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Encyclopedia > Virginius Affair

The Virginius Affair (sometimes called the Virginius Incident) was a diplomatic dispute that occurred in the 1870s between the United States, the United Kingdom and Spain, then proprietor of Cuba. Events and Trends Technology Invention of the telephone (1876) and phonograph (1877) WTF Science Ludwig Boltzmanns statistical definition of thermodynamic entropy War, peace and politics Franco-Prussian War (1870–1871) results in the collapse of the Second French Empire and in the formation of both the French Third Republic...


The Virginius was a blockade-runner used in the American Civil War; she became a prize of the United States federal government, by which she was sold in 1870 to an American, John F. Patterson, who immediately registered her in the New York Custom House. It later appeared that Patterson was merely acting for a number of Cuban insurgents who falsely flew the American flag and were using the Virginius to deliver contraband to the Cubans fighting the Ten Years War. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Contraband consists of items of which possession may be illegal, depending on the variety and the country or the age or sex of the possessor. ... The Ten Years War (1868-1878) The Ten-Years War, also known as The Big War was the first of three wars that Cuba fought against Spain for its freedom, the other two being The Small War (1879-1880) and the Cuban War of Independence (1895-1898). ...


On October 31, 1873 then commanded by Joseph Fry, a former officer of both the Federal and Confederate navies, and having a crew of 52 (chiefly Americans and Englishmen) and 103 passengers (mostly Cubans), she was captured off Morant Bay, Jamaica, by the Spanish vessel Tornado, and was taken to Santiago de Cuba. There, after a summary court-martial, 53 of the crew and passengers, including Fry and some Americans and Englishmen, were executed on November 4, 7 and 8 as pirates. The intervention of the HMS Niobe and her captain, Sir Lambton Lorraine, prevented further deaths. October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the northern states during the American Civil War, while the deraugatory name for people in the north was Yankees. Besides the obvious fact that they were the remaining states left in the United States, the name seems also implied... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... Santiago de Cuba is the capital city of Santiago de Cuba Province in eastern Cuba. ... A court-martial (plural courts-martial) is a military court that determines punishments for members of the military subject to military law. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... November 8 is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 53 days remaining. ... This article is about sea pirates. ...


Relations between Spain and the United States became strained, and war seemed imminent; but on the December 8 the Spanish government agreed to surrender the Virginius to the U.S. on December 16, to deliver the survivors of the crew and passengers to an American warship at Santiago, and to salute the American flag at Santiago on the December 25 if it should not be proved before that date that the Virginius was not entitled to sail under American colors. December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Flag ratio: 10:19; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ...


The Virginius foundered off Cape Hatteras as she was being towed to the United States, by Ossipee. The Attorney-General of the United States decided before December 25 that the Virginius was the property of General Quesada and other Cubans, and had had no right to carry the American flag. An aerial view of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse Cape Hatteras is a cape on the coast of North Carolina. ... The first USS Ossipee was a wooden, screw sloop of war in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...


Under an agreement of the February 27, 1875, the Spanish government paid to the United States an indemnity of $80,000 for the execution of the Americans, and an indemnity was also paid to the British government. February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Indemnity is generally a payment for damages done. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Virginius Affair - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (332 words)
The Virginius Affair (sometimes called the Virginius Incident) was a diplomatic dispute that occurred in the 1870s between the United States, the United Kingdom and Spain, then proprietor of Cuba.
The Virginius was a blockade-runner used in the American Civil War; she became a prize of the United States federal government, by which she was sold in 1870 to an American, John F. Patterson, who immediately registered her in the New York Custom House.
The Virginius foundered off Cape Hatteras as she was being towed to the United States, by Ossipee.
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