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Encyclopedia > Virginia Woolf
(Adeline) Virginia Stephen Woolf

Born 25 January 1882(1882-01-25)
London, England
Died 28 March 1941 (aged 59)
near Lewes, East Sussex, England
Occupation Novelist, Essayist, Publisher, Critic
Notable work(s) To the Lighthouse, Mrs Dalloway
Spouse(s) Leonard Woolf (1880-1969)

(Adeline) Virginia Woolf (née Stephen; 25 January 188228 March 1941) was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. Image File history File links Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) was a British author and feminist. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... This is about Lewes in England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about work. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing a day in the life of protagonist Clarissa Dalloway in post-World War I England. ... Leonard Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969) married Virginia Woolf in 1912. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (September 9 [O.S. August 28] 1828 – November 20 [O.S. November 7] 1910) (Russian: , Russian pronunciation:  ), commonly referred to in English as Leo (Lyof, Lyoff) Tolstoy, was a Russian writer – novelist, essayist, dramatist and philosopher – as well as pacifist Christian anarchist and educational reformer. ... Proust redirects here. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (Russian: , IPA: ) was a Russian short story writer and playwright. ... Emily Brontë (July 30, 1818 - December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, best remembered for her one novel Wuthering Heights, an acknowledged classic of English literature. ... Michael Cunningham (born November 6, 1952) is an award-winning American writer, best known for his 1998 novel The Hours, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1999. ... Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963) was an American poet, novelist, and short story writer. ... Edna OBrien (born December 15, 1930) is an Irish novelist and short story writer whose works often revolve around the inner feelings of women, and their problems in relating to men. ... Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... Modernist literature is the literary form of Modernism and especially High modernism; it should not be confused with modern literature, which is the history of the modern novel and modern poetry as one. ... This article is about (usually written) works. ...


During the interwar period, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury Group. Her most famous works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927), and Orlando (1928), and the book-length essay A Room of One's Own (1929) with its famous dictum, "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction." Interbellum redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Bloomsbury Group was an English collective of loving friends and relatives who lived in or near London during the first half of the twentieth century. ... Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing a day in the life of protagonist Clarissa Dalloway in post-World War I England. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Orlando is a novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1928. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Biography

Born Adeline Virginia Stephen in London to Sir Leslie Stephen, considered the father of the Bloomsbury Group, and Julia Prinsep Stephen (born Jackson) (18461895), she was educated by her parents in their literate and well-connected household at 22 Hyde Park Gate, Kensington. Virginia's parents had each been married previously, and their spouses had died. Consequently, the household contained the children of three marriages: Julia's children with her first husband Herbert Duckworth: George Duckworth (18681934); Stella Duckworth (18691897); and Gerald Duckworth (18701937). Laura Makepeace Stephen (18701945), Leslie's daughter with Minny Thackeray, who was declared mentally disabled and lived with them until she was institutionalised in 1891 to the end of her life; and Leslie and Julia's children: Vanessa Stephen (18791961); Thoby Stephen (18801906); Virginia; and Adrian Stephen (18831948). This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Sir Leslie Stephen (November 28, 1832 – February 22, 1904) was an English author and critic, the father of two famous daughters, Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hyde Park Gate is an address in London, England, which applies to two parallel roads in Kensington on the southern boundary of Kensington Gardens. ... For other uses, see Kensington (disambiguation). ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Gerald de lEtang Duckworth (born 1870, died 28 September 1937, Milan, Italy) was a British publisher. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Vanessa Bell Vanessa Bell (May 28, 1879 – April 7, 1961), was an English painter and interior designer and a member of the Bloomsbury group. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Thoby Stephen (1880 - 1906), known as the Goth, was a member of the Bloomsbury Group, as were his sisters Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf and his younger brother Adrian. ... Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Adrian Stephen (1883-1948) was a member of the Bloomsbury Group, an author and psychoanalyst, and the brother of Virginia Woolf. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Sir Leslie Stephen's eminence as an editor, critic, and biographer, and his connection to William Thackeray (he was the widower of Thackeray's eldest daughter) meant that Woolf was raised in an environment filled with the influences of Victorian literary society. William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 - December 24, 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


Henry James, George Eliot, George Henry Lewes, Julia Margaret Cameron (an aunt of Julia Stephen), and James Russell Lowell, who was made Virginia's godfather, were among the visitors to the house. Julia Stephen was equally well connected. Descended from an attendant of Marie Antoinette, she came from a family of renowned beauties who left their mark on Victorian society as models for Pre-Raphaelite artists and early photographers. Supplementing these influences was the immense library at 22 Hyde Park Gate, from which Virginia (unlike her brothers, who were formally educated) was taught the classics and English literature. For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. ... George Henry Lewes (April 18, 1817 – November 28, 1878) was a British philosopher and literary critic. ... Self-portrait by Julia Margaret Cameron. ... James Russell Lowell (b. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ...


According to her memoirs her most vivid childhood memories, however, were not of London but of St Ives in Cornwall, where the family spent every summer until 1895. The family stayed in their home called the Talland House, which looked out over the Porthminster Bay. Memories of the family holidays and impressions of the landscape, especially the Godrevy Lighthouse, informed the fiction she wrote in later years, notably To the Lighthouse. She also based the summer home in Scotland after the Talland House and the Ramsay family after her own family. , St Ives (Cornish: ) is a seaside town, civil parish and port in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Godrevy Lighthouse Godrevy is a locality in Cornwall, United Kingdom and lies on the eastern rim of St Ives Bay about 3 miles north-east of the town of Hayle. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ...


The sudden death of her mother in 1895, when Virginia was 13, and that of her half sister Stella two years later, led to the first of Virginia's several nervous breakdowns. The death of her father in 1904 provoked her most alarming collapse and she was briefly institutionalized. Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Her breakdowns and subsequent recurring depressive periods, modern scholars have claimed,[1] were also induced by the sexual abuse she and Vanessa were subject to by their half-brothers George and Gerald (which Woolf recalls in her autobiographical essays A Sketch of the Past and 22 Hyde Park Gate). Bad Touch redirects here. ... A Sketch of the Past is an autobiographical essay written by Virginia Woolf in 1939. ...


Throughout her life, Woolf was plagued by drastic mood swings. Though these recurring mental breakdowns greatly affected her social functioning, her literary abilities remained intact. Modern diagnostic techniques have led to a posthumous diagnosis of bipolar disorder, an illness which coloured her work, relationships, and life, and eventually led to her suicide. Following the death of her father in 1904 and her second serious nervous breakdown, Virginia, Vanessa, and Adrian sold 22 Hyde Park Gate, and bought a house at 46 Gordon Square in Bloomsbury. For other uses, see Bipolar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford...


Following studies at King's College London, Woolf came to know Lytton Strachey, Clive Bell, Saxon Sydney-Turner, Duncan Grant, and Leonard Woolf, who together formed the nucleus of the intellectual circle known as the Bloomsbury Group which came to notorious fame in 1910 with the Dreadnought hoax Virginia Woolf participated in, dressed as a male Abyssinian royalty. For other uses, see Kings College. ... Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880–January 21, 1932) was a British writer and critic. ... Arthur Clive Heward Bell (September 16, 1881 – September 18, 1964) was an English Art critic, associated with the Bloomsbury group. ... Self Portrait, 1920, National Gallery of Scotland. ... Leonard Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969) married Virginia Woolf in 1912. ... The Bloomsbury Group was an English collective of loving friends and relatives who lived in or near London during the first half of the twentieth century. ... The Dreadnought Hoaxers in Abyssinian regalia; Virginia Woolf is the bearded figure on the far left The Dreadnought Hoax was a practical joke pulled by Horace de Vere Cole in 1910. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Personal life

Virginia Stephen married writer Leonard Woolf in 1912, referring to him during their engagement as a "penniless Jew." The couple shared a close bond, and in 1937 Woolf wrote in her diary "Love-making — after 25 years can’t be attained by my unattractive countenance ... you see it is enormous pleasure being wanted, a pleasure that I have never felt." They also collaborated professionally, in 1917 founding the Hogarth Press, which subsequently published most of Woolf's work.[2] The ethos of Bloomsbury discouraged sexual exclusivity, and in 1922, Woolf met Vita Sackville-West. After a tentative start, they began a relationship that lasted through most of the 1920s.[3] In 1928, Woolf presented Sackville-West with Orlando, a fantastical biography in which the eponymous hero's life spans three centuries and both genders. It has been called by Nigel Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West's son, "the longest and most charming love letter in literature."[4] After their affair ended, the two women remained friends until Woolf's death. Leonard Woolf (November 25, 1880 – August 14, 1969) married Virginia Woolf in 1912. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hogarth Press was founded in 1917 by Leonard and Virginia Woolf. ... The Bloomsbury Group was an English collective of loving friends and relatives who lived in or near London during the first half of the twentieth century. ... Victoria Mary Sackville-West, The Hon Lady Nicolson, CH (March 9, 1892 – June 2, 1962), best known as Vita Sackville-West, was an English poet, novelist and gardener. ... The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually when speaking about the United States. ... Orlando is a novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1928. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Gender symbols: female (left), male (right). ... Nigel Nicolson MBE (19 January 1917–23 September 2004) was a British writer, publisher and politician. ...


Death

After completing the manuscript of her last (posthumously published) novel Between the Acts, Woolf fell victim to a depression similar to that which she had earlier experienced. The war, the Luftwaffe's destruction of her London homes, as well as the cool reception given to her biography of her late friend Roger Fry, worsened her condition until she was unable to work.[5] Between the Acts is the final novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1941 shortly after her suicide. ...   (German IPA: ) is a generic German term for an air force. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... River with Poplars, circa 1912, Tate Gallery. ...


On 28 March 1941, after having a nervous breakdown, Woolf drowned herself by weighing her pockets with stones and walking into the River Ouse near her home. Her body was not found until April 18. Her husband buried her cremated remains under a tree in the garden of their house in Rodmell, Sussex. is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The River Ouse is a river in the county of West and East Sussex in England. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rodmell is a small village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England. ...


In her last note to her husband she wrote:

I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can't go through another of those terrible times. And I shan't recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can't concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don't think two people could have been happier 'til this terrible disease came. I can't fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can't even write this properly. I can't read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that — everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can't go on spoiling your life any longer. I don't think two people could have been happier than we have been.

Work

Woolf began writing professionally in 1905, initially for the Times Literary Supplement with a journalistic piece about Haworth, home of the Brontë family.[6] Her first novel, The Voyage Out, was published in 1915 by her half-brother's imprint, Gerald Duckworth and Company Ltd. For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... The Times Literary Supplement (or TLS) is a weekly literary review published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. ... Haworth, Main Street Haworth, Main Street For alternate meanings see Haworth (disambiguation) Haworth is a small village and tourist attraction, in the English county of West Yorkshire, best known for its association with the Brontë sisters. ... The Brontë sisters, painted by their brother, Branwell c. ... The Voyage Out is the first novel by Virginia Woolf published in 1915 by Duckworth; published in the U.S. in 1920 by Doran. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Founded in 1898 by Gerald Duckworth, Duckworth is an independent British publisher. ...


This novel was originally entitled Melymbrosia, but Woolf repeatedly changed the draft. An earlier version of The Voyage Out has been reconstructed by Woolf scholar Louise DeSalvo and is now available to the public under the intended title. DeSalvo argues that many of the changes Woolf made in the text were in response to changes in her own life [7].

Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf at Garsington, 1923.
Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf at Garsington, 1923[8].

Woolf went on to publish novels and essays as a public intellectual to both critical and popular success. Much of her work was self-published through the Hogarth Press.[9] She has been hailed as one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century and one of the foremost Modernists, though she disdained some artists in this category. Giles Lytton Strachey (March 1, 1880–January 21, 1932) was a British writer and critic. ... Garsington Manor, in the village of Garsington, near Oxford, England, is a Tudor building, best known as the former home of Lady Ottoline Morrell. ... The Hogarth Press was founded in 1917 by Leonard and Virginia Woolf. ... This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ...


Woolf is considered one of the greatest innovators in the English language. In her works she experimented with stream-of-consciousness and the underlying psychological as well as emotional motives of characters. Woolf's reputation declined sharply after World War II, but her eminence was re-established with the surge of Feminist criticism in the 1970s. After a few more ideologically based altercations, not least caused by claims that Woolf was anti-Semitic and a snob, it seems that a critical consensus has been reached regarding her stature as a novelist. For other uses, see Stream of consciousness (psychology) In literary criticism, stream of consciousness is a literary technique that seeks to portray an individuals point of view by giving the written equivalent of the characters thought processes, either in a loose interior monologue, or in connection to his... Feminist literary criticism is literary criticism informed by feminist theory, or by the politics of feminism more broadly. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ... For the 1960s British Rock band, see The Snobs. ...


Her work was criticised for epitomizing the narrow world of the upper-middle class English intelligentsia. Some critics judged it to be lacking in universality and depth, without the power to communicate anything of emotional or ethical relevance to the disillusioned common reader, weary of the 1920s aesthetes. She was also criticized by some as an anti-Semite, despite her marriage to a Jewish man. She wrote in her diary, "I do not like the Jewish voice; I do not like the Jewish laugh." However, in a 1930 letter to Ethel Smyth quoted in Nigel Nicolson's biography,Virginia Woolf, she recollects her boasts of Leonard's Jewishness confirming her snobbish tendencies, "How I hated marrying a Jew- What a snob I was, for they have immense vitality." [10] The 1920s is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually when speaking about the United States. ... In England in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an aesthete was a person who was usually well educated, had exaggerated tastes and cultivated a style of dress and manner calculated to annoy the mainstream of intellectual society. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Virginia Woolf's peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: Woolf is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language. Her novels are highly experimental: a narrative, frequently uneventful and commonplace, is refracted—and sometimes almost dissolved—in the characters' receptive consciousness. Intense lyricism and stylistic virtuosity fuse to create a world overabundant with auditory and visual impressions.


The intensity of Virginia Woolf's poetic vision elevates the ordinary, sometimes banal settings - often wartime environments - of most of her novels. For example, Mrs Dalloway (1925) centres on the efforts of Clarissa Dalloway, a middle-aged society woman, to organize a party, even as her life is paralleled with that of Septimus Warren Smith, a working-class veteran who has returned from the First World War bearing deep psychological scars. Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing a day in the life of protagonist Clarissa Dalloway in post-World War I England. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


To the Lighthouse (1927) is set on two days ten years apart. The plot centers around the Ramsay family's anticipation of and reflection upon a visit to a lighthouse and the connected familial tensions. One of the primary themes of the novel is the struggle in the creative process that beset painter Lily Briscoe while she struggles to paint in the midst of the family drama. The novel is also a meditation upon the lives of a nation's inhabitants in the midst of war, and of the people left behind. To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Waves (1931) presents a group of six friends whose reflections, which are closer to recitatives than to interior monologues proper, create a wave-like atmosphere that is more akin to a prose poem than to a plot-centered novel. The Waves, first published in 1931 is the most experimental novel of Virginia Woolf. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Her last work, Between the Acts (1941) sums up and magnifies Woolf's chief preoccupations: the transformation of life through art, sexual ambivalence, and meditation on the themes of flux of time and life, presented simultaneously as corrosion and rejuvenation - all set in a highly imaginative and symbolic narrative encompassing almost all of English history. Between the Acts is the final novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1941 shortly after her suicide. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ...


While nowhere near a simple recapitulation of the coterie's ideals, Woolf's work can be understood as consistently in dialogue with Bloomsbury, particularly its tendency (informed by G.E. Moore, among others) towards doctrinaire rationalism.[citation needed] George Edward Moore George Edward Moore, also known as G.E. Moore, (November 4, 1873 - October 24, 1958) was a distinguished and hugely influential English philosopher who was educated and taught at the University of Cambridge. ...


Modern scholarship and interpretations

Recently, studies of Virginia Woolf have focused on feminist and lesbian themes in her work, such as in the 1997 collection of critical essays, Virginia Woolf: Lesbian Readings, edited by Eileen Barrett and Patricia Cramer. Louise A. DeSalvo offers treatment of the incestuous sexual abuse Woolf experienced as a young woman in her book Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on her Life and Work. Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


Woolf's fiction is also studied for its insight into shell shock, war, class, and modern British society. Her best-known nonfiction works, A Room of One's Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938), examine the difficulties female writers and intellectuals faced in an era when men held disproportionate legal and economic power, and the future of women in education and society. The military term combat stress reaction (CSR) comprises the range of adverse behaviours in reaction to the stress of combat and combat related activities. ... -1... Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Three Guineas is a book-length essay by Virginia Woolf, published in June 1938. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Irene Coates's book Who's Afraid of Leonard Woolf: A Case for the Sanity of Virginia Woolf takes the position that Leonard Woolf's treatment of his wife encouraged her ill health and ultimately was responsible for her death. The position, which is not accepted by Leonard's family, is extensively researched and fills in some of the gaps in the traditional account of Virginia Woolf's life. In contrast, Victoria Glendinning's book Leonard Woolf: A Biography, which is even more extensively researched and supported by contemporaneous writings, argues that Leonard Woolf was not only very supportive of his wife, but enabled her to live as long as she did by providing her with the life and atmosphere she needed to live and write. Accounts of Virginia's supposed anti-semitism (Leonard was a secular Jew) are not only taken out of historical context but greatly exaggerated. Virginia's own diaries support this view of the Woolfs' marriage. [11]


The first biography of Virginia Woolf was published in 1972 by her nephew, Quentin Bell. Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1989 Louise Desalvo published the book Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work.


In 1992, Thomas Caramagno published the book The Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf's Art and Manic-Depressive Illness."


Hermione Lee's 1996 biography Virginia Woolf provides a thorough and authoritative examination of Woolf's life and work. Hermione Lee (born 1948) is a critic and biographer. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 2001 Louise DeSalvo and Mitchell A. Leaska edited The Letters of Vita Sackville-West and Virginia Woolf. Julia Briggs's Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life, published in 2005, is the most recent examination of Woolf's life. It focuses on Woolf's writing, including her novels and her commentary on the creative process, to illuminate her life. Thomas Szasz's book My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf (ISBN 0-7658-0321-6) was published in 2006. This article is about the year. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Szasz redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cultural references

  • Michael Cunningham's 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Hours uses some of Woolf's characteristic stylistic tools to intertwine a story of the Virginia who is writing Mrs Dalloway with stories of two other women decades apart, each of whom is planning a party. The book was adapted into a 2002 film, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Nicole Kidman won an Oscar for her portrayal of Woolf in the movie.
  • Playwright Edward Albee asked Woolf's widower Leonard Woolf for permission to use his wife's name in the title of his play Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which concerns a clash between a university professor and his wife as they host a younger faculty couple for evening cocktails. The film adaptation of the play is the only film to be nominated in every eligible category at the Academy Awards.
  • Indiana band Murder by Death have a song entitled "I'm Afraid of 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" on their first album, Like the Exorcist, but More Breakdancing.
  • American folk rock duo Indigo Girls wrote and recorded a song called "Virginia Woolf" for their 1992 album Rites of Passage, and also included it on their live recording 1200 Curfews in 1995.
  • Sharon Carpenter Rose portrays Woolf in the 2009 feature film Lives and Deaths of the Poets, written and directed by Leland Steigs.
  • British indie rock band Assembly Now reference Woolf by name in their song "It's Magnetic".
  • British singer Steve Harley wrote and recorded a song "Riding the Waves (for Virginia Woolf)" for his album Hobo with a grin.
  • American folk singer Sara Hickman recorded a song "Room Of One's Own" on her album "Necessary Angels."
  • Laura Veirs references Virginia Woolf in her song "Rapture".
  • In The Reptile Room, the second novel in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket, there is mention of a snake called the Virginian Wolfsnake. The only thing said about it is that it should never, ever be allowed near a typewriter.
  • In The Hostile Hospital the eighth book in by Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events mentions a woman named Clarissa who is looking sadly out of a window.
  • Folk group Two Nice Girls named their album Chloe Liked Olivia after a key phrase in Woolf's A Room of One's Own.
  • Patrick Wolf's song "To the Lighthouse" was inspired by Woolf's novel.
  • The character Virginia Wolfe in Rocko's Modern Life is named after Woolf.
  • Regina Spektor references Virginia Woolf in her song "Paris".
  • In Scrubs, Elliot cites Virginia Woolf as one of her favorite authors.
  • Javier Krahe, Spanish songwriter, references Virginia Woolf in the song "Nembutal" from his album Corral de Cuernos
  • Profesora, Swedish performance artist released a song called Virginia Woolf at her album.
  • The Murder City Devils, a rock and roll band, reference Virginia Woolf saying, "I think I'll call you Virginia Woolf."
  • In Destroy All Humans!, when at the Santa Monica level, if you scan a housewife's thought she says "I'm afraid of Virginia Woolf."
  • Ludovico Einaudi wrote, probably his most famous solo piano piece, "Le Onde" after reading an Italian translation of Woolf's The Waves.
  • The name of the American band Modest Mouse is derived from a passage from the story "The Mark on the Wall" which reads "...and very frequent even in the minds of modest, mouse-coloured people..."
  • The Celtic rock band GrooveLily mentions Virginia Woolf in a live version of their song, "Screwed-Up People Make Great Art."
  • The feature film Notes on a Scandal (Cate Blanchett, Judi Dench) mentions Woolf during a scene where Blanchett screams, "It's a flat in the archway road and you think of friggin' Virginia Woolf!"
  • On her debut album Ballads of Living and Dying, Marissa Nadler chronicles the death of Virginia Woolf in the song "Virginia".
  • The song "Shakespeare's Sister" by The Smiths is a reference to Virginia Woolf's concept in A Room of One's Own, where she argues that if Shakespeare had a sister with similar talents she would have been denied his opportunities.
  • The season 13 Simpsons episode "Homer the Moe" has a reference to Virginia Woolf's drowning death when Moe's old teacher at Swigmore University walks into a lake until it's too deep to swim out.
  • Composer Dominick Argento received the 1975 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his song cycle, "From the Diary of Virginia Woolf", settings for voice and piano of entries from Woolf's personal diary from 1919 to 1941.
  • American Metalcore band Starkweather reference Virginia Woolf's death and suicide note in their song "Hushabye: Goodnight" with the lyrics, "Find me the heaviest stones to fill my pockets / I thought it for the best that I should drown..."

Michael Cunningham (born November 6, 1952) is an award-winning American writer, best known for his 1998 novel The Hours, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1999. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The Hours is a novel written by Michael Cunningham. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ©A.M.P.A.S.® The Academy Award for Best Motion Picture is one of the Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to artists working in the motion picture industry. ... Nicole Mary Kidman, Order of Australia (born 20 June 1967 in Honolulu) is an Academy Award-winning Australian/American[1] actress. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Edward Franklin Albee III (born March 12, 1928) is an American playwright known for works including Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Zoo Story, The Sandbox and The American Dream. ... For the 1966 film adaptation, see Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (film) Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee that opened on Broadway at the Billy Rose Theater on October 13, 1962. ... Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a 1966 film adaptation of the play of the same name by Edward Albee. ... Murder by Death (formerly known as Little Joe Gould) is a four-piece rock band from Bloomington, Indiana. ... Bob Dylans folk-rock album, Blonde on Blonde Folk-rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Rites of Passage is an album by the Indigo Girls. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Assembly Now is a four-piece indie rock band from London, England. ... Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel were a UK rock band from the early 1970s. ... Sara Hickman A rock/folk/pop/childrens music singer, songwriter, artist and considered an angel by her ardent fans. ... Laura Veirs on the cover of Year of Meteors Laura Veirs (born 1973) is an American singer-songwriter. ... ← The Bad Beginning | The Wide Window → The Reptile Room is a childrens novel and the second of A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. ... A Series of Unfortunate Events is a childrens book series of thirteen novels written by Daniel Handler under the pseudonym of Lemony Snicket, and illustrated by Brett Helquist. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... The Hostile Hospital is the eighth novel in the book series A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... A Series of Unfortunate Events is a childrens book series of thirteen novels written by Daniel Handler under the pseudonym of Lemony Snicket, and illustrated by Brett Helquist. ... Self-styled lesbian country-rock band featuring singer-songwriter Gretchen Phillips. ... Patrick Wolf (born Patrick Apps on June 30, 1983 at St Thomas Hospital, London[1]) is an English singer-songwriter from South London. ... Rockos Modern Life was an Emmy-nominated American animated series created by Joe Murray that aired for four seasons from 1993 to 1996. ... Regina Spektor (Russian: ; born February 18, 1980) is a Soviet-born American singer-songwriter and pianist. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... For other uses, see Scrub. ... The Murder City Devils was a rock-n-roll band active between 1996 and 2001. ... Destroy All Humans! is a video game developed by Pandemic Studios and published by THQ. It was released for the Xbox and PlayStation 2 computer entertainment systems on June 21, 2005. ... Ludovico Einaudi Ludovico Einaudi (Born in Turin, 1955) is a modern-day italian composer and pianist particularly noted for the use of developing melodious phrases in his piano compositions. ... The Waves, first published in 1931 is the most experimental novel of Virginia Woolf. ... Modest Mouse is an North-American indie rock band formed in 1993 in Issaquah, Washington by singer/lyricist/guitarist Isaac Brock, drummer Jeremiah Green, bassist Eric Judy, and guitarist Dann Gallucci. ... Notes on a Scandal (What Was She Thinking? Notes on a Scandal in the United States) is a 2003 novel by Zoë Heller. ... Catherine Élise Cate Blanchett (born May 14, 1969) is an Australian actress and stage director. ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Ballads of Living and Dying is Marissa Nadlers first album, released in 2004 on Eclipse Records. ... Marissa Nadler (5 April 1981 – ) is an American folk musician and fine artist born in Washington D.C. Growing up in Needham, Massachusetts, and coming from a creative family—My mother was an abstract painter and very eccentric. ... Shakespeares Sister is a non-album single by British band The Smiths, released in March 1985. ... The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987, based on the songwriting partnership of singer Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr. ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer the Moe is the third episode of The Simpsons thirteenth season. ... Metalcore is a fusion of extreme metal and hardcore punk that began in the United States. ... Starkweather are a hardcore / metal band from Philidelphia that formed in the late 80s / early 90s. ...

Bibliography

See also: Bibliography of Virginia Woolf

Novels

The Voyage Out is the first novel by Virginia Woolf published in 1915 by Duckworth; published in the U.S. in 1920 by Doran. ... Night and Day (1919) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Jacobs Room is the third novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1922. ... Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing a day in the life of protagonist Clarissa Dalloway in post-World War I England. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... The Waves, first published in 1931 is the most experimental novel of Virginia Woolf. ... The Years is a 1937 novel by Virginia Woolf, the last she published in her lifetime. ... Between the Acts is the final novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1941 shortly after her suicide. ...

Short story collections

  • Monday or Tuesday (1921)
  • A Haunted House and Other Short Stories (1943)
  • The Complete Shorter Fiction (1985)

A Haunted House is a 1944 collection of short fiction by Virginia Woolf A Haunted House Monday or Tuesday An Unwritten Novel The String Quartet Kew Gardens The Mark on the Wall The New Dress The Shooting Party Lappin and Lappinova Solid Objects The Lady in the Looking-Glass The...

"Biographies"

Virginia Woolf published three books which she gave the subtitle "A Biography":

  • Orlando: A Biography (1928, usually characterised Novel, inspired by the life of Vita Sackville-West)
  • Flush: A Biography (1933, more explicitly cross-genre: fiction as "stream of consciousness" tale by Flush, a dog; non-fiction in the sense of telling the story of the owner of the dog, Elizabeth Barrett Browning)
  • Roger Fry: A Biography (1940, usually characterised non-fiction, however: "[Woolf's] novelistic skills worked against her talent as a biographer, for her impressionistic observations jostled uncomfortably with the simultaneous need to marshall a multitude of facts."[12])

Orlando is a novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1928. ... Victoria Mary Sackville-West, The Hon Lady Nicolson, CH (March 9, 1892 – June 2, 1962), best known as Vita Sackville-West, was an English poet, novelist and gardener. ... Flush is a biography of Elizabeth Barrett Brownings dog written by Virginia Woolf and published in 1933. ... Elizabeth Barrett Browning (March 6, 1806 – June 29, 1861) was one of the most respected poets of the Victorian era. ...

Non-fiction books

  • Modern Fiction (1919)
  • The Common Reader (1925)
  • A Room of One's Own (1929)
  • On Being Ill (1930)
  • The London Scene (1931)
  • The Common Reader: Second Series (1932)
  • Three Guineas (1938)
  • The Death of the Moth and Other Essays (1942)
  • The Moment and Other Essays (1947)
  • The Captain's Death Bed And Other Essays (1950)
  • Books and Portraits (1978)
  • Women And Writing (1979)
  • Collected Essays (four volumes)

Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... On Being ill is an essay by Virginia Woolf that appeared in T.S. Eliots New Criterion in January, 1926; The essay was later reprinted, with revisions in Forum in April 1926, under the title illness: An Unexploited Mine. ... Three Guineas is a book-length essay by Virginia Woolf, published in June 1938. ...

Drama

  • Freshwater: A Comedy (performed in 1923, revised in 1935, and published in 1976)

Autobiographical writings and diaries

  • A Writer’s Diary (1953) - Extracts from the complete diary
  • Moments of Being (1976)
  • A Moment's Liberty: the shorter diary (1990)
  • The Diary of Virginia Woolf (five volumes) - Diary of Virginia Woolf from 1915 to 1941
  • Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals, 1897-1909 (1990)
  • Travels With Virginia Woolf (1993) - Greek travel diary of Virginia Woolf, edited by Jan Morris
  • The Platform of Time: Memoirs of Family and Friends, Expanded Edition including Dreadnought Hoax talk, edited by S. P. Rosenbaum (London, Hesperus, 2008)

Letters

  • Congenial Spirits: The Selected Letters (1993)
  • The Letters of Virginia Woolf 1888-1941 (six volumes, 1975-1980)
  • Paper Darts: The Illustrated Letters of Virginia Woolf (1991)

Prefaces, contributions

  • Selections Autobiographical and Imaginative from the Works of George Gissing ed. Alfred C. Gissing, with an introduction by Virginia Woolf (London & New York, 1929)

George Gissing (November 22, 1857 – December 28, 1903) was a British novelist. ... Alfred Charles Gissing (born at Epsom, Surrey on 20 January 1896, died 27 November 1975, Valais, Switzerland), was an English writer and headmaster, the son of George Gissing. ...

Biographies of Virginia Woolf

  • Virginia Woolf by Nigel Nicolson. New York, Penguin Group. 2000
  • Virginia Woolf: A Biography by Quentin Bell. New York, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1972
  • The Unknown Virginia Woolf by Roger Poole. Cambridge UP, 1978.
  • The Invisible Presence: Virginia Woolf and the Mother-Daughter Relationship by Ellen Bayuk Rosenman. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1986.
  • Virginia Woolf: The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Her Life and Work by Louise DeSalvo. Boston: Little Brown, 1989
  • A Virginia Woolf Chronology by Edward Bishop. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1989.
  • A Very Close Conspiracy: Vanessa Bell and Virginia Woolf by Jane Dunn. Boston: Little, Brown, 1990
  • Virginia Woolf: A Writer's Life by Lyndall Gordon. New York: Norton, 1984; 1991.
  • The Flight of the Mind: Virginia Woolf's Art and Manic-Depressive Illness by Thomas D. Caramago. Berkeley: U of California Press, 1992
  • Virginia Woolf by James King. NY: W.W. Norton, 1994.
  • Art and Affection: A Life of Virginia Woolf by Panthea Reid. New York: Oxford UP, 1996.
  • Virginia Woolf by Hermione Lee. New York: Knopf, 1997.
  • Granite and Rainbow: The Hidden Life of Virginia Woolf by Mitchell Leaska. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1998.
  • Virginia Woolf: The Will to Create as a Woman by Ruth Gruber. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2005
  • My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf by Thomas Szasz, 2006
  • The Bedside, Bathtub and Armchair Companion to Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury by Sarah M. Hall, New York: Continuum Publishing, 2007
  • A Life of One's Own: A Guide to Better Living through the Work and Wisdom of Virginia Woolf by Ilana Simons, New York: Penguin Press, 2007

Nigel Nicolson MBE (19 January 1917–23 September 2004) was a British writer, publisher and politician. ... Quentin Claudian Stephen Bell (19 August 1910 – 16 December 1996) was an English art historian and author. ... Lyndall Gordon is a South African academic, known for her literary biographies. ... James King may refer to: James King (soldier) (1589-1652), a Scottish commander in the Battle of Wittstock James King, 17th cent. ... Hermione Lee (born 1948) is a critic and biographer. ... Ruth Gruber (born September 30, 1911) is an American journalist, photographer, writer, humanitarian and a former United States government official. ... Szasz redirects here. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Bell, Quentin: Virginia Woolf; a Biography, 1972
  2. ^ Leonard Woolf: A Biography By Victoria Glendinning - Books - Review - New York Times
  3. ^ Matt & Andrej Koymasky - Famous GLTB - Virginia Woolf
  4. ^ Matt & Andrej Koymasky - Famous GLTB - Virginia Woolf
  5. ^ Lee, Hermione: "Virginia Woolf." Knopf, 1997.
  6. ^ Virginia Woolf. Retrieved on 2007-10-5.
  7. ^ Haule, J. (1982). Melymbrosia: An Early Version of "The Voyage out". Contemporary Literature, 23, 100-104.
  8. ^ Lee, Hermione: "Virginia Woolf." Knopf, 1997.
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ "Mr. Virginia Woolf"
  11. ^ "Mr. Virginia Woolf"
  12. ^ Frances Spalding (ed.), Viginia Woolf: Paper Darts: the Illustrated Letters, Collins & Brown, 1991, (ISBN 1-85585-046-X) (hb) & (ISBN 1-85585-103-2) (pb), pp. 139-140

For the band, see 1997 (band). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

External links

Literature Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Mrs Dalloway E-Text Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

Persondata
NAME Woolf, Virginia
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Stephen, Virginia
SHORT DESCRIPTION English novelist, essayist
DATE OF BIRTH January 25, 1882
PLACE OF BIRTH London, England, UK
DATE OF DEATH March 28, 1941
PLACE OF DEATH near Lewes, England, UK

The Voyage Out is the first novel by Virginia Woolf published in 1915 by Duckworth; published in the U.S. in 1920 by Doran. ... Night and Day (1919) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Jacobs Room is the third novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1922. ... Mrs Dalloway (1925) is a novel by Virginia Woolf detailing a day in the life of protagonist Clarissa Dalloway in post-World War I England. ... To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. ... Orlando is a novel by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1928. ... The Waves, first published in 1931 is the most experimental novel of Virginia Woolf. ... The Years is a 1937 novel by Virginia Woolf, the last she published in her lifetime. ... Between the Acts is the final novel by Virginia Woolf, published in 1941 shortly after her suicide. ... A Haunted House is a 1944 collection of short fiction by Virginia Woolf A Haunted House Monday or Tuesday An Unwritten Novel The String Quartet Kew Gardens The Mark on the Wall The New Dress The Shooting Party Lappin and Lappinova Solid Objects The Lady in the Looking-Glass The... Kew Gardens is a short story by the English author Virginia Woolf. ... The Duchess and the Jeweller (1944) is a short story by Virginia Woolf. ... Flush is a biography of Elizabeth Barrett Brownings dog written by Virginia Woolf and published in 1933. ... The Common Reader may refer to: A Common Reader, a mail order catalogue The Common Reader, 2 essay collections by Virginia Woolf Category: ... Virginia Woolf, the author of A Room of Ones Own. ... On Being ill is an essay by Virginia Woolf that appeared in T.S. Eliots New Criterion in January, 1926; The essay was later reprinted, with revisions in Forum in April 1926, under the title illness: An Unexploited Mine. ... Three Guineas is a book-length essay by Virginia Woolf, published in June 1938. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... This is about Lewes in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Gale - Free Resources - Women's History - Biographies - Virginia Woolf (1131 words)
While Woolf received no formal education, she was raised in a cultured and literary atmosphere, learning from her father's extensive library and from conversing with his friends, many of whom were prominent writers of the era.
Woolf maintained that the purpose of writing an essay was to give pleasure to the reader, and she endeavored to do this with witty, supple prose, apt literary and cultural references, and a wide range of subjects.
While the majority of Woolf's essays are devoted to literary matters, some of her most highly regarded nonfiction writings are topical and occasional essays treating such subjects as war and peace, feminism, life and death, sex and class issues, her own travels, and observations of the contemporary scene.
Virginia Woolf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2306 words)
Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (25 January 1882 28 March 1941) was a British author who is considered to be one of the foremost modernist/feminist literary figures of the twentieth century.
Virginia Woolf's peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: Woolf is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language.
The intensity of Virginia Woolf's poetic vision elevates the ordinary, sometimes banal settings of most of her novels (with the exception of Orlando and Between the Acts), even as they are often set in an environment of war.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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