash memory. A USB flash drive. ...


Games can be transferred to a removable SD card for backup purposes only – they cannot be played from this external memory. If the internal memory is filled, Virtual Console games can be deleted to create more room, and the games can be downloaded again at a later date at no additional cost, or can be copied back over from an SD Card. A SanDisk Multi Card Reader, with a 2 GB SD Card inserted. ...


Virtual Console games are locked to the Wii on which they were purchased—they cannot be transferred to another Wii via an SD card, although it is possible for Wii owners in North America, Europe and Australia to purchase games in the Wii Shop Channel and send them as gifts to people on their Wii Friends list.[38][39] In the event that a Wii is damaged and the Virtual Console games can no longer be played, Nintendo will provide support.[40]


Game saves and save data

Game saving is functional and intact on the Virtual Console for all games which originally had a save feature on their cartridge. Saved games are saved to the Wii Internal Memory and function exactly as the original cartridge did. A game which in its original cartridge form did not have any form of save feature will not have any save game feature on the Virtual Console (though depending on its original system it may have the suspend feature as described below).


Most first-party N64 games used internal cartridge memory for game save data and thus will save properly on the Virtual Console.[citation needed] A select few first-party and nearly all other N64 game cartridges utilized the extra memory capability of the N64 Controller Pak.[41] Saving of data to the Controller Pak is not supported by the Virtual Console, so for those games which used this feature, the save feature will not work properly in the Virtual Console.[citation needed] Mario Kart 64, Wave Race 64, and Cruis'n USA used internal cartridge memory for progress and save game data.[citation needed] Consequently all progress is saved properly (since it was saved to the cartridge itself) but one of the features in Mario Kart 64 (saving ghosts for racing at a later date) will not work since that particular feature utilized the Controller Pak, and the option to copy data to the Controller Pak won't function in those games.[citation needed] Standard Controller Pak, rear view. ... Mario Kart 64 ) is a racing video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ... Wave Race 64 is a racing game for the Nintendo 64 that was released on September 27, 1996 in Japan and on November 5, 1996 in North America. ... Cruisn USA is racing game released in 1994 at the arcades developed by Midway Games and Nintendo. ...


Suspending play

Like other emulation software, the Wii Virtual Console enables the user to suspend play of a game at any time. To do this, users simply return to the Wii main menu from the game.[42] Two exceptions to this are the N64 and Neo Geo titles which do not support this feature.[43] Note that suspending play enables the player to pause the game indefinitely but does not function as a "save state" in that once the game is resumed the user will be able to pause play again but will not be able to return to the previously suspended state.[42]


The suspend feature will not be available if the user resets the Wii with the reset button on the front of the console, and if the Wii loses power there will be no further suspend state nor will there be a way to restart from the previous suspend state.


Control

Virtual Console games can be played using three different controllers. The Wii Remote itself (turned on its side) can be used for NES, TurboGrafx-16, and some Sega Mega Drive/Genesis and Neo Geo games, and the Classic Controller (sold separately from the console) can be used for all Virtual Console games. The controllers from the Nintendo GameCube can also be used. As a result the wireless GameCube controller (the WaveBird) has seen increased popularity.[44] The Nintendo GameCube controller can be used for all games on the Virtual Console except for some TurboGrafx-16 games. The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... “NES” redirects here. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... WaveBird controller The WaveBird Wireless Controller is an RF-based wireless controller manufactured by Nintendo for the GameCube video game console. ...


All Virtual Console games have their buttons mapped to the respective buttons on the controllers, however, in certain circumstances users can use X and Y instead of A and B, if the original controller does not have X and Y buttons (for example the NES).[40] In certain titles, such as Nintendo 64 games, there may be specific control tailored to the Classic Controller or GameCube Controller. So far, none of the Nintendo 64 titles released have been able to support the Rumble Pak feature of the N64 controller.


With the release of Bomberman '93, it was revealed that TurboGrafx-16 games can support full 5 player games. Since a single Wii can only have four Wii Remotes and four GameCube Controllers connected at the same time, a combination of the two is needed for 5 player games. At least one player has to use a Wii Remote or Classic controller, and at least one player has to use a GameCube Controller. The other three can use either one. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...

Platform Wii Remote Classic Controller GameCube Controller
NES/Famicom YesY YesY YesY
SNES/Super Famicom NoN YesY YesY
Nintendo 64 NoN YesY YesY
Mega Drive/Genesis Some* YesY YesY
TurboGrafx-16/PC Engine Some* YesY YesY
Neo Geo NoN YesY YesY
Sega Master System YesY YesY YesY
Commodore 64 YesY YesY YesY

The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... Image File history File links X_mark. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... Image File history File links X_mark. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... Image File history File links X_mark. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... C-64 redirects here. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ... Image File history File links Yes_check. ...

Titles

North America

There were 12 titles total of NES, SNES, N64, and Genesis games available at launch on the Virtual Console for the North American region. Two TurboGrafx-16 titles were added two days later on November 21, 2006. New releases are on Mondays at around 12:00 PM EST/9:00 AM PST (although they have been released an hour or two early on several occasions[45][46]) and typically consisted of around 3 games on average; but starting in 2008, updates began to consist of 1 or 2 games. As of May 26, 2008, there are 226 Virtual Console titles available, with the list growing weekly as per the above. // The following is a list of the 214 games available on the Virtual Console for the Wii in North America, sorted by system and in the order they were added in the Wii Shop Channel. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Though the Virtual Console lineup initially only covered games that had been released in North America, first George Harrison indicated in an interview that there was a possibility that Nintendo or other Virtual Console providers would localize Japanese games that have never been released in English.[47] This later came to reality, and former Japan-only games have appeared on the North American Virtual Console. The first game to be added with such localization was Sin & Punishment from the Nintendo 64. While other previous Japan-only titles had been released through Virtual Console prior to this, the first being Battle Lode Runner from the TurboGrafx-16, added on April 23, 2007, this and all others were originally written in English and required no localization. Despite the fact others fit the category, there are only 6 titles listed under the "Import" genre: Sin & Punishment, Alien Soldier (although the game was available in North America through the Sega Channel), Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels', DoReMi Fantasy: Milon's DokiDoki Adventure, Puyo Puyo 2 and Ninja JaJaMaru-kun. George Harrison at the launch of the Gamecube. ... Battle Lode Runner is a video game originally released for the NEC PC Engine by Hudson Soft in 1993. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Alien Soldier is a side-scrolling run and gun video game developed by Treasure Co. ... Sega Channel logo and mascot Sega Pat Sega Channel was a project developed by Sega for the 16-bit Sega Genesis console. ... SMB 2 title screen (Japanese version) Super Mario Bros. ... Puyo Puyo Tsu (Also known as Puyo Puyo 2, or Puyo Puyo Tsuu) is the sequel to Puyo Puyo, made in 1994 by Compile. ... Screenshot of the title screen (Famicom) Ninja Jajamaru-kun ) was an action game released in Japan on November 15, 1985 by Jaleco for the Famicom and in 1986 for the MSX. It was released for Nintendos Virtual Console on December 26, 2006. ...


Europe

A total of 17 NES, SNES, N64, Mega Drive and Turbografx games were available at launch on the Virtual Console for the European region. The store updates every Thursday at 11 pm GMT (midnight during daylight saving time).[48] The number of games per update has varied, but is usually 2-3. There are currently 219 Virtual Console titles available for the European Virtual Console. // The following is the complete list of the 168 Virtual Console titles available for the Wii in Europe as shown within the Virtual Console section of the Wii Shop Channel. ... For alternate meanings of GMT, see GMT (disambiguation). ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...


Though the Virtual Console titles primarily cover only the games that have been released in Europe, Nintendo UK has recently commented that there is a possibility that in the future, Nintendo will localize Japanese and North American games that have never been released in Europe.[49] Indeed, Hudson have already released three Turbografx games which were not originally released in Europe: Double Dungeons, Dragon's Curse,[50] and Battle Lode Runner. During September 2007, Nintendo contributed Japan-only games to the service as part of its "Hanabi Festival" campaign, releasing games such as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels and Mario's Super Picross and the N64 cult-hit Sin and Punishment and in May 2008, another "Hanabi Festival" campaign took place with Games such as Gradius II, Cho Aniki, Final Soldier, Star Parodier and Gley Lancer being released Double Dungeons is a text based role playing video game developed and published by NCS for the TurboGrafx-16 in 1989 in Japan, and in 1990 in North America. ... Battle Lode Runner is a video game originally released for the NEC PC Engine by Hudson Soft in 1993. ... SMB 2 title screen (Japanese version) Super Mario Bros. ... This game is the Super Famicom adaptation of the original Game Boy game, Marios Picross. ... Gradius II Gofer no Yabō , lit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Final Soldier is a scrolling shooter video game released for the Japanese PC Engine system in 1991 and the third game in the main Star Soldier series. ... Gley Lancer is a scrolling shooter game developed by NCS. It was released in 1992 in Japan for the Sega Mega Drive game console. ...


Australia and New Zealand

There were 11 titles total of NES, SNES, N64, and Mega Drive games available at launch on the Virtual Console for the Oceanic region. The store updates on Fridays, in Australia at 9:00AM and in New Zealand at 11:00PM AEST.[51] There are currently 212 titles available for the Australian and New Zealand Virtual Console. The updates are usually the same as in Europe; currently, the only exceptions have been when Turbografx games were first added to the Australian VC from July 6, 2007 until August 17, 2007,[52][53] the October 12, 2007 update.[54], the March 28, 2008 update, the April 11, 2008 update, and the April 25, 2008 update.[55] // The following is the complete list of the 168 Virtual Console titles available for the Wii in Australia and New Zealand sorted by system as listed within the Virtual Console section of the Wii Shop Channel. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Japan

There were 38 titles of FC, SFC, N64, Mega Drive, and PC Engine games available at launch on the Virtual Console for the Japanese region. Neo-Geo support was added on September 18, 2007. The store updates on Tuesdays. There are currently 319 titles available for the Japanese Virtual Console. Sega Master System support was added on February 26, 2008 for Japan's Virtual Console. Game Gear support under the Master System label will follow at a currently unknown time.[56] // The following is the complete list of the 230 Virtual Console titles available for the Wii in Japan sorted by system and release date. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


South Korea

Main article: List of Virtual Console games (South Korea)

There are 13 titles total of NES/Famicom, SNES/Super Famicom and N64 games available on the Virtual Console for the South Korean region. Games on the South Korean Virtual Console are playable in either Japanese or English (depending on the game), or in some cases, both (Super Mario World). Companies currently supporting by publishing games are Nintendo, Konami, Hudson Soft and Windysoft. The first batch of new games will be updated on May 26, 2008. Super Mario World , commonly abbreviated SMW) is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo Co. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Konami Corporation ) (TYO: 9766 NYSE: KNM SGX: K20) is a leading developer and publisher of numerous popular and strong-selling toys, trading cards, anime, tokusatsu, slot machines and video games. ... Hudson Soft is a Japanese electronic entertainment publisher. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Criticism

Wired's Chris Kohler had protested the disparity between the American and Japanese libraries, both in quantity and quality.[57] The difference between the two libraries has since become minimal, and he has changed his stance.[58] In addition, Kohler has also criticized the overall release strategy, with a handful of games at the beginning and two or three every weeks. Kohler also took issue with the Virtual Console's aspect ratio which stretches the 4:3 games when the Wii's system settings are set for a 16:9 television.[59] The pricing has also been criticized as too high, especially for the NES games,[60] given the prices of many of the games available as used and the near-zero costs of manufacture and distribution. It has become apparent, however, that the effort involved in emulating these games can be significant, as evidenced by several serious bug fix updates (see "Pricing", above) and by significant differences in the emulated versions' game features, including added capabilities (See "Differences from original games", below). Further adding to the cost is getting older games rated by the ESRB. All games released on the Virtual Console must be ESRB-rated, and many have not been as regulations did not exist at times of publishing. Wired is a full-color monthly American magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The aspect ratio of a two-dimensional shape is the ratio of its longer dimension to its shorter dimension. ... The ESRBs logo. ...


Differences from original games

Nintendo has stated that the Virtual Console releases will be faithful to the original games, eliminating the possibility of graphical enhancements, customizable controls, or added online multiplayer features.[61] However, for various reasons, the gameplay experience is not always identical to the original. For example, in F-Zero, when the player hits the rails on the track, the track no longer flashes in black as in the original SNES game. This article is about the first game in the series. ...


Some Nintendo 64 games originally required peripheral hardware (which the Wii hardware does not support) in order to use these features, and they play the same way they originally would without the peripherals plugged in. For example, none of the Nintendo 64 Virtual Console games feature force feedback, which originally required a separate Rumble Pak peripheral.[62] Mario Kart 64 no longer supports saving of "Ghost Data," which originally required a separate Controller Pak on the Nintendo 64.[63] Cruis'n USA and Wave Race 64 also cannot access the option to transfer save data to and from a Controller Pak. However three NES games—Excitebike, Mach Rider and Wrecking Crew—made use of a peripheral called the Famicom Data Recorder (not available outside Japan) to save data of player-designed tracks and courses; this feature was fully implemented in their Virtual Console incarnations by way of saving the course data to the Wii's internal memory.[citation needed] One N64 Virtual Console game that does support an extra feature is Pokémon Snap which allows players to send one in-game photo to the Wii Message Board per day-- emulating the original version's sticker-printing feature which could be used by bringing the Game Pak to special in-store kiosks. A Nintendo 64 gamepad with the Rumble Pak attached. ... Mario Kart 64 ) is a racing video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ... Standard Controller Pak, rear view. ... Cruisn USA is racing game released in 1994 at the arcades developed by Midway Games and Nintendo. ... Wave Race 64 is a racing game for the Nintendo 64 that was released on September 27, 1996 in Japan and on November 5, 1996 in North America. ... Excitebike for the Nintendo Family Computer. ... Mach Rider is a driving video game created by Nintendo. ... Wrecking Crew was a game for the Nintendo Family Computer (also known as the Nintendo Entertainment System) starring Mario. ... Famicom Data Recorder HVC-008 Hardware Famicom Data Recorder HVC-008, is a compact cassette data interface for the Famicom Family Computer. ... Pokémon Snap ) is a video game developed by HAL Laboratory and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... In a variety of electronic equipments, a cartridge (in video game terms, cart, game pack, or Game Pak) can be one method of programming different functionality, providing variable content, or a method by which consumables may be replenished. ...


Some reviewers have reported that games play differently due to the different controllers. Super Mario World, for instance, has been cited as more difficult to play due to the GameCube controller's button placement. The Classic Controller, which has buttons arranged differently, works as a better alternative.[64] The Nintendo 64 controller featured more face buttons than either the GameCube or Classic Controller, so most N64 games released so far have mapped the C-buttons to the right analog stick and the Z button to the L button on the Classic controller, which some reviewers have described to be somewhat awkward.[65] Super Mario World , commonly abbreviated SMW) is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo Co. ... The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ...


Hardware differences aside, most Virtual Console games released thus far have not changed from their original versions; however, Nintendo 64 games render polygons at increased resolution. One significant exception is Tecmo Bowl, which originally featured real player names via the NFL Players Association, but because of licensing issues, their names have been removed, and only their numbers are shown. A similar case has occurred with Wave Race 64, which had all of the Kawasaki ad banners replaced with Wii and Nintendo DS banners, because Nintendo's license with Kawasaki expired. Other documented changes are in Kid Icarus, whose password system has been altered[66] and in the previously unreleased-outside-Asia title Sin & Punishment, whose menu commands, and certain in-game text (all originally written in Japanese), have been translated into English. The title screen logo and in-game subtitles, however, haven't been translated from their original Japanese versions. Tecmo Bowl is an arcade video game released in 1987 by Tecmo, Inc. ... The National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA, is the labor union of players in footballs National Football League. ... Wave Race 64 is a racing game for the Nintendo 64 that was released on September 27, 1996 in Japan and on November 5, 1996 in North America. ... Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. ... The Nintendo DS (sometimes abbreviated NDS or more commonly DS) is a handheld game console developed and manufactured by Nintendo. ... For the title character, see Pit (Kid Icarus). ...


The Virtual Console versions of The Legend of Zelda and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link are not the original NES releases, but instead the updated versions featured in 2003's The Legend of Zelda: Collector's Edition compilation disc for GameCube. This article is about the first game in the series. ... Zelda II: The Adventure of Link is a video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System, and the second in the Legend of Zelda series of games. ...


Reports have surfaced stating that when the Virtual Console version of Punch-Out!! is played in progressive scan, the game suffers from a lag in controls, which significantly raises the difficulty level compared to the NES version.[67] Mike Tysons Punch-Out!! , Mike Tyson Punch-Out!!) is a cartoonish boxing video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System designed, developed, and published by Nintendo. ... Progressive scan Progressive or noninterlaced scanning is any method for displaying, storing or transmitting moving images in which the lines of each frame are drawn in sequence. ...


PAL issues

With the launch of the Wii in territories using the PAL television system, it has become apparent that in most cases the games supplied for the Virtual Console run in 50Hz mode and in their original unoptimized state. Unoptimized PAL games run roughly 17% slower than their original speed in 60Hz and have borders covering the top and the bottom of the screen. Setting the Wii console to 60Hz mode does not force the 50Hz game into 60Hz mode (as is possible on emulators and modified PAL consoles). For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ...


All currently released Nintendo 64 games are partially PAL optimized, resulting in full screen games (although still running in 50Hz and locked to the original slower gameplay speed). This optimization was not the case for the original cartridge versions of Super Mario 64, Wave Race 64 or Mario Kart 64, making the Virtual Console versions superior in that regard. For the Nintendo DS enhanced remake, see Super Mario 64 DS. Super Mario 64 ) is a top-selling platform game developed by Nintendo Entertainment Analysis and Development and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. ... Wave Race 64 is a racing game for the Nintendo 64 that was released on September 27, 1996 in Japan and on November 5, 1996 in North America. ... Mario Kart 64 ) is a racing video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64 video game console. ...


Additionally, some Super Nintendo games are also partially PAL optimized with reduced borders but still retaining the slower run speed of the original PAL release (Super Mario World, Super Probotector and Street Fighter II). Super Mario World , commonly abbreviated SMW) is a platform game developed and published by Nintendo Co. ... Street Fighter II ) is a 1991 competitive fighting game by Capcom. ...


A select few games were already optimized in the original release to begin with, and are thus just as fast as their 60Hz counterparts this time around (The most obvious examples being Donkey Kong Country and Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest). For the television series, see Donkey Kong Country (TV series). ...


Turbografx games are the only Virtual Console games to actually run in 60Hz on PAL Wii systems; this is because the game data was never changed for release in PAL territories, the original hardware itself performed the conversion to a 50Hz signal. For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ...


One example of a poor PAL conversion is seen in the Virtual Console release of Sonic the Hedgehog, which retains the slower framerate and borders of the original PAL Mega Drive version,[68] despite the fact that the GameCube release Sonic Mega Collection allows PAL users to choose which version of the game they want to play. This article is about the 1991 video game. ... Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The main menu screen in Sonic Mega Collection. ...


Recently, during Nintendo's 'Hanabi Festival' campaign, certain titles that were never released in Europe are being added to the Virtual console. Some of these games, namely the Japan only titles such as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, are run in 60Hz only, thus keeping the original speed and gameplay. A small reminder is shown when previewing the game's channel. Interestingly, these games can actually be played in both PAL60 (480i) and 480p modes. This makes these releases look significantly better on Progressive displays such as LCD TV's. The fast moving sprites in NES and SNES games generally create a significant amount of interlace artifacts on such displays that the 480p option resolves. SMB 2 title screen (Japanese version) Super Mario Bros. ...


Initially, some PAL Virtual Console games would not display correctly on high-definition televisions when connected via the component lead. However, starting with the April 13, 2007 update of the PAL Virtual Console, certain newly added games, such as Punch-Out!!, support the "Wii Component Cable Interlace mode." This is a temporary fix to problems with various Virtual Console games being played over component cable on HDTVs. The mode can be enabled by accessing the operations guide of the game, and (with the Nunchuk attached) pressing the buttons Z + A + 2 simultaneously. A sound is played if the mode is enabled correctly. Several older games also have updates available to enable the feature, such as Super Castlevania IV. The mode can be disabled by using the same method, but with the button combination Z + A + 1 instead. A full list of games supporting this mode is available at nintendo.no,[69] an English version can be found at vc-forums.com.[70] is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Mike Tysons Punch-Out!! , Mike Tyson Punch-Out!!) is a cartoonish boxing video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System designed, developed, and published by Nintendo. ... Super Castlevania IV ) was the first Castlevania game released on the Super NES console and is avaible on Wiis virtual console, announced to be released in November 2006. ...


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  70. ^ List of VC titles supporting Wii Component Cable Interlace Mode - The Virtual Console Forums

For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the video game system, see Nintendo Entertainment System. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Matt Casamassina (born December 1975) is a video game journalist working for IGN. He is the author of many reviews and previews of Nintendo games,[1] and the editor-in-chief of the IGN Nintendo Team. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Nintendo - Official Nintendo of America Website
  • Virtual Console - Official Virtual Console site
  • TurboGrafx-16 Virtual Console - Hudson Official Virtual Console site
The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... The Wii Remote, sometimes nicknamed Wiimote, is the primary controller for Nintendos Wii console. ... The Wii Balance Board is a balance board accessory for Nintendos Wii video game console. ... This is a sortable list of released and upcoming Wii games, referred to by their English titles. ... This is a list of games on the Wii video game console that utilize the consoles Wi-Fi connection. ... This is a list of games on the Wii video game console that use Miis. ... // The following is the complete list of the 168 Virtual Console titles available for the Wii in Europe as shown within the Virtual Console section of the Wii Shop Channel. ... // The following is a list of the 214 games available on the Virtual Console for the Wii in North America, sorted by system and in the order they were added in the Wii Shop Channel. ... The Wii Menu as displayed on a widescreen television The Wii Menu is the top level menu interface of the Wii game console. ... This is a list of original downloadable games on the Wii video game console that are downloaded from the WiiWare section of the Wii Shop Channel. ... The Everybody Votes Channel start screen The Everybody Votes Channel is a Wii Menu channel that allows users to vote in simple opinion polls and compare and contrast opinions with those of friends, family and people across the globe. ... The Internet Channel is a version of the Opera web browser for use on the Wii by Opera Software and Nintendo. ... Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection (Abbreviated WFC) is an online service run by Nintendo to facilitate free Internet play in compatible Nintendo DS and Wii games. ... An image from Nintendos WiiConnect 24 site WiiConnect24 is a feature of the Wii console first announced at E3 2006 by Nintendo. ... The Wii Menu as displayed on a widescreen television The Wii Menu is the top level menu interface of the Wii game console. ... For other uses of the word Mii and the acronym MII, see MII. A Mii (IPA: []) is a digital avatar created by Nintendo for the Wiis Mii Channel. ... The Wii Shop Channel is a Wii Channel that lets the player buy new content straight from Nintendo. ... The logos of Wii Sports, Wii Play and Wii Fit, three of the four Wii Series games which currently have logos. ... Wii Play , My First Wii) is a video game for the Wii. ... Wii Fit is a video game developed by Nintendo for the Wii console. ... Wii Chess is a chess video game for the Wii console. ... Wii Music is an upcoming music video game for the Wii that simulates playing musical instruments using the Wii Remote. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Virtual Console Roundup: Rating Wii's Classics Collection from 1UP.com (1978 words)
Nintendo's Virtual Console is a key component of the Wii, granting the system not just a little backwards compatibility but a whole lot of it.
Virtual Console still has a few kinks to work out, but on the whole it's a solidly-realized service that's starting strong and should only improve.
In fact, for HD set owners, Virtual Console is the only way to get these classic games to look good, since playing an actual NES on an HDTV is pretty painful to look at.
Virtual Console - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (259 words)
Virtual Console is the term coined by Nintendo for a new system of technologies in a future video game console.
Satoru Iwatas' speech on March 23, 2006, he declared that Nintendo, Sega and Hudson are working in collaboration to bring a "best of" series of games to the Revolution, which would include games from the Sega Genesis and the TurboGrafx.
In this case, each ROM is programmed to prevent a PC or other digital device from playing Virtual Console games, so that the Revolution is the only device than can play the Virtual Console ROMs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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